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Questions and Answers - 13 April 1994

Questions and Answers No. 10, Wednesday 13 April 1994

PARLIAMENT OF NEW SOUTH WALES
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY

1994

FOURTH SESSION OF THE FIFTIETH PARLIAMENT


___________________



QUESTIONS
AND
ANSWERS

No. 10

WEDNESDAY 13 APRIL 1994


___________________


[The Questions and Answers Paper published for the first sitting day in each week will contain, by number and title, all unanswered questions, together with questions to which answers have been received on the previous sitting and any new questions. On subsequent days, new questions are printed, as are questions to which answers were received the previous day. Consequently the full text of any question will be printed only twice: when notice is given; and, when answered.]

[Pursuant to the Sessional Order adopted by the House on 1 March 1994, Members shall be permitted to lodge 3 questions on notice per sitting day accumulative over one sitting week, provided that the Leader of the Opposition shall be permitted to lodge 4 questions on notice per sitting day. Ministers shall lodge answers to questions on notice within 35 calendar days after the question is first published and such answer shall be published.]
Page 458

PUBLICATION OF QUESTIONANSWER TO BE LODGED BY
Q. & A. No. 5
(Including Question Nos 533 to 555)
13 April 1994
Q. & A. No. 6
(Including Question Nos 556 to 610)
14 April 1994
Q. & A. No. 7
(Including Question Nos 611 to 642)
19 April 1994
Q. & A. No. 8
(Including Question Nos 643 to 671)
20 April 1994
Q. & A. No. 9
(Including Question Nos 672 to 739)
21 April 1994
Q. & A. No. 10
(Including Question Nos 740 to 781)
17 May 1994


Page 459
(Answers required to have been lodged by 12 April 1994)
      Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—521.

(Answers required to be lodged by 13 April 1994)
      Minister for Land and Water Conservation—543, 547.
      Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—534.
          Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—553, 554.
          Minister for Health—552.
          Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—544, 555.
          Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—548, 549.
          Minister for the Environment—550.
          Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—541.


      Notice of Question given on the date shown

      1 MARCH 1994

      (Paper No. 1)

      *5 PRISONERS PROTECTION—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) In the metropolitan area, what accommodation exists for A, B and C classification prisoners requiring protection?
          (2) How many cells are available at each location for each classification?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) Permanent accommodation is available for sentenced inmates requiring protection at the Special Purpose Centre, Long Bay, and at the John Morony Correctional Centre.
          Unsentenced inmates seeking protection are accommodated at Parramatta Correctional Centre and at the Remand Centre, Long Bay.
          Inmates who are brought to Sydney for court or medical appointments are accommodated in a wing of the Reception and Industrial Centre, Long Bay.
          (2) Correctional Centre Classification Accommodation
          Special Purpose Centre Variable Variable
          John Morony C 20
          Parramatta Remand 50
          Remand Centre Remand 68
          Reception and Industrial Centre Variable 40

      Page 460

      *6 FINE DEFAULTERS—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          In relation to sentenced offenders—
          (1) In 1992/93, how many were received into prison as a result of fine default?
          (2) What proportion of all sentenced prisoners did that group constitute?
          (3) What prisons received them?
          (4) What was the per day cost of accommodating those offenders in each of the prisons in which they were incarcerated?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honorable member's questions are:
          (1) 4,157.
          (2) 43.0867 per cent.
          (3) Bathurst; Broken Hill; Cessnock; Cooma; Grafton; Goulburn; Maitland; Mannus; Mulawa; Parramatta; Silverwater; St Heliers; Tamworth; Long Bay—Hospital, Reception and Industrial Centre and the Remand Centre.
          (4) The annual cost of keeping a fine defaulter in minimum security is $34,000. This equates to $93.15 per day of which $8.04 is spent on clothing, food and essential medical costs.

      *8 INTERNATIONAL ATHLETIC CENTRE SCOREBOARD—Mr Knight asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
          Regarding the tender for the scoreboard at the Sydney International Athletic Centre—
          (1) How many tenders were received?
          (2) Who was the successful tenderer?
          (3) At what price was the tender let?
          (4) Was this the lowest price?
          (5) Was the successful tender for a two-colour scoreboard?
          (6) How many unsuccessful tenders were for full-colour scoreboards?
          (7) What percentage of the successful tenderer's project will be Australian made?
          (8) Did the actual size of the successful tenderer's scoreboard conform to the specifications in the tender documents?
          Answer—
          (1) Ten firms submitted a total of 14 tender alternatives for the Athletic Centre scoreboard.
          (2) The successful tenderer was Krone (Australia) Technique Pty Ltd.
          (3) The tender has two parts:
      (a) The supply, installation, testing and commissioning of the alternative offer of a 12-line, 32-character scoreboard was let at a capital cost of $764,759.
          (b) The tendered 10-year maintenance cost of $68,383 will be recommended for acceptance by the building owner/operator in due course.
          (4) No.
          (5) Yes. The successful tender was for a two-colour scoreboard.
          (6) Four tenderers offered scoreboards with full colour range. The costs of these boards are in excess of the tender accepted and the budget for the Athletic Centre scoreboard.

      Page 461
          (7) Krone (Australia) Technique Pty Ltd has formally stated that the Australian content is 30 per cent.
          (8) Yes.

      *9 RAILWAY STATION STAFFING—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What is the present staffing level at Glenfield, Holsworthy, Macquarie Fields, Ingleburn and Minto Railway Stations:
            (a) For each shift?
            (b) In total?
          (2) For those stations listed above where automatic ticket collecting machines have been introduced, has there been any variation in staffing since the introduction when compared with staffing levels prior to the introduction of automatic ticketing machines?
          (3) For those stations where automatic ticketing machines have yet to be introduced:
            (a) Will the machines be installed?
            (b) When?
            (c) Will there be any variation of staff numbers as a result of the installation of the machines?
          (4) What security arrangements are in place at each of the stations listed?
          (5) How many rail travellers use the stations listed each week?
          (6) What facilities exist at each station for disabled rail travellers?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) Glenfield
                Weekdays: Two staff on morning shift, two on afternoon shift and one on night shift.
                Weekends: One staff member on morning shift, one on afternoon shift and one on night shift.
              Holsworthy
                Weekdays: One staff member on morning shift and one on afternoon shift.
                Weekends: Unattended.
              Macquarie Fields
                Weekdays: Two staff on morning shift and one on afternoon shift.
                Weekends: One staff member on morning shift and one on afternoon shift.
              Ingleburn
                Weekdays: Two staff on morning shift and two on afternoon shift.
                Weekends: Two staff on morning shift and one on afternoon shift.
              Minto
                Weekdays: Two staff on morning shift and two on afternoon shift.
                Weekends: Two staff on morning shift and one on afternoon shift.
          (b) Glenfield Eight.
          Holsworthy Two.
          Macquarie Fields Four.
              Ingleburn Five.
          Minto Five.
          (2) No.
          (3) (a) Ticketing machines have been introduced at each of the stations.
          (b) and (c) Not applicable.

      Page 462
          (4) Improved lighting has been installed at each station. Public telephones are provided at each station. There are random patrols of each station by private security guards, in addition to patrols by State police. Closed circuit television surveillance is installed at Minto.
          (5) There have been no passenger counts made at the stations for some time. However, the average number of tickets sold at each station per 28-day accounting period for the 1992/93 financial year is shown below:
              Glenfield 213,000
      Holsworthy 103,836
          Macquarie Fields 218,261
      Ingleburn 319,821
          Minto 382,105
          (6) Glenfield: Access to the Sydney bound platform from the street.
      Holsworthy: Ramp access.
      Macquarie Fields: Access to the south bound platform from the street.
          Ingleburn: Ramp access.
      Minto: Access to both platforms from adjacent streets.

      *10 SRA WORKSHOP FACILITIES—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What was the total cost of the report prepared by the consultants GHD-Transmark Australia entitled a "Review of maintenance needs currently provided by Freight Rail workshops and recommendations on the future delivery of the these maintenance centres"?
          (2) Did the brief provided to the consultants have as one of its premises a reduced workload caused by privatisation and contracting out, that is, remaining work calculated in 1994/95 to be about 50 per cent of the 1992/93 workload?
          (3) Did it imply job losses at Chullora, Goulburn and Bathurst of at least 523 positions over the next 3 years?
          (4) How much capital funding will the SRA expend over the next 3 years in expanding workshop facilities at Goulburn and Bathurst?
          Answer—
          (1) $29,000.
          (2) and (3) The brief specifically required the consultants to provide an estimate of future maintenance workload and hence staffing requirements on a year-to-year basis for each workshop, having regard to matters including:
              •the National Rail Corporation's role;
              •the introduction of "Power-by-the-Hour" contracts;
              •the introduction of "One Spot" wagon depots.
          (4) State Rail has already invested considerable funds in these facilities and it is not expected they will require significant capital expenditure over the next 3 years.

      *11 NORTHERN REGION LOCOMOTIVE FLEET—Mr McManus asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          Have the 19 per cent of SRA locomotives for the Northern Region, serviced and repaired at the Clyde Engineering Facility, accounted for over 55 per cent of the Northern Region's Fleet downturn as at 20 September 1993?


      Page 463
          Answer—
          State Rail locomotives are not serviced or repaired at Clyde Engineering.

      *17 SYDNEY ELECTRICITY—MIRANDA, FIVE DOCK AND BANKSTOWN FACILITIES— Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
          (1) Is Sydney Electricity closing down its Miranda, Five Dock and Bankstown facilities?
          (2) Why has this decision been taken?
          (3) How will the existing functions of these facilities be carried out after closure?
          (4) Will any employees' jobs be made redundant as a result of these closures?
          (5) What assurances can you give these employees on their future job security?
          (6) Has the decision to close these facilities followed a direction to reduce costs by 30 per cent?
          (7) What alternative arrangements will be made to provide customers with the service they currently enjoy?
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) A recent business process study, conducted by Sydney Electricity, of its Southern Region, recommended rationalisation of the facilities used by the Region. The facilities currently used by the Region were designed and built to meet requirements prevailing decades ago, when demand for electricity was growing at a rapid rate and Sydney Electricity was running major capital works programmes. The scene today is one of low growth and very modest capital works programmes.
          This factor, together with the substantial productivity growth achieved in Sydney Electricity in recent years, means that current staff numbers operating from Southern Region facilities are now less than half of what the facilities were designed and built to accommodate. The facilities are now grossly under-utilised and some rationalisation is therefore warranted.
          Following receipt of the study, Sydney Electricity put in place a process of consultation with unions and the workplace. This consultation is now at an advanced stage and it is expected that a decision on the nature and extent of facilities rationalisation will be made in the near future, but, at this point in time, no decision has been taken.
          (3) Sydney Electricity's foremost objective when undertaking any rationalisation of its operations is to provide better value for money and improved services to its customers. The same objectives hold when considering any rationalisation of facilities and for this reason, appropriate customer research has been undertaken and the results of this research will be taken into account before reaching a decision regarding rationalisation. The services currently enjoyed by Sydney Electricity's customers will not be diminished.
          (4) The impact of redundancies is one of the issues covered by the current consultations with unions and staff. Any redundancies likely to flow from the rationalisations will be comfortably met through the current voluntary redundancy programme.
          (5) Any redundancies associated with facilities rationalisation in question will be met within the limits of this current voluntary redundancy programme. Employees will not be subject to forced redundancy.
          (6) Sydney Electricity has now established a record of price reductions to its customers for 3 successive years in a row. It has achieved this through improved management of its resources and massive productivity improvements. Sydney Electricity will continue to pursue improvements in productivity and resource utilisation and will strive to pass the benefits to its customers through lower prices and better services.
          (7) See answer (3) above.

      Page 464

      *19 HOSPITALS—RESTRICTED HOURS—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
          Since June 1992—
          (1) (a) Which hospitals have closed, restricted access or imposed on the hours during which full accident and emergency services are available?
            (b) When and why?
          (2) Have any of these units refused access to ambulance borne patients as a result?
          (3) What has been the average monthly case load in each Accident and Emergency unit?
          Answer—
          (1) Information of this type is not collected centrally. No hospitals close Accident and Emergency Services. Ambulances are occasionally diverted to neighbouring hospitals to level peak loads.
          (2) The Ambulance Service has the discretion to ignore restricted access on clinical grounds (i.e., if the patient's condition is such that a transfer to another hospital is not appropriate).
          (3)
                          A&E Occasions of Service
              UNIT Year Total Monthly Average
                        1992/93 1992/93
            Areas
            Central Coast 55,740 4,645
            Central Sydney 45,189 3,766
            Eastern Sydney 143,447 11,954
            Hunter 81,759 6,813
            Illawarra 172,276 14,356
            Northern Sydney 95,639 7,970
            South Western Sydney 98,500 8,208
            Southern Sydney 65,870 5,489
            Wentworth 56,200 4,683
            Western Sydney 108,217 9,018
            Subtotal 922,837 76,903
            Regions
            Central Western 81,621 6,802
            New England 70,328 5,861
            North Coast 117,502 9,792
            Orana and Far West 43,324 3,610
            South Eastern 60,960 5,080
            South West 60,217 5,018
            Subtotal 433,952 36,163
            RAHC 27,401 2,283
            TOTAL 1,384,190 115,349

      *22 HOSPITAL BED FUNDING—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) With regard to Mount Druitt and Nepean Hospital beds, does he intend to allocate funds on the basis of the number of beds at hospitals within each Area Health Service next year?
          (2) If yes, why?
          (3) If not, why not?

      Page 465
          Answer—
          (1) to (3) Funding for the NSW Health system is based upon the Resource Allocation Formula that encourages the allocation of resources, primarily on a population basis, to provide necessary health services. Each Area Health Service receives funding in line with the targets determined by the Resource Allocation Formula.

      *26 CLASS 81 LOCOMOTIVES REFURBISHMENT—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          Given the ultimate closure of Chullora Workshops, will the SRA honour the contract awarded to the Chullora shops for the provision/refurbishment of 29 Class 81 locomotives?
          Answer—
          Completion of the contract is not dependent on plans for the ultimate closure of the Chullora Workshops. The workshops have already completed three locomotives and are continuing with the 81 Class component change-out programme.

      *28 "LOOK AT ME NOW" OCEAN OUTFALL LEGAL COSTS—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
          (1) How much has the Department spent in legal costs on the proposed "Look At Me Now" ocean outfall at Coffs Harbour?
          (2) Have any payments been made or agreed to be paid by your Department under the ex gratia scheme for financial legal assistance?
          (3) If so:
            (a) How much?
            (b) To whom?
            (c) For what purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) Legal costs of administration of the project: $8,000.
            (b) Legal costs of defending legal proceedings: $13,000—additional costs item to project which is funded equally by Public Works and Coffs Harbour City Council.
      (c) Legal costs of Commission of Inquiry: $29,000—funded equally as for (b).
          (2) Public Works does not administer, nor has knowledge of, any ex gratia scheme for financial legal assistance.
          (3) Not applicable.

      *29 NEWCASTLE ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT—Mr Price asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
          (1) Is it the practice of the Department of Public Works to oversight the preparation and execution of multi-million dollar building construction contracts for Government departments?
          (2) Is it usual to include performance penalty clauses in these major contracts?
          (3) Did the Department advise the Department of Lands in relation to the contract and its supervision in the construction and fit-out of the Newcastle Entertainment Centre?
          (4) Why were penalty clauses not included?

      Page 466
          (5) Did the contract variation of $69,014 for remedial work constitute rework at cost or a negotiated price?
          (6) Who was responsible for replacing the failed floor?
          (7) (a) Were any penalties or bonuses applied in any aspect of this project?
            (b) If so, what are the details?
          Answer—
          (1) Public Works' Charter includes managing project risk for a range of State Government agencies for projects valued greater than $500,000. This service is carried out to minimise risk to Government.
      When requested by Government agencies, Public Works will also oversight the preparation and execution of major building construction contracts.
          (2) Performance Bonus or Penalty clauses are only included in those contracts where specific benefits can be realised. Public Works, as is common practice, utilises liquidated damages to safeguard against late completion and security deposits to ensure the rectification of defects.
          (3) Public Works was engaged by the Department of Conservation and Land Management after the award of the contract to provide advisory services which did not involve certification of any works or variations.
          (4) to (7) These matters are not in my area of responsibility and should be referred to my colleague the Minister for Land and Water Conservation, the Hon. George Souris, M.P.

      *30 HUNTER AREA NURSING HOME BEDS—Mr Price asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) How many nursing home beds are available in the Hunter Area Health Board Region?
          (2) How many beds are available through:
            (a) The public sector and where are they located?
            (b) The private sector and where are they located?
          (3) What is the schedule of fees for each of these premises?
          (4) What is the current waiting list numbers and approximate waiting times?
          (5) What is the current need numerically and what will be the need by the year 2000?
          (6) Where would be the most advantageous geographical locations for the establishment of additional nursing homes, both public and private?
          Answer—
          (1) 2,367 as at 24 September 1993.
          (2) (a) 737.
          (b) 1,630.
          (3) If the facility receives Commonwealth benefits, a daily common patient contribution of $24 is charged. The additional Commonwealth benefit payment to the nursing home is based on the patient category and varies between nursing homes.
          (4) As at 31 October 1993, there were 192 people waiting for a nursing home bed and 180 waiting for hostel accommodation.
          Based on the five-category classification of the Commonwealth's Resident Classification Index (RCI), the approximate waiting times by category for 1992 were:
            Category 1 54 days
            Category 2 99 days
            Category 3 84 days
            Category 4 94 days
            Category 5 150 days

      Page 467
          The RCI categories above, provide a categorical grouping for the level of nursing care required by a client. For example, Category 1 residents are those which require the highest care needs or level of dependency; Category 5 residents are those who are least dependent.
          (5) The Commonwealth formula of 40 beds/1,000 population results in a target number of 1,577 nursing home beds. Based on 1991 census population projections, the Commonwealth target number would be 1,918 by 1996.
          (6) The establishment of additional nursing homes, both public and private, is a responsibility of the Commonwealth Government. The Commonwealth Government control the number of nursing home beds and approve the granting of any additional beds.

      *31 SURGERY CANCELLATIONS—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
          How many patients scheduled for surgery have been cancelled in each area and district during:
            (a) 1989?
            (b) 1990?
            (c) 1991?
            (d) 1992?
            (e) To date in 1993?
          Answer—
          It should be noted that cancellations are defined by the NSW Health Department as those patients who no longer require care and who are removed from a hospital waiting list for any reason other than admission, for example, as a result of the patient or doctor electing to have treatment provided elsewhere.
          Some individuals may define cancellations in terms of patients who have their admission delayed or rescheduled by the treating facility. Data on delayed or rescheduled admissions have not been collected centrally to date. Differences in collection methods and counting practices between Areas, as well as between facilities within Areas, do not permit direct comparison from these sources. However, overall it is possible to indicate that the NSW Health system admits an enormous number of patients, with relatively few having their surgery delayed or rescheduled by the treating facility.
          In January 1994, almost 60,000 patients were admitted in the Area Health Services and yet an estimated 0.7 per cent, on average across all Areas, had their admissions delayed or rescheduled.

      *32 PUBLIC HOSPITAL DENTAL CLINIC WAITING TIMES—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
          What are the waiting times at each public hospital dental clinic for:
            (a) Dentures?
            (b) Basic dental work?
          Answer—
          Persons who are eligible for public dental care and who seek care at dental clinics at hospitals and community health centres are assessed by dental staff and allocated a priority for dental care.
          Those persons who require immediate or urgent care are given highest priority and are provided care as soon as practicable. In the case of dentures they are generally made appointments within 6 to 8 weeks.

      Page 468
          Where urgent care is required on natural teeth, such care is usually provided within 24 hours.
          Where the dental care required is not immediate, the waiting times for both dentures and basic dental care vary between hospitals.

      *33 SYDNEY ELECTRICITY SPONSORSHIPS AND PROMOTIONS—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
          (1) For the years individually 1990, 1991, 1992 and 1993, what has been the expenditure on sponsorship or promotions by Sydney Electricity?
          (2) What organisations have been sponsored or promoted by Sydney Electricity?
          (3) What has been the criteria for selecting each of these organisations?
          (4) Without detracting from the individual merits of these organisations, what benefits are derived by sponsorship and promotion by Sydney Electricity?
          Answer—
          (1) Expenditure on sponsorships are as follows:
              1990/91 $80,000
              1991/92 $60,000
              1992/93 $153,000
              1993/94* $115,000
              * Estimated.
          (2) Sydney Electricity's sponsorships are focused on two areas, youth and environment/heritage (as will be explained in (3)). A summary of the current sponsorships in these two strands is as follows:
            Youth
              •Sydney Electricity sponsors the Young Achievement Australia (YAA) Trade Fair held at Darling Harbour each July. The YAA movements helps students develop employment-related skills by teaching them how to set up and operate their own small business.
              •The Sydney Electricity "Hot Shots" were the No. 1 Sydney team in the National Superleague Netball Championships in 1993. Netball is Australia's largest sport with more than 1 million players.
              •Further extending the promotion of netball, Sydney Electricity will sponsor the Anne Sargeant Netball Clinics for junior players 15 and under.
            Environment/Heritage/Technology
              •Sydney Electricity is the foundation sponsor of the University of New South Wales' Solarch project. This project is dedicated to the development of solar energy, assisting in an environmentally sound future for our community.
              •Sydney Electricity is a benefactor of the National Trust, as a result of having carried out energy audits and implemented an energy management plan for the Trust's Sydney properties. The National Trust Sydney Electricity Heritage Awards, launched in 1993, will provide ongoing promotional opportunities.
              •Sydney Electricity's sponsorship of "Australia's Night Life" exhibit at Taronga Zoo is long standing and has enabled a number of endangered species to be saved from extinction.
              •Sydney Electricity's sponsorship of Fort Denison initially involves preparing an energy management plan, replacing electrical fittings which are in poor condition and significantly increasing the lighting of the island. Beyond this, the sponsorship will enable increased public access and an improvement of facilities.

      Page 469
          (3) Sponsorships are a means by which Sydney Electricity seeks to generate favourable community and staff awareness, and enhance the image of Sydney Electricity and, wherever possible, promote product and services.
          One of the most important features of any sponsorship is the degree to which it will generate favourable media interest and publicity. This is the cornerstone of a successful sponsorship and it is the means by which the image of Sydney Electricity needs a strong, positive identity as a pre-requisite to effectively compete in the present energy market, let alone the deregulated electricity market which is less than 2 years away.
          The Corporate Image Survey, conducted annually by Reark Research, has provided the direction for Sydney Electricity's sponsorships. This research establishes the factors underlying customers' perceptions of Sydney Electricity's corporate image and also establishes the relative importance of these factors.
          Two key issues emerged that impact negatively upon corporate image and which could be addressed to some extent by strategic sponsorships. The two key issues were:
              •Younger customers are less favourably disposed to Sydney Electricity than older customers.
              •Sydney Electricity should do more to protect the environment/heritage and, as an adjunct, do more to promote alternative energy and new technology.
          As a consequence, the corporate sponsorship program has been focused on youth and environment/heritage preservation.
          (4) As the State's largest electricity distributor, Sydney Electricity recognises the need to play a positive role in the community in which it operates, and in which its employees live. Extensive customer survey work (which is conducted annually) indicated that there is an overwhelming desire from the general public for Sydney Electricity to be a more active participant in community affairs. Obviously this comes with the qualification that the involvement should not be extravagant and that it should focus on areas that are appropriate.
          Over the past few years, Sydney Electricity has changed from being a sleepy, overweight, slow moving bureaucracy into a vibrant organisation. It has increased profits, reduced prices, boosted productivity and taken on a role of being a responsible corporate citizen.
          Sponsorships are one way Sydney Electricity can help all of Sydney.
          As an indication of the success of Sydney Electricity's sponsorships, customers of the 1993 corporate image survey were asked whether they considered them appropriate. 90 per cent of customers (who were aware of the sponsorships) considered them to be either very appropriate or appropriate. 9 per cent did not know and 1 per cent considered them inappropriate.
          This is an excellent result and derives from the fact that the sponsorships target areas of need, as perceived by the community, and are financially modest, adding in total less than 1 cent to the average customer's account.

      *41 CHILD PROTECTION OFFICERS—LIVERPOOL AREA—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
          (1) How many additional Child Protection Officers will be assigned to the Liverpool area as a consequence of his recent announcement?
          (2) How many additional District Officers will be allocated to Liverpool as part of the same program?


      Page 470
          Answer—
          (1) The Child Protection Budget has been increased by $2 million for the 1993/94 financial year to a record $38 million. In addition to this $2 million increase, there has been a 33 per cent increase in the Child Protection Budget over the last 5 years.
          From this allocation, 20 specialist child protection advisers are currently being appointed across the State, including the South West Sydney and Macarthur areas, to support and ensure the ongoing professional development of currently employed District Officers.
          (2) The 24 additional District Officer positions have been allocated on a comparative needs basis resulting in increased staffing levels in some rural areas where there has been a substantial increase in the proportion of young vulnerable children in the population.

      *42 VISION CARE PROGRAM—Mr Beckroge asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
          (1) Under the Vision Care Program for spectacles for pensioners, are monies they have invested in a funeral fund considered an asset?
          (2) Does this preclude them from the benefit?
          (3) If so, why, if the investment is not realisable during the lifetime fo the pensioner, is it considered an asset?
          Answer—
          (1) to (3) Only realisable assets are considered.

      *46 SILVERWATER REMAND PRISON PROPOSAL—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          In relation to the Silverwater Remand Prison proposal—
          (1) What were the 10 sites examined as alternatives to Silverwater?
          (2) (a) What advantages did each have?
            (b) Why was each rejected?
          (3) How will $80 million savings be achieved as a result of the construction of the proposed 900 cell Silverwater facility?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) The 10 sites were:
                •Bradmill Cotton Mills, Camperdown;
                •Government Printing Office, Ultimo;
                •Goulburn Street Carpark;
                •Sydney Police Centre;
                •The Hub Building, Ultimo;
                •Silknit House, Surry Hills;
                •Parramatta Hospital grounds;
                •Outer grounds of the John Morony Correctional Centre, South Windsor;
                •Long Bay Correctional Centre; and
                •Silverwater.

      Page 471
          (2) (a) The advantages of the sites identified was their availability at the time and their ability to service the metropolitan court system.
          (b) The Department considered the sites on the following criteria:
              (i) Availability;
              (ii) Proximity to public transport;
              (iii) Services available (electricity, gas, water, sewer);
              (iv) Ability to service metropolitan court system;
              (v) Appropriate zoning or opportunity to change zoning;
              (vi) Purchase price;
              (vii) Size of site; and
              (viii) Neighbouring developments.
              The Bradmill Cotton Mills Building, Silknit House and The Hub Building were all considered too expensive. Selection of any of these three sites would have added $3 million to $5 million to the project cost.
              Goulburn Street Carpark, the Government Printing Office and the Sydney Police Centre were considered to be too costly to refit. These sites also had transport access problems.
              The John Morony and Long Bay Correctional Centres were considered to be too far from the metropolitan court systems at both Parramatta and the Sydney CBD and this would result in additional inmate transport costs.
              Parramatta was dependent on the Health Department's future on the Parramatta site and their timeframe for closure was not suitable to the Department of Corrective Services. Parramatta is also further from the Sydney CBD courts than Silverwater.
          (3) The $80 million in savings referred to relates to an $8 million per annum estimated savings through improved operational efficiency, that will result once the Metropolitan Remand and Reception Centre project becomes operational, based on an inmate to staff ratio of 3:1, over a 20-year period of analysis.

      *47 CITYRAIL INFOLINE SERVICE—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) How many people are employed to take customer calls on CityRail Infoline 131500?
          (2) (a) Are there persons employed by CityRail or the private sector?
            (b) If private sector, which company?
          (3) Has there been reductions in the staff of this service?
          (4) What was the average waiting time for calls when the service was first introduced?
          (5) What is the current waiting time?
          (6) Is this service meeting the goal of providing quick, timely travel advice for CityRail passengers?
          Answer—
          (1) 31.
          (2) (a) They are employed by a private company.
            (b) Serco Australia Pty Ltd.
          (3) No.
          (4) and (5) The average call waiting times are not comparable as the current service provides information on bus, rail and ferry services while the initial service provided information on CityRail services.
          (6) The service is markedly better than the former Metrotrips information service which had a waiting time from 3 to 15 minutes and further significant improvements are imminent.

      Page 472

      *48 AUTOMATIC TICKET VENDING MACHINES—RAILWAY STATIONS—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) How many automatic ticket vending machines are now in use at stations throughout New South Wales?
          (2) What was the cost of these machines?
          (3) What was the cost of installation?
          (4) How many machines have required maintenance since their introduction to service?
          (5) In how many cases was this result of:
            (a) Electronic failure or malfunction?
            (b) Vandalism?
          (6) What provision is made for ticketing at stations where the vending machine is out of order?
          Answer—
          (1) 610.
          (2) $15.1 million.
          (3) $834,680.
          (4) and (5) All machines receive maintenance by the contractor on a monthly basis in accordance with the terms of the contract.
          (6) Most locations have multiple ticket outlets. At small stations where only one machine is installed, customers may purchase their tickets at their destination. A central computer records instances where a particular machine has broken down.

      *49 FRENCHS FOREST POLICE CHARGES—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) When were criminal and departmental charges laid against each of the officers associated with events at Frenchs Forest Police Station?
          (2) Were these charges laid before 25 February 1993 when events at Frenchs Forest became public by way of an article in The Sydney Morning Herald?
          Answer—
          (1) Officers involved:
            Inspector N. Stewart
            (a) Departmental Charges Neglect of Duty (4 counts)—served 8 April 1993.
                          Misconduct—served 8 April 1993.
                          Disobedience—served 8 April 1993.
              Directed to proceed 8 April 1993.
            (b) Criminal Charges Nil.
            Sergeant C. Black
            (a) Departmental Charges Misconduct (3 counts)—served 8 April 1993.
              Directed to proceed 8 April 1993.
            (b) Criminal Charges Nil.

      Page 473
            Constable A. J. Bourke
            (a) Departmental Charges Misconduct (7 counts)—served 8 April 1993.
                          Disobedience—served 8 April 1993.
              Directed to proceed 8 April 1993.
          (b) Criminal Charge "Supply Prohibited Drug"—Summons served 13 August 1993.
              Date approval given 9 August 1993 (approximately).
              Information laid 13 August 1993.
            Constable 1st Class G. Hofmann
            (a) Departmental Charges Misconduct (4 counts)—served 11 April 1993.
              Directed to proceed 8 April 1993.
            (b) Additional Department Misconduct—served 4 June 1993.
              Charge.
              Directed to proceed 2 June 1993.
          (c) Criminal Charge "Larceny of Cannabis Leaf"—Summons served 30 August 1993.
              Date approval given 20 August 1993.
              Information laid 26 August 1993.
            Constable C. Folbigg
            (a) Departmental Charge Misconduct—served 8 April 1993.
              Directed to proceed 8 April 1993.
            (b) Criminal Charges Nil.
            Constable 1st Class A. Neilson
            (a) Departmental Charges Misconduct (4 counts)—served 8 April 1993.
              Directed to proceed 8 April 1993.
            (b) Additional Departmental Misconduct—served 4 June 1993.
              Charge.
              Directed to proceed 2 June 1993.
            (c) Criminal Charges Nil.
          (2) No.

      *50 MR 217 TRAFFIC COUNTS—Mr Hunter asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Over the past 5 years, how many times have traffic counts been undertaken along MR 217?
          (2) (a) What were the locations of each traffic counting point?
            (b) What was the traffic count at each point and when were the counts undertaken?
          (3) What is the actual or estimated traffic count on MR 217 at its intersection with Victory Parade, Toronto?
          (4) What is the cost for installation of traffic lights at a T intersection, such as MR 217 and Victory Parade?
          (5) (a) What is the actual or estimated traffic count on MR 217 at the Cockle Creek Rail Bridge?
            (b) Is the bridge safe for this traffic volume?
            (c) Are there plans to replace or upgrade the bridge?
            (d) What interest does the SRA have in the bridge?
            (e) Who is responsible for the safety of road users crossing the bridge?

      Page 474
          Answer—
          (1) There are 2 permanent and 29 periodic traffic counting stations on Main Road No. 217. The permanent stations record continuously and samples are taken from the periodic stations as resources permit. The available data is analysed on about a 2-year cycle, which enables annual average daily traffic volumes to be determined.
          (2) (a) and (b) Details of the locations and annual average daily traffic volumes at the sites are available from the Newcastle Zone Office of the Roads and Traffic Authority.
          (3) There is no actual count for Main Road No. 217 at Victory Parade. However, annual average daily traffic volumes in that vicinity and details of a 1990 count of vehicle turning movements at the intersection, which are too voluminous to print, are available from the Authority's Zone Office at Newcastle.
          (4) Depending upon the extent of work required, the installation of traffic control signals at the Main Road No. 217 and Victory Parade intersection could cost in excess of $1 million.
          (5) (a) Details are available at the Authority's Zone Office at Newcastle.
            (b) Safety at the bridge is considered to be adequate.
          (c) No.
            (d) Maintenance of the structure of the bridge is the responsibility of the SRA.
            (e) Lake Macquarie Council.

      *51 HOME CARE—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
          In the electorate of Moorebank for the financial years 1989/90, 1990/91, 1991/92 and 1992/93—
          (1) How many people received Home Care?
          (2) How many hours of Home Care were provided?
          (3) Which branches of Home Care provided these services and what proportion of the total hours of Home Care services originated from each branch?
          (4) How many people were refused Home Care services?
          (5) What are the categories of services requested that have been refused?
          (6) What are the projections for 1993/94 for questions (1) and (2)?
          Answer—
          (1) to (3) Residents of the electorate of Moorebank receive assistance from the Macarthur and Liverpool branches of Home Care Service. These branches also provide services to residents of other electorates and it is not feasible to accurately isolate service provision to one electorate. The following information relates to the total of the two branches:
            1989/90 1,457 people
            1990/91 1,733 people
            1991/92 1,782 people
          1992/93 1,563 people
            1989/90 153,185 hours
            1990/91 151,223 hours
            1991/92 148,778 hours
          1992/93 140,502 hours


      Page 475
            1989/90 $2,077,471
            1990/91 $2,169,390
            1991/92 $2,366,873
          1992/93 $2,456,075
          (4) Information on people refused Home Care Assistance is not maintained.
          (5) People who are assessed as eligible for assistance from the Home and Community Care Program but for whom Home Care is not provided, are not at risk of immediate institutionalisation.
          (6) Home Care cannot project total customer numbers for the electorate of Moorebank alone, however, 138,300 hours of assistance are projected for the Macarthur and Liverpool branches of Home Care in 1993/94.

      *55 RESOURCE ALLOCATION FORMULA—Mrs Lo Po' asked the Minister for Health—
          What changes are being considered or have been made to the Resource Allocation Formula and what are the original and revised 1998/99 target shares for each of the areas and districts?
          Answer—
          The following changes have been made to the Resource Allocation Formula:
              •2001 population projections used rather than 1996 projections.
              •Inclusion of funding allowance for projected level of secondary service cross-boundary flows.
              •Development of a composite standardised indicator of need blending data on mortality, socio-economic status and geographic location. Rural isolation is incorporated into this factor.
              •Removal of allowance for nursing home type patients in acute hospitals, following the purification of budgets to include these patients in the Aged and Disabled Services Program.
              •Incorporation of revised flow matrices for RGH Concord and Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children.
              •1990/91 inpatient statistics and revised DRG cot weights used rather than 1988/89 statistics and 1986 weights.
              •High cost, complex casemix activity (previously referred to as tertiary) projections were recalculated taking account of the Department's Tertiary Services Plan and the latest available information on distribution of complex casemix workloads.
          The original 1998/99 target shares and the new 2000/01 target shares are:


      Area Health ServiceOriginal 1998/99
      Target Share
      New 2000/01
      Target Share
      Southern Sydney7.0 7.24
      Eastern Sydney9.8 9.30
      Central Sydney8.6 8.24
      South West Sydney9.1 9.46
      Western Sydney9.9 10.35
          Page 476
          Wentworth
      4.2 3.95
      Northern Sydney9.7 9.19
      Central Coast4.0 4.02
      Hunter8.7 8.40
      Illawarra4.1 4.33
          There were no original target shares for districts and new ones are still being calculated.

      *57 CAPITAL ASSET SALES—Mrs Lo Po' asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) What is the value and timetable for the sale of each of the capital assets the Department is considering for disposal?
          (2) What revenue was collected over each of the last 5 years from asset sales?
          (3) How was it subsequently used?
          Answer—
          (1) The estimated return from asset sales over the next 5 years is $100 million. For commercial reasons, the estimated proceeds from individual sites is not indicated.
          (2) The following revenue was raised from asset sales over each of the last 5 years:
              1992/93 $6.15 million
            1991/92 $3.48 million
            1990/91 $7.44 million
            1989/90 $13.27 million
            1988/89 $9.89 million
          (3) Revenue raised over the last 5 years was used by the Department for major and minor capital works in the Public Hospital System.

      *60 MYALL RIVER DREDGING—Mr Martin asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
          (1) Are there adequate funds for the dredging of the Myall River mouth and a short distance upstream?
          (2) Is the shallowness of the Myall River causing a problem in the area for both boating access and business in Tea Gardens and Hawks Nest?
          (3) Will he make a special effort to review the needs of the area?
          (4) Will he ensure that the waterway is navigable?
          Answer—
          (1) The NSW Government meets the full cost of dredging navigation channels for the commercial fishing industry. The Government offers a 50 per cent subsidy to councils under the Waterways Infrastructure Development Program (WIDP) for dredging which benefits recreational boating.
          There is no significant commercial fishing industry presence on the Myall River and any dredging would primarily benefit recreational boating. Accordingly, a 50 per cent Government subsidy would be applicable. Should council wish to undertake dredging of the Myall River,
      Page 477
      the Government would need to consider council's application in light of other statewide priorities.
          (2) There are sections of the Myall River where siltation is affecting the navigability of the waterway for larger vessels, as indicated by representations to undertake dredging in several places such as Corrie Island, Durness and in the National Park.
          (3) A review of the needs of the area is a matter for the council. Should council decide to re-order its priorities after reviewing the needs of the area, every effort would be made by the Government to accommodate any application for assistance having regard to overall statewide priorities.
          (4) The Government cannot ensure the continued navigability of this or other waterways. The Government is always prepared to help councils in providing navigable waterways by offering assistance to undertake the navigational dredging necessary subject to the availability of funds and statewide priorities.

      *63 BOOZ ALLEN CONSULTANCIES—Ms Nori asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) On how many projects has the firm Booz Allen been used?
          (2) On which particular projects?
          (3) Have the reports in relation to these projects been made publicly available?
          (4) If not, why not?
          (5) Which ones are not publicly available?
          (6) How much has Booz Allen been paid for their consultancy?
          (7) Will he provide a breakdown of the various costs into the following categories:
            (a) Fees?
            (b) Travel costs (domestic and international)?
            (c) Accommodation costs?
            (d) Daily allowances?
          (8) If not, why not?
          Answer—
          (1) and 2) Thirty-one projects since 1988. These have included reports on a broad range of issues ranging from strategic analysis of the State Rail Authority, International Road Pricing Practice, and Road Transport future directions.
          (3) The findings of the State Rail commissioned reports were released while the reports themselves have not been. The report of the assessment of US Light Density Line expenditure related to abandonment or preservation of rail service to the grain industry was made public to interested parties.
          The draft system specification for the Ultimo/Pyrmont Light Rail Transit project was provided to any party that wished to purchase a copy of the Expression of Interest documentation for the project.
          The Road Transport Future Directions, International Road Pricing Practice and Road Transport Beyond 2000 have been made publicly available.
          (4) Some of the reports were commissioned for use in commercial negotiations and so not made public due to the commercially sensitive information contained. Others were seen to be internal matters to improve operations efficiency.

      Page 478
          (5) The remainder, except for those reports detailed in answer (3), are not publicly available.
          (6) $8,112,636.92 from 1988 to 15 November 1993.
          (7) A great deal of the consultancy/contract works carried out by Booz Allen are on a fixed sum basis. The detailed examination of accounts for the 31 consultancies involved would involve an unjustifiable diversion allocation of resources by the authorities concerned to provide a detailed breakdown of each project.
          (8) Not applicable.

      *72 ILLAWARRA REGIONAL HOSPITAL—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) How many beds were in use at the Wollongong and Port Kembla campuses of the Illawarra Regional Hospital as at:
            (a) 1 July 1988?
            (b) 1 July 1989?
            (c) 1 July 1990?
            (d) 1 July 1991?
            (e) 1 July 1992?
            (f) 1 July 1993?
          (2) How many beds have been closed at the Wollongong and Port Kembla campuses of the Illawarra Regional Hospital since 1 July 1993?
          (3) Since 1 July 1988, which wards/medical treatment areas have had their bed capacity reduced at the Wollongong and Port Kembla campuses of the Illawarra Regional Hospital?
          (4) What does the Department of Health regard as the minimum number of beds the Wollongong and Port Kembla campuses of the Illawarra Regional Hospital need to remain functional as a major referral centre for the Illawarra?
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) Admissions for the Wollongong and Port Kembla campuses of the Illawarra Regional Hospital for years ended 30 June were:
            1987/1988 20,751
            1988/1989 21,317
            1989/1990 22,489
          1990/1991 23,466
            1991/1992 24,737
          1992/1993 27,374
          The available number of beds is not a very meaningful measure of the effectiveness of the health system. The Department measures number of patients treated as non-inpatients, day stay patients and patients who stay more than 1 day. These are far more useful measures of system capacity than bed numbers. In each of the categories mentioned, the Illawarra is measuring the number of patients treated. The Department is also assessing the outcome of treatment.
          (3) Bed numbers are not a measure of a hospital's capacity to provide services. Advances in medical technology, application of early discharge programs, patterns of service provision and provision of many services on an outpatient basis enables increased services to be provided with less beds.
          (4) The Illawarra Regional Hospital is operating with a sufficient number of beds at this time to provide referral level services for the Illawarra.


      Page 479
      *73 HARNESS RACING BARRIER DRAWS—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
          (1) Is he aware of claims made by the Professional Trotting Horseman's Association that barrier draws can be manipulated at New South Wales harness races?
          (2) Has this abuse of the racing system been known to the Harness Racing Authority?
          (3) If so, for how long?
          (4) Will the Government intervene to ensure that such abuse of the harness racing system is stopped or prevented?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) There has been no evidence substantiated that the barrier draw system has been manipulated.
          (3) Not applicable.
          (4) Not applicable.

      *75 HEALTH DEPARTMENT STAFFING—Mr Yeadon asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) What is the description and location and what duties are undertaken by staff occupying the 993 positions which Budget Paper 3 shows will be deleted in 1993/94?
          (2) Why did payments for redundancies blow out from $5 million to $10.1 million in 1992/93?
          Answer—
          (1) The staffing figures in Budget Paper 3 reflect a projected average for 1993/94 and are only a guide for the average number of staff who might be employed during that year.
          The estimated average number of staff to be employed during 1993/94 is 74,630, an anticipated reduction of 897 over the previous year. The estimated reduction represents only 1.2 per cent of total staffing and is primarily within the Department's major program 2.3 "Support for Area Health Services and Public Hospitals".
          The reductions are expected to occur through the continuing program of cost effective delivery of services, including the contracting out of support service, without compromising or reducing direct patient care and services.
          For pure comparability purposes, the estimated staff to be employed in 1993/94 does not include some 2,400 associated with the transfer of Concord Hospital to the State.
          (2) The $5 million indicated for 1992/93 redundancy payments was only a nominal estimate of expected outlays.
          Redundancy payments in total reflect improved service provision through cost effective methods, without affecting direct patient care or reducing levels of service to the public.

      *78 ORGAN DONORS—Mr Yeadon asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) Is he aware that a recent advertisement in The Sydney Morning Herald, 28 October 1993, is in breach of the Human Tissue Act 1983, section 23 (1) and 24 (1) in that the advertisement clearly states that relatives may veto a donor's wishes.
          (2) Why has this been stated when taxpayers' funds have been expended to set up a detailed database of donors through the Roads and Traffic Authority's DRIVES computer.
          (3) Who authorised this advertisement?

      Page 480
          (4) Will he reassure the public that signing a donor card, endorsing a driver's licence or some other clear expression of intent is sufficient under the existing law to ensure organs are donated according to the donor's wishes?
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) The Human Tissue Act 1983, section 23 (1) (b), clearly states that tissue can be removed if the person "had not withdrawn the wish or revoked the consent". It is clear that the family can veto formalised indications of wishes if a subsequent conversation had indicated contrary wishes.
          This advertisement was placed by ACCORD (The Australian Coordinating Committee on Organ Registries and Donation). The intent of the advertisement is to bring to the attention of the public the importance of discussion with family members of one's wishes regarding organ/tissue donation. It intends also, to indicate the policy of compassion in New South Wales hospitals, in that staff will always discuss such sensitive issues with family members, so that they can give effect to the deceased's wishes.
          Hospital staff find it very difficult to know what to do if grieving family members object to the removal of organs/tissues from a deceased loved one, but they will do what they feel will be the least disruptive to the family unit in the circumstances.
          The publication of the National Medical and Research Council of Australia, An Australian Code of Practice for Transplantation of cadaveric organs and tissues, 1990 is a set of basic guidelines which can be modified to meet the legal requirements of particular States and Territories, or to suit local circumstances. The document is intended for staff of hospitals involved in organ donation and transplantation.
          Section 4.2 of these guidelines states that: "If a relative objects despite the known request of the deceased patient, the hospital may, in all States and Territories, legally ignore the relatives. However, in practice, the wishes of the next of kin, who usually will uphold the known request of the patient, are respected."
          Most New South Wales drivers (55 per cent) have made no indication whatsoever on their driver's licence as to their organ donation wishes and since the introduction of the 5-year licence, the Roads and Traffic Authority cannot regularly update a person's organ donation wishes. Therefore, regular family discussion is being promoted through this advertisement, in order to ascertain subsequent withdrawal or addition of consent.
          The Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (the medical practitioners most closely involved with the issue of organ donation and grieving relatives) have published a document entitled, Statement and Guidelines on brain death and organ donation—1993. Under the section: The wishes of the patient and discussion of organ donation, the following is stated: "When written authority exists, those wishes legally take precedence over the wishes of the next of kin. In practice, however, the wishes of the senior available next of kin are always to be taken into account, firstly for their knowledge of any subsequent withdrawal of consent, and secondly, for the sake of the family unit and the good of the surviving relatives. Experience shows that the next of kin rarely oppose the known wishes of the patient, and will even act contrary to their own beliefs in order to fulfil them".
          (3) The advertisement was authorised by the Australian Coordinating Committee on Organ Registries and Donation (ACCORD), a national body established by the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council, to improve donor organ acquisition in Australia.
          (4) The public can be reassured that signing a donor card, endorsing a drivers' licence and family discussion of one's intent, is sufficient to ensure organs/tissues are donated, in the appropriate circumstances, provided that subsequent family discussion has not indicated that these wishes are rescinded.

      Page 481

      *80 MENTAL HEALTH—FORM 4—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) When did the Mental Health Act Implementation Monitoring Committee recommend that Form 4, Statement of Legal Rights and Other Entitlements, under section 30 of the Mental Health Act 1990, be simplified?
          (2) Has the task of simplifying the form been completed?
          (3) If not:
            (a) Why not?
            (b) When will simplification be done?
            (c) Will urgent priority be given to this task?
          (4) If so:
            (a) When will the form be translated into community languages for the benefit of involuntarily admitted NESB patients?
            (b) Into which languages will the form be translated?
          Answer—
          (1) 20 August 1992.
          (2) Yes.
          (3) Not applicable.
          (4) (a) As soon as practicable following appropriate amendments to the Act and consequential amendments to the Regulation.
            (b) The form will be translated into 18 community languages namely: Arabic, Chinese, Croatian, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Lao, Macedonian, Maltese, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Turkish and Vietnamese.

      *81 LIVERPOOL HOSPITAL—DENTAL SERVICES—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) What is the current number of persons on the waiting list and waiting time involved for each type of dental service provided at Liverpool Hospital?
          (2) What funding has been allocated to the dental service at Liverpool Hospital for 1993/94?
          (3) What funding was provided to the dental service at Liverpool Hospital in:
            (a) 1988/89?
            (b) 1989/90?
            (c) 1990/91?
            (d) 1991/92?
            (e) 1992/93?
          (4) How does the funding allocated in 1993/94 to the dental service at Liverpool Hospital compare with the funding provided to other dental services in New South Wales?
          (5) Why have some constituents been told they will have to wait up to 3 years for dental services?
          (6) What steps will he take to urgently address this matter?
          Answer—
          (1) Patients requiring attention are dealt with on a clinical priority basis. Those requiring emergency dental treatment and relief of pain are usually treated on the day of presentation. Patients requiring less urgent work are placed on a booking list. If at any time the clinical condition of these persons deteriorates, they are reassessed to determine if they should be treated immediately.
      The current number on the waiting list is 3,000.

      Page 482
          (2) $366,429 for dental services and $229,276 for denture services, at Liverpool Hospital, has been allocated for 1993/94.
          In addition, the South Western Sydney Area Health Service anticipates receiving $2,000,000 for emergency and general dental services, under the Commonwealth Dental Health Program, between 1 January 1994 and 30 June 1996.
          (3) Dental Service Denture Service
            1988/89 * Not available
          1989/90 * $307,621
          1990/91 * $307,621
          1991/92 * $351,900
            1992/93 $369,401 $351,900
          * Allocation not disaggregated to program or service level.
          (4) The level of funding for South Western Sydney Area Health Service is comparable to other metropolitan Area Health Services, except for those with major Dental Teaching Hospitals.
          (5) and (6) Booking lists for dental care have increased because of the recession an the ageing population; which has led to a rapid expansion of eligible recipients.

      *84 CORRECTIVE SERVICES STAFFING—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          In the Department of Corrective Services, for each financial year 1988/89 to 1992/93 and in the year to date, what has been the full-time equivalent staffing of each of the:
            (a) IIU?
            (b) SIU?
            (c) Staff Discipline Unit?
            (d) Other officers investigating staff discipline?
            (e) Custodial and non-custodial officers?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          The following figures refer to effective full-time positions. As the positions may vary during a year, for comparison purposes, the figures have all been taken as at 1 July each year.
            (a) Internal Investigation Unit
              1 July 1988 25 (24 custodial + 1 non-custodial)
              1 July 1989 24 (23 custodial + 1 non-custodial)
              1 July 1990 24 (23 custodial + 1 non-custodial)
              1 July 1991 30 (28 custodial + 2 non-custodial)
              1 July 1992 30 (28 custodial + 2 non-custodial)
              1 July 1993 28 (28 custodial)
            (b) Special Investigation Unit—established with 1 custodial officer on 17 May 1990:
              1 July 1990 1
              1 July 1991 1
              1 July 1992 7 (1 custodial + 6 police on secondment)
              1 July 1993 7 (1 custodial + 6 police on secondment)
              Police were seconded to the Department of Corrective Services prior to the establishment of the Unit. The number of police seconded during the period 1988 to 1991 varied in accordance with the workload; on average up to 4 officers were seconded each year.

      Page 483
            (c) Staff Discipline Unit
              1 July 1988 Nil
              1 July 1989 1
              1 July 1990 1
              1 July 1991 1
              1 July 1992 2
              1 July 1993 6 (1 custodial + 5 non-custodial)
            (d) Other officers investigating staff discipline
              There is no record of other positions available for the investigation of staff discipline.
            (e) Custodial and non-custodial positions
              Departmental staff are classified in three categories, custodial, industrial and non-custodial. The custodial category includes custodial officers employed in the Department. The industrial category includes staff employed in and with Corrective Services Industries. The non-custodial category includes all other officers.
              1 July 1988 2,236 custodial, 287 industrial, 1,245.23 non-custodial
              1 July 1989 2,392 custodial, 295 industrial, 1,328.82 non-custodial
              1 July 1990 2,288 custodial, 331 industrial, 1,273.36 non-custodial
              1 July 1991 2,586 custodial, 420 industrial, 1,468.10 non-custodial
              1 July 1992 2,879 custodial, 446 industrial, 1,053.02 non-custodial
              1 July 1993 2,907 custodial, 446 industrial, 1,043.49 non-custodial
              The decimal point/part numbers for non-custodial staff are aggregates of positions which are less than full-time.

      *85 PRISONERS—EARLY RELEASES—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          Over each of the last 5 years—
          (1) How many prisoners have been erroneously released from gaol prior to the correct date for release?
          (2) From which institution was each released?
          (3) On what date were they released?
          (4) What was the most serious offence for which they were imprisoned?
          (5) What was the length of the sentence being served?
          (6) How many prisoners were to be erroneously released from gaol prior to the correct date of release though subsequently not released?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          Diversion of departmental resources to obtain this information for the last 5 years cannot be justified.

      *86 CORRECTIVE SERVICES INDUSTRIES—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          In relation to Corrective Services Industries—
          (1) How many projects involving capital equipment valued at more than $100,000 have been commenced or completed by DCSI since 1989?

      Page 484
          (2) What has been the total cost of each project to date?
          (3) What feasibility studies were undertaken in each case?
          (4) Did they endorse the final level of investment?
          (5) How many inmates does each project currently employ?
          (6) What connection is between these projects and post-release employment programs?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) 5.
          (2)

      Capital Equipment Purchased from 1 January 1989
                                                ProjectCost to DateNo. of Inmates Employed
                                                Upgrade of Glen Innes Sawmill to fulfil need for additional inmate employment and OH&S considerations.$690,000 53
                                                Provision of Powder Coating Plant, John Morony Correctional Centre.$298,000 36
                                                Provision of Plant to manufacture textile garments, Long Bay Correctional Centre.$238,000 50
                                                Installation of Milk Processing and Packaging Facility, Emu Plains Correctional Centre.$431,000 30
                                                Provision of Timber and Textile products workshops at Lithgow Correctional Centre.$535,000 180
          (3) Feasibility appraisals and studies to determine the merits of proposed levels of capital investment for each of the above projects were conducted by Corrective Services Industries and/or the Capital Works Branch of the Department of Corrective Services.
          (4) Yes.
          (5) See answer (2) above.
          (6) Correctional Industry programs are conducted to provide opportunities for inmate development. The programs are designed to provide inmates with an understanding of the value of work to society and the habits and skills to enhance their opportunity to gain and retain employment upon release.

      *90 AUTOMATIC TICKETING SYSTEM—CITYRAIL—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Does the new CityRail automatic ticketing system prevent passengers from breaking their journey in the event of them disembarking at a station prior to the station for which the ticket was purchased?
          (2) What instructions are given to station staff in dealing with passengers who are incorrectly ticketed?


      Page 485
          Answer—
          (1) The regulation has not been altered in that customers in possession of a single or return ticket are not permitted to break their journey.
          (2) Staff are instructed to take appropriate action according to the circumstances. As an example, should a customer inadvertently select the wrong destination station, arrangements will be made for the ticket to be exchanged and for any adjustment to be made to the fare paid.

      *91 RAILWAY STATIONS—REVENUES AND WORKS—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What is the monthly revenue from ticket sales from July 1991 to September 1993 inclusive, at the following railway stations:
            (a) Holsworthy?
            (b) Glenfield?
            (c) Macquarie Fields?
            (d) Ingleburn?
            (e) Minto?
            (f) Casula?
            (g) Liverpool?
            (h) Campbelltown?
            (i) Macarthur?
            (j) Leumeah?
          (2) What are the other sources of revenue for these stations?
          (3) What amounts were received for the same period from these other sources?
          (4) What works have been carried out at the above stations during the same period?
          (5) How much did these works cost?
          Answer—
          (1) The average revenue per (28-day) accounting period to 16 October 1993 is as follows:
            1991/92 1992/93 1993/94
            $ $ $
          Holsworthy 38,813 46 ,694 55,088
          Glenfield 68,198 71,857 77,337
          Macquarie Fields 63,281 62,912 64,078
          Ingleburn 135,008 128,507 132,325
          Minto 163,568 162,112 165,993
          Casula Not applicable Not applicable 104
          Liverpool 299,750 272,135 266,566
          Campbelltown 299,720 277,472 293,748
          Macarthur 27,507 28,75 932,434
          Leumeah 134,644 133,751 133,577
          (2) Advertising, refreshment vending machines and retail outlets.
          (3) Advertising revenue cannot be apportioned station by station. However, revenue from vending machines at Liverpool, Campbelltown and Minto Stations was $62,352, $38,269 and $3,144 respectively, and rents from retail outlets at Ingleburn, Liverpool and Campbelltown Stations were $5,535, $84,420 and $63,140 respectively.

      Page 486
          (4) and (5)
            Holsworthy: Commuter carpark and lighting upgrade ($6,000).
          Glenfield: Station security fencing ($33,000).
          Macquarie Fields: Commuter carpark and lighting upgrade ($9,000).
          Ingleburn: Commuter carpark, lighting upgrade and station security fencing ($42,000).
      Minto: Station upgrade and commuter carpark ($144,000).
          Casula: Nil.
            Liverpool: Platform and ramp resurfacing, painting and enclosure of pedestrian ramp ($247,000).
            Campbelltown: Stage 1 of a major upgrade ($264,000).
            Macarthur: New seats, signs and bins, station security fencing ($52,000).
            Leumeah: Commuter carpark ($163,000).

      *94 WARABROOK PROPOSED RAILWAY STATION—Mr Price asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What progress has been made on the establishment of the proposed Warabrook Railway Station?
          (2) What is the planned completion date for this project?
          (3) Has there been any cost escalation in this project?
          (4) If so:
            (a) What amount?
            (b) Why?
          Answer—
          (1) Council approval has been obtained for the Development Application, design work has been completed and agreement reached in regard to land acquisition.
          (2) Around May 1995.
          (3) No.
          (4) (a) and (b) Not applicable.

      *95 HUNTER REGION—RESPITE CARE BEDS—Mr Price asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) What is the number of respite care beds in the Hunter Region for:
            (a) Intellectually disabled children?
            (b) Intellectually disabled adults?
            (c) Physically disabled children?
            (d) Physically disabled adults?
          (2) Who are the contact organisations for each of these categories?
          (3) Where are each of the establishments located?
          (4) (a) Are any costs and charges incurred by the carers when assigning their relatives to these beds?
            (b) If so, what its the schedule in each case?
          Answer—
          (1) to (4) Responsibility for the ongoing care of the developmentally disabled was transferred to the Department of Community Services in 1989. That Department falls within the administration of my colleague, the Hon. J. A. Longley, M.P.

      Page 487

      *98 BATHURST-SYDNEY FREIGHT—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) How many days a week are freight and parcels transported from Sydney to Bathurst?
          (2) Is this traffic invariably carried by rail?
          (3) If not, who carries it?
          (4) If carried by Omega Transport, have they any relationship with Hills Transport, and what is Hills Transport's role in transportation of SRA freight?
          (5) Is it costing more to move fright and parcels from Sydney to Bathurst by road?
          (6) If freight is being forwarded by road, are trains also operating to Bathurst?
          Answer—
          (1) Rail transport of freight and parcels from Sydney to Bathurst is available at least 5 days a week.
          (2) Yes.
          (3) Not applicable.
          (4) Omega Transport is a unit of Hills Transport. Hills Transport has the TrackFast contract for Bathurst, Orange and Dubbo.
          (5) Neither TrackFast nor Freight Rail use road transport between Sydney and Bathurst. Comparative costs of road and rail transport cannot be made in the absence of details of the goods to be transported.
          (6) Not applicable.

      *99 CONTAINER LIFTER—BATHURST RAILYARD—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What is the value of the container lifter presently stored in the Bathurst rail yard?
          (2) Will TrackFast have any further use for the lift?
          (3) Is it intended to dispose of it?
          (4) If so, how will it be disposed?
          (5) Is there any intention to give the lift to the new operators of the Blayney Container Terminal?
          (6) (a) Will the lift be offered to the Blayney Terminal?
            (b) If so, will he give an assurance that full market value will be obtained?
          Answer—
          (1) An estimated $15,000 to $20,000.
          (2) No.
          (3) Yes.
          (4) By public tender.
          (5) No.
          (6) (a) and (b) See answer to question (4).

      *104 PACIFIC POWER—SES POSITIONS—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
          What were the SES positions and overall staff positions for Pacific Power for the years:
            (a) 1988 to 1990?
            (b) 1992 and 1993?

      Page 488
          Answer—
          The number of SES positions and total staff for the period 1988 to 1993 are set out below:
      As at 30 June No. of SES Positions No. of Staff
            1988 - 10,488
              1989 - 8,296
              1990 1017,283
              1991 1026,710
              1992 996,482
              1993 945,870*
                    As at 28 February 1994, total SES positions in Pacific Power had dropped to 86.
            * Staff numbers based on full-time equivalent staff.

      *109 LIVERPOOL COURT HOUSE—CAPITAL WORKS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) Is Liverpool the only major regional court complex in the metropolitan area where major works have not been carried out since 1988?
          (2) Where does Liverpool Court House appear on the current priority list for capital expenditure?
          (3) Where did Liverpool Court House appear on the priority list for 1993/94?
          (4) Which projects which appeared on the priority list for 1993/94 ahead of Liverpool Court House were:
            (a) Funded?
            (b) Not funded in the 1993/94 budget?
          (5) (a) Which projects which appeared below Liverpool Court House on the priority list for 1993/94 were funded in the 1993/94 budget?
            (b) Why were those projects, if any, funded ahead of Liverpool?
            (c) When does he anticipate Liverpool Court House will receive funding for improvements and what is the value and nature of the proposed improvements?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) New South Wales Public Works defines major works a projects costing more than half a million dollars. If this is the definition that the honourable member is using, then the answer is no. Other major complexes such as Blacktown and Bankstown have not had major works since 1988. Major works are carried out with regard to need determined by the condition of the building and operating requirements. However, although less than half a million dollars has been spent, considerable work has been carried out at Liverpool Court House this financial year.
          (2) Liverpool Court House was seventh on the priority list at the beginning of this financial year for capital works expenditure and is being dealt with according to that priority.
          (3) As above.
          (4) (a) Law Courts Building Bail Court and video link, Manly Court House refurbishment and upgrading, and Hornsby, Moree, Parramatta and Penrith Court Houses.
          (b) None.

      Page 489
          (5) (a) Wagga Wagga, Bega and Goulburn Court Houses were funded in the 1993/94 budget, as was Liverpool Court House.
          (b) They were not funded ahead of Liverpool. Work on these three projects is continuing with plans being drawn for Bega and Goulburn. Existing plans for Wagga Wagga were implemented but plans for the remainder of the project are still under consideration.
          (c) A substantial amount of work at Liverpool has already been completed this year, including refurbishing and extending both the Registry and general office, expanding the Clerk of the Court's office, providing a new office for the Assistant Clerk of the Court, a new Registry counter and security, and relocating fixed public seating.
          The work carried out at Liverpool Court House has significantly increased office space in the Local Court Office, and staff no longer have to share desks. The facsimile machine now has a set place for installation which is accessible to all staff. The public foyer to the Court office has been made more user-friendly, with a reduction in the overall number of counters.
          In the past, signage for the counters was not sufficient to direct customers to the appropriate counter. Often, customers had to be redirected to the correct counter after having waited for some time for service. The renovation of the counter and erection of a workstation screen has segregated staff from the public and those staff working in the public contact area, thus improving efficiency.
          The extension of the wall of the Registrar's office to the ceiling has provided the Registrar with an office where confidential interviews can now take place. In the past, if the Registrar needed to interview a member of staff, he would leave his office and use the legal profession interview room. Further, with changes to legislation, the Registrar is conducting an increasing amount of legal work in his chambers. The new chambers are of great benefit to customers.
          The Callover room is used by the Registrar 3 days per week. It previously consisted of a bare room with chairs and tables. The renovations have made it resemble a miniature court room, which is now suitable for the processes performed within. The room is presently being used by an Arbitrator performing District Court arbitration work, assisting in a reduction in civil delays.
          The work carried out has also greatly improved the District Court Criminal Registry, which is now operating to capacity. Prior to the renovations, some staff of the District Court Criminal Registry were still located at the Parramatta Registry. To assist the District Court, after-court work such as recognisances, warrants and community service orders were performed by Local Courts staff. As a result of the renovations, the District Court now has a proper office from which to operate fax facilities, a counter for processing work and answering enquiries and, most importantly, a compactus to store court files. In the past, filing cabinets were stored in the court's foyer area and in passageways and interview rooms. The security of files was a major concern as were occupational health and safety issues due to the blocking of emergency escape routes.
          In response to the New South Wales Ozone Regulations 1991, the R-12 reciprocal chiller has been replaced in the air-conditioning system at a cost of $39,500. The chiller now satisfies CFC legislation and will not require major maintenance for the next 15 years.
          Expenditure in the current year so far on Stage 1 is $178,568 and approval has been given for a further $250,000 to complete Stage 2, which includes upgrading of public facilities to provide greater security and privacy for people being interviewed in family law matters (including Shine Rooms), segregation of prisoners, upgrading of lighting and provision of emergency lighting, improved jury accommodation and an electrical upgrade for safety and efficiency reasons.


      Page 490
      *115 CENTRAL COAST TANGARA SERVICES—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) When is it scheduled that Tangara carriages will be introduced to commuter services between Central Coast railway stations and stations in the Sydney metropolitan network?
          (2) Will the introduction of Tangara carriages include a trial period to allow for community consultation on the merits of the new carriages?
          (3) (a) If so:
              (i) Over what period will the trial be held?
              (ii) What form of community consultation will be held?
              (iii) If the community demonstrates broad opposition to Tangara carriages, will he agree to a return to interurban carriages for the said services?
            (b) If not, why not?
          (4) How long is it expected to take Tangara carriages to completely replace interurban carriages on commuter services between Sydney and the Central Coast?
          Answer—
          (1) Delivery of the first of the modified cars is expected in April 1994. The date the cars will enter service is not known at this stage.
          (2) and (3) Community consultation has already taken place.
          (4) The outer suburban Tangara trains will allow the withdrawal from service of the old, non-air-conditioned single-deck intercity rollingstock, and for the return to suburban use of the sets currently operating between Sydney and the Central Coast via the North Shore line. It is not intended that the existing double-deck interurban cars be replaced.

      *117 ENGADINE DISTRICT AMBULANCE SERVICES—Mr McManus asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) Is he aware that ambulance services are required to leave the Engadine District unattended whilst being redirected or assigned to other districts?
          (2) Have these services been requested to cover areas such as Vaucluse and North Shore?
          (3) Have other suburban ambulance services been required to attend urgent calls whilst the Engadine staff have been redirected?
          (4) If so, how often in the last 3 years and under what circumstances?
          (5) Is there any danger to local residents as a result of these actions?
          (6) Will he ensure that Engadine is protected on a full-time basis?
          (7) Will he ensure that additional staff and vehicles will be allocated to the Menai district?
          Answer—
          (1) The Ambulance Service is demand driven. On occasions there is a requirement for officers to transport patients, on medical request, out of the local area.
          (2) After transporting a patient to a facility out of the local area, officers may be requested to transport other patients back to the Sutherland Shire or other areas en route.
          (3) If the Engadine officers have already been despatched, the nearest available ambulance is despatched to the emergency within the Engadine area.
          (4) This information is not collected.
          (5) Local residents are not in danger as all emergency cases are responded to immediately.

      Page 491
          (6) The Engadine Ambulance Service provides 7 days a week, 24 hours a day coverage.
          (7) On 10 December 1993, my colleague, the Member for Sutherland, the Hon. Chris Downy, M.P., and I announced that construction of an ambulance station would commence at Menai during 1994. The ambulance station is designed to accommodate four ambulances plus amenities and support facilities for an 11-officer, 24-hour roster.

      *118 GRAIN RAIL FREIGHT RATES—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What is the freight rate per tonne for grain from Gilgandra?
          (2) What is the freight rate per tonne for grain from Trangie?
          (3) Is wheat from Gilgandra and Trangie both railed via Dubbo?
          (4) Is the rail line from Dubbo to Gilgandra in excellent condition and requires minimal maintenance?
          (5) Are growers on the eastern side of Gilgandra able to deliver their wheat to the Mendooran silos and save $6.89 per tonne rail freight costs?
          (6) Are the inequitable rail freight charges costing Gilgandra wheat farmers an additional $840,000 compared to Trangie wheat farmers in a good season?
          (7) Will he intervene to ensure the Gilgandra wheat farmers are not discriminated against by setting rail freight charges from Gilgandra at the same rate as those from Trangie?
          Answer—
          (1) $29.10.
          (2) $26.08.
          (3) Yes, if going to Newcastle for export.
          (4) The Dubbo-Gilgandra branch is a medium standard line. It is in average condition and requires normal maintenance for a line of its standard.
          (5) No.
          (6) Any difference between the rates for Trangie and Gilgandra is not considered to be inequitable.
          (7) It is not considered that Gilgandra farmers are discriminated against. Rates for all sites are set through commercial negotiations and take into account costs and market conditions. The NSW Grain Industry Task Force, which includes the NSW Farmers' Association, has negotiated the 1993/94 Export Wheat freight rates with the agreement of all parties involved. If farmers from the Gilgandra area are concerned about the level of local freight rates, they may make submissions to the Task Force both direct and through the NSW Farmers' Association.

      *128 NATIONAL FORESTS POLICY—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) What resources are presently being allocated within his portfolio administration to the implementation of the National Forests policy?
          (2) Which officers have direct responsibility for implementing this policy?
          (3) What progress has been made in determining agreed criteria for the protection of old growth forests and wilderness in New South Wales?


      Page 492
          Answer—
          (1) The National Parks and Wildlife Service's Deputy Director (Policy and Wildlife) is a member of the Joint Implementation Subcommittee established between the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) and Ministerial Council on Forestry, Fisheries and Agriculture.
          A Senior Research Officer of the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) is a member of the Technical Working Group on Reserve Criteria. That officer is a recognised authority on reserve selection techniques.
          A Senior Officer of the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) serves on the Technical Working Group on Forest Use and Management.
          (2) The officers directly responsible for the implementation of the NFPS within my portfolio are the Director-General of the National Parks and Wildlife Service, and the Director-General of the Environment Protection Authority. They may, from time-to-time, delegate certain functions to subordinate officers.
          (3) The Technical Working Group on Reserve Criteria has recently completed a draft discussion paper documenting its work so far in developing criteria for reserve selection for the protection of wilderness and old-growth forests. It will be submitted to the next meeting of ANZECC for review. The discussion paper, like the NFPS, takes an Australia-wide approach. It is not restricted to New South Wales

      *129 HOME CARE SERVICES—ELECTORATE OF BLACKTOWN—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
          In the electorate of Blacktown for the financial years 1989/90, 1990/91, 1991/92 and 1992/93—
          (1) How many people received Home Care?
          (2) How many hours of Home Care were provided?
          (3) Which branches of Home Care provided these services and what proportion of the total hours of Home Care services originated from each branch?
          (4) How many people were refused Home Care services?
          (5) What are the categories of services requested that have been refused?
          (6) What are the projections for 1993/94 as to:
            (a) How many people will receive Home Care?
            (b) How many hours of Home Care will be provided?
          Answer—
          (1) to (3) Residents of the electorate of Blacktown receive assistance from the Holroyd and Prospect Branches of Home Care Service. These branches also provide services to residents of other electorates. It is not feasible to accurately isolate service provision to one electorate. The following information relates to the total of the two branches:
              Year People Hours $
              1989/90 1,804 132,613 2,807,791
              1990/91 1,692 140,718 2,891,461
              1991/92 1,593 144,751 3,178,180
              1992/93 1,523 141,274 3,318,597
          (4) Information on people refused Home Care Assistance is not maintained.

      Page 493
          (5) People who are assessed as eligible for assistance from the Home and Community Care Program but for whom Home Care is not provided, are not at risk of immediate institutionalisation. While no service category is identified as low priority, it is typical for people refused assistance to be seeking low levels of housekeeping or home maintenance only.
          (6) Home Care does not project total customer numbers for the electorate of Blacktown, however, 141,800 hours of assistance are projected for the Holroyd and Prospect Branches of Home Care in 1993/94, with an increase of $114,799 in the Direct Services Budget.

      *130 LOCAL COUNCIL RATE PAYMENTS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
          (1) Will the requirement of the new Local Government Act to have councils issue quarterly rate assessments prevent the Blacktown Council from continuing its past policy of allowing ratepayers to pay rates by seven equal instalments?
          (2) Will he grant permission to Blacktown, or any council, to continue with more frequent rate payments?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes. A council may not automatically continue its past practice of allowing rate payers to pay rates by seven equal instalments. However, once rates are due and payable, a Council may, under section 564 (1), enter into an agreement with a ratepayer to change the payment process from that legislated. These arrangements can be initiated by ratepayers but are subject to council approval.
          (2) Where ratepayers and councils pursue special payment arrangements through agreements under section 564 (1) of the 1993 Act, the Minister's approval for such agreements is not required.

      *131 BUILDING DISPUTES TRIBUNALS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads and Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport—
          (1) How many cases were heard by Building Disputes Tribunals in the 12 months to 31 October 1993?
          (2) How many of these cases were resolved in favour of the consumer?
          Answer—
          (1) 717 claims were heard and determined in the 12 months to 31 October 1993 in the Building Disputes Tribunals.
          (2) Of the 717 building claims lodged, 481 were resolved in favour of the consumer, as defined by section 12B (1) of the Consumer Claims Tribunal Act 1987 (as amended).

      *132 CONSUMER CLAIMS TRIBUNAL CASES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads and Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport—
          (1) Since the jurisdiction of Consumer Claims Tribunals was increased from $6,000 to $10,000, from 1 August 1992, how many cases have been heard each month by the Tribunals up to 31 October 1993?
          (2) How do these monthly figures compare with the previous corresponding period?

      Page 494
          Answer—
          (1) Claims heard and determined
            1 August 1992 to 31 October 1993:
            August 1992 256
            September 1992 347
            October 1992 298
            November 1992 231
            December 1992 172
            January 1993 10
            February 1993 291
            March 1993 425
            April 1993 165
            May 1993 342
            June 1993 311
            July 1993 285
            August 1993 300
            September 1993 284
            October 1993 212
            Total 3,929
          (2) When the number of cases heard during the period from August 1992 to October 1993 (inclusive) is compared with the number of cases heard from August 1991 to October 1992 (inclusive), the result is a total decrease of 15 per cent.

      *133 CONSUMER CLAIMS TRIBUNAL—COMPLAINTS AGAINST LEGAL PRACTITIONERS— Mr Amery asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads and Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport—
          (1) How many complaints have been received by the Department of Consumer Affairs concerning unreasonable charges by either barristers or solicitors?
          (2) How many of these complaints were referred to a Consumer Claims Tribunal?
          (3) In whose favour were these complaints settled?
          Answer—
          (1) In the year ending 31 October 1993, a total of 18 such complaints were received by the Department of Consumer Affairs.
          (2) Three of these were advised to lodge a claim with the Tribunals and three were referred to the Tribunals, after mediation had been attempted.
          (3) It would appear that of these six complainants, only two have lodged claims with Tribunals and both have received partial redress.

      *137 PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL PATIENTS—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) How many patients were admitted to psychiatric hospitals throughout New South Wales in each year since 1988?
          (2) How many psychiatric patients have been admitted, in the first instance, to the Mount Druitt Hospital and Nepean Hospital in each year since 1988?
          (3) How many psychiatric patients were transferred from these hospitals each year since 1988 to psychiatric hospitals in New South Wales?

      Page 495
          Answer—
          (1) The number of admissions to gazetted psychiatric hospitals under the Mental Health Act 1990, in each year since 1988, is as follows:


      YearNumber of Admissions
      1988/89 10,138
      1989/90 9,053
      1990/91 8,813
      1991/92 8,618
      1992/93 8,334
          (2) The number of psychiatric patients admitted, in the first instance, to Nepean Hospital and Mount Druitt Hospital since 1988 is as follows:


      YearNepean HospitalMount Druitt Hospital
      1988Unit not open*
      1989Unit not open*
      1990Unit not open*
      1991 283*
      1992 428*
      1993 383*
      1994 94 (to date)*
* Mount Druitt Hospital does not have a specialist psychiatric inpatient unit. Patients who present suffering from a psychiatric illness as the principal diagnosis are referred to a specialist psychiatric treatment centre.


      (3) The number of psychiatric patients transferred from these hospitals each year since 1988 to psychiatric hospitals in New South Wales is as follows:



      YearNepean HospitalMount Druitt Hospital
      1988Not availableNot available
      1989Not availableNot available
      1990Not available 3
      1991 18 11
      1992 29 10
      1993 16 19
      1994 4 (to date)Not available
                            Page 496

      *140 COMPLAINTS AGAINST WINDSOR CASTLE HOTEL—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) Did a police operation take place to establish if antisocial behaviour or crime was prevalent in the adjacent area to the hotel?
          (2) Was it alleged that these problems were caused by the hotel's operations and its hours of trading?
          (3) Who made such complaints?
          (4) Was there any validity in any of the complaints?
          (5) If so, what was established as the cause of trouble in proximity of the hotel?
          Answer—
          (1) Although the Windsor Castle Hotel has been included in a number of operations, this hotel has not been specifically targeted for antisocial behaviour adjacent to the hotel.
          (2) It has been alleged that problems have been caused by hotel patrons in respect to malicious damage and summary offences, although this has not been substantiated by police.
          (3) Mr Douglas Clements.
          (4) Yes, although local residents in close proximity to the hotel have made no complaints.
          (5) The hotel has a large patronage on Friday and Saturday nights. Patrons from the hotel loiter in the area, yelling and shouting while waiting for lifts and taxi cabs, noise from departing motor vehicles and patrons obstructing the roadway traffic.

      *141 COMPLAINTS AGAINST WINDSOR CASTLE HOTEL—Mr Face asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
          (1) Has the Chief Secretary's Department received any complaints from Mr Doug Clements concerning the operations of the Windsor Castle Hotel, East Maitland, and its licensee, Clifford John Lopez?
          (2) Has Mr Doug Clements petitioned to have the licensed hours varied?
          (3) Is there any record of officers of your Department concerning threats that have been made against hotelier Lopez?
          (4) Will you instigate an investigation as to whether the hotelier Lopez is subject to threats and vexatious actions concerning his licensed premises so as to have it closed?
          (5) If proof of vexatious behaviour by Mr Doug Clements exists, will this be taken into account in future complaints brought by him against the Windsor Castle Hotel?
          Answer—
          (1) All complainants names are received on a confidential basis by both the Liquor Administration Board and the Chief Secretary's Department. On that basis, I am not prepared to answer whether any named person has lodged a complaint with the Liquor Administration Board or the Chief Secretary's Department.
          (2) As above.
          (3) As above.
          (4) No. If threats have been made to the licensee, these should be referred to the police.
          (5) The Secretary of the Liquor Administration Board has advised me that, as with any application to the Board, each application is considered on its merits, having regard to the particular facts of the case.


      Page 497
      *142 ILLAWARRA CARDIAC CATHETER LABORATORY—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) Is the Director-General of Health correct in stating that Health Department policy as expressed in ". . . 2000", is that the population of the Illawarra region does not justify cardiac surgery?
          (2) Are established cardiac catheter facilities associated with cardiac surgical facilities available 1 hour's drive north of Wollongong?
          (3) (a) In the current economic environment, is public funding of cardiac catheter laboratories at the Wollongong or Port Kembla campuses of the Illawarra Regional Hospital, therefore inappropriate?
            (b) If so, does this involve significant increased risk for patients?
          (4) (a) Will the Health Department permit a private cardiac catheter laboratory to open in the Illawarra region?
            (b) If so, will the Health Department lend the money for such a facility?
            (c) How much money is being loaned by the Health Department?
            (d) What are the terms and conditions of the proposal?
            (e) Will the money be loaned to an individual or to a company?
            (f) What is the set-up cost of the cardiac catheter laboratory?
            (g) How much of the set-up cost will be provided by the lender?
            (h) What security will be provided to the lender?
            (i) What staffing is required for such a facility?
            (j) What are the year costs (staff, consumables, etc.) of running such a facility?
            (k) How much is the Commonwealth rebate for cardiac catheterisation?
            (l) Does setting up of such a facility with State funds and receiving payment from the Commonwealth in any way contravene the Federal/State Medicare agreement?
            (m) Is it a desirable option in the public interest as regards:
            (i) Cost to patients?
            (ii) Patient access?
          (5) (a) How many patients were referred from the Illawarra region for cardiac catheterisation each year for the last 3 years (excluding patients from the Shoalhaven)?
            (b) Are the Shoalhaven patients expected to continue to be investigated at major centres in Sydney?
            (c) Based on the number of patients above and the Commonwealth rebate, how much revenue could be generated per annum from a private cardiac catheterisation laboratory?
            (d) How far would this amount go towards repaying the loan made by the Health Department?
            (e) How would the Health Department ensure that the public sector would not carry the cost of the loan, in the event the private facility failed to earn enough to repay the loan?
            (f) If the number of patients in (e) above is not enough to generate sufficient income to repay the loan, how many studies would need to be performed to achieve this?
            (g) If the loan is being made to a company, what guarantee is there that the investors are "at arm's length", i.e., are in no way connected with the ordering of services provided by the cardiac catheter laboratory?
          (6) (a) Do established diagnostic cardiac catheter laboratories in Sydney have additional under-utilised available capacity?
            (b) Is the under-utilisation capacity due solely to budget restrictions?

      Page 498
            (c) If so:
            (i) Will provision of additional funds assist patients from Shoalhaven?
            (ii) In what ways?
          (7) Before approving further public/private (in public hospitals) cardiac catheter laboratories, will he undertake an audit of the existing cardiac catheter laboratories within the public health system in Sydney, and determine if they are:
            (a) Used to their maximum capacity?
            (b) If not, to what extent is their under-utilisation associated with budgetary constraints?
            (c) Viable, appropriate and convenient or could be made available to cater for:
            (i) Illawarra patients?
            (ii) Shoalhaven patients specifically?
          Answer—
          (1) Illawarra residents requiring cardiac surgery receive this service at one of the Sydney teaching hospitals because the population of the Illawarra is insufficient to sustain a local service.
          (2) The closest cardiac catheterisation services are currently provided at St George Hospital.
          (3) (a) A Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) Unit will open by mid-1994 at the Port Kembla Campus of the Illawarra Regional Hospital. The DSA Unit will be used predominantly for vascular angiography and diagnostic cardiac catheterisation.
            (b) Not applicable.
          (4) (a) The NSW Department of Health approved an application to establish a diagnostic cardiac catheterisation unit at the Illawarra Private Hospital, Figtree, in November 1993.
            (b) to (j) Not applicable.
            (k) The Medical Benefits Schedule fees vary according to the nature of the procedure and the number of images required.
            (l) and (m) Not applicable.
          (5) (a) Cardiac catheterisation may be performed as either an inpatient or outpatient procedure. Only inpatient data is collected and the number of Illawarra patients (excluding Shoalhaven) was:
                1990 460
                1991 503
                1992 582
            (b) Shoalhaven patients are referred by their medical practitioner to any facility selected by the medical practitioner in consultation with the patient.
            (c) to (g) Not applicable.
          (6) (a) No.
            (b) Not applicable.
            (c) Not applicable.
          (7) (a) The Health Department has recently reviewed cardiac catheterisation services. The review concluded that it would be appropriate to provide diagnostic services for low risk patients at the Illawarra Regional Hospital, Wollongong.
            (b) Not applicable.
            (c) The Illawarra Area Health Service will be establishing a public diagnostic service for low risk patients at the Illawarra Regional Hospital, and will maintain links to both the Prince Henry Hospital and the St George Hospital for therapeutic and surgical services. This service will be available for Shoalhaven residents should referring medical practitioners make referrals to it.

      Page 499

      *143 POLICE DRUG SECURITY—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) Given the lack of knowledge the Police Commissioner possessed concerning the Frenchs Forest issues, as emerged during the recent Parliamentary Inquiry into Police Administration, will he direct the recently appointed Assistant Commissioner, Professional Responsibilities, to review all I.A./I.P.S.U. documents and reports concerning police drug security issues for the 3-year period prior to the establishment of the Parliamentary Committee?
          (2) Will he then provide full details, including dates, police stations, types of drugs, amounts in quantitative and street value, of all and any reported irregularities historically reported during that period?
          (3) In each case, have any police officers been charged with offences in relation to those matters?
          (4) In each case, what were the recommendations of investigative police, if any, to increase security of drug exhibits?
          (5) What happened in respect to those recommendations in each case?
          (6) Were such recommendations made known to the then Assistant Commissioner of Professional Responsibilities?
          (7) Did the Assistant Commissioner of Professional Responsibilities provide any reports/memos to the Commissioner in relation to any of the matters referred to above, if so, what were the dates of each report, and content?
          Answer—
          The following advice has been provided by the Commissioner:
          (1) to (7) No. The honourable member was a member of the Joint Select Committee Upon Police Administration, during which time he had ample opportunity to seek information on drug security.
          The whole issue of drug destruction and security is currently being reviewed by the Government and the honourable member will be advised of the outcome of that review at the appropriate time.

      *145 COMMUNITY SERVICES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—

      With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio administration?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
          (4) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (5) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (6) Where there has been a decline in expenditure during the period nominated in question (3), why?


      Page 500
          Answer—
          (1) Children's Services.
            Youth Services.
            Family Support.
            Services for the Ageing and People with Disabilities.
            Community Development.
            Multicultural Projects.
          Also, residents in the electorate of Moorebank have access to services in other areas.
          (2) Organisations that receive funds determine their own staffing levels. However, the Department estimates 26 staff are employed in services other than children's services in the electorate of Moorebank.
          Staffing levels to children's services are determined by licensing requirements.
          (3) Actual expenditures:
              1990/91 $1,121,385
              1991/92 $1,215,976
              1992/93 $1,338,197
          (4) $1,418,872.
          (5) Under the post-school options projects, school leavers who have an intellectual disability with either moderate or high support needs have been targeted for service provision.
          Other recent initiatives that will be based in Campbelltown are the Intensive Family Based Service, a service to families at risk of break down and the Cottage Centre Community Caring Project a pilot service aimed at identifying those families at risk of child abuse and providing early intervention to reduce or eliminate this risk. The Department of Community Services has also seconded a staff member to this service. Also a one-off amount of $105,000 has also been provided to the area for services to homeless youth.
          The Liverpool Neighbourhood Centre will continue to provide a 2-day per week co-ordination service at Moorebank Neighbourhood Centre.
          (6) There has been no decline in expenditure in the electorate of Moorebank.

      *146 CITYRAIL FLEET—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What percentage of the CityRail fleet is not in service at the present moment?
          (2) What percentage of the above will be maintained through the MainTrain contract?
          Answer—
          (1) 11 per cent of CityRail's carriage fleet was out of service on an average daily basis during Accounting Period 9 (6 February to 5 March 1994).
          (2) 7.4 per cent underwent repairs in that period under the MainTrain contract.

      *147 EAST HILLS RAILWAY LINE QUADRUPLICATION—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Does the State Rail Authority have any plans, completed or under preparation, allowing for future quadruplication of the East Hills line?
          (2) If so, what is the timescale for implementation?
          (3) Will existing rail bridges be removed and rebuilt as part of the expansion process or is there a more economic scheme available?


      Page 501
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) Provision for the work has been made in the State Rail Authority's forward capital works estimates for the next 6 years.
          (3) Detailed design is not complete and the most cost effective means of proceeding has yet to be determined.

      *148 SCHOOL PEAK TRAIN SCHEDULING—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Is he aware of an incident at Pymble Railway Station at about 3.35 p.m. on Wednesday, 10 November 1993, where the cancelled 3.32 p.m. train sped through the station without warning?
          (2) As at this hour the station is crowded with schoolchildren, will the State Rail Authority in future ensure that such an incident is at least announced over the public address system to warn children to stand back from the edge of the platform?
          (3) Does the SRA have any policies concerning school peak train scheduling?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) Yes.
          (3) Yes. The needs of students, as well as other commuters, are taken into consideration when timetable changes are contemplated.

      *149 ROADWORKS RADIO ADVERTISEMENTS—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What is the cost of radio advertisements run in the last 2 months about roadworks funded from 3x3 monies in Parramatta and the Central Coast?
          (2) What tendering process took place in connection with these advertisements?
          (3) How long are the advertisements expected to run?
          Answer—
          (1) The total cost of the radio advertisements referred to was $158,775.
          (2) The RTA engaged a radio broker, at no cost to the Authority, to secure the "best deal for the Authority".
          (3) Paid advertising concluded in the week ending 5 December 1993. Some bonus advertisements were broadcast after that date.

      *150 MURWILLUMBAH-ROBINA PROPOSED RAIL LINK—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What, if any, is the current NSW Government commitment to the development of the Murwillumbah-Robina Rail Link?
          (2) Why has the release of the joint study of the Rail Link been delayed?
          (3) Have the joint study's yet to be published conclusions been criticised by the member for Ballina?

      Page 502
          (4) Has $105,000 been allocated for a feasibility study for the Rail Link in the 1993/94 budget?
          (5) Will he give a commitment to consult with relevant sections of the North Coast community regarding the terms of reference and scope of the feasibility study?
          Answer—
          (1) The Government is continuing to investigate the Rail Link proposal to ensure that construction may proceed when it is economically justified.
          (2) and (3) I have written to the Queensland Minister for Transport seeking his participation to extend the study into the Rail Link and therefore propose to wait until this is completed before public release is considered.
          (4) Yes.
          (5) Tweed Shire Council, through the Member for Ballina, has been invited to advise of any issue it considers should be included in the study.

      *151 GONINANS MAINTRAIN CONTRACT—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What are the conditions of contract regarding how long Goninans are required to maintain individual rail cars and Tangara four-car sets?
          (2) What inspection procedures have been established by the State Rail Authority to ensure quality control of all maintenance work?
          (3) What monitoring procedures have been established to differentiate works required under new vehicle guarantees, i.e., Tangara rolling stock and scheduled maintenance of existing non-Tangara stock?
          (4) How are relevant staff informed of such procedures?
          (5) What system of total quality management has been established as part of the MainTrain contract?
          (6) Is this system accepted by the Australian Standards Organisation?
          Answer—
          (1) The contract with A. Goninan and Co. is for a 10-year period.
          (2) State Rail Quality Assurance staff will monitor quality on an on-going basis.
          (3) State Rail's computer database holds details of all new carriages and associated components which allows State Rail to differentiate between warranty and overhaul work.
          (4) Staff are trained in the standard procedures which are in place.
          (5) and (6) The contract with A. Goninan and Co. requires MainTrain to become accredited to the Australian Quality Standard AS 3902. MainTrain is to have a total quality management system and continuous improvement program which can be externally audited.

      *163 PRIVATE HOSPITAL LICENSEES—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) What reservations does the NSW Department of Health hold in respect of Mr Dennis Michael Brown, the Chief Executive Officer of Hospitals of AME, to be a licensee of a private hospital?
          (2) What reservations did the NSW Department of Health express about NME Inc., or any subsidiary, or associated company, or the officers, or employees of any of those organisations, in its submission to Justice Yeldham in his consideration of the application of AME Hospitals Pty Ltd for a licence in respect of a proposed private hospital to be known as St George Private Medical Complex at Kogarah?

      Page 503
          Answer—
          (1) Mr Dennis Brown, Chief Executive Officer of AME Hospitals Pty Limited, is not a licensee of a private hospital. He however, is a director of a company that is a licensee of a number of private hospitals. The Department of Health submitted certain material to Mr Yeldham, Q.C., the Director-General's delegate, to determine whether AME Hospitals Pty Limited should be granted an approval in principle licence for St George Private Hospital complex. This included material concerning an NME Inc. hospital in Singapore at which Mr Brown was then Chief Executive Officer. This material related to circumstances surrounding the death of an Australian citizen, Peter Wynne, at the hospital and questions raised by the father of the deceased, Dr M. Wynne, about quality assurance practices and business practices of the Singapore Hospital and Mr Brown's responses to Dr Wynne in respect of those practices.
          (2) The NSW Department of Health submitted to the delegate, Mr Yeldham, Q.C., that based on evidence of its activities as a provider of hospital and health services in the U.S., NME Inc., as a majority shareholder in Australian Medical Enterprises Limited which owns AME Hospitals Pty Limited, was in a position to influence AME Hospitals Pty Limited as licensee. As a consequence of the material put before him concerning NME Inc.'s activities in the U.S., Mr Yeldham imposed conditions on the grant of a licence to AME Hospitals Pty Limited, designed to isolate AME Limited and its subsidiary licensee from the influence of NME Inc.

      *164 HYDROTHERAPY SERVICES—WENTWORTH AREA HEALTH SERVICE—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) Has any provision been made for a pain clinic and hydrotherapy services in the redevelopment of Nepean District Hospital?
          (2) What resources are available for pain sufferers in Wentworth Area Health Service?
          (3) What is the waiting times for patients from the Wentworth Area at the nearest pain clinic?
          Answer—
          (1) No dedicated Pain Clinic is planned at the Phase 1 upgrading of Nepean Hospital which will be commissioned during 1994.
          The Wentworth Area Health Service will monitor the need for establishment of such a dedicated clinic in line with other health need priorities of the community.
          A modern and well-equipped hydrotherapy pool is located at Governor Phillip Special Hospital and this facility adequately caters for the needs of the local community and an additional pool at Nepean Hospital is not justified.
          (2) The resources available for pain sufferers in Wentworth Area Health Service can be summarised as follows:
            (a) ACUTE SHORT-TERM PAIN:
              This is managed within the acute hospitals, usually through the Emergency Department. Methods for dealing with this kind of pain include oral medications, parenteral injections, suppositories, topical applications and patient controlled analgesia through intravenous pumps under medical supervision.


      Page 504
            (b) ACUTE LONG-TERM PAIN:
              This is usually associated with cancers, and can be managed in clients' homes with the assistance of Oncology and Palliative Care specialists. Methods for dealing with this kind of pain include self-administration or carer administration of oral, topical parenteral, or rectal medications, use of a syringe-driven pump to deliver a constant amount of analgesia parenterally; or any additional methods which clients may choose including alternatives such as relaxation techniques. Medication administration is taught and supervised by nurse specialists on Palliative Care Teams.
            (c) CHRONIC PAIN:
              This is often associated with back and neck pain, and clients are usually referred for assessment to the Pain Clinic at Westmead Hospital. In addition to the use of medications as outlined above, clients can also use more physiotherapy, relaxation techniques, and may also use trans-epidermal nerve stimulating (TENS) machines.
              TENS machines are freely available from large pharmacies and may also be requested through the Program of Appliances for Disabled People (PADP) scheme.
          (3) The nearest Pain Clinic for residents of Wentworth Area Health Service is located at Westmead Hospital.
          Those patients suffering acute short and long-term pain are seen immediately. Other patients, at present, are scheduled according to clinical need, as the process of treatment is lengthy and thus only a limited number of patients can be accepted for the available places.

      *165 BUILDING CONTRACTS—TIMBER SPECIFICATIONS—Mr Sullivan asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
          (1) Does the Government specify in building and other contracts it lets that only plantation-sourced or renewable timber can be used?
          (2) If not, why not?
          (3) Is the Government encouraging local government bodies, State owned corporations and authorities and other organisations to specify only plantation-sourced or renewable timber in building and other contracts they let out?
          (4) If not, why not?
          Answer—
          (1) Where the order quantities specified are large enough to make source certifcation viable, all tenders issued by the State Contracts Control Board since November 1990 have required that timbers not be used unless either plantation grown or timber from sustained yield forests. Government bodies which contract independently of the State Contracts Control Board rely on similar procedures where practicable.
          (2) Answered in answer (1) above.
          (3) In order to raise awareness on timber utilisation issues, the National Parks and Wildlife Service has published its policy to avoid and promote the avoidance of the purchase or consumption of rainforest derived timbers of both Australian and overseas origin.
          (4) Answered in answer (3) above.


      Page 505
      *166 SKIN CARE CENTRE—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) Has the Skin Cancer Centre, which has "expanded its services to Bondi Junction", any connection with the NSW Department of Health?
          (2) If so, what are these connections?
          (3) Is it true that "the Skin Cancer Centre has all the state-of-the-art detection and treatment equipment and is linked to a specialised pathology laboratory and plastic surgery services"?
          (4) Are any of these specialised pathology laboratory or plastic surgery services involved with or provided by any unit of the NSW Department of Health?
          Answer—
          (1) No.
          (2) Not applicable.
          (3) The NSW Health Department is not in a position to comment on the facilities that a private centre maintains, nor on the links that the facility claims to have with laboratories or other services.
          (4) Patients from any private facility may be referred to facilities run by the NSW Health Department. However, this would be through normal referral patterns and no formalised connection exists between the Department and these centres.

      *171 FIREARMS LICENCES—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) How many people in each police district held:
            (a) pistol licences;
            (b) shooters licences;
          in:
              (i) 1990/91?
              (ii) 1991/92?
              (iii) 1992/93?
          (2) How many people in each police district currently hold:
            (a) Pistol licences?
            (b) Licences to possess longarms?
          (3) (a) Since 1 May 1992, how many applications have been received for firearms licences in each category?
            (b) In each category, how many applications were:
              (i) Approved?
              (ii) Refused?
          (4) Since 1 May 1992, how many firearms licences have been revoked?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Commissioner of Police that:
          (1) The dissection requested by Mr Anderson is not available. However, the following details are provided on a statewide basis:
            On 30 June 1991 there were 210,299 current shooter's licences and 8,541 current pistol licences/permits.
            On 30 June 1992 there were 171,630 current shooter's licences and 7,068 current pistol licences/permits.
            On 30 June 1993 there were 179,924 current shooter's licences and 8,527 current pistol licences/permits.

      Page 506
          (2) (a) 10,203 current licences and permits for pistols as at 28 February 1994.
            (b) 178,733 current shooter's licences as at 28 February 1994.
          (3) (a) Between 1 May 1992 and 11 March 1994, 162,391 applications for shooter's licences, 4,963 applications for pistol licences/permits, 104 applications for dealer's licences and 538 applications for prohibited weapons permits have been received.
            (b) (i) Between 1 May 1992 and 11 March 1994, 147,820 applications for shooter's licences, 4,047 applications for pistol licences/permits, 90 applications for dealer's licences and 343 applications for prohibited weapons permits were approved.
              (ii) Between 1 May 1992 and 11 March 1994, 1,445 applications for shooter's licences, 174 applications for pistol licences/permits, 1 application for dealer's licence and 16 applications for prohibited weapons permits were refused.
          (4) Across the variety of licences and permits a total of 1,410 revocations have occurred as at 28 February 1994.

      *173 PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PROTOCOL STAFF—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          What are the duties of each of the 17 public relations and protocol staff within the Department of Corrective Services?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answer to the honourable member's question is:
          There are seven positions only in the Department of Corrective Services Public Relations Unit. Its role and responsibilities—which include the handling of freedom of information requests—are set out in the Departments annual report.

      *174 PRISONS JOBS—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) How many positions were cut from New South Wales prisons:
            (a) In 1992/93?
            (b) In the present financial year to date?
          (2) How many of those positions were filled at the time?
          (3) What savings will be achieved as a result of the cuts?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) Restructuring within the Department continues, resulting in a number fo reclassifications and transfers. For example, as a result of the opening of Junee Correctional Centre in July 1993, 600 inmates were transferred there from the publicly managed correctional institutions and several correctional centres were subsequently restructured and reclassified. Adjustments to the staffing levels were discussed with, and subsequently endorsed, by the relevant union. The Department of Corrective Services assumed responsibility for court security between
      Page 507
      April and June 1993, which resulted in the establishment of 119 positions in that area. A further 117 positions were established to enable the Department to progressively assume responsibility for court transport from November 1993 to January 1994.
          Departmental staff are classified in three categories, custodial, industrial and non-custodial. The custodial category includes custodial officers employed in the Department. The industrial category includes staff employed in and with Corrective Services Industries. The non-custodial category includes all other officers.
            1 July 1988 2,236 custodial, 287 industrial, 1,245.23 non-custodial
            1 July 1989 2,392 custodial, 295 industrial, 1,328.82 non-custodial
            1 July 1990 2,288 custodial, 331 industrial, 1,273.36 non-custodial
            1 July 1991 2,586 custodial, 420 industrial, 1,468.10 non-custodial
            1 July 1992 2,879 custodial, 446 industrial, 1,053.02 non-custodial
            1 July 1993 2,907 custodial, 446 industrial, 1,043.49 non-custodial
          The decimal point/part numbers for non-custodial staff are aggregates of positions which are less than full-time.
          (2) Officers who occupied positions which were deleted were transferred to other positions within the Department.
          (3) Any savings from the deletion of positions have been allocated to other programs.

      *175 CORRESPONDENCE—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) Why has the Minister for Justice not provided a substantive reply to the following correspondence:
            (a) Re: Prisoner Gary John O'Brien, which was sent on 27 July 1993, receipt acknowledged on 9 August 1993?
            (b) Re: Prisoner Lance Chapman, which was sent on 3 August 1993, receipt acknowledged on 20 August 1993?
            (c) Re: Prisoner David John Lewthwaite, which was sent on 3 August 1993, receipt acknowledged on 20 August 1993?
          (2) When will substantive replies to these letters be forthcoming?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) and (2) A response to the correspondence has been sent to the honourable member for Peats.

      *176 SPEED CAMERAS—NEWCASTLE AND MAITLAND—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) At what locations are speed cameras used in the Newcastle and Maitland police districts?
          (2) In what patrols are each of the locations?
          (3) What are the number of infringements at each location since November 1992 until the year ending 1993?
          (4) Of the locations where speed cameras are being used, what are the number of accidents for each year 1991, 1992, and to December 1993, and is this the basis for their locations?

      Page 508
          (5) Are any more sites being considered in each patrol where speed is prevalent and police are unable to chase speeding motorists because of the danger?
          (6) If not, why not?
          (7) Are the present locations of speed cameras predominantly on main roads or major arterial roads?
          (8) Will areas of high complaint and potential danger be considered?
          (9) What is the criteria for location of speed cameras?
          Answer—
          (1) to (4) Crash Statistics form part of the criteria.

      LocationPatrolFrames
      Detected
      Accidents
      1991-93
      Darby Street, Cooks Hill (2 sites)Newcastle 12
      2
      25
      Lambton Road, Broadmeadow (2 sites)Hamilton 622
      340
      25
      Lambton Road, New Lambton (2 sites)Hamilton 85
      43
      24
      Hannell Street, Maryville (4 sites)Newcastle 132
      28
      Nil
      Nil
      30
      Main Road 217, Argenton (Lake Road) (2 sites)CharlestownNil
      36
      15
      Main Road 217, Boolaroo (T.C. Frith Ave) (2 sites)Charlestown 42
      173
      1
      Main Road 217, Toronto (2 sites)Toronto 8
      1,377
      6
      Maitland Road, Islington (Pacific Highway) (2 sites)Hamilton 69
      26
      20
      Maitland Road, Mayfield (Pacific Highway) (2 sites)Mayfield 86
      319
      143
      Main Road 223 (2 sites)WallsendNil
      11
      52
      Macquarie Road, Cardiff (2 sites)WallsendNil
      2
      29
      King Street, Warners Bay (2 sites)Charlestown 4
      2
      28
      The Esplanade, Speers Point (2 sites)Charlestown 112
      12
      19
      Burwood Road, Kahibah (2 sites)Charlestown 1
      17
      4
        Page 509
        Warners Bay Road (2 sites)
      Charlestown 12
      8
      34
      Pacific Highway, Gateshead (2 sites)Charlestown 40
      232
      38
      Pacific Highway Belmont (2 sites)Belmont 823
      247
      117
      Wommara Avenue, Belmont (2 sites)Belmont Nil
      1
      6
          (5) At this stage, no additional locations have been identified by supervisors. Highway Patrol Supervisors at each patrol monitor crash records to identify any "black spot" locations which might meet the criteria for speed camera operations.
          (6) See response to (5).
          (7) and (8) Yes.
          (9) These locations must have a crash risk factor exceeding 110 crashes per 100 million vehicular kilometres travelled per annum and; meet either one of two severity index factors.

      *177 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) If there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
          Answer—
          (1) NSW PUBLIC WORKS
          As part of the Floodplain Management Voluntary Purchase Scheme, Public Works has provided grants to council for the voluntary purchase of Moorebank properties in the Georges River flood zone.
          Public Works is constructing the Chipping Norton Lake Scheme, most of which is in the Moorebank electorate. The scheme consists of foreshore parks and recreational waterway facilities.
          PORTS
          The MSB Waterways Authority is responsible for the safe navigation and provision and maintenance of navigation aids on the southern shore of the Georges River from Sandy Point to Warwick Farm.
          The services and facilities proved are navigation beacons and speed limit and advisory signs. The Boating Service Officer for the Georges River patrols the river from Sandy Point to Warwick Farm including the Chipping Norton Lakes Scheme.

      Page 510
          (2) NSW PUBLIC WORKS
          Two staff from Public Works' MetSouth Region have 50 per cent of their work time directly associated with the provision of support to the schemes. The equivalent of one Head Office staff member is also directly associated with work on the schemes.
          PORTS
          One Boating Service Officer.
          (3) PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

      Financial YearChipping Norton Lake SchemeFloodplain Management Voluntary Purchase
      Scheme
      Budget Projection ($000's)Actual Expenditure ($000's)Budget Projection ($000's)Actual Expenditure ($000's)
      1990/911,3701,773600738
      1991/921,125750700709
      1992/934606547001,139
      1993/94370— 1,200—
          PORTS

      1990/91Nil
      1991/92$2,000Replace flood damaged pile.
      1992/93$1,000Replace signage at Sandy Point, Pleasure Point and Voyager Point.
      1993/94$30,000Provision of new navigation aids.
          (4) NSW PUBLIC WORKS
          No new/additional services and facilities are foreseen.
          PORTS
          The provision of six new navigation beacons and piles at Voyager Point and Deepwater at Hammondville at a cost of $30,000.
          (5) NSW PUBLIC WORKS
          There has been a steady decrease in expenditure on the Chipping Norton Lake Scheme as development areas are completed and then transferred to councils for ongoing management. There has been an increase in the allocation of funds to Liverpool Council to allow it to accelerate the implementation of its Floodplain Management Scheme.
          PORTS
          There has been an increase in expenditure since 1990/91.


      Page 511
      *178 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within the portfolio areas of the Attorney General?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) If there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
          Answer—
          Legal Aid Commission
          (1) The Legal Aid Commission has two branch offices at Liverpool and Bankstown which serve the constituents in the electorate of Moorebank. Free legal advice is available, by appointment, to constituents wishing to see a solicitor at these branch offices or from any other metropolitan branch office. Legal representation is available to constituents who satisfy the eligibility criteria for a grant of legal aid.
          (2) Staff at the Liverpool and Bankstown offices are directly involved in service provision. However, cases or work conducted by private practitioners is administered by staff at head office.
          It is not possible to identify the number of staff directly servicing the legal needs of the constituents of the electorate of Moorebank.
          (3) (a) to (d) The Commission does not break down its expenditure by electorate or by office. It is therefore impossible to provide this information.
          (4) The Commission is maintaining its level of service to Moorebank constituents. The Commission is currently developing its corporate plan which will identify the Commission's functional objectives over the next 3 years.
          (5) Not applicable.
          Public Trustee
          (1) The Public Trustee provides a will making, estate administration and power of attorney service within the Moorebank area.
          (2) There are 11 staff directly associated with the provision of those services.
          (3) (a) 1990/91 Projected $512,500 Actual $382,406
            (b) 1991/92 Projected $399,150 Actual $380,514
            (c) 1992/93 Projected $420,775 Actual $422,802
            (d) 1993/94 Projected $471,775
          (4) There will be no new/additional services and facilities provided during 1993/94.
          (5) There has been no decline in expenditure.


      Page 512
          Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions
          (1) The Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions has two regional offices which would serve the electorates of Moorebank, Campbelltown and Liverpool.
          (2) The Campbelltown office has 20 staff, Liverpool has 22.
          (3) The Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions does not break down its expenditure by electorate or by office. It is therefore impossible to provide this information.
          (4) No new or additional services are planned for the area in the current financial year.
          (5) Not applicable.

      *179 BUSH FIRES—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) Has there been an enquiry into the cause of near fatal bushfires in the Hawkes Nest and Myall Lakes National Park?
          (2) If not, will he commence an investigation?
          (3) If so, will he make the final report public?
          (4) Will officers of his administration review the preparedness of that community to cope with the fire?
          (5) Are any monies owing to the local fire authorities to ensure they have sufficient resources?
          Answer—
          (1) Although the fires at Myall Lakes, Pipers Creek and Hawks Nest gave rise to a suspicion that they were deliberately lit, there is no firm evidence in this regard. Internal investigations were conducted by the Services which had jurisdiction for those areas.
          Police inquiries were made into the fires which occurred near Hawks Nest and Pipers Creek. However, no evidence was forthcoming which substantiated claims that they had been deliberately lit.
          (2) No, as there is insufficient evidence to warrant an investigation.
          (3) Not applicable.
          (4) Officers of the Department of Bush Fire Services have spoken with the Fire Control Officer, Great Lakes Council, to ascertain what local action is proposed as a result of these fires.
          In relation to the Myall Lakes area, the council intends to ensure that the fire trail system which protects the area is maintained.
          In relation to the Hawks Nest area, a fire trail is to be established to protect the areas adjacent to the caravan park from nearby forests and the fire trail will link to other already maintained areas which have been established to protect the caravan park.
          (5) There are no monies owing to Great Lakes Council. When the council arranges the upgrade of three bush fire brigade stations and the construction of two new fire stations the council will lodge a claim on the Bush Fire Fighting Fund.

      *180 SYDENHAM RAILWAY STATION—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) When is Sydenham Railway Station to be considered for funding as an "easy access" station?
          (2) Why was such a major interchange not on the Department's priority list in the first 33 "easy access" stations?


      Page 513
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) Sydenham Station will be considered for easy access when funding becomes available.

      *183 LIVERPOOL TRAIN SERVICES—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) How many fast trains are scheduled for weekday mornings for Liverpool to Sydney services between the hours of 6 a.m. and 9 a.m.?
          (2) How many all stations trains are scheduled for the same period?
          (3) What is the average time of the journey for each type of service?
          (4) How many fast trains are scheduled for Sydney to Liverpool services between the hours of 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.?
          (5) How many all stations trains are scheduled for the same period of time?
          (6) What is the average time of the journey for each type of service?
          Answer—
          (1) 14.
          (2) 3.
          (3) Approximately 48 and 57 minutes respectively.
          (4) 12.
          (5) 2.
          (6) Approximately 48 and 57 minutes respectively.

      *186 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Health—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) If there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
          Answer—
          (1) to (5) Health services and facilities are not provided on an electorate basis. The electorate of Moorebank is part of the South Western Sydney Area Health Service (SWSAHS), and thus residents of Moorebank have access to all the services and facilities provided by the South Western Sydney Area Health Service.

      Page 514
          In 1992/93 the South Western Sydney Area Health Service:
          • provided services in 6 public general hospitals, 3 public nursing homes, 12 Community Health Centres and 22 Early Childhood Health Centres;
              •employed, on average, 4,977 Full Time Equivalent staff;
              •expended just over $274 million on the provision of health services (gross operating payments);
              •provided 90,472 admissions and 1,289,640 non-inpatient occasions of service.
          Recent initiatives that have benefited all residents of the South Western Sydney Area Health Service include:
      • enhancement of palliative care, dental, aged care assessment, mental health, renal, oncology, coronary care and hospital nursing services;
          • the opening of the Caroline Chisholm Unit for Mothers and Babies;
          • the new pathology building at Liverpool Hospital;
          • renovations to the Coronary Care and Intensive Care Departments at Liverpool Hospital.

      *189 COUNTY ROAD—EASTWOOD TO NORTH RYDE—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) When will construction of the County Road between First Avenue, Eastwood, and Herring Road, North Ryde, commence?
          (2) Why is the RTA deliberately diverting traffic from their arterial road network and placing large volumes on to Lovell/Quarry Roads at Ryde which are local roads?
          (3) (a) Does the RTA adhere to its own traffic guidelines?
            (b) If so, why is it breaching those guidelines on Lovell and Quarry Roads?
          (4) Will he direct the RTA to adjust the phasing of the traffic lights on Lane Cove Road entering Quarry Road, and Blaxland Road entering Lovell Road, to reduce traffic flow in those residential streets?
          Answer—
          (1) The need for the proposed County Road between First Avenue/Blaxland Road and Epping Road, which includes the length in question, is being given consideration by the RTA.
          (2) The RTA is not diverting traffic to these local roads.
          (3) (a) Yes. Every effort is made to apply these guidelines consistently, having regard to the varying conditions and circumstances at individual locations.
            (b) Conditions at these locations have been assessed on their merits with a view to providing traffic arrangements most appropriate to cope with prevailing conditions.
          (4) No. The RTA has reduced the time allowed by traffic control signals to motorists wishing to enter Quarry Road from Lane Cove Road.

      *190 ERSKINEVILLE BARRACKS—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Why is the State Rail Authority closing the barracks at Erskineville Station which served country train drivers and guards?
          (2) Will these drivers and guards now be accommodated at a private motel in Chippendale?
          (3) Will taxi transport be provided from Central Station to the motel?
          (4) How does the cost of the new scheme compare with the cost of keeping the Erskineville barracks open?
          (5) Were staff consulted about these changes?
          (6) What will happen to the support staff who serviced the Erskineville barracks?

      Page 515
          Answer—
          (1) Due to occupancy levels below 50 per cent, the State Rail Authority is considering calling for public expressions of interest to determine the cost of providing alternative private accommodation.
          (2) No.
          (3) and (4) Not applicable.
          (5) Yes.
          (6) Two have already accepted voluntary redundancy and the other has been selected to work in the XPLORER depot.

      *191 ENDEAVOUR TRAINS—ILLAWARRA SERVICES—Mr McManus asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Will the new Endeavour trains be servicing the Wollongong/Nowra line?
          (2) If so, from what date is the service expected to commence?
          (3) If not, why not?
          Answer—
          (1) The trains will operate between Dapto and Bomaderry.
          (2) June 1994.
          (3) Not applicable.

      *192 PORT KEMBLA LOCOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE DEPOT—Mr McManus asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Are there any plans to close the Port Kembla locomotive maintenance depot?
          (2) If so:
            (a) Why?
            (b) When would these plans take effect?
          Answer—
          (1) No.
          (2) (a) and (b) Not applicable.

      *193 APPROVED PLACES FOR INSTITUTIONAL PATIENTS—ELECTORATE OF PORT STEPHENS—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
          (1) How many licensed or approved places are there for aged/infirmed or former institutional patients in the electorate of Port Stephens?
          (2) Are these establishments required to have smoke and other forms of alarms?
          (3) Do people who reside in such places have access to a 24-hour telephone service in order to summon help in an emergency?
          (4) Do such establishments lock their doors of an evening?

      Page 516
          (5) How many former psychiatric patients reside in these establishments in the electorate of Port Stephens?
          (6) Are there elderly people residing in such establishments that are considered to be at risk?
          (7) Does the Department conduct regular checks and/or inspections of such establishments?
          (8) If so, how often have these checks and/or inspections been carried out in the past 2 years?
          (9) Does the Department ensure that people in such establishments are receiving adequate and suitable nutrition?
          (10) What other Government agencies carry out welfare and health standard inspection of such establishments?
          (11) Does the Department liaise regularly with other Federal, State and local authorities?
          (12) What is the approximate rent paid per week for a room in such establishments?
          (13) Are you satisfied that the health and welfare of people in such establishments is adequate?
          Answer—
          (1) There are 15 non-Government, licensed residential centres for persons with a disability in the electorate of Port Stephens. These centres include, Federally-funded aged hostels, unfunded aged hostels, funded hostels and group homes for persons with a disability and privately operated residential centres.
          These centres are licensed to accommodate 429 residents.
          (2) All licensed centres are required, as a condition of the licence, to provide a safe environment which includes the provision and maintenance of adequate fire safety equipment and procedures.
          (3) It is a requirement of licensing that all centres be adequately staffed. Where appropriate, provision is made for emergency procedures including immediate staff contact.
          (4) Licensees of residential centres would be in breach of the conditions of their licences if residents were restricted from exercising their right to come and go as they please. However, centres may be made safe at night by locking doors against entry without proper cause.
          (5) These figures are not available.
          (6) Departmental guidelines aim to protect residents at risk.
          (7) Centres are inspected regularly.
          (8) The frequency of inspections is governed by the needs of the residents of the centre and varies from centre to centre.
          (9) It is a condition of the licence that meals are adequate and nutritious. Compliance with this condition is monitored during departmental inspections.
          (10) The Federal Government has responsibilities to inspect funded aged hostels for compliance with funding conditions. Local Government authorities inspect all centres for compliance with their building and health ordinances.
          (11) The Department has involvement with all relevant Federal, State and Local Government authorities.
          (12) It is usual for residents of funded aged hostels and for funded residential centres for persons with disability to pay up to 85 per cent of their pension (and sometimes their rental allowance) for board, lodging and provision of services. Residents in privately operated centres pay varying amounts for board and lodging.
          (13) The Department of Community Services, through the implementation of its licensing program, seeks to ensure that the health and welfare of the residents is appropriately safeguarded.


      Page 517
      *194 CARDIFF RAILWAY STATION—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) When is Cardiff Railway Station to be considered for funding as an "easy access" station?
          (2) Why was the station not on the Department's priority list in the first 33 "easy access" stations?
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) Cardiff Station did not meet the selection criteria for inclusion in the initial programme but may be considered for future disabled access programmes.

      *196 TANGARAS—SYDNEY-NEWCASTLE SERVICE—Mr Price asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) On what date are the modified Tangara trains due to commence service on the Newcastle-Sydney service?
          (2) How many 4-car trains are to be allocated to this service?
          (3) Will these trains be programmed as express (minimum intermediate stopping) services between Sydney and Newcastle?
          (4) If not, what is the intended service roll in any revised timetable?
          Answer—
          (1) to (4) Outer suburban Tangaras from Sydney will only operate as far as Wyong on the Main Northern Line.

      *201 ROCKDALE RAILWAY STATION—Mr Thompson asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) When is Rockdale Railway Station to be considered for funding as an "easy access" station?
          (2) Why was such a major interchange not on the Department's priority list in the first 33 "easy access" stations?
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) Rockdale Station will be considered for easy access when funding becomes available.

      *203 USE OF SPEED CAMERAS IN NEWCASTLE AND MAITLAND—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) What is the frequency and amount of time that speed cameras are used at each individual location in patrols?
          (2) Is there a set criteria for frequency and time span of operation of such cameras?
          (3) Are any cameras used on high complaint areas?


      Page 518
          Answer—
          (1) On average, 2 to 4 hours at each site, dependant upon the prevailing traffic and weather conditions.
          (2) Yes.
          (3) Yes.

      *205 CRIME COMMISSION REPORT ON FRENCHS FOREST—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) Will he now table Inspector-General Wilson's report to him on the Frenchs Forest matter?
          (2) Did senior constable Pirani refuse to be interviewed by the Crime Commission?
          (3) Was the reason given that he was ill?
          (4) As Constable Pirani is the central figure in the Frenchs Forest drug investigation, why didn't the Crime Commission use its cohesive powers to insist on an interview and/or cross-examine his personal psychiatrist?
          (5) Does the Crime Commission's failure in this line of inquiry mean that a police officer simply has to report sick, refer the investigator to the psychiatrist and then not give permission to the psychiatrist to discuss the case to bring that line of inquiry to an end?
          (6) Did this apply to Assistant Commissioner Cole?
          (7) Who were the officers who investigated on behalf of the Crime Commission?
          (8) Are they police officers?
          (9) Are they on secondment?
          (10) If so, do they need to return to the police force in order to further their career?
          (11) Did evidence from Assistant Commissioner Moroney, Detective Senior Sergeant Smith and Detective Sergeant O'Toole show that information was urgently required by Assistant Commissioner Cole for a report to Commissioner Lauer?
          (12) Does evidence show that these reports were required by Assistant Commissioner Cole for a briefing on the shooting for Commissioner Lauer on the morning of 2 July?
          (13) Did that meeting between Cole and Lauer take place?
          (14) Where did it take place?
          (15) Was anybody else present?
          (16) Are there any notes or records of that meeting?
          (17) Is it usual for records to be kept of such senior meetings?
          (18) Are there any missing records?
          (19) Did Cole have the Situation Report dated 1 July?
          (20) Does this report make reference to:
            (a) The need for inquiries and auditing to be conducted throughout the entire "D" district on drug and firearm exhibits currently on hand?
            (b) The possible commission of other offences by serving police officers?
          (21) If so, does the Minister accept that a meeting between Cole and Lauer could not possibly have discussed drug matters to do with the Frenchs Forest Shooting?
          (22) Is there evidence to show that Senior Constable Pirani lives in a million dollar house?
          (23) Did the Crime Commission investigate the origin of the wealth of Senior Constable Pirani?
          (24) What action did the Crime Commission take, or what investigations were made with regard to:
            (a) The stealing of 3 kilograms of cannabis from Frenchs Forest Police Station?
            (b) Allegations that drug squad detectives were involved in the distribution of drugs?
            (c) To follow-up and investigate the Kirribilli premises that were a source of drugs?

      Page 519
          (25) Did the Police Department take action on these Kirribilli premises after Constable Bourke refused to be involved with a controlled drug buy?
          (26) Did the Crime Commission pursue this matter with the Police Department and, if so, what was the result?
          (27) In the last 12 months, what personnel changes have occurred in the drug squads of the North, North West and South West?
          (28) Did any of these changes result from:
            (a) Investigation of irregularities in the drug squads above?
            (b) If so, were concerns expressed about drug security and/or irregularities by the Crime Commission or some other body, individual or group?
          Answer—
          (1) to (28) These matters were the subject of a Report by the Crime Commission, which was tabled in the Parliament. They also received detailed consideration by the Joint Select Committee Upon Police Administration.
          As a member of that Committee, the honourable member had ample opportunity to ask questions about these matters.

      *206 RAILWAY TICKET SALES—ELECTORATE OF LAKE MACQUARIE—Mr Hunter asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) What are the average actual/estimated:
            (a) daily;
            (b) weekly;
          ticket sales for each of the past 5 years at each rail station in the electorate of Lake Macquarie?
          (2) What are the actual/estimated ticket sales for each month of each of the past 5 years at each rail station in the electorate of Lake Macquarie?
          (3) What are the actual ticket sales at each rail station in the electorate of Lake Macquarie on a daily, weekly and monthly basis since the installation of automatic ticket machines at each station?
          (4) What number of staff are assigned to each station:
            (a) Before installation of the ticket machines?
            (b) After installation of the ticket machines?
          Answer—
          (1) to (3) The time taken to compile this data is felt to be too great to justify such an exercise.
          (4) (a) and (b) The hours during which stations are staffed will not change due to the implementation of AFC.

      *207 COFFS HARBOUR COMMISSION OF INQUIRY—Ms Allan asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
          (1) How much is the Department of Public Works spending on legal representation at the Commission of Inquiry into the proposed outfall at Coffs Harbour?
          (2) Has the Department employed any consultants to advise departmental officers and/or legal representatives during the inquiry?
          (3) If so, who are the consultants and how much are they being paid?

      Page 520
          Answer—
          (1) $29,000—funded equally by Public Works and Coffs Habour City Council.
          (2) Yes.
          (3) It should be noted that although Coffs Harbour Council requested Public Works engage the consultants for the purposes of the Commission of Inquiry, the bulk of the consultants' advices would have been required and obtained in the normal course of administration of the Project
      Public Works has made the following specific engagements relevant to the Inquiry:
          Dr Helen Brayshaw (archaeology) and Dr Dennis Bryne $9,000
      Dr Timothy Hagan (effects of blasting) $8,000
          Professor Rod Simpson and Dr Steve Smith (marine fauna) $4,000
          Mr A. Floyd (effect on vegetation) $2,000
      Dr David Fox via Department of Health (health issues) $1,500
          Mr Phil Anderson (marine hydrology) $3,000
          Dr David James (cost benefits of the proposal on options) $3,000

      *208 FUNDING OF ETHNIC GROUPS—ELECTORATE OF MOUNT DRUITT—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice—
          (1) What financial assistance has the Department provided to ethnic groups in the electorate of Mount Druitt?
          (2) What are the names of these organisations?
          (3) What amount of money was provided?
          (4) How much of these funds came from Federal sources?
          Answer—
          (1) The Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs has approved grants totalling $64,000 during the 1993/94 financial year to ethnic community groups in the electorate of Mount Druitt.
          (2) The Western Sydney Turkish Islamic Cultural Centre of Cnr Luxford Road and Hythe Street, Mount Druitt, is in receipt of a grant of $14,000 for the 1994 calendar year under the Ethnic Affairs Commission's Community Advancement Program. The grant is to assist the Centre to provide community welfare services for Muslim communities in western Sydney.
          The Philippine-Australian Community Foundation Inc. of Lot 167, Cnr Duke and Abraham Streets, Rooty Hill, has received approval for a capital grant of $50,000 under the Ethnic Affairs Commission's Community Development Program. The grant will assist the Foundation to build a new office, meeting room and amenities to provide a centre for the social and cultural activities of the Filipino community in the Western Sydney area.
          (3) Western Sydney Turkish Islamic Cultural Centre $14,000
            Philippine-Australian Community Foundation Inc. $50,000
          (4) Both the Community Advancement Program and the Community Development Program are funded entirely by the NSW Government.
          Details of grants in previous years are contained in the annual reports of the Ethnic Affairs Commission which have been tabled in Parliament.


      Page 521
      *209 ANGIOGRAPHY FACILITIES—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) Has Liverpool Hospital ceased carrying out angiograms due to the poor quality of the equipment being utilised?
          (2) Will patients from South Western Sydney requiring an angiogram now have to be transported to Prince Henry Hospital until such time as proper facilities are provided to allow coronary angiograms to be resumed?
          (3) Have negotiations commenced to bring forward the provision of a proper angiography suite?
          (4) (a) Will he take urgent action to provide the necessary funding to allow the angiography suite to be provided during the current financial year?
            (b) If not, why not?
          Answer—
          (1) No. Liverpool Hospital has ceased cardiac (heart) angiograms because the facility being used, which was predominantly purchased for angiography of other parts of the body, was not providing cardiac angiograms of sufficient quality. The equipment is still being used extensively for angiograms of other parts of the body, which are of excellent quality.
          (2) There are current arrangements, for which additional funding has been provided, for patients to be transported to Prince Henry Hospital for cardiac (heart) angiograms. This arrangement will continue until a purpose-built coronary angiography facility is established at Liverpool Hospital.
          (3) and (4) Planning is already advanced for the establishment of a purpose-built coronary angiography suite and it is anticipated that it will be commissioned around September 1994.

      *210 VIOLENCE ORDERS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) How many applications were made at each court house in New South Wales for:
            (a) apprehended violence orders;
            (b) breaches of apprehended violence orders;
            (i) in 1991/2?
            (ii) in 1992/3?
            (iii) in the financial year to date?
          (2) How many of these applications were sought by members of the NSW Police Service?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) I am unable to supply information prior to September 1993 but information collected for the period September to December 1993 shows that:
            (a) a total of 9,718 applications for Aprehended Violence Orders were made in courts in New South Wales, being 2,667 applications for Personal Violence and 7,051 applications for Domestic Violence.
            (b) 1,274 breaches were listed.

      Page 522
          (2) 4,640 applications for orders were made by members of the NSW Police Service, being 3,774 complaints initiated by police and 866 applications made in conjunction with charges. Figures for individual courts are detailed and are separately available to the member.

      *212 SENIOR SERGEANT COLQUHOUN—ALLEGATIONS OF NUDE SUNBATHING—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) (a) Were there any complaints other than the 1990 anonymous complaint about nude sunbathing by Senior Sergeant Tom Colquhoun at the Newcastle Police and Citizens Youth Club?
            (b) If so, what was the complaint, and by whom was it made and by whom and what action, if any, was taken?
          (2) Why was no investigation made of the anonymous complaint about nude sunbathing and to whom was this anonymous complaint sent?
          (3) Who investigated the anonymous complaint?
          (4) What was the name, rank and location of such person or persons?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) No, there were no other complaints about nude sunbathing.
          (b) Not applicable.
          (2) The anonymous complaint was sent to seven members of Parliament including the previous Minister and the Ombudsman. A preliminary investigation was made about the nude sunbathing.
          (3) Chief Superintendent P. E. Carter.
          (4) Chief Superintendent P. E. Carter, Regd No. 10000, Commander Police Citizens Youth Club Command, Federation of Police Citizens' Youth Clubs, 169-175 Liverpool Street, Sydney.

      *216 SENIOR SERGEANT COLQUHOUN—ANONYMOUS COMPLAINT—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) Who conducted the preliminary inquiries into the anonymous complaint against Senior Sergeant Colquhoun?
          (2) What was the name, rank and location of the person or persons who conducted the preliminary inquiry?
          (3) What were the specifics of the complaint made against Senior Sergeant Colquhoun?
          (4) Was the 1990 complaint similar in any way to complaints made by the member for Charlestown and the Committee of the Lake Macquarie Police Citizens Youth Club in 1991 to the Ombudsman?
          (5) If there was some commonality between both complaints, why was no action taken until the subsequent complaints in 1992 by Constable Wright and Constable MacPherson?
          (6) What was the basis of the reply in 1990 to the Ombudsman for not proceeding?
          (7) What was the basis of the reply to the 1991 complaint to the Ombudsman as to why no inquiry was held into the activities of Senior Sergeant Colquhoun?
          (8) Is it now evident that much of the 1990 and 1991 complaint is the basis of the charges and continuing investigations into the activities of Senior Sergeant Colquhoun?
          (9) Why did Chief Superintendent Perce Carter continue to protect Senior Sergeant Colquhoun?


      Page 523
          Answer—
          (1) to (2) Chief Superintendent P. E. Carter, Regd No. 10000, 169-175 Liverpool Street, Sydney.
          (3) General allegations of lack of ability, abuse of position, drinking on duty and illegal use of club equipment.
          (4) Yes.
          (5) Action was taken to investigate both matters.
          (6) The Ombudsman decided in early 1991 not to take any action because suitable means of redress was available to the anonymous complainants through the proceedings of the Government and Related Employees Appeals Tribunal.
          (7) I am unaware of a further complaint to the Ombudsman in 1991. Dealings with the Ombudsman on this anonymous complaint were in late 1990 and early 1991.
          (8) There is some overlap in that earlier complaints were revisited and resulted in departmental charges. The only charge admitted related to a 1992 event.
          (9) Chief Superintendent Carter acted on the evidence available to him.

      *217 COURTS ADMINISTRATION MEMO—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) Have staff of the Newcastle Court been advised by memo not to release information or discuss issues relating to court administration with the local members of Parliament?
          (2) If so, when was the memo or instruction issued?
          (3) What were its contents?
          (4) Given concerns raised by a judge about security arrangements during sittings of the Newcastle Court, would the Minister arrange for local members to be briefed on the adequacy of current security measures at the court?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) Yes.
          (2) 9 November 1993.
          (3) Local Courts Circular 1993/17 issued by the Local Courts Administration on 9 November 1993 reminded all Local Courts officers of the longstanding tradition that members of Parliament obtain information by writing to the responsible Minister, or by contacting the Minister's staff. Attached to the Circular was a copy of Premier's Direction 92-32 dated 22 September 1992 concerning the "Provision of Information to Members of Parliament".
          (4) The Clerk of the Court at Newcastle may be contacted by local members for a briefing on the adequacy of current security measures at the court.

      *218 SENIOR POLICE PROMOTIONS—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) What is the current rank of the following police officers:
            (a) Mr B. R. Harding, date of birth, 29 July 1944?
            (b) Mr D. M. Gilligan, date of birth, 13 February 1945?
            (c) Mr J. W. Burke, date of birth, 23 August 1940?

      Page 524
          (2) (a) When were they promoted to the position of Inspector?
            (b) What were their subsequent promotions?
          (3) For each of these promotions:
            (a) Who was Commissioner at the time?
            (b) Did the Police Board approve their promotions?
            (c) What information was before the Police Board when they approved the promotions?
            (d) What input was there from the then Commissioner?
            (e) Was a selection panel used?
            (f) If so, who was on the selection panel?
            (g) (i) Was any information sought from outside the NSW Police Service?
            (ii) If so, what and from where?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) Mr B. R. Harding (date of birth, 13 February 1945) is a Superintendent.
            (b) Mr D. M. Gilligan (date of birth, 29 July 1944) is a Chief Superintendent.
            (c) Mr J. W. Burke is a Chief Inspector.
          (2) (a) Mr Harding was promoted from Senior Sergeant to Superintendent on 15 March 1989.
              Mr Gilligan was promoted to Inspector on 27 April 1988.
              Mr Burke was promoted to Inspector on 27 July 1988.
            (b) Mr Harding has not been promoted beyond the rank of Superintendent.
              Mr Gilligan has had two promotions to Superintendent and Chief Superintendent.
              Mr Burke is now a Chief Inspector.
          (3) Mr Harding's promotion to Superintendent
            (a) Mr A. D. M. Graham, Acting Commissioner.
            (b) The Board recommended the promotion to the Hon. E. P. Pickering, M.L.C.
            (c) Advertisement for position; written applications of the candidates and their individual performances at interview; service histories; Internal Affairs reports; referees comments.
            (d) The Acting Commissioner was a member of the Board which conducted the interviews for the position.
            (e) The Board was the selection panel.
            (f) Sir Gordon Jackson, Sir Harold Knight and Mr A. D. M. Graham.
            (g) (i) and (ii) Unable to determine from Board's records.
            Mr Gilligan's promotion to Inspector
            (a) Mr A. D. M. Graham, Acting Commissioner.
            (b) The then Board, Sir Maurice Byers, Sir Gordon Jackson and Mr A. D. M. Graham, recommended the promotion to the Hon. G. Paciullo, M.P.
            (c) Selection Committee report, Internal Affairs report, referees comments and the Acting Commissioner's submission to the Board.
            (d) The Acting Commissioner advised in his submission his intention to discuss the appointment at a Board meeting. The exact nature of this advice is unknown.
            (e) Yes.
            (f) Chief Superintendent D. W. A. Kelly (Convenor), Superintendent D. H. Jackson (second member) and Mr D. Lee (third member).
            (g) (i) and (ii) Unable to determine from Board records.

      Page 525
            Mr Gilligan's promotion to Superintendent
            (a) Mr J. K. Avery.
            (b) The Board recommended the promotion to the Hon. E. P. Pickering, M.L.C.
            (c) Advertisement for position, the candidates' written applications and performance at interview, service histories, Internal Affairs reports and comments by referees.
            (d) The Commissioner was a member of the Board which conducted the interviews for the position.
            (e) The Board was the selection panel.
            (f) Sir Gordon Jackson, Sir Harold Knight, Mr J. K. Avery and Mr A. D. M. Graham.
            (g) (i) and (ii) There is no Board record of any such information being sought.
            Mr Gilligan's promotion to Chief Superintendent
            (a) Mr J. K. Avery.
            (b) The Board recommended the promotion to the Hon. E. P. Pickering, M.L.C.
            (c) Advertisements for the position, the written applications of the candidates and their performance at interview, service histories, Internal Affairs reports and comments by referees.
            (d) The Commissioner was a member of the Board which conducted the interview.
            (e) The Board was the selection panel.
            (f) Sir Gordon Jackson and Commissioner Avery.
            (g) (i) and (ii) There is no Board record of any such information being sought.
            Mr Burke's promotion to Inspector
            (a) Mr J. K. Avery.
            (b) The then Board, Sir Maurice Byers, Sir Gordon Jackson and Mr J. K. Avery, recommended the promotion to the Hon. E. P. Pickering, M.L.C.
            (c) Selection Committee report and all applications received, Internal Affairs report, referees comments and the Commissioner's submission to the Board.
            (d) The Commissioner endorsed the Committee's report and recommended, subject to medical fitness, the appointment of Senior Sergeant J. W. Burke.
            (e) Yes.
            (f) Superintendent V. F. Shaw (Convenor), Chief Inspector J. P. Toohey (second member) and Ms M. J. Clark.
            (g) (i) and (ii) There is no Board record on any such information being sought.
            Mr Burke's promotion to Chief Inspector
            (a) Mr A. D. M. Graham, Acting Commissioner.
            (b) The then Board, Sir Gordon Jackson, Sir Harold Knight and Mr A. D. M. Graham, recommended the promotion to the Hon. E. P. Pickering, M.L.C.
            (c) Selection Committee report and all applications, Internal Affairs report, referees comments and the Acting Commissioner's submission to the Board.
            (d) The Acting Commissioner endorsed the Committee's report and recommended that subject to medical fitness, the appointment of Inspector Burke.
            (e) Yes.
            (f) Superintendent W. J. Collins (Convenor), Superintendent R. J. Anderson (second member) and Mr P. Synott.
            (g) (i) and (ii) There is no Board record of any such information being sought.


      Page 526
      *222 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within the portfolio areas of Housing and Planning?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
          Answer—
          I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) Department of Housing
            The Department of Housing does not record its services by electorate. Until 31 October 1993, the electorate of Moorebank was part of the Department's former Southern Metropolitan Region which comprised the local government areas of Bankstown, Canterbury, Hurstville, Sutherland, Rockdale, Kogarah, Liverpool, Campbelltown, Camden and Wollondilly.
            The Department is currently being restructured and as from 1 November 1993 the electorate of Moorebank falls within the Department's South Western Sydney Regional Housing Office's area of responsibility which includes the local government areas of Liverpool, Fairfield, Campbelltown, Camden and Wollondilly.
            The South Western Sydney Regional Housing Office provides a range of housing services for Department of Housing tenants and applications within the electorate of Moorebank.
            These services are provided by staff at offices located at Miller, Liverpool, Macquarie Fields and Minto which are within reasonable access from all parts of the electorate. The services provided from these offices include rental collection, tenancy management, maintenance, rental assistance, applications and allocations, general housing enquiries, community housing services, priority housing, crisis housing, and so on.
            Water Board
            Water and wastewater facilities.
            Property Services Group
            The Property Services Group's Land Division comprises Landcom and the Business Land group (formerly Macarthur Development Corporation). Landcom has supplied serviced residential home sites. The Business Land Group (BLG) has had an ongoing role of developing Government-owned industrial land in the Minto and Ingleburn Industrial Estates since 1973. The BLG has constructed roads and extended service mains to provide fully serviced industrial lots to promote economic growth in the region.


      Page 527
          (2) Department of Housing
            The former Southern Metropolitan Region had a staff establishment of 250 staff providing these services as well as administrative support. The staff establishment for the new South Western Sydney Regional Housing Office is being finalised.
            Water Board
            Approximately 16 staff.
            Property Services Group
            6 staff.
          (3) Department of Housing
            The following figures relate to the General Operating Budget, Maintenance and Upgrading Budget and the Rental Assistance Scheme Budget for the Department's former Southern Metropolitan Regional Office.
                  Approximate Projection Expenditure
            (a) 1990/91 $30,002,414 $29,102,873
            (b) 1991/92 $32,449,703 $33,045,393
            (c) 1992/93 $35,648,180 $35,533,917
            (d) The new figures below represent a pro rata distribution of funds to reflect the new Regional boundaries and do not present a decrease in real items for clients in the South Western Sydney Region.
                  Approximate Projection Expenditure
              1993/94 $17,365,067 $17,365,067 (estimate)
            Construction and acquisition works undertaken in the Moorebank electorate during this period include:
                •Nuwarra Road, Moorebank—23 pensioner units, cost $1.2 million, completed March 1991.
                •Cooper Street, Moorebank—6 townhouses, cost $1 million, completed March 1991.
                •Heathcote Road, Moorebank—122 townhouses, cost $1.4 million, completed May 1992.
            Water Board
            (a) 1990/91 $0.904 million
            (b) 1991/92 $0.878 million
            (c) 1992/93 $0.911 million
            (d) 1993/94 $0.821 million (Budget)
            Property Services Group
            The details for Landcom are as follows:
                    Budget Projections Actual Expenditure
            (a) 1990/91 $145,000$1,300,604
            (b) 1991/92 $1,415,000$366,909
            (c) 1992/93 $5,000$857,141
            (d) 1993/94 Nil
            The details for the Business Land Group are as follows:
                    Budget Projections Actual Expenditure
            (a) 1990/91 $6,741,000$7,365,366
            (b) 1991/92 $5,040,000$2,080,534
            (c) 1992/93 $1,221,000$1,473,442
            (d) 1993/94 $455,000$310,330*
            * Year to date.


      Page 528
          (4) Department of Housing
            The Department will continue to provide the full range of housing services mentioned in answer (1) for the residents of the electorate of Moorebank.
            The current restructuring of the Department is aimed at improving the provision of client services and will lead to improved planning and co-ordination of services to ensure they are more responsive to local needs.
            Already, alternative rent collection methods have been introduced through a voluntary rent reduction scheme with the Department of Social Security and the commencement of a pilot scheme with Australia Post.
            Water Board
            During 1993/94, the Water Board is installing water and sewer infrastructure to service the Wattlegrove Development. This development is being completed in stages with the final project not being completed until after 1994.
            Also in 1993/94, the Water Board will be installing a 600 mm water main from Minto to Ingleburn Reservoir to improve water quality.
            Property Services Group
            No new or additional services and facilities will be provided by Landcom. With the present slow industrial property market, it is envisaged that no new works will be undertaken by the BLG as present demand for such sites can be met with existing serviced stock.
          (5) Department of Housing
            There has been no decline in overall expenditure.
            Water Board
            Expenditure in the Moorebank electorate has declined only marginally since 1990/91. This occurred due to productivity improvements, not reduction in services.
            Property Services Group
            Landcom's stock of serviceable land in the electorate of Moorebank is almost exhausted. The remaining land available is being investigated for development under the current planning legislation.
            A decline in expenditure by the BLG has been directly related to reduced demand for industrial land since 1990/91.

      *223 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?


      Page 529
          Answer—
          PACIFIC POWER
          (1) Pacific Power's assets within the electorate of Moorebank comprise a 330 kV substation (Ingleburn Substation) situated off Kent Street, Minto, and a number of 330 kV transmission lines.
          The Substation provides electricity at 66,000 volts to Prospect Electricity for distribution in the local area.
          (2) Maintenance staff attend the substation and transmission lines from time-to-time. There are no staff located in the area, however, and there are no external services or facilities available.
          (3) Not applicable.
          (4) Not applicable.
          (5) Nor applicable.
          OFFICE OF ENERGY
          (1) The service provided is reticulated electricity supply by Prospect Electricity. Associated with this service are concessions for pensioners and users of life support systems to assist with the cost of the electricity supply.
          In addition, welfare agencies distribute (on behalf of the Government) vouchers under the Energy Accounts Payment Assistance (EAPA) scheme. The EAPA scheme is targeted at underprivileged householders and allows the agencies discretion to provide vouchers ($30 value) which can be redeemed against electricity accounts.
          (2) It is not possible to accurately state the number of staff directly associated with the provision of the above services at an electorate level.
          (3) The cost of the provision of electricity supply and discounts available to pensioners and life support system users is not maintained by Prospect Electricity on an electoral area basis.
          The amount of EAPA assistance provided (or expected to be provided) to residents of the electorate has been estimated as follows:
      1990/91 1991/92 1992/93 1993/94
              $90,000 $169,200 $192,600$205,200
                  (4) Apart from providing electricity supply where requested, no new or additional services are planned.
          (5) Expenditure in providing electricity supply is budgeted on a needs basis. It is therefore meaningless to compare expenditure from year-to-year.
          As can be seen from the above figures the expenditure on the EAPA scheme has increased each year from 1990/91.

      *224 MARITIME SERVICES BOARD—ENTERPRISE AGREEMENT—Mr Langton asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
          (1) Will the new enterprise agreement being drafted by the Maritime Services Board lead to a reduction in emergency response personnel in the Port of Sydney and Port Botany?
          (2) If so, how many positions will be lost and what are their titles?
          (3) How will the MSB be able to guarantee a continuation of current levels of safety?
          (4) Will the same agreement lead to a reduction in environment inspectors?
          (5) If so, how many positions will be lost?
          (6) How will the MSB be able to guarantee a continuation of current levels of pollution control/monitoring?


      Page 530
          Answer—
          (1) The Enterprise Based Agreement leads to the combining of three groups of people. They are the Support Service Officers who act as land patrol within the port, the Environment Inspectors who attend to the connections of dangerous goods and the Marine Service Officers who provide the marine component of the Sydney Port Authority emergency response. In combining these three groups of people, there will be a reduction in total staff however it will increase productivity and enable cross training and greater skills to be available within the newly designated position of Port Officer.
          (2) Currently in the structure, there are 9 Environment Inspectors, 24 Support Service Officers and 46 Marine Service Officers. The combination of these three groups will lead to a new designation of Port Officer consisting of 60 people—an overall reducation of 19 positions.
          (3) The combination of these groupings will enhance the Authority's ability to attend to emergencies within the port as it will provide a level of personnel to meet all contingencies.
          (4) Although there is no longer a position of Environment Inspector as such, the Port Officer will carry out inspections as required.
          (5) Refer to answer (2) above.
          (6) With combinations of these groupings, the Authority will retain five people in Port Botany and five people in Sydney who will undertake all controlling and provide the emergency response officer for both ports.

      *225 M2 LAND ACQUISITION—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Concerning Roads and Traffic Authority acquisition of land for the proposed M2 tollway, does the RTA comply with the Just Terms legislation?
          (2) How are (if that is the case) Just Terms guaranteed in the M2 acquisition program?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) The Roads and Traffic Authority guarantees just terms by submitting terms of acquision in accordance with section 55 of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms) Act 1991.

      *228 GOVERNMENT CLEANING SERVICE—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
          (1) How many staff are employed by the Government Cleaning Service in the electorate of The Entrance?
          (2) How many are employed in cleaning:
            (a) Schools?
            (b) Police stations?
            (c) Others?
          (3) Which police stations, schools and other Government offices do they service?
          (4) Have all cleaners in the electorate of The Entrance been guaranteed employment if the service is privatised?
          (5) Will all recreation leave, long service leave and superannuation entitlements be paid to them prior to transfer to a new employer?


      Page 531
          Answer—
          (1) There are 57 employees employed by the Government Cleaning Service in the electorate of The Entrance.
          (2) (a) Schools54
            (b) Police Stations2
            (c) Others1
          (3) GCS employees service the following locations:
            Bateau Bay Public School
              Berkeley Vale High School
              Brook Avenue Public School
              Chittaway Bay Public School
              Glenvale Special School
              Glenvale Special School
              North Entrance Annexe
              Holgate Public School
              Hunter Institute of Technology
              Killarney Vale Public School
              Narara Valley High School
              Ourimbah Public School
                              Terrigal High School
                              Terrigal Police School
                              Terrigal Public School
                              The Entrance High School
                              The Entrance Police Station
                              The Entrance Public School
                              Wamberal Public School
                              Wyoming Public School
                              Valley View Public School
                              (4) A condition of the sale is that all regular cleaners and regional staff receive an offer of continuity of employment until 30 June 1995.
          (5) All leave entitlements will be paid to the cleaners on completion of sale which is expected late in January 1994. Superannuation is administered by the State Authorities Superannuation Board. All questions on this subject should be referred to that organisation.

      *232 BUS SERVICES REPLACING RAIL SERVICES—Mr Moss asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) How many private buses were engaged in carrying passengers between railway stations, in lieu of trains, on each metropolitan railway line between July 1992 and June 1993?
          (2) Within that period, how many actual days were buses required on each line?
          (3) What was the total cost for hiring such buses?
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) The information is not readily available and to seek it would require a substantial diversion of resources which cannot be justified.
          (3) $9.822 million.

      *235 AUBURN HOSPITAL—Mr Nagle asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) For what annual throughput of patients was Auburn Hospital designed?
          (2) What are the monthly figures for admissions since the hospital opened?
          (3) Do those figures suggest any conclusions on the provision of public hospital beds and resources for the electorate of Auburn?
          (4) What is the rate of re-admission of patients recovering from acute surgery?
          (5) If the statistics are not available, why not, and will the hospital now undertake to keep these figures from now on?


      Page 532
          Answer—
          (1) Auburn Hospital was commissioned in March 1964 and had 5,739 admissions in 1965, the hospital's first full year of operation. In 1993 the hospital had 12,327 admissions.
          The increase in admissions has been influenced by improved clinical technology and a comprehensive range of domiciliary support services which has resulted in shorter length of stay of patients in hospital whereby the patients can return home but still receive the same degree of post-recovery care.
          (2) Whilst the monthly figures are not available back that far, the annual admission figures are provided hereunder.
                  Year Admitted YearAdmitted
                    1964 3,065 1979 11,915
                    1965 5,739 1980 12,529
                    1966 6,746 1981 12,792
                    1967 6,905 1982 12,558
                    1968 7,430 1983 13,862
                    1969 8,190 1984 12,115
                    1970 9,419 1985 8,973
                    1971 9,584 1986 10,781
                    1972 10,868 1987 Lang Area Health Services
                    1973 11,895 1988 }data not available
                    1974 11,672 1989 10,970
                    1975 11,862 1990 10,710
                    1976 11,678 1991 10,654
                    1977 11,929 1992 11,556
                    1978 11,924 1993 12,327
          (3) The above data clearly indicates the increased activity in line with the growth of the services being provided by the hospital.
          A significant feature is an increase in activity with a reduction in beds brought about by improved medical technology, support services, good bed management practices and overall better utilisation of available resources.
          (4) and (5) For the period covering the last 12 months there were no re-admissions for acute surgery within 1 month.

      *237 SPEED CAMERA LOCATIONS—ELECTORATE OF AUBURN—Mr Nagle asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) At what locations are speed cameras used in the electorate of Auburn?
          (2) In what patrols are each of the locations?
          (3) What are the number of infringements at each location since November 1992 until February 1994?
          (4) Of the locations where speed cameras are being used, what are the number of accidents for each year 1991, 1992 and to December 1993 and is this the basis for their locations?
          (5) Are any more sites being considered in each patrol where speed is prevalent and police are unable to chase speeding motorists because of the danger?
          (6) If not, why not?
          (7) Are the present locations of speed cameras predominantly on main roads or major arterial roads?
          (8) Will areas of high complaint and potential danger be considered?
          (9) What is the criteria for location of speed cameras?

      Page 533
          Answer—
          (1) Parramatta Road between Duck Creek and Station Road for both east and west bound traffic and along Olympic Drive between Church and Boorea Streets for both north and south bound traffic.
          (2) The relevant section of Parramatta Road is within Auburn Patrol and Olympic Drive falls within both Auburn and Flemington Patrols.
          (3) 1,909 infringement notices issued on Parramatta Road from November 1992 to February 1994 and 44 infringement notices issued on Olympic Drive for the same period.
          (4) Year Parramatta Road Olympic Drive
          1991 28 8
            1992 48 8
            1993 116 17
            (5) No additional sites have been proposed at present.
          (6) There are no other sites in the area that meet the criteria for selection.
          (7) Yes.
          (8) Yes, provided they fulfil the necessary criteria for selection.
          (9) In urban areas, the criteria is a crash risk factor in excess of 110 (using the Roads and Traffic Authority database) or 130 (using the Police Service database) and either 25 per cent severity (RTA database) or 40 per cent (Police database) according to Severity Index 1 or 40 per cent severity (RTA) according to Severity Index 2 (RTA database).

      *241 SLAG SAND—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) Has the State Government considered the use of slag sand (particularly "BF Crusher Fines") rather than approve the underwater mining of fine sand from deposits offshore of southern Sydney?
          (2) If not, why not?
          (3) Has the State Government encouraged research or undertaken research itself into the substitution of blast furnace slag sand for natural sand in the building industry, particularly in Sydney?
          (4) Has the State Government been made aware of research which shows that "BF Crusher Fines" slag sand has comparable qualities to Cattai Fine Sand and Premium Fine Sand?
          Answer—
          I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) to (3) These questions would be more appropriately directed to the Hon. Ian Causley, M.P., Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines.
          (4) A recently exhibited draft Sydney Regional Environmental Plan (SREP) No. 9 (2) recommended that industry investigate the feasibility of the use of blast furnace slag and quarry sand as a substitute for extracting and from naturally occurring deposits. Submissions on the draft SREP will be received to 31 March 1994.


      Page 534
      *247 FIRE BRIGADE UPGRADE—WOLLONGONG—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) Why did he defer and then later reverse the decision to upgrade the Fire Brigade in the Wollongong/Illawarra area from secondary accreditation to primary rescue accreditation?
          (2) Did he decide not to disband the Police Rescue Unit in the Wollongong/Illawarra area, made while he was Police Minister but prior to taking over the role of Emergency Services Minister?
          (3) Why did he, when assuming responsibility for Emergency Services, not honour the commitment of the previous Minister to visit Wollongong and hold discussions with Fire Brigade representatives?
          (4) How much has been expended on training and otherwise equipping the fully qualified rescue accredited members of the Fire Brigade in the Wollongong/Illawarra area?
          Answer—
          (1) Following my decision last year to retain the Police Rescue Squad Unit at Wollongong as the accredited primary rescue unit, I asked the State Rescue and Emergency Services Board (SRESB) to review the rescue needs for the area.
          The SRESB and I are satisfied that the existing rescue accreditations are more than adequate to cover the rescue needs of the Illawarra area.
          (2) No.
          (3) An incoming Minister cannot necessarily be expected to carry out any visit which may have been arranged by a previous Minister.
          (4) $4,100 on training and $6,277 on additional rescue equipment.

      *251 PROSPECT RESERVOIR LAND—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) Does the Water Board plan to dispose of land it owns at Prospect Reservoir?
          (2) If so, why and when?
          (3) Have the Department of Planning and/or the Water Board approached or been approached by developers with a view to developing land around Prospect Reservoir for residential purposes?
          Answer—
          I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) No.
          (2) Not applicable.
          (3) The Water Board was approached by a consortium with a proposal to develop the land around Prospect Reservoir in the late 1980s. This proposal was rejected at the time. The Board has received more recent approaches from developers but there are no plans to dispose of any land around Prospect Reservoir.


      Page 535
      *252 YOUNG WOMEN'S SPORT—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
          (1) What specific programs is your Department funding to encourage young women's participation in sport in New South Wales?
          (2) What consultation processes are in place so that this State works co-operatively with the Commonwealth to maximise young women's participation in sport in the lead up to the Olympics 2000?
          Answer—
          (1) Fair access to services by the community is State Government policy and for the Department of Sport, Recreation and Racing it is one of the key performance areas in its Corporate Plan. Outlined in its policy "Opportunities in Sport and Physical Activity for Women", the Department has made, and will continue to make, strategic decisions to improve opportunities for participation and talent development for women and girls, and to ensure the development of excellence in performance by female athletes.
          The Department works co-operatively with the Ministry for the Status and Advancement of Women to ensure key strategies are reflected in the recently launched Government policy statement of women, titled "Working for Women".
          The following programs which are funded and implemented by the Department, demonstrate the Department's commitment to encouraging young women to participate in sport in New South Wales.
          Active Girls Campaign
          Findings from various research projects over the past decade indicate that teenage girls have fewer opportunities and more restricted access to sport than boys. There is also a higher dropout rate of girls from sport and physical activity in their teenage years than boys.
          As a result, special measures have been set in place to overcome gender bias in sport. The Active Girls Campaign was established in 1991 to encourage teenage girls to become more actively involved in sport and physical activity and to increase public awareness of the social pressures and discriminatory practices that discourage girls from fully participating in sport.
          The campaign is directed at teenage girls, schools, parents, coaches, sporting organisations and clubs and the media. It comprises of promotional material, advertising campaigns, community resources and specific programs.
          The campaign is actively supported in New South Wales by the Department.
          One of the initiatives of the Active Girls Campaign is the "Commonwealth Bank Active Girls Triathlon Series". As a pilot program in 1993, the aim of the triathlon series is to encourage teenage girls to participate.
          Due to the success of the two triathlons held in New South Wales last year, the Department is conducting four such events this year.
          The triathlons are funded by the Department, the Commonwealth Bank and the Australian Sports Commission.
          Aussie Sports Programs
          This national sporting initiative is committed to the development of young people through sport. Aussie Sport promotes modified sports, with all sports being open to all young people. The program is aimed at developing sporting skills, promoting fun and enjoyment and encouraging participation and fair play. It is a joint initiative of the Department, the Australian Sports Commission and the NSW Department of School Education.
          The Department of Sport, Recreation and Racing provides $120,000 as a direct contribution as well as providing considerable administrative support and resources.

      Page 536
          Mums on the Go
          The Department is targeting resources to encourage women with pre-school aged children to become involved in sport and physical activity.
          A market research program has been conducted by the Department to assess the needs of these women and their barriers to participation. Resources and programs are currently being developed in a program titled "Mums on the Go".
          By encouraging women with pre-school aged children to be physically active, they in turn will be excellent role models for their daughters.
          Towards Gender Equity
          In achieving "co-operating federalism", all State Departments of Sport and Recreation, in conjunction with the Australian Sports Commission, are involved in a project titled "Towards Gender Equity".
          This project is aimed at ensuring women have fair access to all aspects of organised sport, including participation, coaching, sports administration and officiating. Encouraging teenage girls to continue their participation as registered members of State Sporting Associations is a key strategy of this project.
          Sportswomen's Register
          This resource booklet, produced by the Department, provides community groups, schools and the media with female sporting role models who are available for interviews, speeches, presentations and other public appearances.
          The first edition of this booklet was released in 1990. It is currently being updated and the second edition is due to be distributed mid-year.
          Sportswomen Speaking Out
          In February 1991, a very successful pilot seminar was conducted by the Department to skill individual female athletes and sports administrators in the area of communication, media and sponsorship. With the release of the Sportwomen's Register 1994–96, another Sportwomen Speaking Out, seminar is planned for this year.
          Ministerial Women in Sport Advisory Council
          I established a Ministerial Women in Sport Advisory Council in 1993 to advise on issues relating to women's involvement in sport and physical activity in New South Wales. To ensure the needs of teenage girls are met, there is youth representation on the Council.
          (2) The Department recognises the importance of emplying a "co-operative approach" to maximise young women's participation in sport. The following committees exist to ensure the highest level of co-operation between the States, the Territories and the Commonwealth.
          Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport, Special Subcommittee on Women in Sport and Recreation
          With representation from the Commonwealth, States and Territories, this Subcommittee fosters and develops a unified national approach to issues pertaining to women in sport and recreation. This includes issues relating to young women's participation in sport.
          A document titled Australian Strategy for Women in Sport and Recreation has been developed by the Committee and is currently being implemented, with progress being monitored. Projects such as "Towards Gender Equity" and advances made in combating sex discrimination in sport are examples of this Committee's achievements.


      Page 537
          Women in Sport State Delegates Forum
          State and Federal delegates meet twice yearly at a "Women in Sport" forum to co-operatively develop and implement programs and to exchange views and information on matters pertaining to women in sport and recreation in Australia.

      *253 MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EXAMINATIONS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) How many magnetic resonance imaging examinations were conducted of inpatients within the boundaries of each Area Health Service in:
            (a) 1992/93?
            (b) The financial year to date?
          (2) (a) Is each Area Health Service funded for magnetic resonance imaging examinations in exactly the same way?
            (b) If not:
              (i) How do they vary?
              (ii) Why?
          (3) (a) Is specific funding received by any Area Health Services from the Commonwealth Government for magnetic resonance imaging examinations?
            (b) If so:
              (i) Which areas?
              (ii) In what amounts?
          (4) (a) Will he, as a matter of urgency, ensure equitable access to magnetic resonance imaging examinations for inpatients and uniform funding arrangements for same?
            (b) If not, why not?
          Answer—
          (1) to (4) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a highly specialised diagnostic imaging technique which has established value in examinations of the brain and spine and growing applications in a number of other areas, including oncology and cardiology.
          Staff expertise, sufficient throughput of patients, and appropriate clinical support services are each important factors in the optimal provision of such specialty services and the development of clinical excellence. As a result these types of services are located at a limited number of sites, but serve all Area and District Health Services.
          At present there are two public units in New South Wales. However, three additional units are currently being installed and all are expected to be scanning patients prior to October of this year. These units are located at the following principal referral hospitals: Royal North Shore, Royal Prince Alfred, Westmead, Prince of Wales and John Hunter. In excess of 6,800 scans were performed at public units during 1992/93. Following commissioning of all five public units, it would be expected that over 17,000 scans per annum will be performed.
          MRI scans are more often performed as an outpatient procedure. As part of the State/Commonwealth agreement for provision of MRI Services no distinction is made between private and public or inpatient/outpatient classifications.
          Funding for each of these units is, and will be, made under a specific purpose grant arrangement agreed with the Commonwealth. Funding is based on throughput, with the average maximum allocation from the Commonwealth being $1.03 million. Additional funding is provided by the NSW Government toward full operating costs of the units.
          In addition to the specific purpose funding arrangement, this Government has for a number of years, sought to improve equity of access for the people of New South Wales through
      Page 538
      provision of between $300,000 and $400,000 each year to enable the purchase of scans from the private sector. Allocation of these funds has been provided to those centres providing statewide, specialised neurological/neurosurgical services; this is consistent with National and State guidelines for the provision of MRI units.
          Furthermore, negotiations with the Commonwealth enabled the reallocation of funds during 1993/94 to a number of Area Health Services, including Western Sydney and South Western Sydney, to contract MRI scans from the private sector as an interim arrangement until the three new units become operational.
          New South Wales has commenced discussions with the Commonwealth in order to propose the provision of an additional four MRI units prior to the year 1999. The Department of Health's Selected Specialty Services Plan indicates that Liverpool Hospital would be considered a high priority for one of these units; site planning has taken this into account.

      *259 DRUG AUDIT—DEE WHY DISTRICT—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) What was the procedure for the audit of all drug exhibits in the Dee Why Police District that was undertaken in the aftermath of the Bourke drug allegations?
          (2) At what level must such a drug audit be approved?
          (3) Is it a requirement that the Commissioner be informed of such an extensive audit over such a wide area in such extraordinary circumstances?
          Answer—
          (1) Following an appraisal of the allegations by Constable Bourke together with a meeting at Frenchs Forest Police Station, Chief Superintendent McIntosh further conferred with the Region Commander, North.
          On the basis of these meetings the Chief Superintendent decided to have an audit undertaken of all drug and firearm exhibits, including weapons of police on leave, throughout the Warringah District.
          (2) The District Commander has the prerogative and ultimate responsibility to carry out such an audit.
          (3) No.

      *260 CANNABIS PLANT EXHIBITS—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) What action was taken by the Police Service as a result of information contained in the Crime Commission Report that cannabis plants were being stripped of their leaves in the Frenchs Forest drug custody area and that this activity was common knowledge amongst officers stationed there?
          (2) Are such large exhibits normally cut up and placed in sealed bags?
          (3) Are these bags tamper-proof?
          Answer—
          (1) to (3) Answers to these questions were provided by the Commissioner to the honourable member on 25 August 1993 during evidence given to the Joint Select Committee on Police Administration.


      Page 539
      *261 CONSTABLE BOURKE SHOOTING—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) When was the Commissioner first briefed about Constable Bourke being shot and by whom?
          (2) Are there any records of this briefing?
          (3) Were the situations reports available?
          (4) (a) Were there any subsequent briefings to the Commissioner about the Bourke shooting?
            (b) If so, by whom?
          (5) Are there any records of these briefings?
          (6) Were situation reports on Frenchs Forest used at any of these briefings?
          (7) Was the Commissioner briefed about previous injuries sustained by Bourke on duty, including a stabbing and a previous shooting?
          Answer—
          (1) to (7) Answers to these questions were provided by the Commissioner to the honourable member on 25 August 1993 during evidence given to the Joint Select Committee on Police Administration.

      *262 DRUG SECURITY INSPECTIONS—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) How many drug security inspections has the Inspector General undertaken?
          (2) Why did he give 7 days notice of an inspection?
          (3) What is the full list of stations inspected by the Inspector General, the dates, and any anomalies discovered?
          (4) On how many occasions did the Inspector General discover violations of Commissioner's Instruction 79.05 during his inspections?
          (5) (a) How many were violations of the two-key security system?
            (b) On what dates and at which stations?
          (6) (a) How many were situations in which the same officer held both keys?
            (b) On what dates and at which stations?
          (7) Did the Inspector General give 7 days notice of his inspection on these occasions?
          (8) What discipline followed from his discovery of these violations?
          (9) (a) Did the Inspector General ever inspect Frenchs Forest Police Station?
            (b) If so:
              (i) What are the details?
              (ii) What were his findings?
          (10) Did Constable Bourke walk into Inspector Stewart's office at Frenchs Forest with one key, take the other key out of his unlocked drawer, go to the drug exhibit safe, open it, and take exhibit A190754?
          Answer—
          (1) The Inspector-General has undertaken no drug security inspections as such.
          From the commencement of his work on 29 July 1991 through November 1992, the Inspector-General was involved primarily in the inspection of NSW Police Service District commands. That work was undertaken as a result of the mandate received from the Police Board to:

      Page 540
              •monitor and review the organisational structure of the NSW Police Service, its aims, objectives, planning strategies, communication channels and management practices;
              •consider and make recommendations to the Police Board regarding priorities for organisational consolidation, change, revision or review;
              •assess the senior management capabilities of the Police Service and monitor and evaluate the performance of members of the Police Service Senior Executive Service, within their contractual obligations.
          (2) During a briefing from the Chairman, Police Board, on 29 July 1991, the Inspector-General was advised that he should give initial priority to inspections designed to assess the quality of command at the District level, and "in the absence of exceptional circumstances, 7 days notice of inspection must be given to the officer concerned".
          (3) District Dates visited Patrols visited
                            Penrith (now Nepean/Blue Mountains)9-11 September 1991 St Mary's
                                          Springwood
                                          Penrith
                                          South Penrith
                                          Mount Druitt
                            Goulburn (now Southern Highlands)23-26 September 1991 and Goulburn
                                          30 September 1991 Young
                                          Cootamundra
                                          Gundagai
                                          Bowral
                            Bankstown (now Georges River)8-11 October 1991 Revesby
                                          Lakemba
                                          Flemington
                                          Bankstown
                                          Auburn
                                          Campsie
                                          Bass Hill
                            Lismore (now Northern Rivers)27 October 1991 to Lismore
                                          2 November 1991 Casino
                                          Kyogle
                                          Tweed Heads
                                          Byron Bay
                                          Ballina
                                          McLean
                                          Grafton
                            Wollongong (now Illawarra) 11-15 November 1991Wollongong
                                          Corrimal
                                          Dapto
                                          Warilla
                                          Port Kembla
                                          Nowra
                                          Milton

          Page 541
                            Sutherland (now St George/Sutherland)25-29 November 1991 Sutherland
                                          Cronulla
                                          Miranda
                                          Engadine
                                          Menai
                                          Riverwood
                                          Hurstville
                                          Kogarah
                                          Kingsgrove
                            Parramatta (now Cumberland)7-10 January 1992 Parramatta
                                          Windsor
                                          Castle Hill
                                          Granville
                                          Ermington
                            Chatswood (now Northern Suburbs)20-24 January 1992 Chatswood
                                          Eastwood
                                          Ryde
                                          Pennant Hills
                                          Gladesville
                                          Hornsby
                                          Lane Cove
                                          Pymble
                            Wagga Wagga (now Riverina)30 March 1992 to Narrandera
                                          2 April 1992 and Leeton
                                          9 April 1992Griffith
                                          Hay
                                          West Wyalong
                                          Temora
                                          Junee
                                          Wagga Wagga
                            Ashfield (now Mid Western Suburbs)13-16 April 1992 Burwood
                                          Enfield
                                          Earlwood
                                          Five Dock
                                          Drummoyne
                                          Ashfield
                            Central Coast (formerly Gosford)27 April 1992 to Gosford
                                          1 May 1992Wyong
                                          The Entrance
                                          Terrigal
                                          Toukley
                                          Woy Woy
                            Liverpool (now Macarthur) 11-15 May 1992Liverpool
                                          Campbelltown
                                          Raby
                                          Macquarie Fields
                                          Moorebank
                                          Camden
                                          Picton
                                          Green Valley

          Page 542
                            Eastern Suburbs 1-5 June 1992Maroubra
                                          Malabar
                                          Mascot
                                          Bondi
                                          Randwick
                                          Rose Bay
                                          Paddington
                                          Waverley
                            Port Macquarie (now Mid North Coast)22-26 June 1992 Bulahdelah
                                          Forster
                                          Taree
                                          Port Macquarie
                                          Kempsey
                                          Macksville
                                          Coffs Harbour
                            Barrier (formerly Broken Hill)14-18 September 1992 Wilcannia
                                          Dareton
                                          Broken Hill
                                          Tibooburra (Sector)
                            Warringah (formerly Dee Why)9-13 November 1992 Collaroy
                                          North Sydney
                                          Mosman
                                          Manly
                                          Frenchs Forest
                                          Mona Vale
                                          Dee Why
                                          Broken Bay Water
                                          Police
                            Orana (formerly Dubbo) 23-28 November 1992 andMudgee
                                          30 November 1992 Wellington
                                          Nyngan
                                          Bourke
                                          Brewarrina (Sector)
                                          Walgett
                                          Coonamble
                                          Coonabarabran
                                          Dubbo
              * Anomalies relevant to each District Command, consistent with the Inspector-General's terms of reference, were documented by report to the Police Board.
          (4) I am advised that the Inspector-General's inspections did not include comprehensive coverage of Commissioner's Instructions, nor did his terms of reference anticipate that they would. The Inspector-General did not routinely inspect for breaches of Instruction 79.05.
          (5) (a) The Inspector General reports that relying on memory, there were three occasions he discovered violations of the two key system.
            (b) Dates and places not available.
          (6) (a) There was no situation in which the same officer held both keys.
            (b) Not applicable.
          (7) Yes. See response to (2).

      Page 543
          (8) I am advised that the violations were discussed with the Patrol Commander and verbally reported to the District Commander. Each was admonished to comply with the Commissioner's Instructions. No formal report was made and no discipline resulted.
          (9) (a) I am advised that the Inspector-General visited French's Forest Patrol on 11 November 1992 as part of his inspection of the Warringah District.
            (b) I am advised that the Inspector-General examined organisation, planning, the continuing impact of regionalisation, intelligence-based rostering, community based policing and patrol management. They appeared to be in order.
          (10) This matter was the subject of a Report by the Crime Commission and consideration by the Joint Select Committee Upon Police Administration.

      *263 FRENCHS FOREST DRUG EXHIBIT—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) Did five cannabis plants disappear from the Frenchs Forest drug exhibit between 26 October 1991 and 8 July 1992?
          (2) Were these plants replaced by Bourke, at the behest of Sergeant Black, who was in charge of drug custody at Frenchs Forest?
          (3) If so, on what date (or between what dates) were they replaced?
          (4) Was this the Commission of a criminal offence by Black?
          (5) If so, was Black charged?
          (6) If not, why not?
          (7) Did the Crime Commission find that this action by Black was an attempt to "regularise" the exhibit system?
          (8) Is this acceptable practice for the "regularisation" of drug exhibits at New South Wales police stations?
          (9) Did the Crime Commission also find that Black was genuinely concerned to properly administer an exhibits control system?
          (10) Is the illegal replacement of stolen drug exhibits recommended as a means of properly administering drug exhibits?
          (11) Was Junior Probationary Constable Folbigg instructed to accompany his supervisor, Constable Bourke, to Davidson National Park to gather these replacement plants?
          (12) What mechanisms were in place for Folbigg to decline his superiors and report them on this matter?
          (13) What would have been the consequences for his career?
          (14) Have any subsequent measures been introduced to guide a Probationary Constable in such a situation?
          (15) How was the disappearance and replacement of this drug exhibit finally discovered and on what date?
          (16) Did these replacement plants, in turn, go missing?
          (17) Was this exhibit audited by Sergeant Black as part of the drug audit on 26 May 1992 during which he discovered the loss of exhibit A190754?
          (18) Was this exhibit audited by Inspector Stewart and Sergeant Black during the drug audit on 18 or 19 June 1992?
          (19) Are there any records of this audit?
          (20) If not, why not?
          (21) Was this exhibit audited by Sergeant Black during the drug audits of 1 July 1992 and 13 July 1992?
          (22) When was the next drug audit at Frenchs Forest carried out?
          (23) What were the dates of all subsequent drug audits at Frenchs Forest?

      Page 544
          (24) Were they internal or external audits?
          (25) Were any external drug audits of Frenchs Forest undertaken after the Bourke allegations came to light?
          (26) On how many occasions has Frenchs Forest been audited by the Comprehensive Audit Branch from 1990?
          (27) Was the audit of 13 January 1993 by the Comprehensive Audit Branch a random audit?
          Answer—
          (1) to (27) These matters were the subject of a report by the Crime Commission, which was tabled in Parliament. They also received detailed consideration by the Joint Select Committee Upon Police Administration.
          As a member of that Committee the honourable member had ample opportunity to ask questions about these matters.

      *264 SPEED CAMERAS—ELECTORATE OF LAKE MACQUARIE—Mr Hunter asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) How many speed camera locations are there in the electorate of Lake Macquarie?
          (2) Where are the locations?
          (3) How many speeding fines have been issued at each location for each year of operation?
          (4) What was the total amount in dollars of these fines for each year?
          (5) If accident incidents reduce in the areas of speed camera use, will the relocation of cameras be considered?
          Answer—
          (1) 4.
          (2) Main Road, Boolaroo (2 locations).
            Main Road, Toronto (2 locations).
          (3) A breakdown of speeding fines issued on a 2-yearly basis is not readily available. Total fines issued as at 2 February 1994 are as follows:
            Main Road, Boolaroo
              1st location 42
              2nd location 173
            Main Road, Toronto
              1st location 8
              2nd location 1,377
          (4) These figures are not available.
          (5) Yes.

      *268 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?

      Page 545
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
          Answer—
          This information is not readily available and to seek it would require a substantial diversion of resources which cannot be justified.

      *269 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads and Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within her portfolio area?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
          Answer—
          (1) Resources within the Consumer Affairs portfolio are allocated on the basis of statewide programs rather than electoral boundaries.
          Nevertheless, residents residing in the electorate of Moorebank may avail themselves of a wide range of services offered by the Department of Consumer Affairs and the Building Services Corporation at several locations throughout the metropolitan area.
          These services include:
            Department of Consumer Affairs:
                •advice on fair trading issues;
                •mediation of marketplace disputes;
                •advice/assistance in lodging Consumer Claims Tribunal/Building Disputes Tribunal claims and processing of Business Name Registration/Association Incorporation applications.
            Building Services Corporation:
                •advice on building matters;
                •mediation of building disputes;
                •facilitating lodgment of insurance claims and applications for owner-builder permits, contractor licences, qualified supervisor certificates or registration and authorisations to purchase/use CFCs.

      Page 546
          (2) and (3) I refer the honourable member to the Budget estimates papers and the relevant agency annual reports.
          (4) This financial year agencies within my portfolio have continued to make available to residents of the electorate of Moorebank the same comprehensive range of services outlined in answer (1) above.
          I would also draw the honourable member's attention to the important portfolio initiatives outlined in the Governor's Speech and in other public agency documents (e.g., corporate plans).
          (5) See answers (2) and (3) above.

      *270 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
          Answer—
          Details of services and facilities provided by the Department of Sport, Recreation and Racing within the electorate of Moorebank during 1990/91, 1991/92 and 1992/93 are provided below.
          (1) Capital Assistance Program—grants are provided through this program to assist in the development of local sporting and recreational facilities.
          Sports Development Courses—accreditation courses are conducted with the aim of improving standards of sports coaching and administration.
          Swimsafe Program—Learn to Swim Programs and specialised instruction in the principles of water safety are provided for preschool and school age children and adults during the summer months.
          Vacation Activity Centre Program—Conducted during each school holiday period this program offers a range of sporting and recreational activities to primary school age children. The program is being replaced by programs providing introductory sports skills and coaching in specific sports.
          Introductory Sport and Recreation Opportunities—opportunities to try a wide variety of sporting and recreational activities are offered to adults through this program.
          Aussie Sport Programs—"Sportsfund" provides an after school sports program specifically for primary school children with trained high school students as instructors. The "Sportslink" program is a preseason skill development program designed to introduce children to community sport.
          Aussie Sport Programs—"Sportsfun" provides an after school sports program specifically for primary school children with trained high school students as instructors. The "Sportslink" program is a preseason skill development program designed to introduce children to community sport.

      Page 547
          (2) The electorate of Moorebank is serviced by the Department's South West Metropolitan Regional Office. Staff levels at this office have remained constant at six permanent staff since 1990/91.
          In addition, one staff member at the Department's Head Office is responsible for administration of the Capital Assistance Program.
          (3) 1990/91
            Capital Assistance Program—$20,000 provided towards one facility.
            Swimsafe Learn to Swim Program—772 participants, total expenditure $16,366.
            Vacation Activity Centre Program—603 participants, total expenditure $6,657.
            Introductory Opportunities—20 participants, total expenditure $305.
            Sports Development Programs—Nil.
            Aussie Sport Programs—251 participants, total expenditure $1,305.
          1991/92
            Capital Assistance Program—$35,000 provided towards two facilities.
            Swimsafe Learn to Swim Program—728 participants, total expenditure $15,106.
            Vacation Activity Centre Program—576 participants, total expenditure $6,451.
            Introductory Opportunities—23 participants, total expenditure $295.
            Sports Development Programs—Nil.
            Aussie Sport Programs—247 participants, total expenditure $1,395.
          1992/93
            Capital Assistance Program—$32,000 provided towards three facilities.
            FootyTAB Funding—$37,500 provided towards sporting facility at Fields Road, Macquarie Fields.
            Swimsafe Learn to Swim Program—679 participants, total expenditure $14,462.
            Vacation Activity Centre Program—615 participants, total expenditure $6,955.
            Introductory Opportunities—26 participants, total expenditure $337.
            Sports Development Programs—26 participants, total expenditure $2,250.
            Aussie Sport Programs—282 participants, total expenditure $1,488.
          1993/94
            Capital Assistance Program—$34,000 provided towards five facilities.
            Swimsafe Learn to Swim Program—675 participants, total expenditure $14,647.
            Vacation Activity Centre Program—175 participants, projected expenditure $2,150.
            Introductory Opportunities—50 participants, projected expenditure $650.
            Sports Development Programs—20 participants, projected expenditure $1,000.
            Aussie Sport Programs—325 participants, projected expenditure $1,750.
            International Shooting Facility Holsworthy, studies undertaken—total expenditure $145,000.
            International Sporting Events Council (ISEC)—provision of $20,000 grant towards the staging of the 1994 World Barefoot Water Ski Championships to be held at Helles Park, Moorebank, March 1994.
          (4) The following new/additional services will be provided during 1993/94:
              Aussie Sport Skill Development Program—Moorebank April 1994.
              Sportslink Program—Holsworthy June 1994.
              Sports Administration Program—Moorebank May 1994.
              Australian Rules Talented Athlete Program—Macquarie Fields April 1994—this program will provide intensive training and coaching for children of school age with demonstrated talent and potential in Australian Rules.

      Page 548
          (5) Expenditure in the following program areas within electorate of Moorebank has increased since 1990/91:
            Capital Assistance Program.
            Introductory Opportunities.
            Sports Development Programs.
            Aussie Sport Programs.
          A decline in enrolments has contributed to a decrease in expenditure in the Swimsafe Program.
          The Vacation Activity Centre Program is being replaced by school holiday sports skill development programs.

      *272 NORTHERN PENINSULA LIGHT RAIL—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Has he announced on three occasions over the past 18 months that the Government would see a light rail service running on Sydney's northern peninsula?
          (2) Have private sector companies privately stated that the scheme is not feasible?
          (3) When will the next announcement be made?
          Answer—
          (1) Details of the proposed light rail system have been released as required.
          (2) Not to my knowledge.
          (3) Details of progress are released as required.

      *273 AIRPORT RAIL LINK—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Did he claim in 1992 that the airport rail link would be solely funded by the private sector?
          (2) Has he subsequently claimed the Government would part fund the project?
          (3) What is the likely extent of contribution required by the Government?
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) The Government has always sought to maximise the private sector contribution to the airport rail link.
          (2) This will depend on the outcome of the tender process.

      *279 LOBSTER FISHERS—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
          (1) Were lobster fishers advised in March 1986 to reduce and/or not increase effort?
          (2) Did a large number of lobster fishers embrace the spirit of that direction?
          (3) Did a number of lobster fishers ignore the direction and increase effort?
          (4) Was the period 1987 to December 1990 used to establish the criteria for entitlement to a licence?
          (5) Does the criteria period disadvantage those lobster fishers who responded to the spirit of the direction in March 1986?
          (6) Will he restore equity for those lobster fishers disadvantaged?

      Page 549
          Answer—
          (1) On 12 March 1986, the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries, Jack Hallam, issued a press release which included a general warning against investment in the fishing industry on the expectation of gaining entry to a particular area or fishery.
          (2) In general terms the spirit of the direction was not embraced and there was an overall increase in fishing effort in the lobster fishery.
          (3) Individuals increased their effort in the rock lobster fishery despite a number of warnings against doing so. This situation has continued following declaration of a restricted lobster fishery in 1993.
          (4) Catch history for the period 1987 to 1990, inclusive, was one of several criteria used to determine eligibility for a rock lobster restricted fishery permit.
          (5) Effort in the lobster fishery continued to increase after 1986, placing even greater pressure on the resource. It is apparent throughout the fishing industry that ministerial warnings against investment based on the expectation of gaining entry to any particular fishery have not been heeded.
          (6) Under the present fisheries property rights proposals, persons who recorded rock lobster catches during the criteria period but did not qualify for a permit may be allocated rights based on their catch history.

      *281 SPEED CAMERAS—ELECTORATE OF WALLSEND—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) At what locations are speed cameras used in the electorate of Wallsend?
          (2) What are the numbers of infringements at each location during 1993?
          (3) What is the total value of fines imposed by infringement notices at each location during 1993?
          (4) What is the number of road accidents for each of the years 1991, 1992 and 1993 at each location?
          (5) How many of these accidents caused:
            (a) Death?
            (b) Injury?
          (6) Are each of these locations identified black spots?
          (7) If not, what are the reasons for choosing that location?
          (8) Are any more locations being considered in the electorate of Wallsend for speed cameras?
          Answer—
          (1) Macquarie Road, Cardiff 2 locations
            Main Road, Argenton 2 locations
            Main Road, Wallsend 2 locations
            Lambton Road, New Lambton 2 locations
          (2) Macquarie Road, Cardiff
              1st location No infringements issued
              2nd location 2 infringements issued
            Main Road, Argenton
              1st location No infringements issued
              2nd location 36 infringements issued

      Page 550
            Main Road, Wallsend
              1st location No infringements issued
              2nd location 11 infringements issued
            Lambton Road, New Lambton
              1st location 85 infringements issued
              2nd location 43 infringements issued
          (3) These figures are not available.
          (4) Macquarie Road, Cardiff 29 accidents
            Main Road, Argenton 15 accidents
            Main Road, Wallsend 52 accidents
            Lambton Road, New Lambton 24 accidents
          (5) (a) Nil.
            (b) 50.
          (6) Yes.
          (7) Not applicable.
          (8) Not known at this stage.

      *282 ETHNIC FUNDING—ELECTORATE OF WALLSEND—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice—
          (1) What financial assistance has the Department provided to ethnic community groups in the electorate of Wallsend?
          (2) What are the names of these organisations?
          (3) What amount of money was provided?
          (4) How much of these funds came from Federal sources?
          Answer—
          (1) Since no applications for assistance were received from groups in the electorate of Wallsend in this financial year, no financial assistance has been provided by the Ethnic Affairs Commission directly to ethnic community groups in the electorate of Wallsend to date during the 1993/94 financial year.
          (2) Not applicable, refer to the answer to question (1).
          (3) Not applicable, refer to the answer to question (1).
          (4) Not applicable, refer to the answer to question (1).
          Details of grants in previous years are contained in the annual reports of the Ethnic Affairs Commission which have been tabled in Parliament.

      *286 TOOMELAH WATER SUPPLY—Dr Refshauge asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
          (1) Has the Moree Plains Shire Council written to his predecessor asking for assistance in ensuring that a maintenance and service contract be expedited for the Toomelah Aboriginal Community?
          (2) What action has the Department of Public Works taken to assist the Toomelah Aboriginal Community and the maintenance of their water supply?


      Page 551
          Answer—
          (1) Moree Plains Council made representations to the Hon. W. Murray, M.P., in his position as local member. Mr Murray pursued the matter, and continues to pursue it , in that role.
          (2) Public Works is not responsible for maintenance at Toomelah and has not been approached for assistance. However, Public Works had previously arranged for the attendance of two Toomelah community residents at a sewerage operators training course. While the fees were paid and all arrangements completed for them to attend the course, they did not present themselves, and have offered no explanation since.
      I understand the NSW Aboriginal Land Council is assisting the Toomelah Aboriginal community in respect of arranging maintenance contracts for their water supply.

      *287 PACIFIC POWER SES STAFF RATIO—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
          (1) What are the overall staff and SES staff numbers in respect of years 1991, 1992 and 1993 for the following Pacific Power Business Units:
            (a) Pacific Power Hunter?
            (b) Pacific Power Central Coast?
            (c) Pacific Power Western?
            (d) Pacific Power Grid?
            (e) Pacific Power Services?
            (f) Pacific Power Subsidiary Companies?
            (g) Pacific Power Business Units?
          (2) What are the respective ratio of SES to staff numbers for each of the business units above?
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) Outlined below are overall staff numbers and SES positions in respect of years 1991, 1992 and 1993 in the various business units, together with the respective ratio of SES positions to overall staff numbers.
          Staff numbers June 1991
                            Staff SESRatio
      SES to overall staff
            Hunter 1,110 6 1:185
            Central Coast 1,629 13 1:125
            Western 461 6 1:77
            Supply/Grid 1,109 13 1:85
            Services *
            Subsidiary 7 3 1:2
            Other Business Units 1,897 61 1:31
            Apprentices, Cadets, Trainees 497 - -
          ______ _______
          6,710 1021:66
      * Services Business Unit created in November 1991.


      Page 552
          Staff numbers June 1992
                            Staff SESRatio
      SES to overall staff
            Hunter 1,119 7 1:160
            Central Coast 1,439 9 1:160
            Western 498 6 1:83
            Grid 1,092 14 1:78
            Services 1,605 34 1:47
            Subsidiaries 16 3 1:5
            Other Business Units 274 26 1:11
            Apprentices, Cadets, Trainees 439 - -
          ______ _______
      6,482 991:65
          Staff numbers as at 30 November 1993
                            Staff SESRatio
      SES to overall staff
            Hunter 948 6 1:158
            Central Coast 1,172 10 1:117
            Western 430 6 1:72
            Grid 1,047 13 1:81
            Services 1,594 32 1:50
            Subsidiaries 10 3 1:3
            Other Business Units 175 20 1:9
            Apprentices, Cadets, Trainees 432 - -
          ______ _______
                            5,808 901:65

      *288 PACIFIC POWER SALARY AND WAGE INCREASES—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
          (1) Was an Enterprise Agreement for some 6,000 employees of Pacific Power recently rejected by a vote of these employees?
          (2) Have these employees not received any general wage increase since 1991?
          (3) Have any instructions been issued by him or the Government to Pacific Power to restrict any productivity-based salary or wage increases to 4 per cent despite reported production improvements of 30 per cent for Pacific Power?
          (4) Has there been any intervention or directions given to Pacific Power in regard to this Enterprise Agreement which would have been the largest negotiated with a State Government enterprise?
          (5) What independence is permitted to Government trading enterprises such as Pacific Power in negotiating Enterprise Agreements?
          (6) What is the Government position on wage and salary increases?
          (7) Following the rejection of the Enterprise Agreement, what steps will the Government be taking regarding the salaries and wages of Pacific Power employees?
          Answer—
          (1) A corporate enterprise agreement for all Pacific Power employees was rejected on 8 November 1993, following a ballot of employees.
          (2) Although employees have not received a general wage increase since 1991, many employees have received wage increases as a result of job evaluation, reclassification and promotion through skill development programs introduced as the result of award restructuring.

      Page 553
          (3) The proposed corporate enterprise agreement referred to in (1) above provided no increases for past productivity. It did however provide a 4 per cent initial increase for entering into an enterprise agreement for future and expected productivity incentives and the rewriting of the award and conversion into the agreement. The rewriting of the award was agreed to at the time of award restructuring.
          (4) There is a requirement of all Chief Executive Officers to gain Ministerial approval of all proposed enterprise agreements, and in Pacific Power's case this was obtained in May 1993.
          (5) Subject to Ministerial approval, the items for negotiation and the manner in which negotiations proceeded remain with Pacific Power.
          (6) Pacific Power's negotiations on entering enterprise agreements conforms with Government policy.
          (7) Following the rejection of the corporate enterprise agreement, Pacific Power has made the same document available to individual business units or discrete sections of those units. This offer is currently under review by employees and managers.

      *289 GEORGES RIVER NATIONAL PARK—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) What has been the operating budget for the Georges River National Park for the years 1990, 1991, 1992 and 1993?
          (2) How much of this money was allocated by the National Parks and Wildlife Service?
          (3) How much money for the years 1990, 1991, 1992 and 1993 was received from entry fees into the park and hiring charges for the use of parkland?
          (4) What were the staffing levels for the years 1990, 1991, 1992 and 1993?
          (5) Is the National Parks and Wildlife Service proposing to install gates to prevent entry into the park after hours?
          (6) If so, when will these gates be installed?
          (7) Is he aware of concern regarding the cost of entry fees into the park?
          (8) Have these increased entry fees resulted in fewer visitors and picnickers visiting the area?
          (9) What steps does he propose to take to reduce these charges?
          (10) Will he consider establishing a trustee system of community and departmental persons to administer and control this community facility?
          (11) If not, why not?
          Answer—
          (1) $
            1989/90 312,000
            1990/91 310,000
            1991/92 278,000
            1992/93 338,490
          Maintenance expenses and salary and wages for permanent and casual staff are included in these figures. Not costed are the salaries of NPWS District Rangers or the value of organisational support provided for the management of the area from other functional areas of the service.
          (2) $
            1989/90 312,000
            1990/91 310,000
            1991/92 278,000
            1992/93 338,490

      Page 554
          (3) Park Use Fees Ground Hiring
                        $ $
            1989/90 168,000 17,000
            1990/91 200,000 20,000
            1991/92 180,000 14,000
            1992/93 146,000 6,000
          Revenues obtained through park use and other fees are included in the Service's overall funding levels that are allocated to regions and districts to meet operational costs. This situation also exists in relation to other parks where park use and other fees apply.
          (4) 1989/90 8 permanent staff
            1990/91 7 permanent staff
            1991/92 7 permanent staff
            1992/93 6 permanent staff
          (5) Yes. The Director-General informs me that the service is proposing to install gates because of vandalism which has caused thousands of dollars damage to park facilities. Activities include break-ins and destruction of park property, damage to grassed areas and trees, lighting of fires, car dumping and drug taking (evidenced by the used syringes removed by park workers). Support has been received from local police for the proposal.
          (6) The installation is subject to my approval. The Director-General advises me the Service is currently preparing documentation for my consideration of the proposal and I have not yet made a decision on the matter.
          (7) Local residents and patrons are encouraged to purchase annual entry permits which enable unlimited vehicle entry to all service managed areas and provide substantial savings for regular visitors.
          It is also a long standing policy of the service for holders of the pensioner health benefit card to be provided free use of park facilities.
          During week days there is a confessional entry fee of $4 per car into Georges River National Park.
          (8) The number of vehicles paying daily entry fees to the park has decreased; however the revenue from the sale of annual entry permits at the park has increased (from $3,800 in 1989/90 to $12,000 in 1992/93).
          (9) The current daily park entry fee of $7.50 per car was introduced after a comprehensive pricing policy review undertaken for the Service by independent consultants and is consistent with all other national parks in New South Wales which charge an entry fee. This fee applies only on weekends and public holidays. On weekdays there is a confessional entry fee of $4 per car. Further fee reviews are tied to movements in the consumer price index and in this regard there has been no increase since the current fee was introduced in June 1992.
          (10) and (11) Community input into the management of Georges River National Park is already available via the NPWS South Metropolitan District Advisory Committee. The former Georges River SRA Trust is represented on this committee.

      *292 OMBUDSMAN REPORT—POLICE COMPLAINTS—Mr Scully asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) What steps does he propose to take to bring to the attention of all New South Wales police officers the recent report of the NSW Ombudsman into an alleged assault in December 1990 by police officers from Cabramatta Patrol?
          (2) Would it be beneficial to police officers if they read this report?

      Page 555
          (3) (a) What steps does he propose to deal with the suggestions in the report that there may be widespread collusion and fabrication of evidence in the Police Service to frustrate internal inquiries?
            (b) Will he bring this to the attention of individual police officers?
          (4) Does the contents of the report explain the reason why so many police officers charged with criminal offences are acquitted or why so many complaints against police are not sustained?
          Answer—
          (1) In accordance with the Ombudsman's recommendation, the Police Service, through the Training Section of the Internal Affairs Branch, has included in its training of investigators, information on this matter. In addition, a case study is to be prepared for inclusion in the training of all police officers entering the Service.
          (2) Whilst the reading of sections of this report may be useful to police, it is considered that greater benefit can be obtained by addressing the issues raised in education and training material.
          (3) (a) The Police Service rejects the notion that there is widespread collusion and fabrication of evidence to frustrate internal inquiries. However, it is clear that additional checks and balances are needed to ensure that wherever possible, investigations into police conduct are conducted in an honest, efficient and professional manner.
          All the Ombudsman's recommendations in relation to this matter are to be implemented pending legal advice.
          (b) All individual police will be advised and expected to become familiar with any procedural and policy changes adopted.
          (4) Criminal proceedings succeed and fail for a variety of reasons. However, it is recognised that there are special problems associated with the investigation of police. Internal training courses are designed to equip investigators with the skills necessary to deal with these problems.

      *293 GOVERNMENT CLEANING SERVICE—ELECTORATE OF SMITHFIELD—Mr Scully asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
          (1) How many persons employed by the Government Cleaning Service are employed in each school in the electorate of Smithfield?
          (2) What is the number employed in each school?
          Answer—
          (1) There are 54 employees employed in school locations within the electorate of Smithfield.
          (2) They are employed as follows:
              Bossley Park High School 6
              Bossley Park Public School 3
              Edensor Park Public School 3
              Governor King Public School 3
              Holroyd High School 6
              Prairie Vale Public School 3
              Prairewood High School 8
              Ringrose Public School 3

      Page 556
              Sherwood Grange Public School 2
              Smithfield West Public School 3
              Smithfield Public School 4
              St Johns Park High School 5
              Widemere Public School 2
              William Stimson Public School 3

      *294 ILLAWARRA REGIONAL HOSPITAL MAINTENANCE—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Health—
          (1) What is the total value of maintenance and repair work required to be carried out on the major building complex (Hickman House and the services building) at the Wollongong campus of the Illawarra Regional Hospital?
          (2) Has a program been prepared and commenced by which these repairs and maintenance will be undertaken and completed?
          (3) If not, why not?
          (4) What is the estimated cost and priority being given to:
            (a) The waterproof sealing of the roof of Hickman House and the waterproof sealing of the southern and south western walls of Hickman House?
            (b) The removal and replacement of the concrete sunshades on the services building?
            (c) The upgrading of the lifts in Hickman House and the services building?
            (d) The completion of the window replacement program in Hickman House?
          Answer—
          (1) Approximately $2.5 million is being spent this year on repairs and maintenance work for the Illawarra Regional Hospital at its two campuses located at Wollongong and Warrawong. The Wollongong Campus receives the bulk of these funds, which are used in a continuous program of planned maintenance to the building's fabric, engineering services and electromedical equipment. The long-term upgrade and improvement needs of the buildings at the Wollongong Campus are consistent with the size and age of the buildings.
          (2) and (3) IAHS has an Asset Management Pilot Program which will programme the detailed maintenance requirements of all the hospital's assets and cross-link these to priorities for service delivery in order to ensure that the greatest return from investment is achieved. Additionally, the major elements have already been identified and included in forward submissions for capital allocations.
          (4) (a) The waterproof sealing of the roof of Hickman House will cost in the vicinity of $110,000 and it has been given a high priority by the hospital. A costing has not been obtained for the sealing of the southern and southwestern walls of Hickman House. A priority has not been assigned to this work due to the need to assess the benefit of firstly waterproofing the roof.
          (b) The removal and replacement of the sunshades on the Services Building will cost $2.2 million. This work has been given a high priority by the hospital.
          (c) The upgrading of the lifts in Hickman House and the Services Building will cost approximately $1.72 million and this also has been given a high priority by the hospital.
          (d) The completion of the window replacement programme in Hickman House will cost around $0.75 million.
          All of the above works will best be undertaken during the very extensive decanting and renovation programmes now being planned for the hospital's existing buildings which will follow the construction of the Clinical Services Building.

      Page 557

      *298 ETHNIC GRANTS—ELECTORATE OF ROCKDALE—Mr Thompson asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice—
          (1) What financial assistance has been provided to ethnic groups in the electorate of Rockdale?
          (2) What are the names of the organisations involved?
          Answer—
          (1) The Ethnic Affairs Commission of NSW has provided a total of $60,000 for the electorate of Rockdale.
          (2) The following organisations received grants from the EAC:
              Organisation: Al Zahra Muslim Women's Association Inc.
              Amount: $12,000.
              Year: 1993.
            Project: Muslim women's support and research program addressing issue of social isolation.
              Organisation: Al Zahra Muslim Association.
              Amount: $6,000.
              Year: 1993.
              Project: Raising community awareness of social and economic issues.
              Organisation: Al Zahra Muslim Women's Association Inc.
              Amount: $21,000.
              Year: 1994.
            Project: Muslim women against domestic violence—education, referral and information.
              Organisation: Coptic Orthodox Church of NSW.
              Amount: $21,000.
              Year: 1994.
            Project: Community development—aged, women and youth, to achieve better integration with wider community.

      *299 MARTYN McCABE—Mr Whelan asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) Has Mr Martyn McCabe of Katoomba been charged with murder?
          (2) When was he charged?
          (3) Was bail sought?
          (4) Where is Mr McCabe being held?
          (5) When will court proceedings commence?
          (6) At which court?
          (7) What is the reason for the delay?


      Page 558
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) 4 April 1993.
          (3) Bail has been sought and refused twice since Mr McCabe's arrest.
          (4) Mr McCabe is currently being held at the Remand Centre, Long Bay Correctional Complex.
          (5) 14 March 1994.
          (6) Darlinghurst Supreme Court.
          (7) 14 March 1994 was the earliest date after committal on 27 October 1993 that this matter could be listed for hearing.

      *300 LISMORE AND MURWILLUMBAH COURT DELAYS—Mr Whelan asked the nistryMinister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) How many praecipes for civil action have been filed at:
            (a) Murwillumbah District Court?
            (b) Lismore Supreme Court?
          (2) How many are awaiting settlement?
          (3) Is the backlog of civil matters at these courts longer than at other courts in the State?
          (4) If so, how much longer?
          (5) Have only 2 weeks of sittings been scheduled for the Murwillumbah District Court to hear civil matters in 1994?
          (6) How long does it take from lodgement of a case until the matter is heard?
          (7) Can it take up to 3½ years for matters to be heard?
          (8) Why are delays of this magnitude allowed to occur?
          (9) Will he increase the number of sitting days in these courts during 1994 so as to reduce the backlog of cases waiting to be heard?
          (10) If not, why not?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
      (1) (a) 39 praecipes for civil action were filed at Murwillumbah District Court in 1993.
          (b) 118 Notices to Set Down for Trial were filed at Lismore Supreme Court in 1993.
          (2) (a) After the last sittings in September 1993, there were 42 matters pending at Murwillumbah District Court where praecipes for trial had been filed.
          (b) There are 75 matters awaiting disposal at Lismore Supreme Court whether by settlement or hearing.
          (3) (a) The average time between the filing of a praecipe and finalisation of proceedings in the District Court on a statewide basis as compared with Murwillumbah is as follows:
                          Statewide Murwillumbah
              May 1993 175 weeks 120 weeks
              June 1993 114 weeks No sittings
              July 1993 85 weeks No sittings
              August 1993 122 weeks No sittings
              September 1993 83 weeks 91 weeks
              October 1993 143 weeks No sittings

      Page 559
              The reason for the fluctuations in the statewide figure can be explained by the number of very old matters being finalised in the particular month, which inflates the real waiting time for the majority of matters. Usually, whether it be at Murwillumbah or elsewhere, these very old matters are due to the parties not being prepared or ready to proceed. The above statistics are collated on a monthly basis, and as there were only two sittings of the Murwillumbah District Court in 1993, figures are not available for the other months shown.
          (b) The 75 matters awaiting disposal at Lismore Supreme Court compare with 177 matters at Wollongong, 104 matters at Wagga Wagga and 54 matters at Bathurst.
          There is only a small proportion of matters at each country venue in which Notices to Set Down for Trial were lodged prior to 30 June 1991. For example:
          Wollongong 8 matters
              Wagga Wagga 1 matter
              Bathurst 9 matters
              Lismore 5 matters
          (4) Refer to answer to question (3).
          (5) Yes.
          (6) (a) Unknown in respect of the District Court. No general statistics are maintained on time averages from commencement of a matter to finalisation. As detailed in the answer to question (3), statistics are maintained from the filing of the praecipe, which is when the plaintiff informs the Court that the case is purportedly ready to proceed to a hearing.
          (b) In the Supreme Court, assuming the matter is ready to proceed at the time of filing a Notice to Set Down for Trial, it would normally be heard within 2 years of the date of filing such Notice.
          (7) (a) In respect of the District Court, yes, but as mentioned in the answer to question (3), delays of this nature are rarely due to the inability of the Court to accommodate the proceedings earlier.
          (b) In respect of the Supreme Court, as can be seen from the answers given to questions (3) and (6), if the matter is ready to proceed at the time of filing the Notice to Set Down for Trial, it should not take 3½ years to be heard.
          (8) (a) In respect of the District Court, it is not a question of the Court allowing these delays to occur. Until recently, the management of cases was left to the parties, or more particularly, their legal representatives. Often the Court had very little control over what has commonly been referred to as "court delays" but which, in most cases, should more accurately be called "case delays".
          With the Government's support, the Court is now moving towards judicial case management, which is having a marked impact in caseload reduction. Indeed, with the co-operation of the legal profession, the indications are that case delays should continue to decrease.
          (b) In respect of the Supreme Court, as can be seen from the answers given to questions (3), (6) and (7), it should not take 3½ years for matters to be heard.
          (9) The allocation of sittings of the Supreme and District Courts is not a matter for the Attorney General to determine. Rather, it is the responsibility of the Chief Justice and Chief Judge respectively.
          (a) The Principal Courts Administrator of the District Court has advised that there will be no increase in the number of sitting days at Murwillumbah during 1994.

      Page 560
          (b) The Chief Executive Officer and Principal Registrar of the Supreme Court has advised that there are normally sittings of 2 weeks at Lismore Supreme Court each year with 1 Judge in attendance. For the sittings in 1994 at Lismore, there will be 1 Judge sitting for 4 weeks as well as 1 Master sitting for 2 weeks.
          This compares with only 2 weeks of sittings at Wagga Wagga and Bathurst and a total of 6 weeks at Wollongong, with 1 Judge in attendance.
          (10) The allocation of sittings of the District Court is a matter solely for the Chief Judge to determine. In this regard, the Chief Judge must consider every venue throughout the State and determine the best manner by which the needs of each individual community can best be served, within the finite judicial resources available to the Court.
          In addition to the annual allocation the Chief Judge will provide extra sittings as and when a particular need arises.
          In relation to Murwillumbah, it is not considered that additional sittings are warranted. Although the "delay" at Murwillumbah was slightly higher than the statewide average in September 1993, the backlog itself is due more to the parties than the Court's inability to hear the cases.

      *301 NORTH SYDNEY LOCAL COURT—Mr Whelan asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) From 1 January 1994, will North Sydney Local Court only be open 2 days per week?
          (2) How many days is it open now?
          (3) How many cases does it hear each year?
          (4) Where will these cases be heard from 1 January 1994?
          (5) Has the population of the area decreased?
          (6) If not, why the reduced sitting of this court?
          (7) How much money will be saved by providing a 2/5th service?
          (8) How many kilometres will people have to travel to attend other courts?
          (9) (a) Will restraining orders in domestic violence cases take longer to arrange than under the current system?
            (b) Will this place women and children at risk?
          (10) Who supports the partial closure of the court?
          (11) Will he reverse the decision?
          (12) If not, why not?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) No.
          (2) 5 days per week.
          (3) In the 12 months ended June 1993, the North Sydney Local Court finalised 3,361 general matters, 58 Family Law matters and 1,187 Civil Claims actions.
          (4) North Sydney, except defended Civil Claims actions which are adjourned to the Downing Centre.
          (5) No. The 1991 Census for the North Sydney Council area indicated a population of 50,446, whilst the preliminary 1992 figures indicate a population of 51,600 (source— Australian Bureau of Statistics).
          (6) A Magistrate will be available at North Sydney 5 days per week.

      Page 561
          (7) A full-time service is being provided.
          (8) None. However, the Downing Centre is located less than 4 kilometres from North Sydney whilst Hornsby is 22 kilometres from North Sydney.
          (9) (a) No.
          (b) No.
          (10) It is not a partial closure of the court.
          (11) Not applicable.
          (12) Not applicable.

      *302 TRUSTS AND MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
          (1) What Conservation and Land Management Trusts have Members of Parliament been appointed to?
          (2) What are the terms of appointment?
          (3) When were they appointed and what is the duration of those appointments?
          Answer—
          (1) Members of Parliament have been appointed to the following Conservation and Land Management Trusts:
              Tyalgum Public Recreation and Preservation of Native Flora and Fauna Reserve Trust.
              Kalianna Reserve Trust.
              Lambton Mechanics Institute Trust.
          (2) The terms of appointment are that a member of a trust is normally appointed for a period of 5 years and they are bound by the Crown Lands Act 1989.
          (3) The date of appointment and duration of these appointments is as follows:
              Mr D. F. C. Beck, M.P., Member for Murwillumbah, was originally appointed to the Tyalgum Public Recreation and Preservation of Native Flora and Fauna Reserve Trust on 27 February 1976. His most recent appointment was by Government Gazette of 3 July 1992 for a term expiring on 14 June 1997.
              Mr I. A. Glachan, M.P., Member for Albury, was appointed to the Kalianna Reserve Trust in 1989 for a term expiring 18 July 1994. Mr Glachan has sought reappointment for a further term of 5 years.
              Mr J. C. Price, M.P., Member for Waratah, was appointed to the Lambton Mechanics Institute Trust on 1 January 1992, the term expiring 31 December 1997.

      *303 LUNA PARK TRUST—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
          (1) When was the Luna Park Trust formed?
          (2) Who are the trustees?
          (3) Where and when were the advertisements published seeking applicants for this Trust?
          (4) What are the terms of the trustees?
          (5) Are any of the trustees employed by the Trust or any of the commercial interests in Luna Park?
          (6) How many employees are there on the Luna Park Trust?
          (7) What positions do they hold?
          (8) What is their salary?

      Page 562
          (9) How much has been allocated to the Trust in the form of grants and on what dates were they approved and granted, and by whom?
          (10) Who prepared the submissions for these grants?
          (11) How much is by way of loan?
          (12) Has the Crown Solicitor and the Treasury approved the loan arrangements?
          (13) When will Luna Park be operating?
          Answer—
          (1) The Luna Park Trust was established by the Luna Park Site Act 1990. Assent to this Act was given in September 1990 and it was proclaimed in October of the same year.
          (2) The current trustees of the Luna Park Reserve Trust are:
              Mr J. Armstrong (Chairman).
            Mr A. Anderson.
            Ms R. Crichton.
            Mr S. Marshall.
            Mr G. Nock, A.M., O.B.E.
            Ms R. Read.
          (3) The above individuals were appointed by invitation.
          (4) All the Trustees were appointed for a period commencing on 12 October 1990 and expiring on 11 October 1995.
          (5) No.
          (6) 2.
          (7) General Manager.
          Secretary.
          (8) $110,000 p.a.
          $30,000 p.a.
          (9) The following grants have been provided to the Trust for the management and administration of Luna Park Reserve:
          Amount Approval Date Purpose
      $60,000 Minister for Lands 17.10.90 Security.
          $150,000 Minister for Lands 18.12.90 Ongoing site management.
          $120,000 Premiers Department 25.3.91 Plan of Management.
      $290,000 Premiers Department 6.8.91 Ongoing site management.
      $216,000 Premiers Department 17.8.92 Ongoing site management.
          $750,000 Premiers Department 1.10.93 Administration and ongoing site management.
          $24.9 m Premier 19.11.91 Redevelopment costs. Staged pay-ments based on completion of works. As at 31.3.94 a total of $20.1 million has been paid to the Trust.
          (10) Mr D. A. Sinclair, Assistant Director, Crown Land Management.
          (11) None
          (12) Not applicable
          (13) It is currently envisaged that the Park will be operational in late 1994.


      Page 563
      *304 PADDY'S MARKET LEASES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
          (1) Did he tell Paddy's Market stallholders at the opening of Paddy's Market at Haymarket on Saturday, 11 December 1993, that he had negotiated the 99-year sublease of the Sydney Market Authority down to a 25-year sublease?
          (2) Did he direct the Sydney Market Authority to forego its 99-year sublease in favour of a 25-year sublease as foreshadowed by him in the House on 9 November 1993?
          (3) Did the Sydney Market Authority in its Annual Report for 1992/93 value the 99-year sublease at $12.1 million on 1991 values?
          (4) How much has the asset of the 99-year sublease been devalued by the direction to truncate the sublease to 25 years?
          (5) What is the amount of consideration given by the developer to the Government or the Sydney Market Authority in return for the developer's obligation to provide a 99-year sublease being reduced to a 25-year sublease?
          (6) Did the developer receive development incentives in return for offering a 99-year sublease and an obligation to return Paddy's to the Haymarket site?
          (7) (a) Do those development incentives remain in place?
            (b) If not, why?
          (8) Will the Government compensate the Sydney Market Authority for downgrading the value of the asset of the 99-year sublease?
          (9) Will the Government compensate the Sydney Market Authority for the subsequent loss of income caused by the direction?
          (10) Has he directed or negotiated any other alterations to the original 99-year sublease?
          (11) Does the new sublease make a provision for, in any circumstances, the sublease to be terminated prior to the 25-year period?
          (12) Has he at any time indicated to stallholders or the Sydney Market Authority that the Government wished to sell its interest in Paddy's Markets?
          (13) If so, why did he participate in the renegotiation of the 99-year sublease to a 25-year sublease?
          (14) Will the truncation of the sublease to 25 years adversely affect the value of the tradeable stand rights of Paddy's Market stallholders at Haymarket?
          (15) Will the Government offer stallholders compensation as a result of the adverse effect on tradeable stand rights because of the 99-year sublease being truncated to a 25-year sublease?
          (16) Were stallholders forced to accept the Sydney Market Authority's terms and conditions of occupancy for Paddy's Haymarket before they were allowed to return there to trade?
          (17) Do those terms and conditions include a provision that states permits in respect of stands subsist only for so long as the Authority conducts the market?
          (18) Do those terms and conditions also indicate that upon the Authority ceasing for any reason whatever to conduct such market, all permits then subsisting shall terminate and the stallholders shall thereafter have no right of use or occupancy?
          (19) Who were the stallholders advised of some or all of the alterations to be made to the sublease by him or his office?
          Answer—
          (1) Stallholders were advised that the term of the Authority's occupancy rights is now 25 years.
          (2) Yes.
          (3) Yes.

      Page 564
          (4) $1 million.
          (5) Nil.
          (6) No.
          (7) (a) Not applicable.
            (b) Not applicable.
          (8) This matter is under consideration by the Government in the context of Community Service Obligation policies.
          (9) This matter is under consideration by the Government in the context of Community Service Obligation policies.
          (10) Yes.
          (11) The new agreement may be terminated prior to the 25-year period only by the consent of both parties or through default or breach.
          (12) I have mentioned this in statements to stallholders.
          (13) The new agreement incorporated a number of changes which were variously to the advantage of the Government or the developer.
          (14) This is for the marketplace to determine.
          (15) No, for the reason explained in answer to question (14).
          (16) All standholders were required to accept the terms and conditions of occupancy as a condition of trade. All standholders were provided the opportunity to comment on the new conditions prior to their confirmation and the elected Paddy's Advisory Committee was also consulted. As a result of these consultations a number of changes were made to the conditions.
          (17) Yes, a similar provision was also included in the terms and conditions of occupancy for the Redfern Markets.
          (18) Yes. This provision is similar to the previous provision at Redfern.
          (19) Yes.

      *310 PROMOTION TO SENIOR SERGEANT OF THOMAS COLQUHOUN—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) Were the circumstances of the promotion to Senior Sergeant of Thomas Colquhoun sent to some members of the Select Committee into Police Promotions by way of an anonymous letter?
          (2) (a) Were any investigations held as to where the anonymous letter may have come from?
            (b) If so, by whom?
          (3) Was the matter drawn to the attention of the Ombudsman?
          (4) If not, will he as a matter of urgency, refer such document to the Ombudsman:
            (a) To take into account any wrongdoing on Colquhoun's part along with other matters being investigated by the Ombudsman?
            (b) To see whether proper procedures exist for checking the validity or otherwise of material contained in applications for promotion?
          (5) (a) Were the contents of such letter disregarded because it was anonymous?
            (b) If not, what aspects of it were taken into account?
          (6) If there was an anonymous letter, did it refer to Senior Sergeant Thomas Colquhoun directly or were the circumstances described alluding to Senior Sergeant Thomas Coloquhoun?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) (a) No investigation was made as to the authorship of the letter.
            (b) Not applicable.

      Page 565
          (3) Yes. In a report dated 25 October 1990, the Assistant Commissioner, Professional Responsibility, forwarded a copy of the complaint to the Office of the Ombudsman as well as the Independent Commission Against Corruption.
          (4) (a) and (b) Not applicable.
          (5) (a) The contents of the letter were investigated by the Ombudsman who decided not to take any action.
            (b) Not applicable.
          (6) The anonymous letter referred to Senior Sergeant Thomas Colquhoun by name and position.

      *311 PROMOTION OF DETECTIVE SENIOR SERGEANT BOB CLARK—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) Did Detective Sergeant Clark recently win an appeal before GREAT in relation to a position of the rank of Inspector in the police Liquor and Gaming Investigation Section?
          (2) In view of the precedent created when the Police Board and the then Minister for Police refused to promote a Detective Sergeant Sellwood who had no charges, civil or departmental, pending against him, does the Minister propose to adopt a similar stand in relation to Detective Sergeant Clark?
          (3) In relation to the Deputy Ombudsman's Inquiry concluded earlier this year, wherein findings clearly adverse to Detective Sergeant Clark were made, will a completely independent counsel be engaged to advise the Police Service on the Deputy Ombudsman's findings concerning departmental matters?
          (4) What advice was given by the barrister engaged by the Police Service in relation to the Deputy Ombudsman's findings adverse to Detective Sergeant Clark?
          (5) Is that barrister employed by or otherwise retained by the Police Service?
          (6) Did the barrister concerned have his chambers located in the Avery Building which is in fact police headquarters?
          (7) Is that barrister a member of the Independent Bar acting as a general counsel?
          (8) If so, why are his chambers located in the Avery Building?
          (9) What are the financial arrangements between that barrister and the Police Service?
          (10) On what basis did the Police Service regard the barrister as being independent of the Police Service when deciding to seek independent counsel in the matter of the Deputy Ombudsman's findings relative to Detective Sergeant Clark?
          (11) If the barrister is employed or retained by the Police Service and has chambers in the Avery Building, is he completely satisfied that proper processes of obtaining independent legal advice in the Clark matter have been followed?
          (12) In order to ensure fairness in relation to this matter, will he order that a second advising be obtained from counsel truly independent of the Police Service?
          (13) Will he take steps to ensure that Detective Sergeant Clark's promotion will be withheld until all court and departmental matters, including a civil action still pending in the Supreme Court alleging a civil conspiracy, are properly dispensed with, particularly in light of the precedent created in the Sellwood matter?
          (14) Is he aware that the former Ombudsman found that Detective Sergeant Clark had previously breached Police Regulations 50 and 51?
          (15) What action was taken by the Police Service in relation to that finding?
          (16) Will he express confidence in the suitability, fitness and propriety of Detective Sergeant Clark to be promoted to the position of Inspector in the Police Service?


      Page 566
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) Each case is considered on its individual merits.
          (3) Yes.
          (4) That is privileged information.
          (5) The barrister is a member of the NSW Bar retained as General Counsel for the Police Service with a right of self practice.
          (6) Yes.
          (7) See response to (5).
          (8) For reasons of confidentiality and convenience. The arrangement has the approval of the Council of the NSW Bar Association.
          (9) Payment is on a fee per day basis.
          (10) General Counsel is an experienced and able member of the Bar and it is part of his retainer that he should advise on disciplinary matters.
          (11) The Ombudsman's recommendation was a matter for decision by the Commissioner of Police.
          (12) The Commissioner of Police has decided to seek a second advising.
          (13) Yes.
          (14) The former Ombudsman recommended that no action should be taken.
          (15) See above.
          (16) See response to (2).

      *317 MUDD CREEK—Mr Hunter asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) Is the Hunter Water Corporation aware of the degraded state of Mudd Creek at Blackalls Park in the electorate of Lake Macquarie?
          (2) Has the Hunter Water Corporation held discussions with Lake Macquarie City Council on the rehabilitation of Mudd Creek?
          (3) What was the outcome of these discussions?
          (4) (a) Will the Hunter Water Corporation contribute to the rehabilitation of Mudd Creek?
            (b) If not, why not?
          Answer—
          I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the Hunter Water Corporation is a State-owned corporation, fully accountable and responsible for determination of operational matters such as this. All matters concerning its operations should therefore be referred directly to the Corporation.
          To be of assistance, the Minister has referred the Member of Lake Macquarie's questions to the Managing Director of the Hunter Water Corporation for direct reply.

      *318 ETHNIC FUNDING—ELECTORATE OF LAKE MACQUARIE—Mr Hunter asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice—
          (1) What financial assistance has the Ethnic Affairs Commission provided to ethnic community groups in the electorate of Lake Macquarie?
          (2) What are the names of these community groups?
          (3) What amount of money was provided to each group?
          (4) How much of these funds came from Federal sources?

      Page 567
          Answer—
          (1) Since no applications for assistance were received from groups in the electorate of Lake Macquarie in this financial year, no financial assistance has been provided by the Ethnic Affairs Commission directly to ethnic community groups in the electorate of Lake Macquarie to date during the 1993/94 financial year.
          (2) Not applicable, refer to the answer to question (1).
          (3) Not applicable, refer to the answer to question (1).
          (4) Not applicable, refer to the answer to question (1).
          Details of grants in previous years are contained in the annual reports of the Ethnic Affairs Commission which have been tabled in Parliament.

      *319 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) If there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
          Answer—
          The Premier’s Administration covers agencies such as the Auditor-General’s Office, Office of Economic Development, The Cabinet Office and the Government Pricing Tribunal. They operate on a whole-of-State basis and are not focused on electorates. Moorebank receives comparable attention to other electorates according to need.
          The State Electoral Office does provide services which can be identified on an electorate basis. For example, the conduct of State elections and by-elections and for Local Government elections and by-elections in council areas. Indirectly, it may also service electors in the electorate for statutory and industrial ballots functions.
          For the last State general election held in March 1991 the Electoral Office would have spent approximately $100,000 in the electorate of Moorebank and for the last Local Government general elections held in September 1991, about $15,000.
          The Electoral Office services to electorates in the future will continue to be to:
            (a) prepare an electoral roll for use in state elections and by-elections and Local Government elections and by-elections.
            (b) prepare the registration of political parties in local council areas.
            (c) provide information to local council areas regarding electors and registration of political parties.


      Page 568
      *321 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
          With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
          (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within the portfolio area of the Minister for Tourism?
          (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
          (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
            (a) 1990/91?
            (b) 1991/92?
            (c) 1992/93?
            (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
          (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
          (5) If there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
          Answer—
          (1) Nil. The NSW Tourism Commission does not operate on an electorate or Local Government area basis. Its operations cover tourism marketing zones, and the electorate of Moorebank comes under the Greater Sydney Tourism Marketing Zone. Constituents of the electorate of Moorebank have access to the Commission's normal services from its Head Office staff such as international and domestic marketing advice, product and development advice, research and statistical findings and tourism planning advice.
          (2) The Greater Sydney Product Development Co-Ordinator and other specialist head office staff.
          (3) (a) Nil.
          (b) Nil.
      (c) Nil.
          (d) $100,000 for Greater Sydney Tourism Marketing Committee.
          (4) Nil.
          (5) Not applicable.

      *323 INEBRIATES DETENTION—Mr Mills asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) How many people were detained under the Inebriates Act in 1992/93?
          (2) What were the minimum, average and maximum periods of detention?
          (3) To which institutions were they sent and how many to each?
          (4) What are the catchment areas for each of these institutions?
          Answer—
          (1) to (4) This is a matter for the Minister for Police.

      *326 NEWCASTLE SHOWGROUND AND EXHIBITION CENTRE TRUST—Mr Price asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
          When will the 1992/93 Annual Report of the Newcastle Showground and Exhibition Centre Trust be tabled?

      Page 569
          Answer—
          The Newcastle Showground and Exhibition Centre Trust annual report was tabled on 17 March 1994.

      *330 ENERGY CONSERVATION MEASURES—HOMEBUSH BAY—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) What specific plans has the Government prepared for energy conservation measures to be introduced in the construction program for the Olympic sporting facilities at Homebush Bay?
          (2) In particular, what plans does the Government have for the application of solar energy measures for Homebush Bay?
          (3) What are the energy conservation measures for Homebush Bay?
          Answer—
          I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
          (1) The Government is committed to the principles of ecologically sustainable development including a greater emphasis on energy conservation. Flowing from these principles the Government, through its agencies, will ensure that the Homebush Bay facilities fully address the guidelines which apply within Australia.
          (2) There is a clear recognition within the Government that solar energy will play a significant part in overall planning at Homebush Bay.
          (3) The Government is acting to ensure that energy conservation measures at Homebush Bay will demonstrate the leading edge of practical technologies.

      *331 BUILDING INDUSTRY TASK FORCE—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) Has the Building Industry Task Force provided the Attorney General with regular reports in accordance with the recommendation of the Royal Commissioner, Mr Roger Gyles, Q.C.?
          (2) If so, have the reports been tabled in Parliament in accordance with the recommendation of the Royal Commissioner, Roger Gyles, Q.C.?
          (3) If not, why not?
          (4) In the 1992/93 financial year, have unions sought advice from the Building Industry Task Force?
          (5) If so:
            (a) On how many occasions did unions seek advice from the Building Industry Task Force?
            (b) What unions sought this advice?
            (c) What did this advice relate to?
          Answer—
          (1) Royal Commissioner Gyles, Q.C., only referred to reporting by the BITF in the Royal Commission's First Interim Report dated 4 March 1991. This Report recommended the establishment of the BITF for a period of 12 months. Royal Commissioner Gyles said:

      Page 570
            "I would also recommend that the head of the Task Force be obliged to report progress to the Premier and Attorney General as well as to the Director (of Public Prosecutions) and the Commissioner (of Police) at the expiration of the 12 months term. I would recommend that the Report be in a form that would enable it to be tabled in Parliament, even if portions of it could not be made public for fears of affecting current or proposed criminal proceedings".
          Hence, it is not correct to say that Royal Commissioner Gyles recommended "regular reports" as the question suggests. What was recommended was a final report at the expiration of the life of the task force.
          (2) No.
          (3) At the time of Royal Commissioner Gyles' First Interim Report in March 1991, it was envisaged that there be only one report from the BITF at the expiration of its term on 30 September 1992. The term of the BITF has now been extended.
          (4) Yes.
          (5) (a) In the period 1 July 1992 to 30 June 1993 there were six separate occasions on which unions sought advice from the BITF. These include matters where a union sought BITF investigation of its complaint.
            (b) It would be inappropriate for the unions concerned to be named. Those who approach the BITF to make a complaint or seek advice should be able to do so secure in the knowledge that this information will not be made public. It is possible to indicate, however, that the number of unions on behalf of which approaches were made to the BITF in the period was four.
            (c) Given the concerns outlined in answer to part (b), of this question, it is appropriate only to say that the advice related to criminal, civil and industrial matters.

      *332 BUILDING INDUSTRY TASK FORCE COSTS—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          With regard to the expenditure by the Building Industry Task Force for the 1992/93 financial year—
          (1) (a) Was a total of $527,849 expended on fees for service?
            (b) To whom were these fees paid?
            (c) How much was paid?
            (d) For what services?
          (2) (a) Was a total of $131,834 expended on a building fitout program?
            (b) What specific fitouts were undertaken with this program?
            (c) What was spent on labour and what on materials?
          (3) (a) Was a total of $158,331 expended on security?
            (b) What specifically was this sum expended on?
            (c) Who received this/these payment/s?
          (4) (a) Was a total of $117,978 expended on furniture?
            (b) What furniture was purchased with these funds?
            (c) Into whose offices was this furniture placed?
            (d) From whom was the furniture purchased?
          (5) How much money was recovered for the State by the Building Industry Task Force in 1992/93 financial year?


      Page 571
          Answer—
          (1) (a) Yes.
            (b) to (d) As the fees for service involve the retention of personnel associated with criminal investigations it is not appropriate to identify such consultants.
          (2) (a) Yes.
            (b) During the Royal Commission the Government leased from the State Authorities Superannuation Board 3½ levels of 109 Pitt Street. Following the conclusion of the Royal Commission, the BITF released 1½ floors of office space. As a result, $80,410 was paid to the State Authorities Superannuation Board for the cost of "making good" the quit premises, as required by the terms of the lease. A further $51,424 was expended in alterations to the two retained floors in order to accommodate all BITF personnel on those floors. For example, the former Royal Commission hearing room was adapted for document storage. The net effect of these measures was a significant saving on rental.
            (c) The fitout was undertaken by the Department of Public Works. PWD rendered an account to the BITF which it paid. The BITF was not provided with an itemised account as to labour and materials.
          (3) (a) Since much of the work of the BITF involves sensitive criminal investigation, security systems were installed for the amount specified.
            (b) Provision of security personnel on-site at BITF premises at 109 Pitt Street between the hours of 4 p.m. and 8 a.m. on weekdays and for 24 hours on Saturdays and Sundays and public holidays.
            (c) New South Wales Police Service.
          (4) (a) Yes.
            (b) From the time of its establishment, the BITF had been leasing its office furniture. A decision was taken to purchase the office furniture instead of continuing to lease it. The type of furniture purchased included desks, chairs and bookcases.
            (c) Substantial part of both floors consists of open-plan offices. The furniture is continuing to be used by the majority of BITF personnel. The net effect over time of the purchase was a significant saving on rental.
            (d) Furniture placements.
          (5) The total amount which was recovered for the State with the assistance of the building Industry Task Force in 1992/93 was $5,316,000—funds being regarded as having been "recovered" where a legally binding agreement to pay has been entered into. With respect to unsuccessful tenderers fees alone, the BITF assisted the Construction Policy Steering Committee and its members to secure agreements to pay the Government $3,056,000. A refund of unsuccessful tenderers fees of $2,089,000 was actually received by the Government in the financial year. In addition, the Commonwealth Government secured from contractors, with the assistance of the BITF, just under $6.1 million in unsuccessful tenderers fees.

      *333 BUILDING INDUSTRY TASK FORCE INVESTIGATIONS—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
          (1) What was the total number of investigations by the Building Industry Task Force for the 1992/93 financial year:
            (a) For civil matters?
            (b) For criminal matters?

      Page 572
          (2) For each of the above, how many subjects of investigations fall into the following categories:
            (a) Employers?
            (b) Union officials?
            (c) Union members?
            (d) Wage employees?
            (e) Contractors?
            (f) Other?
          (3) (a) What is the breakdown into categories for civil investigations (e.g., "no ticket no start")?
            (b) What is the breakdown into categories for criminal investigations (e.g., "intimidation")?
          (4) For each of the above categories, how many subjects of investigation fall into the following sub-categories:
            (a) Employers?
            (b) Union officials?
            (c) Union members?
            (d) Wage employees?
            (e) Contractors?
            (f) Others?
          (5) How many successful prosecutions initiated by the Building Industry Task Force were completed in the 1992/93 financial year?
          (6) Of the criminal charges laid in 1992/93 financial year, what is:
            (a) Total number of charges made?
            (b) Total number of people charged?
            (c) Total number of firms charged?
            (d) Total number of charges relating to matters raised, in respect to those persons by the Royal Commission into the Building Industry?
            (e) Total number of charges related to matters canvassed in respect to those firms, by the Royal Commission?
          (7) Of the total of people charged, what is the category of person, e.g., union officials, union members, employers, wage employees, contractors, other?
          (8) How many civil proceedings were taken by the Building Industry Task Force on behalf of other parties in 1992/93 financial year?
          (9) How many civil proceedings did the Building Industry Task Force assist other parties with in the 1992/93 financial year?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) As a 30 June 1993, there were 115 civil matters under current investigation by the BITF with 163 further matters classified as "non-current" (meaning that the matter had either been dealt with by the BITF or a decision had been taken that there be no further action).
            (b) As at 30 June 1993, there were 74 criminal matters under current investigation by the BITF with 169 further matters classified as "non-current" (meaning that charges had been laid or a decision had been taken that there be no further action).

      Page 573
          (2) (a) to (f)
          Criminal
          The BITF utilises the following categories:
      Suspect/Offender TypesCurrentNon-Current
      Union official/delegate1058
      Project Manager813
      Company Director or Manager3222
      Building contractor/construction company1216
      Subcontractor512
      Scaffolding contractor630
      Consultant32
      Employer organisation (MBA/AFCC)1011
      Reputed professional criminal731
      Employee (general)33
      Public Official36
      These figures total more than 74 + 169 respectively and some matters have more than one offender type.
          Civil
      Party Complained AboutCurrentNon-CurrentTotal
      Non-Union394988
      Union*76114190
      115163278
      * Union includes BWIU, CFMEU, AWU, FEBFA, OPDU, PGEU, FIMEE also includes complaints about organisers and delegates.
          (3) (a)
      CategoryCurrentNon-CurrentTotal
      Abuse of Right of Entry4711
      Abuse of Safety-1616
      Advice on awards2810
      Breaching Dispute Settlement Procedures156
      CERT/BUSS172138
      Collusive Tendering224
      Contempt of AIRC/Federal Court-33
      Defective Building Works-44
      Demarcations/amalgamations3-3
      Page 574
      Election Irregularities
      -11
      Fraud9514
      Insolvency-11
      Intimidation81523
      MBA Apprenticeship Scheme156
      No ticket, no start (S481)303464
      Payment for time lost112
      Predatory pricing2-2
      Price fixing336
      Recovery of arrear of union dues-66
      Roping-in6-6
      Secondary boycotts/bans151530
      Sector Agreements426
      Site Allowances112
      Top-up-44
      Union Restrictive Practices6410
      Total115163278
            (b)
      Offence TypesCurrentNon-CurrentTotal
      Extortion21921
      Assault178
      Intimidation (including conspiracy)53540
      Officer/solicit corrupt benefit275178
      Conspiracy to cheat and defraud131124
      Obtain money/benefit by deception131831
      Forgery3-3
      Stealing-88
      False testimony (RCBI)81321
      Malicious damage-22
      Trespass-11
      Tax Offence224
      CTRA Breach-11
      Trade whilst insolvent-11
      Page 575

          (4) (a) to (f) Data not available.
          (5) Between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 1993, the BITF completed six successful prosecutions.
          (6) (a) Between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 1993, 27 offences were alleged either by way of charge or summons.
            (b) The total number of people proceeded against was 14.
            (c) Nil (although four company directors and one accountant were proceeded against).
            (d) Between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 1993, 19 charge or summons matters were intiated with respect to matters raised before the Royal Commission.
            (e) Not applicable.
          (7) The people charged or proceeded by way of summons between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 1993 were:
              Horse Trainer.
              Plumber.
              Company Director.
              Council Worker.
              Company Director.
              Machine Operator.
              Stock Buyer.
              Company Director.
              Accountant.
              Site Supervisor (former company director).
              BWIU organiser.
              Secretary, South Cost Labour Council.
              Area organiser, Australian Workers' Union.
              Former BWIU organiser.
          (8) Between July 1992 and 30 June 1993, the BITF did not initiate any civil proceedings. However, in early February 1993, as a result of pickets on a NSW Government project (Richmond TAFE), BITF investigators took statements from witnesses as to the prevention and hindering of supplies to the site. Those statements were briefed, through the Crown Solicitor, to counsel who advised that there was sufficient evidence to seek an interlocutory injunction. The BITF prepared to take such proceedings. Just before papers were filed in the Federal Court, Dennis Matthews of the CFMEU gave an undertaking to the builder, Stuart Bros, which rendered such proceedings unnecessary.
          (9) On one occasion between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 1993, the BITF directly assisted other parties in civil proceedings. In early November 1992, a site at Bulli was the subject of picketing. The builder and developer instituted proceedings in the Federal Court of Australia and on 6 November 1992, Justice Einfield issued an interlocutory injunction against the picketers.
          In March 1993, guidelines were issued which apply specifically to the following BITF functions.
              •applying for injunctions to restrain unions and their officials from engaging in unlawful secondary boycotts and black bans. The Government can apply to the Federal Court for an injunction to restrain actual or threatened breaches of the Trade Practices Act.
              •facilitating actions by small businesses affected by bans or boycotts, including the provision of advice.


      Page 576
      *337 OPERA HOUSE—Ms Allan asked the Treasurer and Minister for the Arts—
          (1) What financial problems are currently being experienced by the Opera House?
          (2) Why have these problems occurred?
          (3) What strategies are being put in place to deal with them?
          Answer—
          (1) There are no financial problems being currently experienced by the Opera House that are either outside the normal budgetary cycle or part of the appropriate review process by management.
          (2) Not applicable.
          (3) Not applicable.

      *341 OFFICE OF THE AGEING—REDUNDANCY PAYMENTS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
          (1) How many employees of the Office of the Ageing have received redundancy payments in the financial years ending 30 June:
            (a) 1988?
            (b) 1989?
            (c) 1990?
            (d) 1991?
            (e) 1992?
            (f) 1993?
          (2) How many employees that have received redundancy payments have been re-employed in the Office of the Ageing as:
            (a) Senior Executive Service?
            (b) Permanent?
            (c) Casual/Temporary?
            (d) Contract?
            (e) Consultants?
          (3) What is the total payout for redundancies in each of the financial years ended 30 June:
            (a) 1988?
            (b) 1989?
            (c) 1990?
            (d) 1991?
            (e) 1992?
            (f) 1993?
          Answer—
          (1) There has only been one redundancy payment in 1992.
          (2) Not applicable.
          (3) A redundancy payment of $15,690.80 was paid in 1992.


      Page 577
      *342 DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS—REDUNDANCY PAYMENTS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads and Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport—
          (1) How many employees of the Department of Consumer Affairs received redundancy payments in the financial years ending 30 June:
            (a) 1988?
            (b) 1989?
            (c) 1990?
            (d) 1991?
            (e) 1992?
            (f) 1993?
          (2) How many employees that received redundancy payments have been re-employed in the Department as:
            (a) Senior Executive Service?
            (b) Permanent?
            (c) Casual/Temporary?
            (d) Contract?
            (e) Consultants?
          (3) What is the total payout for redundancies in each of the financial years ended 30 June:
            (a) 1988?
            (b) 1989?
            (c) 1990?
            (d) 1991?
            (e) 1992?
            (f) 1993?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) to (c) The present Department of Consumer Affairs came into existence in 1991.
            (d) 10.
            (e) Nil.
            (f) Nil.
          (2) No employees from the Department of Consumer Affairs who received redundancy payments from the Department have been re-employed by the Department.
          (3) (a) to (c) See answer (1).
            (d) $538,000.
            (e) Nil.
            (f) Nil.

      *346 PORT MACQUARIE RACECOURSE—Mr Face asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
          (1) Have any applications been made in the last 5 years for additions or upgrading of facilities at the Port Macquarie Racecourse?
          (2) If so, what were the applications for and what would they have achieved if monies from the Racecourse Development Fund were to be expended?
          (3) Has there been an increase in business in the various aspects of racing at Port Macquarie in the last 5 years?
          (4) When was the last occasion that any application for monies from the Racecourse Development Fund by the Racecourse Development Committee were considered?

      Page 578
          (5) Can the Racecourse Development Committee give an indication as to when monies may be likely be expended on upgrading Port Macquarie Racecourse?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) The following applications were received for projects intended to improve convenience and safety for patrons and participants:


      6/9/88Construct a machinery shed
      Reconstruct and drain section of course proper
      Reconstruct and drain section of sand track
      $
      38,027
      15,900
      9,812
      10/2/89Seal horse walkway8,876
      31/5/89Sealing roadways and car parking areas on racecourse grounds99,334
      21/7/89Reconstruct sand training track
      Construct Equitrack training track
      192,800
      804,825
      21/7/89Reconstruct No. 2 training track
      Replace roof of dining room
      Construct access track to 1,200 metre chute
      Drainage to course proper
      Drainage to machinery shed
      85,000
      6,649
      6,460
      4,600
      3,562
      13/12/89Reconstruct irrigation system14,869
      28/8/90Professional fees to commission a consultant to report on design feasibility and cost estimates of major improvements to patrons' facilitiesNot advised
      6/12/90Professional fees for master plan drawings, grandstand design drawings, D A drawings and preliminary budget estimates 60,000
      15/4/91Preparation of sketch plans and preliminary budgets
      Sink a test bore for water
      10,000
      5,900
      7/8/91Costs associated with construction of a new grandstand
      Professional fees
      Building alterations
      Semaphore Board
      Furniture, crockery, cutlery, TV sets
      2,695,830
      280,000
      80,000
      40,000
      60,000
      27/2/92Supply and install electric water pump13,099
      12/8/92Consultants fees for design development, the co-ordination of consultants and authorities, D A drawings and publicity associated with grandstand project160,000
      3/5/93Chute guide1,040
      5/11/93Additional fees for planning and design of amended proposal— two-level grandstand instead of three33,000
      Page 579

          Of these applications, a total of $351,240 has been allocated to the Port Macquarie Raceclub through Racecourse Development Funds for the years 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992 and 1993. These were as follows:


      1/5/88Training tracks$
      14,000
      1/10/88Improvements to training tracks9,800
      1/10/88Improvements to course proper17,000
      1/10/88Machinery sheds and storage buildings26,000
      1/3/89Paving, roads, carparks, footpaths, fences7,100
      1/10/89Paving, roads, carparks, footpaths, fences127,000
      1/2/90Improvements to irrigation and water supply12,000
      1/5/91Improvements to irrigation and water supply2,000
      1/5/91Preparation of sketch plans10,000
      27/2/92Improvements to irrigation and water supply 5,300
      1/8/93Consultants fees associated with grandstand project120,000
      12/8/93Improvements to running rails1,040
          (3) Results of meetings conducted at Port Macquarie over the last 5 years are as follows:


      YearsNo. of MeetingsOn-course Tote
      Turnover
      Bookmakers
      Turnover
      1988/8928$
      2,176,627
      $
      4,967,318
      1989/90251,113,4515,236,129
      1990/91261,767,1026,060,137
      1991/92272,011,0894,947,471
      1992/93262,777,5495,051,967
      (4) 5 November 1993.
          (5) Applications for financial assistance in respect of projects at Port Macquarie with estimated costs of less than $100,000 will be considered on receipt. However, major projects, viz., those in excess of $100,000, will not be considered until the RDC's funding review in 1996/97.


      Page 580
      *347 RACECOURSE DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE ALLOCATIONS—Mr Face asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
          (1) What was the amount of money made available in each of the years 1990, 1991, 1992 and 1993 with regard to allocation of funds from the Racecourse Development Committee from the Racecourse Development Fund?
          (2) What projects were funded from each of those years allocations?
          (3) How long had each project been waiting for approval since their application was approved for each of those years projects from previous years?
          (4) (a) Was there a reduction in the 1993 allocation of monies from the Racecourse Development Fund?
            (b) If so, what was the reason for the reduction?
            (c) What was the percentage rate?
          (5) (a) During the same years, was there any allocation of monies for evaluation, for value management studies, or any type of report for a particular project?
            (b) If so, what were they and what was the money allocation and expended on each project?
          (6) (a) Were there any special applications and subsequent approvals for evaluations, value management studies or feasibility studies?
            (b) If so, where were they, who was the recipient, what was the money approved and what was the subsequent expenditure?
          Answer—

      (1) The amount of funding approved was as follows:
            1989/90 $51,002,563
      1990/91 $16,345,285
      1991/92 $16,936,714
      1992/93 $5,288,424
      (2) and (3) To provide the detailed information requested in the member's question would impinge on the resources and time of senior department officers. It is estimated that the work required to compile the data requested would involve over 600 person hours. For this reason, I am not willing to divert resources from the Department's core responsibilities to meet this request. General statistical information is available in both the Department's and the TAB's annual reports. These are freely available and the member is welcome to inspect them personally.
      (4) (a) Yes. See table below.
        YearIncome to FundAmount
        Approved
        Amount Actually
        Allocated*
        1991/92$28,049,299$16,936,714$27,566,623
        1992/93$22,239,826$5,288,424$11,246,995
    * Includes amounts brought forward from prior years approvals.

          Page 581
          (b) Decisions on the allocation of finance to the Racecourse Development Fund are based on recommendations from the TAB following consultation with the racing industry generally. In this regard and so as to lessen the effects of the 1993 economic downturn, the TAB and the racing industry felt it more appropriate to maintain the level of distribution to the various racing clubs by reducing payments to the RDF, thereby enabling the clubs to meet their normal day-to-day expenses including the payment of prize money rather than for the money to be paid into the Fund for Capital Developments to Racecourses.
          In approving of this recommendation, I received assurances from the Racecourse Development Committee that its level of funding during the current financial year would be sufficient to meet its anticipated expenditure. To that end, it is pointed out that projected expenditure from the Fund during the current financial year is some $13.2 million compared to $11.2 million during 1992/93. The increased level of expenditure from the Fund during 1993/94 has been made possible as a result of savings during 1992/93.
          (c) Income to the RDF in 1992/93 was 20.7 per cent less than the previous year.
          (5) (a) Yes.
          (b) Wentworth Park Trustees $3,441
          Newcastle Harness Racing Club $7,000
          NSW Harness Racing Club $5,000
          Sydney Turf Club $6,600
          Albury Greyhound Racing Club $3,300
          Goulburn and District Race Club $5,410
          Scone Race Club $3,200
          Fairfield H R & Agric Ltd $3,600
          (6) (a) No.
          (b) Not applicable.

          *348 GOULBURN RACECOURSE—Mr Face asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) Has there been an announcement recently for approval for the NSW Department of Public Works being appointed Project Manager for the construction of a new $6.5 million racecourse at Goulburn?
              (2) Who appointed the Public Works Department for this purpose?
              (3) Will such Project Manager be the first step in proceeding forwards to a development application for the project?
              (4) (a) Have any further monies been pledged for the development application?
                (b) If so, by whom and for how much and from what source was it funded?
              (5) (a) Is the proposed development at Goulburn a priority of the Racecourse Development Committee?
                (b) If so, on what criteria?
              (6) When was the Goulburn project first committed for consideration to the Racecourse Development Committee?
              (7) What evaluations have there been for the construction of the Goulburn Racecourse with regard to:
                (a) A racing-related business point of view?
                (b) A cost benefit impact statement?
                (c) Its ability to attract new non-racing related development?
                (d) Its ability to attract trainers into the area and other ancillary racing activities?
                (e) Additional nominations on race days?

          Page 582
                (f) Its extra turnover in comparison to its present turnover as to whether or not it will affect other galloper meetings in the racing calendar?
                (g) Whether it will affect the other racing codes in the region?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
          (2) The Racecourse Development Committee.
          (3) Yes.
          (4) (a) Yes.
          (b) Following a recommendation by the RDC, I approved in principle of an amount of $120,000 being provided from the Racecourse Development Fund for costs associated with the preparation of the Development Application.
          (5) (a) Yes.
          (b) The proposed development of a Racing/Training Complex at Goulburn was announced by the then Minister, the Hon. R. B. Rowland Smith, M.L.C., in May 1989 following a recommendation from the Racecourse Development Committee.
              In making the recommendation, the RDC was acting on advice received from the Australian Jockey Club and the Conference of Country Racing Associations as well as on its own investigations. Both the Australian Jockey Club and the Country Conference strongly supported the establishment of a Racing/Training Complex in each Racing Association area of New South Wales. Goulburn and District Race Club met the criteria established by the two bodies and the RDC recommended the site as there was no other location in the South East Racing Association that met the criteria.
                  Other sites for Racing/Training Centres approved by the then Minister were at Bathurst, Ballina, Dubbo, Muswellbrook, Tamworth, Taree and Wagga Wagga. With the exception of Dubbo, all the other locations have had Racing/Training Centres established or are now under construction.
          (6) 1989.
          (7) (a) to (g) A Value Management Study has been conducted and economic appraisal is now in process.
          All of the matters raised in this question will comprise part of the economic appraisal now being undertaken by Coopers & Lybrand.

          *349 FERN BAY REZONINGS—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              In view of the decision by Port Stephens Council to reject the rezoning application for the 480 hectares of Department of Housing and Howship Holdings Land at Fern Bay—
              (1) Who made the decision that tenders for the sale of the Department of Housing land at Fern Bay close 5 days before the rezoning decision?
              (2) Was this done with Ministerial approval?
              (3) Was a reserve price placed upon the land?
              (4) If so, was this reserve calculated under the present Rural 1A zoning or the potential residential zoning?
              (5) How many tenders have been submitted for the Department of Housing land?
              (6) Have any bids been submitted by any firm associated with the current rezoning application?
              (7) Given that a recession motion has ensured that the rezoning will again be debated at a special meeting on 21 December, will he clarify the status of the Department of Housing land before then?

          Page 583
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) Mr G. Hookey, Manager, Commercial Properties, Department of Housing.
              (2) No.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) The reserve price was determined following advice from the Valuer-General's Office. The valuation report describes the current and the proposed zoning of the subject land.
              (5) Two.
              (6) Yes.
              (7) The Department of Housing is investigating its options for the future use of the subject land.

          *350 NEWCASTLE BIGHT—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              In view of the complexity of the issues and the several jurisdictions involved in the management of the Newcastle Bight—
              (1) Does the Minister support the drawing up of the management plan currently being organised under the direction of the Department of Conservation and Land Management?
              (2) Will the Minister assist in providing funds for the completion of this plan?
              (3) Does the Minister support a moratorium on the alienation of any public land on the Newcastle Bight pending the outcome of the Conservation and Land Management Plan for Newcastle Bight?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) Yes.
              (2) No.
              (3) It is inappropriate for me to respond to this question in relation to public lands which are outside my portfolio responsibility.
              Part of the area included in the Draft Local Environmental Plan prepared by Port Stephens Council for the Fern Bay locality is owned by the Department of Housing. The Department has no interest in extensively developing this site. The land is to be disposed of through the Property Services Group in accordance with normal procedures.

          *351 GLENROCK STATE RECREATION AREA—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) What progress has been made on the Management Plan for the Glenrock State Recreation Area?
              (2) When will the plan be released?
              (3) What funds are available in the current budget for works in the state recreation area?
              (4) What programs are planned to use these funds?


          Page 584
              Answer—
              (1) The plan of management for Glenrock State Recreation Area has been completed and will be printed in preparation for public exhibition.
              (2) The plan of management will be released on 25 March 1994 for a period of public exhibition extending until 11 July 1994.
              (3) A total of $24,200 has been provided for works programmes/maintenance.
              (4) Radio construction/maintenance $19,470
              Gun Club road gate closure $600
              Minor maintenance works (includes dune rehabilitation and $4,130
                  removal of bakers cottages). _______
              Total $24,200
              Not costed in these figures are the salaries of NPWS District Staff, including an additional Field Officer, or the value of organisational support provided for the management of these areas from other functional areas of the Service.

          *352 MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES—COMMITTEE OF REVIEW—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              What management procedures were put in place by SRA officials to overcome management and administrative problems as identified in section 4 and 5 of the Report of the Committee of Review established to examine the report by engineer Mr V. Neary, dated 19 May 1989?
              Answer—
              Management procedures were not changed as a direct result of the findings of the Committee of Review. The need to tighten procedures had been identified by the State Rail Authority's management consultants and auditors prior to Mr Neary's report.
              However, Internal Audit, tendering and procurement procedures have been strengthened and controls on hiring consultants tightened. A compliance and review function has also been established. In addition, a Central Contracts Group, formed in 1988, overcame some project management problems identified by the Committee of Review.

          *353 COMMITTEE OF REVIEW TERMS OF REFERENCE—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              With regard to the Report of the Committee of Review finding no evidence of corruption or maladministration—
              (1) What terms of reference were given to the Auditor-General in order to undertake the review?
              (2) What changes regarding contract administration did the Auditor-General recommend to overcome the issues raised in section 4 and 5 of the review committee's report?
              (3) Will he make public the Auditor-General's examination of the review committee's report?
              Answer—
              (1) to (3) The Auditor-General did not undertake the review.


          Page 585
          *354 LOCOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE—KELSO WORKSHOP—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Are locomotives being repaired and/or maintained at the Kelso Workshop experiencing large scale quality failure?
              (2) What penalties are Clyde Industries Kelso Workshops paying for late work and apparent warranty failures?
              (3) What quality control procedures are being put in place to avoid a continuation of these problems?
              Answer—
              (1) No.
              (2) and (3) There are currently no problems with the work performance of Clyde Industries.

          *358 MAINTRAIN CONTRACT—Mr McManus asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              With regard to the MainTrain contract—
              (1) Does the contract stipulate that the SRA has to raise the capital to upgrade the workshop facility?
              (2) Did T-Corp grant the SRA a loan facility of up to $27 million to upgrade the Clyde Workshop enabling the SRA to meet its contractual obligations?
              (3) Why is the New South Wales taxpayer paying for the capital upgrading of the Clyde Workshop enabling Goninans to carry out various rail maintenance projects?
              Answer—
              (1) No.
              (2) No.
              (3) The New South Wales taxpayer is not paying for the upgrade. A commercial loan of $27 million has been made to Goninans by T-Corp. This loan is at commercial rates and must be repaid in full.

          *359 HEALTH OUTCOME COUNCILS—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) Which Area Health Services and District Health Services have established Health Outcome Councils?
              (2) What is the purpose of these councils?
              (3) What health focus has been chosen in each area?
              (4) Who are the members of the Health Outcome Council in the Hunter Area?
              Answer—
              (1) The Chief Executive Officer of each Health Area has been asked to establish at least one Health Outcome Council by 30 June 1994. General Managers of District Health Services have also been encouraged to establish Health Outcome Councils as soon as practicable, and will be required to do so by 30 June 1995.
              As of February 1994, the NSW Health Department had been advised that the following Area and District Health Services had established or were in the process of establishing Health Outcome Councils.

          Page 586
              Area Health Services: Central Sydney, Eastern Sydney, Hunter, Illawarra, Northern Sydney, South Western Sydney, Western Sydney.
              District Health Services: Barwon, Castlereagh, Evans, Far West, Hume, Macquarie, Monaro, Murray, Murrumbidgee, Orana, Richmond, Riverina, South Coast, Southern Tablelands, Tweed.
              (2) Health Outcome Councils constitute one of the major initiatives to implement the NSW Health Outcomes Program, which seeks to re-orient the planning, implementation and evaluation of health services and programs towards health outcomes.
              The overall purpose of each Health Outcome Council is to deal with a specific health problem in a Health Area or District, such as asthma, breast cancer or coronary heart disease. The Council brings together clinicians, consumers, public health specialists and managers in a forum to address five key questions and recommend action:
                  •What are the objectives of clinical and preventive services in the Health Area or District for the identified problem topic?
                  •What services are currently being provided?
                  •What indicators can be used to measure the effectiveness and quality of these services?
                  •Is information on these indicators being appropriately fed back to so that services can be continuously improved?
                  •How much is being spent on the services and could the same amount be spent differently to achieve the same or better results?
              (3) Individual Area and District Health Services decide on priority health problems to be considered by Health Outcome Councils. As of February 1994, Health Outcome Councils which have been or are being established deal with the following topics: Aboriginal health, aged care, asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, immunisation, injury, suicide, orthopaedics and tuberculosis.
              (4) The members of the Heart Health Outcome Council in the Hunter Area are:
                  Dr T. Smyth Chief Executive Officer
                  Dr R. Porter Director, Clinical Services and Planning
                  Professor P. Fletcher Cardiologist
                  Dr B. Bastian Cardiologist
                  Dr J. Siberberg Cardiologist
                  Dr J. Stephenson Director, Public Health Unit
                  Ms B. Coulter National Heart Foundation
                  Professor R. Heller Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics
                  Professor R. Sanson Fisher Hunter Centre for Health Advancement
                  Dr P. Williams Faculty of Medicine, Health Sciences
                  Dr A. Sprogis Hunter Urban Division of General Practice
                  Dr A. Dobson Centre of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

          *360 MS VIVIANA AUSTIN—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
              (1) In what field of teaching did Ms Viviana Austin (now of Kotara) first apply for accreditation to the Department of Education (DOE) and for employment with the Department?
              (2) Was this application made about March 1980?
              (3) What was the Department's original response?
              (4) Was the original recommendation of the Classifiers Committee "specialist conditionally certificated" for secondary teaching?

          Page 587
              (5) What qualifications from Chile were recognised in this assessment by the Classifiers Committee?
              (6) Did the Committee on Overseas Professional Qualifications assess Ms Austin's qualifications as "attracting graduate status in Australia" (Certificate No. 81-35)?
              (7) Who challenged the Classifiers Committee recommendations on Ms Austin?
              (8) When was the challenge made?
              (9) To whom was the challenge made?
              (10) Was the challenge made in writing?
              (11) What was the technical basis of the challenge to Ms Austin's Chilean qualifications?
              (12) With what documents was the challenge substantiated?
              (13) What were the reasons for the subsequent rejection of Ms Austin's qualifications?
              (14) Did the Classifiers Committee change its assessment?
              (15) If so:
                (a) On what basis?
                (b) Who were the members of the Classifiers Committee?
              (16) If not, who rejected the qualifications?
              (17) Why was Ms Austin not advised then, or since, of the reasons for withdrawal of the earlier decision to recognise her qualifications?
              (18) What are the differences between the qualifications of Ms Austin and those of Ms Maria Luz Escudero from the same University in Chile?
              (19) What qualifications of Ms Escudero were recognised by DOE in 1980/81 in granting accreditation?
              (20) What was the assessment of the Committee on Overseas Professional Qualifications in Ms Escudero's case?
              (21) If none, why was such assessment not obtained by DOE?
              (22) When was Ms Escudero employed as a permanent teacher?
              (23) Have assessments of Ms Austin's qualifications been made by TAFE?
              (24) If so, what were the results of these assessments?
              (25) What subjects has Ms Austin taught in TAFE?
              (26) What accreditation was awarded to Ms Austin by non-Government education bodies?
              (27) What is Ms Austin's teaching record in non-Government schools?
              (28) What were the reasons for the DOE's change of mind in reassessing Ms Austin's qualifications as at 1 May 1991?
              (29) Why was accreditation given as at 1 May 1991 for "Secondary Textiles and Design" (approval No. 80/134036)?
              (30) Why was accreditation not given as at 1 May 1991 for "Home Economics"?
              (31) What organisation in the Department of School Education (DSE) accepted Ms Austin's qualifications in part in 1991?
              (32) Has the Home Economics Special Interest Group of the NSW Teachers Federation determined that Ms Austin's qualifications are "more than adequate to teach Home Economics"?
              (33) Has Ms Austin been accredited by DSE as a teacher of Community Languages (Spanish)?
              (34) Does this accreditation entitle Ms Austin to teach HSC Spanish in Saturday and Community Language Schools?
              (35) If so, why has Ms Austin been denied accreditation for secondary school teaching of Spanish?
              (36) Do the rules of section 4.2.3 of the DOE document entitled "The Requirements for Classification as a Teacher in the NSW Education Teaching Service" still apply?
              (37) If so, on what basis does DSE deny that Ms Austin meets the requirement of one-ninth of a degree in spanish as a second teaching subject area?

          Page 588
              (38) Did Ms Austin's file in DOE contain a note stating only words to the effect of "married to Robert Austin" when inspected by her in 1988?
              (39) Was Ms Austin accompanied by Mr Alan Bruce, Welfare Officer of the Teachers Federation, at the time of inspection of her file?
              (40) If so:
                (a) Of what relevance to her file was the information about her spouse?
                (b) Was such a file entry about her spouse illegal under the then Anti-Discrimination Act?
              (41) Is that note still in her DSE file?
              (42) How many permanent teachers who qualified subsequent to 1 May 1991 have been appointed to positions in Textiles and Design ahead of Ms Austin since she was accredited at 1 May 1991?
              (43) What steps will the Minister take, and when, to remove the discrimination suffered by my constituent regarding:
                (a) Complete recognition of her qualifications?
                (b) Employment by DSE?
              Answer—
              (1) Ms Austin sought appointment to the permanent teaching staff with preferences for (1) Primary and (2) Secondary. No secondary teaching subjects were listed by Ms Austin on her application. Ms Austin also indicated that she had abilities in the Spanish language that were appropriate to teaching.
              (2) Yes, the application was received by the Department of School Education on 3 March 1980.
              (3) The Department's original response to Ms Austin was a letter dated 29 April 1980, advising that Ms Austin was not eligible to teach in the Primary area. The Department also advised:
          "The (Classifiers) Committee felt that your qualifications should be further reviewed in the light of recommendations of the Committee of Overseas Professional Qualifications, in respect of teaching in the Secondary area."
              (4) Yes.
              (5) The qualifications considered by the Classifiers Committee which led to the decision that she be classified as Specialist Conditionally Certificated (Secondary) were:
              • Diploma of Workroom Forewomen (Fashions).
              • Title of State Teacher of Manual Education and Special Techniques awarded by the Technical State University.
              (6) Yes.
              (7) Concern was raised over the decision of the Classifiers Committee by an Inspector (Home Science). These concerns were supported by senior departmental personnel.
              (8) Concerns were raised on 17 July 1980.
              (9) Concerns were relayed to the Officer-in-Charge Employment and the Director, Planning Services, Head Office, Bridge Street, Sydney.
              (10) The concerns were relayed in writing.
              (11) The Classifiers Committee regarded Ms Austin as an applicant in the area of Needlework, and recommended Specialist Conditional Certificated status in the Secondary area. This recommendation had careful regard to the rather narrow vocational nature of the studies, both at secondary and tertiary level, and was related to the Fashion Teachers' Certificate in New South Wales.

          Page 589
              The above was also considered in the light of the then Director-General's determination that students who graduated from the Fashion Teachers' Certificate (East Sydney Technical College) course could be accepted for employment with the Department up to 28 February 1977.
              (12) The documents were minuted recommendations of an Inspector (Home Science), Staff Inspector (Secondary) and Director Planning Services, as well as minutes from the Classifiers Committee of 7 August 1974.
              (13) The Director-General's determination that Needlework specialists were not to be accepted for employment with the Department of School Education after 28 February 1977.
              (14) Yes.
              (15) (a) The basis as detailed in (11) and (13).
              (b) The Classifiers Committee consisted of senior representatives from the Department, the Teachers' Federation and tertiary institutions.
              (16) Not applicable.
              (17) Ms Austin was advised, by letter dated 29 October 1980, that the Classifiers Committee had reviewed her qualifications and that "teachers with similar qualifications were eligible for employment prior to 28 February 1977, but eligibility lapsed after that date".
              (18) Ms Escudero qualified at the University of Chile as a State School Teacher in Nutrition and Domestic Science with Mentions in Manual Techniques, Special Techniques, Health and Wellbeing. Ms Escudero was approved to teach Home Science only as the courses completed satisfied requirements. The courses studied by Ms Austin compared to those studied by Ms Escudero are quite disparate.
              (19) State School Teacher in Nutrition and Domestic Science with Mentions in Manual Techniques, Special Techniques, Health and Wellbeing were the qualifications from the University in Chile.
              (20) Departmental records do not reflect whether the Committee on Overseas Professional Qualifications assessed Ms Escudero's qualifications.
              (21) The assessment of qualifications provided by the Committee on Overseas Professional Qualifications is a guide for general employment purposes as to the level of general education reached by the bearer. It is not an assessment of qualifications for purposes of employment as a teacher. Ms Escudero's qualifications met the departmental guidelines for employment.
              (22) 27 January 1981.
              (23) The TAFE Commission of NSW has no record of any assessment of Ms Austin's qualifications.
              (24) Not applicable.
              (25) Ms Austin was employed at Granville College of TAFE as an emergency part-time teacher for one only, 3-hour class in 1989. The records do not indicate course/subject taught.
              (26) Departmental records pertain to employment in Government schools only.
              (27) Departmental records pertain to employment in Government schools only.
              Information supplied by Ms Austin however, details her teaching record in non-Government schools to be:
          1980—Spanish Community School—Spanish teacher.
              1986—Rosary High School—Spanish teacher.
          1987—John Therry Catholic High School—Home Science/Textiles and Design/Early Childhood teacher.
          1989—St Joachim's Catholic Public School—Relief teacher.
              1991—Private primary and secondary schools—Relief teacher.
              (28) The reassessment of Ms Austin's qualifications occurred after a review of the Department's policy on employment of teachers with overseas qualifications in 1991 and subsequent new criteria for classification.

          Page 590
              (29) Ms Austin's qualifications allowed accreditation under the new departmental policy.
              (30) Ms Austin is not eligible for classification of secondary Home Economics as she does not have academic qualifications and training for accreditation in Home Economics.
              (31) Personnel and Employee Relations Directorate.
              (32) Yes. This group within the NSW Teachers Federation, however, is not accredited by the Department of School Education to determine qualifications for employment as a teacher.
              (33) Yes.
              (34) The Saturday School, wherever possible, employs fully qualified certificated language teachers to conduct classes. Where this is not possible, Community Language teachers such as Viviana Austin are employed.
              (35) Ms Austin will be accredited for Spanish language upon completion of Spanish II at Monash University.
              (36) Yes, but "The Requirements for Classification as a Teacher in the NSW Education Teaching Service" document is currently under review. Ms Austin was assessed under the policy on the employment of teachers with overseas qualifications.
              (37) The policy on the employment of teachers with overseas qualifications requires the assessing of subjects as first teaching subjects only. In this regard, Ms Austin is required to have 2/9 of a degree in Spanish. It is under this policy that Ms Austin's initial approval for employment and her application for accreditation for Spanish was processed.
              (38) No, refer to answer (40).
              (39) Departmental records do not reveal who was present while Ms Austin perused her file.
              (40) (a) Following Ms Austin's failure to contact the Department to arrange an interview, concern was raised that the address listed for Ms Austin was incorrect. The reference to Mr Austin states:
                  "Mrs Austin is married to Mr R. W. Austin. Have we sent the request to come to interview to the correct address. Please check Mr Austin's address."
                  Mr R. W. Austin signed Ms Austin's initial application for employment. It was only the concern that Ms Austin had not contacted the Department that led to the notation about Mr Austin.
                (b) No.
              (41) Yes.
              (42) It would be most unlikely for any applicant for employment to have been appointed to a teaching position, Textiles and Design only, subsequent to 1 May 1991.
              (43) (a) No discrimination has been suffered by Ms Austin. Her qualifications have been assessed and appropriate teaching approvals issued under guidelines and policies operating at the time. Information has been provided to Ms Austin on the further studies required for approval as a Spanish teacher.
                (b) Ms Austin is on the waiting list for employment as a teacher with the Department of School Education and is being considered for any position for which she is academically qualified. Ms Austin is also free to apply for any positions advertised by the Department in her subject areas.

          *361 GOVERNMENT CLEANING SERVICE—ELECTORATE OF WALLSEND—Mr Mills asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
              With regard to the sale of the Government Cleaning Service—
              (1) Has the Government guaranteed that all regular cleaning and supervisory staff will be offered continuity of employment until July 1995?
              (2) How many full-time Government Cleaning Service staff are employed in the electorate of Wallsend?

          Page 591
              (3) Will all the full-time staff be employed after the sale?
              (4) If not, what is the basis for determining who will be separated?
              (5) How many part-time Government Cleaning Service staff are employed in the electorate of Wallsend?
              (6) Will all the part-time staff be employed?
              (7) If not, what is the basis for determining who will be separated?
              (8) How many casual Government Cleaning Service staff are employed in the electorate of Wallsend?
              (9) Will all the casual staff be employed?
              (10) If not, what is the basis for determining who will be separated?
              (11) Will service with the Government be recognised for determining award entitlements such as sick leave, long service leave and in the event of future redundancy?
              (12) If so, why has she announced that unused annual and long service leave will be paid out by the Government?
              (13) Will this payout be made at the time of sale?
              (14) If not, when will the payout be made?
              (15) Will the performance of the private cleaning companies towards staff transferred from Government Cleaning Service be monitored after the sale?
              (16) If so:
                (a) By which department?
                (b) For how long?
              (17) What penalty action does the Government envisage taking against private companies that breach their commitments to staff transferred from Government Cleaning Service?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes. All regular cleaning staff and regional staff were offered employment as part of the contracts.
              (2) This information is not readily available and to provide an answer would require considerable dedication of staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the Commercial Services Group.
              (3) It was a requirement of the sale that all regular full-time cleaning staff were offered employment by the successful tenderers.
              (4) Not applicable.
              (5) See reply to question (2).
              (6) Part-time regular staff were offered employment by the successful tenderers.
              (7) Not applicable.
              (8) See reply to question (2).
              (9) The Government Cleaning Service provided the new employers with a list of all approved relief staff to use, if required.
              (10) The decision whether to use the relief staff is one for the successful tenderers.
              (11) Yes. Former public sector service will be recognised for sick leave, long service leave and redundancy entitlement purposes.
              (12) The Public Sector Management Act under which the cleaners were employed, does not provide for the transfer of unused leave from the public to the private sector. The monetary value of entitlements therefore had to be paid. Government service will continue to be recognised for future accrual purposes.
              (13) Yes. Payment was made at the time of sale of the Government Cleaning Service.
              (14) Not applicable.
              (15) Yes.

          Page 592
              (16) (a) Commercial Services Group.
                (b) For the duration of the contracts.
              (17) The new employers are required to have in place clearly defined grievance and dispute management procedures for resolving any grievances or disputes within the organisation. If a company fails to fulfil its commitments it will be in breach of its contract. There is a $1 million per zone performance security deposit and contractual provisions to delete sites or terminate the contract in part or full. In addition, employees will be covered by the relevant private sector award and be protected under normal industrial provisions.

          *362 PREMIER'S CONCERTS—Mr Neilly asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
              (1) Who were the groups allocated tickets for the 1993 Senior Citizens Week concerts?
              (2) Who were the groups allocated tickets for the 1993 Christmas concerts?
              Answer—
              My colleague the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing advises that:
              (1) Tickets for the 1993 Senior Citizens Week concerts were allocated to various groups totalling 189 in number.
              (2) Tickets for the 1993 Christmas concerts were allocated to various groups totalling 138 in number.
              Copies of the two lists of groups have been supplied direct to the honourable member.

          *363 NORTHERN COAL HAULAGE LINE—Mr Neilly asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Have negotiations to privatise the Northern Coal Haulage Line reached heads of agreement stage?
              (2) If so, what are the heads of agreement?
              (3) Is privatisation limited to coal haulage?
              (4) Will employment security be guaranteed for the State Rail Authority employees concerned?
              Answer—
              (1) No.
              (2) to (4) Not applicable.

          *365 SHORTLAND—SH23 TRAFFIC SOUND MONITORING—Mr Price asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Given the progressive increase in traffic on SH23, when will the RTA conduct further sound monitoring tests, particularly in the area between University Drive, Callaghan, and Sandgate Road, Shortland?
              (2) (a) Why has urgently needed sound proofing along SH23, adjacent to the residencies facing Vale Street, Birmingham Gardens, been denied?
                (b) When will this serious omission be corrected?
              (3) As the alleged sound reducing surface has proved to be totally ineffective, when will hot mix resurfacing be applied in order to reduce this problem?

          Page 593
              Answer—
              (1) At this stage, the RTA has not programmed additional noise testing in this area. However, traffic volumes are constantly monitored and should there be any significant change in volumes or traffic patterns, arrangements will be made to undertake further noise testing.
              (2) (a) Testing carried out in July and October 1993 showed that noise levels were below the minimum levels that warrant noise mitigation works.
                (b) See answer (2) (a) above.
              (3) See answer (2) (a) above.

          *367 ROTATIONAL TRANSFERS MODEL—Mr Price asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Did Mr Gill ever present a working rotational transfers model to a meeting of the Families and Friends Against Rotational Transfers?
              (2) (a) Was such a model ever presented to Police Association representatives?
                (b) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) (a) Yes.
                (b) Not applicable.

          *368 FAIRFIELD RAILWAY STATION—Mr Scully asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—

              (1) Is he aware that the State Rail Authority has not provided separate points of ingress and egress on Fairfield Railway Station?
              (2) Is he aware that during peak times passengers find it extremely difficult to enter Fairfield Station when attempting to catch trains to Liverpool?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) A separate entry only turnstile has been installed near the booking office on the City bound platform. Installation of a separate entry only turnstile on the Liverpool bound platform is planned by the end of March.

          *370 ILLAWARRA PRIVATE HOSPITAL—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) Will a Cardiac Catheterisation Unit he established at the Illawarra Private Hospital at Figtree?
              (2) If such a unit is established, will it mean that a Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) proposed for the Port Kembla campus of the Illawarra Regional Hospital will not be established?
              (3) Does the Illawarra Private Hospital at Figtree have the necessary after hours for emergency back-up services and facilities to cope with any complications from cardiac catheterisation?

          Page 594
              (4) What is the estimated number of patients travelling each year to Sydney from the Illawarra for:
                (a) Diagnostic angiography?
                (b) Cardiac catheterisation?
              Answer—
              (1) A Digital Subtraction Angiography Unit (DSA) has been established at the Illawarra Hospital, Figtree. This unit is capable of performing some cardiac catheterisation procedures.
              (2) No. A DSA Unit will be established at the Illawarra Regional Hospital and has already been approved by the Department of Health.
              (3) Illawarra Private Hospital has 24-hour on-site medical cover at a registrar level with on-call specialist cover for intensive care. Illawarra Private Hospital has arrangements for transfer of any patients with complications as part of their licence agreement.
              (4) (a) 80.
              (b) 600.

          *371 YOUTH LAWLINE—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              (1) Will the Government provide funds so that the Illawarra Legal Centre's Youth Lawline can continue to operate throughout 1994?
              (2) If not, what are the reasons for withholding funding from this service which will most likely lead to the service closing down?
              (3) Is he aware that the Youth Lawline Service dealt with 109 cases of young people between January and August 1993?
              (4) Is he considering any alternative accessible source of legal advice for young people in the Illawarra region?
              Answer—
              (1) The Legal Aid Commission has committed funding to the Illawarra Legal Centre in 1993/94. The Centre will receive $131,500 via the Community Legal Centre Funding Program, and a further $70,000 under the Special Welfare Rights Program, each administered by the Commission.
              Discussions between the Illawarra Legal Centre and the Managing Director of the Legal Aid Commission were held on Monday 28 February 1994. The Illawarra Legal Centre has since applied for funding for Youth Lawline as part of their current funding application under the Community Legal Centres Funding Program. The submission will be reviewed by the Commission's Special Purposes Funding Subcommittee.
              (2) Funding is not being "withheld", as per the answer to question (1) above.
              (3) The service of Youth Lawline accords with the aims and objectives contained in the Greenpaper which was prepared by the Juvenile Justice Advisory Council and released in February 1993. However, in terms of the portfolio administered by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice, the Department of Juvenile Justice and the Attorney General's Department do not have separate budget allocations for funding community groups, and the Legal Aid Commission has already committed funds as discussed above for the 1993/94 financial year.
              The decision of the Legal Aid Commission in the allocation of funds is not a matter which is or can be the subject of interference by the Attorney General.
              (4) Per answer to questions (1) and (3) above.

          Page 595

          *376 JOINT SELECT COMMITTEE UPON THE SYDNEY WATER BOARD—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Has the Sydney Water Board provided direct assistance to Government Members of the Joint Select Committee upon the Sydney Water Board?
              (2) If so, how much assistance, at what expense to the Board, and by which officers was the assistance provided?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) To give the Joint Select Committee full support, the Sydney Water Board endeavoured to provide every assistance by responding to every request by all the members—Government, ALP, Democrat, Independent—of the Committee, by the Committee's Consultant and by the Committee Clerks.
              (2) In giving this full assistance in supporting the Joint Select Committee, the Water Board has incurred an expense of, at least, $283,000 comprising:
                  •labour costs;
                  •printing;
                  •production of maps;
                  •cabcharges;
                  •costs of tours of Water Board areas;
                  •couriers;
                  •legal services;
                  •production of colour slides;
                  •production of the Board's very detailed submission.
              Assistance was provided by approximately 100 senior board officers including the Managing Director.

          *378 SLARKE'S ROAD DAM—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
              Does the Government still maintain as an option for the augmentation of the Coffs Harbour water supply, the establishment of the Slarke's Road Dam drawing water from the Bellingen River?
              Answer—
              A community consultation program is currently being conducted in Coffs Harbour and neighbouring local government areas to obtain community views on the alternatives.
              Council's project team has short listed three alternatives:
                Kangaroo River storage and Nymboida River.
          Mirum Creek storage and Orara/Bobo Rivers.
          Slarke's Road storage and Bellinger River.


          Page 596
          *380 INNER CITY CYCLEWAY—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Does the redevelopment of the Pyrmont Penisula promote cycling as a transport option to the city?
              (2) Is the only viable bicycle access between Pyrmont and the Sydney Central Business District via Pyrmont Bridge?
              (3) Has this bridge been recommended as a cycleway in several studies?
              (4) Is he aware that the Darling Harbour Authority refuses to allow cyclists access to Pyrmont Bridge and has removed the only ramp between the Bridge and the City of Sydney?
              (5) Will he ensure that bicycle access is expedited between Pyrmont and the city?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable members' questions are:
              (1) Yes.
              (2) No, there are several access routes between Pyrmont and the CBD.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) Darling Harbour was developed as a pedestrian precinct and current policy is that cyclists must dismount on entering the Darling Harbour precinct. This policy is under review in light of the redevelopment of Pyrmont. The ramp referred to was a temporary bailey bridge. It has been replaced by a new bridge which combines ramps, escalators, stairs and lifts.
              (5) Yes, the Building Better Cities Program is funding improvements to the bicycle and pedestrian links between Pyrmont and the CBD. Several options have been identified and concept design work is underway on a new bicycle link between Pyrmont Bridge and the CBD.

          2 MARCH 1994

          (Paper No. 2)

          *381 WESTERN CITYRAIL LINE—SIX CAR TRAINS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) What is the reason for the use of "six car sets" on the western line during peak hours?
              (2) Is this contrary to assurances given at the time of the last change to CityRail timetables, that only "eight car sets" will be used on peak hours services?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) All CityRail western line trains arriving at Central Station in the morning main peak period and departing Central in the afternoon main peak period are scheduled to consist of eight cars.
              However, in some instances it is necessary to operate six-car sets due to maintenance requirements.


          Page 597
          *382 COMMERCIAL UNION INSURANCE—Mr Amery asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              (1) Is the Commercial Union Insurance a licensed insurer in New South Wales for the Compulsory Third Party Personal Injury Insurance scheme?
              (2) Has this company an arrangement with the National Party that provides that part of the premium paid for "Green Slips" insurance is redirected to the National Party by way of commission to party members and branches?
              (3) What is the policy of the Government in allowing insurance companies to enter into such agreements with political parties involving a compulsory scheme?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) and (3) With regard to Compulsory Third Party Personal Injury Insurance premiums, it should be noted that New South Wales has a privatised and largely deregulated Compulsory Third Party Personal Injury Insurance scheme. The scheme is operated by 14 insurance companies, licensed by the Motor Accidents Authority.
              The Motor Accidents Act 1988 provides that the Authority must ensure that Compulsory Third Party Personal Injury premiums, charged by the licensed insurers, are sufficient to fully fund their liabilities.
              This is managed through a "File and Write" system. Insurers must propose the Compulsory Third Party Personal Injury premium and provide independent actuarial advice on its adequacy. The Authority then examines the insurers' proposals and must be satisfied that the premium satisfies the test contained in section 15B of the Act.
              This section provides that the Authority can only reject a premium if it is of the opinion that:
                  •the premium will not fully fund the present and likely future liabilities of the insurer;
                  •the premium is excessive, based on actuarial advice; or
                  •the premium does not conform to the Authority's guidelines.
              The Authority has no power to regulate or interfere with the means by which a private company markets and distributes its products. Many companies have established various means of distributing "Green Slips" and these arrangements are not subject to any control or direction by the Authority other than to ensure, that as far as practical, all costs incurred by the insurer are taken into account in determining premiums.

          *383 PROPERTY TRANSFER SERVICE FEES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads and Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport—
              (1) What penalties, if any, may apply to the practice, by solicitors and conveyancers charging a service fee on property transfers?
              (2) Is the Department of Consumer Affairs aware that this is a common practice?
              (3) If no complaint has been received from the person charged this fee, would the Department take any action, and, if so, what action would be considered appropriate in the circumstances?
              (4) If the Department were made aware of a situation where this practice had taken place, but had since ceased, would the Department consider any further action?
              (5) Would the Department consider conducting an inspection to ascertain if this practice has ceased and report on the findings?


          Page 598
              Answer—
              (1) I am advised by the Department of Consumer Affairs that this matter falls within the administrative responsibility of my colleague the Attorney General, and accordingly, this question should be directed to the Hon. J. P. Hannaford, M.L.C.
              (2) I am advised by the Department of Consumer Affairs that it is not aware that this is a common practice.
              (3) to (5) In the absence of specific details I again refer the honourable member to the Attorney General.

          *384 HOUSING APPLICANT T0781030—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Has the Department of Housing received representations from the honourable member for Liverpool on behalf of applicant T0781030?
              (2) What was the determination of the Housing Review Committee regarding this applicant?
              (3) How many other applicants for priority housing are terminally ill and being denied housing?
              (4) What action does he propose to take in this matter?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) Yes.
              (2) The Housing Review Committee is an independent committee comprising community interest group representatives and a department officer. On 17 February 1994 the Housing Review Committee declined applicant T0781030 for priority housing assistance. Although the applicant's severe medical problems were noted by the Committee, it was considered that the applicant could be suitably housed in other areas within the Sydney metropolitan area where his turn for accommodation has been reached in the ordinary manner.
              (3) There are no statistics kept on terminally ill applicants who are declined for priority housing assistance. All cases submitted to the Housing Review Committee are considered individually and judged on their merit.
              (4) A senior departmental officer has contacted the applicant and his wife to discuss the applicant's current circumstances. The applicant's wife advises they have specific reasons for remaining in the Liverpool area and will submit documents to this effect. Upon receipt of these documents, the applicant's case will be resubmitted to the Housing Review Committee for further consideration.

          *385 LIVERPOOL HOSPITAL ELECTRICITY SUPPLY—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) What arrangements are in place at Liverpool Hospital to maintain the electricity supply in the event of a power failure?
              (2) On how many occasions has there been an interruption to the electricity supply at Liverpool Hospital since 1 July 1993?
              (3) On what dates did such interruptions occur and for what duration?
              (4) Why are such interruptions occurring and what action has been or will be taken to reduce or eliminate such occurrences?

          Page 599
              Answer—
              (1) In the event of a power failure, electricity supplies are maintained by a 750 kVA diesel alternator.
              (2) During the period 1 July 1993 till 27 February 1994, there were 16 interruptions to essential power and 15 interruptions to non-essential power, being a total of 31 occasions of interruption to the electrical power supply. All of these interruptions were planned.
              (3) During the period 1 July 1993 till 27 February 1994, the following interruptions took place:
                Date Type of Power Duration
                18/7/93 Essential At 0800: 20 sec.
          At 1130: 5 sec.
          Non-essential No power from 0800-1200.
                8/8/93 Essential Several interruptions:
              0730-1230, each less than 30 sec.
                Non-essential No power from 0730-1300.
                22/8/93 Essential Several interruptions:
          0730-0900, each less than 30 sec.
          Non-essential No power from 0730-0930.
          18/9/93 Essential At 0730: 20 sec.
          At 1035: 5 sec.
          Non-essential No power from 0730-1100.
          11/12/93 Essential Several interruptions:
          0800-1130, each less than 30 sec.
          Non-essential No power from 0800-1200.
                12/12/93 Essential Several interruptions:
          0800-1815, each less than 30 sec.
              Non-essential No power from 0800-1845.
          19/12/93 Essential Several interruptions:
          0700-1930, each less than 30 sec.
          Non-essential No power from 0700-2000.
                22/12/93 Essential At 1800: 20 sec.
          At 1820: 5 sec.
          Non-essential No power from 1800-1900.
                23/1/94 Essential No power from 0700-0705.
          Non-essential No power from 0800-0820.
                27/1/94 Essential No power from 0700-0705.
          No power from 0730-0735.
          Non-essential No power from 0800-0820.
          29/1/94 Essential Several interruptions:
          0730-1400, each less than 30 sec.
                        Non-essential No power from 0720-1400.
          5/2/94 Essential Several interruptions:
          0720-1330, each less than 30 sec.
                Non-essential No power from 0720-1400.
          12/2/94 Essential Several interruptions:
          0750-1405, each less than 30 sec.
                Non-essential No power from 0750-1405.

          Page 600
                Date Type of Power Duration
          19/2/94 Essential Several interruptions:
          0730-1305, each less than 30 sec.
          Non-essential No power from 0845-1310.
          26/2/94 Essential Several interruptions:
          0830-1510, each less than 30 sec.
          Non-essential No power from 0830-1510.
          27/2/94 Essential Several interruptions:
          0845-1310, each less than 30 sec.
              (4) The reasons for the interruptions to the electrical power were to:
              (a) Test the essential alternate diesel alternator.
                (b) Test the ability of the staff to operate under managed emergency conditions.
              (c) Check the present supply switching procedures.
              (d) Test all operations prior to the installation of the new 1,500 kVA standby alternator in April 1994.
          It is important to note that all of the interruptions were planned.

          *386 LIVERPOOL ATTACK—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Did a resident of Rotary Street, Liverpool, contact Liverpool Police at approximately 6 p.m. on Sunday, 27 February 1994, shortly after he and his dog were attacked and injured by two German shepherd dogs?
              (2) At what time did police attend the residence?
              (3) What was the reason for the delay?
              (4) What police action, if any, is proposed as a consequence of the attack on the resident and his dog?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) Approximately 11 p.m.
              (3) A number of more serious incidents were occurring at the same time and the shift supervisor allocated this incident a low priority in comparison.
              (4) The normal procedure in matters of this nature in the Liverpool City Council area is to refer such complaints to the local Dog Ordinance Inspector.
              On this occasion, the Dog Ordinance Inspector issued a warning to the owner of the two German shepherd dogs to ensure that they are properly secured.

          *387 BLACKSPOTS—Mr Beckroge asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Has the RTA established a list of blackspots on New South Wales roads?
              (2) If so, where are these blackspots located?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) At various locations throughout the State. The list for 1993 is currently being finalised.


          Page 601
          *388 MENINDEE LAKES STORAGE SYSTEM—Mr Beckroge asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
              (1) Is he aware that the management of the Menindee Lakes Storage System has resulted in Menindee Lake being left to dry out?
              (2) Is he also aware that thousands of fish of all species have been left to die as the water dries up?
              (3) If so, what action does he and his department intend taking to clean up the mess that remains from tonnes of dead fish?
              (4) Does the Government intend releasing water from Lake Pamamaroo to flush the Menindee Lake?
              (5) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) Yes. However, the vast majority are not native fish but European carp, an introduced aquatic pest.
              (3) The Department of Water Resourves undertook a small release of water from Lake Pamamaroo to flush the dead fish away from the nearby foreshore area, thereby removing the offending sight and odour. The Deparment also arranged for Adelaide fishing contractor to harvest the live carp within Lake Memindee for crayfish bait. In addition to this, NSW Fisheries and the RSPCA approved of the use of electro-fishing by the contractor to take the remaining carp.
              (4) Other than the small relase mentioned in answer (3) there will be no substantial water release from Lake Pamamaroo into Lake Menindee until a large inflow to the storage system occurs.
              (5) To release a quantity of water to flush Lake Menindee would jeopoardise the long-term reliability of supply of Broken Hill and residents of the lower Darling River.

          *389 CLYDE ENGINEERING JOBS—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) How many new jobs have been created at Clyde Engineering, Bathurst, through new contracts allocated to them?
              (2) When is it expected that the 223 new jobs referred to by him twice in 1993 will occur?
              Answer—
              (1) Clyde advises that it has created 110 new jobs at Bathurst.
              (2) The figure of 223 was based on Clyde's initial proposal to completely build the new Ready Power locomotives at Bathurst.
              Clyde took a commercial decision to build the 55 Ready Power locomotives at its Braemar facility, resulting in jobs planned for Bathurst being transferred to Braemar.

          *390 WOODFORD BENDS UPGRADING—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) What financial involvement has the Government, through its 3x3 program, in the upgrading of the area on the Great Western Highway known as the Woodford Bends?
              (2) How much Commonwealth Government money has been made available for this project?

          Page 602
              Answer—
              (1) $22.15 million.
              (2) $7 million.

          *391 GARDENS OF STONE—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
              (1) Is it the Government's intention to include the Gardens of Stone area in a national park?
              (2) If so, when is it anticipated this will occur?
              (3) Will this mean that some landholders in the area will have their leases revoked?
              (4) Will compensation be payable to those landholders?
              Answer—
              (1) to (4) During 1990 and 1991, the then Ministers for Lands and the Environment conducted joint inspections and several meetings were held in respect of various nature reserve and national park proposals. However, as of this date, the proposal has not advanced further.

          *392 GUNNEDAH ABATTOIR—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) Has he been approached by Gunnedah Shire Council to grant them an exemption from advertising one of their senior positions, the position of Abattoir Manager?
              (2) (a) Did Gunnedah Shire seek Loans Council approval to borrow $1.7 million for works at the abattoir?
                (b) On what basis was the loan arranged?
                (c) Did it come from council funds?
              Answer—
              (1) The Gunnedah Council has not yet approached me for an exemption from advertising the position of Abattoir Manager. I understand, however, that the council recently resolved to make such an application for exemption. When received, the application will be considered on its merits as all such applications are.
              (2) (a) The function of determining individual borrowing limits for local government authorities is a State responsibility and not one for the Australian Loan Council.
                  On this basis, the Gunnedah Council approached the Director General of the Department of Local Government and Co-operatives with a request for an increased borrowing limit for the current financial year. It was recommended to me that I approve of the council receiving an increase of $1,850,000 for the purpose of carrying out improvements and extensions to the Gunnedah Abattoir. The recommendation was subsequently approved.
                (b) and (c) The Gunnedah Council has arranged to borrow the funds from one of Australia's leading financial institutions. I am not aware of the basis on which the loan is to be raised as this is a matter of negotiation between the council and the lender.


          Page 603
          *393 FARMING FINANCIAL HARDSHIP—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) Does the Government recognise the hardship being caused to many farming families through the action of the banks and other farm lending organisations through capitalisation of outstanding interest?
              (2) Does the Government intend to set up any form of compulsory mediation mechanism so that a bank may not eject farmers from their land and sell their properties until some form of mediation takes place?
              Answer—
              (1) The position regarding capitalisation of outstanding interest by banks and other farm lending organisations is noted. It is, however, a matter between the lenders and the farming families concerned and is an area in which I do not propose to become involved as it relates to a commercial decision.
              (2) The Government does not propose to establish any form of compulsory mediation mechanism as the assistance and mediation measures currently available to farming families are considered to be appropriate. These measures include:
                  •the Rural Counselling Network, which is partly funded by this Government;
                  •the dispute resolution arrangements under the Code of Banking Practice;
                  •the Rural Women's Network, an initiative of NSW Agriculture; and
                  •the Farm Assessment Scheme, which is a joint initiative of the Australian Bankers Association and the National Farmers Federation.
              In addition, farming families have the right to investigate legal avenues if they so desire, without the need for Government intervention.

          *394 OBERON FIRE BAN—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Were any restrictions on lighting of fires in the open in force on 28 November 1993?
              (2) If so, under what conditions could fires be lit?
              (3) Did Oberon police receive any complaints regarding the lighting of at least one fire on 28 November 1993?
              (4) If so, what was the result of their investigation?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) The issue of a permit.
              (3) No. The incident was initially reported to the Fire Captain, Back Creek, near Oberon.
              (4) On 30 November 1993, police received a complaint concerning alleged harassment and during this interview, the complainant referred to a fire which had been lit on 28 November 1993 during the bushfire restrictions.
              No further action was taken by police, in this regard, as the Fire Control Officer for the Oberon Shire Council had already issued a caution to the offender.


          Page 604
          *395 LISTENING DEVICES WARRANT—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              In regard to the matter concerning the charging with certain offences of Mr A. Katsoulas, a former member of the NSW Police—
              (1) On 28 November 1986, did the NSW Police obtain the grant of a warrant under the Listening Devices Act 1984, concerning offences suspected of having been committed by the former member, Anthony Katsoulas?
              (2) Was the warrant issued by Mr Justice Slattery on 28 November 1986?
              (3) Was the warrant issued pursuant to section 16, Part 4—Warrants, Listening Devices Act of 1984?
              Answer—
              (1) to (3) While advice of applications for the issue of listening device warrants is provided to the Attorney General, I am not at liberty to release the information sought.
              As criminal charges were laid against Mr Katsoulas by the police, I suggest that an approach be made to the Minister for Police for this information.

          *396 SPORT AND RECREATION CAPITAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS—Mr Hunter asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) Under the Sport and Recreation Capital Assistance Grants Scheme, what funds have been granted in each State electorate for the current year and each of the past 2 years?
              (2) (a) What other State funds have been allocated for sporting facilities or to sporting groups in each State electorate for the current year and each of the past 4 years?
                (b) What was the source of the funds allocated as distinct from those under Sport and Recreation Capital Assistance Grants?
              Answer—
              (1) To provide an answer to this question would require the diversion of significant time and resources of my Department which is outside the core responsibilities of the Department. Information relating to CAP applications may be found in the Department's annual reports.
              (2) (a) See above response to question (1).
                (b) Regional Sports Facilities Program, Government Guaranteed Loans Scheme and FootyTAB.

          *397 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Treasurer and Minister for the Arts—
              With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?

          Page 605
              (3) What were the Budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the Budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
              Answer—
              Arts Portfolio
              (1) The majority of assistance offered by organisations within the arts portfolio is provided through the Ministry for the Arts' Cultural Grants Program and the State Library's Library Development Grants and public library subsidy, which are offered statewide. Any eligible group may apply for a grant. Applications are considered on their merits each year. It is not possible to guarantee that any group or electorate will receive ongoing funding.
              (2) 21.
              (3) Figures statewide are as follows:
                Cultural Library Development Public Library
                  Grants Grants Subsidy
                (a) $21,828,000 $2,259,680 $14,145,000
                (b) $35,464,000 $2,427,200 $15,170,000
                (c) $37,556,000 $2,587,200 $16,170,000
                (d) Not applicable.
              (4) Not applicable.
              (5) Not applicable.
              Treasury Portfolio
              (1) Nil. Treasury is a central agency and, as such, does not provide services and facilities on a local area basis.
              (2) to (5) Not applicable.

          *398 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the Budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the Budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?


          Page 606
              Answer—
              NSW Coal Compensation Board
              (1) Nil.
              (2) Not applicable.
              (3) Not applicable.
              (4) Nil.
              (5) Not applicable.
              NSW Fish Marketing Authority
              (1) Nil.
              (2) Not applicable.
              (3) Not applicable.
              (4) Nil.
              (5) Not applicable.
              NSW Fisheries
              (1) A NSW fisheries office is situated at 1 Water Street, Sans Souci, which provides a service to enforce the provisions of the Fisheries and Oyster Farms Act/Regulations in the waterways of Botany Bay, Port Hacking and the Georges River. Advisory information services are also provided by the Sans Souci office to the commercial and recreational fishing industries, the oyster farming industry and the community.
              Two vehicles and three vessels are stationed at the office facilities which consist of a general office and public counter areas, with storage garage and seized gear shed located under the office complex. Slipping facilities and underground fuel storage are available on site and shared with the Maritime Services Board and the NSW Water Police.
              (2) The following permanent staff stationed at Sans Souci are supervised by the Senior Fisheries Officer, based at Wollstonecraft:
                1 District Fisheries Officer.
                5 Fisheries Officers.
                1 Clerical Officer (3 days per week).
              (3) (a) $27,200.
                (b) $51,430.
                (c) $51,425.
                (d) $40,400 (maintenance and working) + $90,000 (salaries).
              (4) A new telephone system is being installed at the Sans Souci office to provide more efficient and effective communications for public enquiries. Computer equipment is being upgraded.
              (5) Not applicable.
              NSW Agriculture
              (1) NSW Agriculture provides a general enquiries service, district advisory service, diagnostic service and research on horticultural and other projects applicable to the area from:
                  •Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, Camden;
                  •Biological and Chemical Research Institute, Rydalmere;
                  •Windsor district office;
                  •University of Western Sydney—a specialist unit investigating the recycling of organic waste for agricultural purposes.
              Further details on these services may be found on the following pages of the 1992/93 Annual Report of NSW Agriculture:
                  9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 17, 28, 29.

          Page 607
              (2) The following staff are directly associated with the provision of those services:


          PositionProgramLocation
          District AgronomistPastures and rangelandsWindsor
          District Horticulturist (Vegetables)Fresh and processed horticultural productsEMAI, Camden
          District Horticulturist (Cut Flowers)Fresh and processed horticultural productsWindsor
          Enquiries OfficerAnimal industries positionWindsor
          Agricultural Environmental OfficerAgricultural resource managementWindsor
          District Livestock Officer (Dairying)Beef, dairy and intensive livestock productsEMAI, Camden
          Entomologists and other scientific officersQuality assurance and plant protectionBCRI, Rydalmere
          General Manager, Organic Waste Recylcing UnitUWS, Richmond
              (3) The electorate is characterised by the Defence Forces established and rapid urban expansion over the past 3 years.
              Approximate current annual expenditure by NSW Agriculture within the electorate is estimated as follows:
                Overheads (including salaries)* $2,666
                Operating costs† $150
          ______
          $2,816 per year.
                * Salaries of eight professional staff coupled with technical, clerical support and infrastructure costs— approximately $640,000. Commitment by each officer to various issues in the electorate 1 day in 240 or, 0.033 full-time equivalent of one person.
                †Operating costs for motor vehicles, telephones and stores at 30 cents/km travelled at 500 km/year.
              (4) The Department of Agriculture's broad range of service for all members of the New South Wales community will be continued.
              (5) Declines in statewide expenditure have been slight and been largely offset by improved productivity.
              Department of Mineral Resources
              (1) Nil.
              (2) Not applicable.
              (3) Not applicable.
              (4) Nil.
              (5) Not applicable.


          Page 608
          *399 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OR MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
              With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within her portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the Budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the Budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?
              Answer—
              (1) to (5) In regard to my portfolio of Chief Secretary, I have to advise that the Chief Secretary's Department has no services or facilities in the electorate of Moorebank. The NSW Lotteries appoints businesses throughout the State to sell NSW Lotteries products. NSW Lotteries does not allocate staff or expenditure to specific areas or electorates.
              In regard to my portfolio of Administrative Services, the Commercial Services Group operates facilities for printing, supply, State Mail, fleet management, telecommunications and Government information and advertising. These businesses provide common use support services to New South Wales public sector agencies on a statewide basis. Only the Government Information Service provides direct services to the public.
              No services and facilities operate specifically in the electorate of Moorebank.

          *400 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF MOOREBANK—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Small Business and Minister for Regional Development—
              With regard to the electorate of Moorebank—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the Budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure from 1990/91, why?


          Page 609
              Answer—
              (1) Services and facilities provided by the Department of Business and Regional Development are not targeted at electorates but at small and medium enterprises in metropolitan and regional New South Wales.
              Programs to assist new and existing small business are available to businesses in the electorate of Moorebank at the Parramatta and Sydney (City) locations of the Office of Small Business (OSB).
              Programs provided by the National Industry Extension Service (NIES) are available to businesses in the electorate of Moorebank by NIES field officers visiting the enterprise directly.
              Programs provided by the Office of Regional Development are not relevant, except in the case where a business located in the electorate of Moorebank might be contemplating relocation in regional New South Wales.
              (2) The Office of Small Business has a staff of 21 employed in three locations in the Sydney metropolitan area—two locations in the Sydney CBD, and in Parramatta.
              The National Industry Extension Service has a staff of 31, including 17 industry advisers who directly deliver NIES programs to businesses—typically small to medium enterprises in manufacturing and service industries.
              (3) Disaggregated budget projections of OSB and NIES services to businesses in the electorate of Moorebank are not available.
              Actual expenditures of OSB services to businesses in the electorate of Moorebank were:
                $1,500 (1990/91); $13,921 (1991/92); $16,380 (1992/93).
              Offers of assistance provided under NIES programs to businesses in the electorate of Moorebank totalled: $412,056 (1989-93) (disaggregated annual figures are not available).
              (4) On 10 February 1994, I announced the membership of the Greater Western Sydney Economic Development Board (GWSEDB).
              The Board will be a peak body championing economic development for the Greater Western Sydney region. It will pursue opportunities for competitive and sustainable economic development in the region by leading efforts to retain and expand existing industry, co-ordinate regional efforts by the public and private sector to establish new enterprises and advise the NSW Government on the significant economic issues affecting Greater Western Sydney. The Board has a budget of $400,000 for 1993/94 and will be supported by a secretariat of three.
              (5) Not applicable.

          *401 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
              With regard to the electorate of The Entrance—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly related and associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the Budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the Budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure since 1990/91, why?

          Page 610
              Answer—
              (1) to (5) The Premier’s administration covers agencies such as the Auditor-General’s Office, Office of Economic Development, The Cabinet Office and the Government Pricing Tribunal. They operate on a whole-of-State basis and are not focused on electorates. The Entrance receives comparable attention to other electorates according to need.
              The State Electoral Office does provide services which can be identified on an electorate basis. For example, the conduct of State Elections and By-elections and for Local Government Elections and By-elections in council areas. Indirectly, it may also service electors in the electorate for statutory and industrial ballots functions.
              For the last State General Election held in March 1991, the Electoral Office would have spent approximately $100,000 in the electorate of The Entrance. The last Local Government General Elections held in September 1991 and a by-election in January 1992 would have involved expenditure of about $150,000.
              The Electoral Office services to electorates in the future will continue to be to:
                  •prepare an electoral roll for use in State Elections and By-elections and Local Government Elections and By-elections;
          • prepare the registration of political parties in local council areas;
                  •provide information to local council areas regarding electors and registration of political parties.

          *402 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Treasurer and Minister for the Arts—
              With regard to the electorate of The Entrance—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly related or associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the Budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the Budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure since 1990/91, why?
              Answer—
              Treasury Portfolio
              (1) Nil. Treasury is a central agency and, as such, does not provide services and facilities on a local area basis.
              (2) to (5) Not applicable.
              Arts Portfolio
              (1) The majority of assistance offered by organisations within the arts portfolio is provided through the Ministry for the Arts' Cultural Grants Program and the State Library's Library Development Grants and public library subsidy, which are offered statewide. Any eligible group may apply for a grant. Applications are considered on their merits each year. It is not possible to guarantee that any group or electorate will receive ongoing funding.

          Page 611
              (2) 21.
              (3) Figures Statewide are as follows:
                Cultural Library Development Public Library
                  Grants Grants Subsidy
                (a) $21,828,000 $2,259,680 $14,145,000
                (b) $35,464,000 $2,427,200 $15,170,000
                (c) $37,556,000 $2,587,200 $16,170,000
                (d) Not applicable.
              (4) Not applicable.
              (5) Not applicable.

          *403 EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION OF JAMES JUSTICE BOND (JIM)—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              With regard to the application by Mr James Justice Bond (Jim) of 41 Patricia Street, Killarney Vale, for employment within the NSW Police Service as a security officer—
              (1) (a) How many positions of security officer were available at the time of Mr Bond's application?
                (b) How many placements have since been made?
                (c) If there is a shortfall in positions, for what reasons has this occurred?
              (2) (a) Has the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service advised the NSW Police Service's Equal Employment Opportunity Section that assistance could be made available to ensure Mr Bond could carry out responsibilities as a security officer?
                (b) Has the Police Service chosen not to accept that assistance?
                (c) If so, why?
              (3) What requirements were placed on applicants for the position Mr Bond sought employment in?
              (4) (a) Did Mr Bond meet all of these requirements?
                (b) If not, which requirements did Mr Bond not meet and why?
                (c) If so, why has he not been offered employment?
              (5) (a) What duties of a security officer, as referred to in the Minister's letter to the honourable member of 25 January 1994, would have to be removed or adjusted to permit Mr Bond's employment?
                (b) How would such and adjustment or removal be of detriment to Mr Bond's ability to serve as a security officer?
              (6) Has Mr Bond's dyslexia been considered to impair his ability to effectively serve as a security officer?
              Answer—
              (1) (a) One position was filled on 24 May 1993. However, at that time, there were some 30 to 40 other fully processed applicants within the system awaiting possible acceptance on a competitive basis.
                (b) Counting the position on 24 May 1993, there have been 14 placements made, the last being 7 March 1994.
                (c) If the term "shortfall" can be considered as "vacancies", then vacancies occur as a result of such things as seeking other employment, retirement and the like terms.

          Page 612
              (2) (a) The NSW Police Service EEO Branch was aware at the time of Mr Bond's application of the services offered by the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service (CRS) in the form of workplace assessments for people with disabilities.
                (b) The Police Service has not ruled out the use of the services of the CRS to carry out a workplace assessment for Mr Bond.
                (c) Enquiries with the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service reveal that its assessment process is flexible enough to allow significant input from employers in order to assess the feasibility of "reasonable adjustment".
              Assistant Commissioner Moroney intends to examine the matter of "reasonable adjustment" with the appropriate authorities with a view to ensuring that Mr Bond's case is carefully reviewed by an independent body such as the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service. Mr Moroney will then give close consideration to Mr Bond's case in the light of that advice.
              (3) All applicants are required to undergo the following:
          • A traffic record and criminal record check.
                  •A "paper" medical check, made on the medical form forwarded with the application.
                  •A written test.
                  •An interview, where a mark is recorded, according to competitiveness.
                  •A general observation of the application regarding competitiveness.
                  •Background checks, where local police visit neighbours of the applicant and conduct other local inquiries to verify character to be accepted as Security Officer for the Police Service.
                  •Applicants are then placed in a "pool" of prospective applicants according to their competitiveness.
                  •The "pool" may consist of 40 to 50 applicants at any one time.
                  •Undergo a full medical examination by the Police Medical Officer.
                  •Even though an applicant might satisfy all requirements, they may not be selected for employment due to the competitive nature of the "pool" selection process. The best applicant always goes to the top of the "pool".
                  •When a vacancy occurs within the Security Officer ranks, the "best" applicant in the "pool" (according to merit) is utilised to replace the vacancy.
              Applications for Security Officer positions are received on a continuous basis. The last advertisement was placed on 22 September 1990.
              Applications with the most merit are accumulated within a system, numbered competitively, and held for vacancies to occur. The unsuccessful applicants at all stages throughout the process are informed by letter regarding their position. The acceptance rate of applicants is approximately one in ten.
              (4) (a) No.
                (b) Mr Bond did not meet the medical and industrial requirements for the position. Specifically, the neuropsychological assessment recommended by the Police Medical Officer identified: Mr Bond cannot read or write, has impaired memory skills, has difficulty with attention concentration and has below average visual tracking and scanning abilities.
                  Had Mr Bond satisfied all aspects of the neuropsychological assessment, he would have then been assessed on competitive merit with other applicants for his possible acceptance into a "pool of applicants" and then considered for appointment when he became "number one" in the pool.
                  As Mr Bond clearly could not meet the required standards to sufficiently and capably discharge some of the major and important tasks of a Security Officer position, his application was not approved.
                (c) Not applicable.

          Page 613
              (5) (a) The neuropsychological report identifies a number of matters which would make it difficult, for Mr Bond to carry out most of the functions of a Security Officer. For example:
                    •Issue temporary security passes to non-accredited persons and immediately make a written record of such issue in the appropriate register.
                    •Make full and contemporaneous written record of all incidents, breaches of security, issue of passes, keys or other equipment as required, including maintaining a personal notebook record in accordance with training precedents/orders.
                    •To check and verify such documentation as may be presented by way of access authority, delivery dockets, authority to remove property, etc.
                    •To continually maintain security in strict accordance with training manuals and standard operational procedures for that site.
                (b) The importance of security at premises in the Police Service, Government House, Parliament House and wherever else it is to be carried out, and the professional manner in which it is expected to be carried out, speaks for itself. If any individual is unable to carry out the required task in the manner expected, then the quality and ability of that individual must be questioned and better quality applicants encouraged and selected. The practice of promotion and employment within the Police Service is selection on competitive merit.
              (6) Mr Bond was not successful with his application on the grounds that he is considered to be not capable to adequately discharge a number of major fundamental tasks peculiar to the position of Security Officer in the NSW Police Service.
              I am assured that the basis for his unsuccessful application was not related to his dyslexia, but rather to the overall need to effectively discharge the full range of the duties of the position in the public interest.
              Notwithstanding all of this, the Assistant Commissioner responsible for recruitment of Security Officers, Mr Moroney, has undertaken to specially review this matter in consultation with the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service, the Equal Employment Opportunity Branch and the Recruit Selection Review Committee of the NSW Police Service.
              Mr Moroney recently had discussions with Mr Bond personally regarding this review and I understand he is now aware of the action currently underway.

          *404 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              With regard to the electorate of The Entrance and the Attorney General portfolio—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly related or associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the Budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the Budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure since 1990/91, why?


          Page 614
              Answer—
              (1) The Public Trustee operates a branch office at 1 Watt Street, Gosford, within the electorate of Gosford. This office services an area covering the electorates of Gosford, Peats, Wyong and The Entrance. The Gosford office provides the full range of executor, administrator, attorney, agency and will making services to the residents of all four electorates.
              The office of the director of public prosecutions operates a regional office at 107-109 Mann Street, Gosford, to service the district court at Gosford and the local courts that commit matters to that district court.
              The Legal Aid Commission has two branch offices at Gosford and Newcastle which directly serve the constituents in The Entrance electorate. Free legal advice is available, by appointment, to constituents wishing to see a solicitor at these branch offices or from any other metropolitan branch office. Legal representation is available to constituents who satisfy the eligibility criteria for a grant of legal aid.
              The eligibility criteria includes a means test (that assesses the applicant's income and assets), policy guidelines (which specify the legal matters for which legal aid is available) and in most cases a merit test (which looks at the likelihood of success of the case and the benefit to the applicant).
              For most legal matters, constituents may also seek assistance from local legal practitioners who do legal aid work.
              (2) So far as the Public Trustee Office is concerned, there are 10 staff directly related or associated with the provision of those services.
              The Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions at Gosford is staffed by 10 persons, being 5 solicitors and 5 administrative staff. There are also 2 crown prosecutors who have chambers at Gosford.
              Staff at Gosford and Newcastle Legal Aid Commission offices are directly involved in service provision. However, legal aid matters conducted by private practitioners are administered by staff at head office. It is not possible to identify the number of staff directly servicing the legal aid needs of The Entrance constituents.
              (3) (a) The Public Trustee's expenditure records for 1990/91 do not correspond with the demands of this question.
                  So far as the office of the director of public prosecutions is concerned, budget projections and allocations are not assessed on a regional basis. However, estimates of expenditure for each year are provided below.
                  In 1990/91, it is estimated that $505,000 was spent on services facilities of the Gosford office of the Director of Public Prosecutions.
                  The Legal Aid Commission does not break down its expenditure by electorate, however information of general expenditure is included in the Commission's annual report.
                (b) Public Trustee
                  1991/92 projections $381,932
                  Actual expenditure $333,177
                  Office of Director of Public Prosecutions
                  1991/92 $576,000
                (c) Public Trustee
                  1992/93 projections $334,963
                  Actual expenditure $427,235
                  Office of Director of Public Prosecutions
                  1992/93 $616,000

          Page 615
                (d) Public Trustee
                  1993/94 $354,105
                  Office of Director of Public Prosecutions
                  1993/94 $636,000
              (4) There are no new or additional services or facilities to be provided during 1993/94.
              (5) There has been no decline in expenditure since 1990/91.

          *405 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              With regard to the electorate of The Entrance and the Justice portfolio—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly related or associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the Budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the Budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure since 1990/91, why?
              Answer—
              I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) An office of the New South Wales Probation Service is located at Long Jetty. Services provided include pre-sentence reports on offenders for Local and District Courts, the operation of the Community Service Orders and Fine Default Orders Scheme, and supervision of offenders on Probation Orders and Parole Orders. An Attendance Centre Program is provided at Toukley for offenders from the electorate of The Entrance.
              (2) Ten.
              (3) Probation Service expenditures, including salaries, rent, telephone, electricity and cleaning, were approximately:
              (a) $417,576.
              (b) $419,221.
              (c) $429,463.
              (d) $430,199.
              A motor vehicle fleet of five vehicles has been maintained at the office during the whole of the relevant period.
              (4) An amalgamation of the Tuggerah Lakes office (based at Long Jetty) with the Gosford district office will take place during 1993/94. This will rationalise and improve the administration of services to the whole of the Central Coast area. There will be no diminution of services to any part of the Central Coast, and there will be an extension of some services, such as the Attendance Centre Program, to new areas.
              (5) There has been no decline in expenditure.


          Page 616
          *406 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              With regard to the electorate of The Entrance—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly related or associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the Budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the Budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure since 1990/91, why?
              Answer—
              (1) to (5) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would impinge upon the time and resources of my Department which is not warranted within the priorities of the Department. General information relating to services and facilities provided by the Department may be obtained from the Department's annual reports.

          *407 BELLAMBI BOAT RAMP—Mr Markham asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
              (1) Is he aware of the problem to boat owners of the heavy surge caused by north-east swells at the Bellambi Boat Ramp which makes launching and retrieving small boats a dangerous experience?
              (2) Is he aware of the suggestion put forward by experienced boat owners who use the Bellambi ramp that floating pontoons moored on the edge of the existing ramp would alleviate this safety problem?
              (3) Will the Department of Public Works investigate this suggestion?
              (4) Will the Department of Public Works initiate action to overcome this hazardous situation?

              Answer—
              (1) The Illawarra coast is rugged and exposed and lacks the sheltered boat launching locations commonly found in estuary mouths on other sections of coast. When the Bellambi ramp and breakwater was built some 14 years ago, it was recognised that there would be some wave action at the ramp. The breakwater was designed using extensive hydraulic model testing to minimise this wave action and to provide a much safer launching location than was otherwise available on the Illawarra coast.
              (2) NSW Public Works has advised that pontoons, by their very nature of riding on top of long period waves, would not assist in reducing ocean swell at the ramp. Furthermore, pontoons would experience a greater degree of damage during storms than the fixed jetty currently in place alongside the ramp as the breakwater has been designed to be overtopped under storm conditions.

          Page 617
              (3) Responsibility for the Bellambi facility rests with Wollongong City Council. Should council wish to investigate modification to the design, financial assistance could be provided under the Waterways Infrastructure Development Program and NSW Public Works could provide technical assistance. As noted earlier, Public Works believes that further reduction of wave action is not feasible.
              (4) As previously noted, responsibility for the facility rests with council. Should investigation reveal that works were feasible, council could seek further assistance under the Waterways Infrastructure Development Program for their implementation.

          *408 DIRTY WATER—ELECTORATE OF KEIRA—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) What is the Water Board payment policy for customers in the electorate of Keira who experience dirty water problems?
              (2) Will the Water Board discount water bills to customers in the electorate of Keira who use extra water to rewash clothes because of stains sustained during washing due to dirty water?
              (3) Will the Water Board compensate customers whose clothing and linen, etc., are damaged by the supply of dirty water by replacing damaged items?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) The Water Board investigates the cause of the dirty water with a view to reducing or eliminating the problem. It does not reduce charges.
              (2) No, because the Water Board has not been negligent in the supply of water.
              (3) No. The Water Board would consider compensation if it were the direct cause of a dirty water event, but as the cases referred to are the result of naturally occurring iron and manganese in the water, no compensation will be given.

          *409 DIRTY WATER—SODIUM DITHIONATE—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Does the Water Board supply a powder (sodium dithionate) to customers in the electorate of Keira who experience staining of clothing, etc., caused by dirty water?
              (2) If so:
                (a) What is the composition of sodium dithionate?
                (b) What tests have been carried out on the effectiveness of sodium dithionate in removing stains?
                (c) If not, why not?
                (d) If so, what are the results of these tests?
              (3) Will sodium dithionate cause skin irritations to babies when napkins are washed in this substance?


          Page 618
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) Yes.
              (2) (a) Sodium dithionate is a pure compound, Na2S2O6.2H2O.
                (b) The textile industry determined that sodium dithionate is the most effective compound for removing iron and manganese stains from clothing. Sodium dithionate is not effective in removing organic stains, so a combination of detergent and sodium dithionate is recommended for dirty washing.
                (c) and (d) See answer (2) (b).
              (3) As in all laundry compounds, skin irritations to babies could occur if the compound is not removed either by rinsing by hand or in the washing machine.

          *410 WATERMAIN REPLACEMENT—ELECTORATE OF KEIRA—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Under the Old Watermain Replacement Program how much watermain has been replaced in the electorate of Keira in the years:
                (a) 1991/92?
                (b) 1992/93?
                (c) 1993/94?
              (2) In what streets have the mains been replaced?
              (3) What is the cost of replacement?
              (4) What mains will be replaced and where in 1994/95?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) (a) 4,644 metres.
              (b) 1,602 metres.
              (c) 2,230 metres.
              (2) Balgownie Brokers Road
                    Foothills Road
          Bellambi Gladstone Street
          Lavender Street
          Albert Street
              Corrimal Cawley Street
          Dobbie Avenue
              Gwynneville Gipps Road
              Mount Kembla Cordeaux Road
              Reidtown Steel Street
              Russell Vale Keerong Avenue
              Tarrawanna Harrigan Street
          Keira Street
              Towradgi Murranar Crescent
          Juanita Avenue

          Page 619
              Wollongong Allan Street
                  Cliff Road
                    Harbour Street
                  Urunga Parade
          Belmore Street
                  Burelli Street
          Corrimal Street
                  Greenacre Street
              New Dapto Road
                  Northcote Street
          Smith Street
                    Sperry Street
          Staff Street
                  Woodlawn Avenue
              (3) Depending on local site conditions and pipe size, the cost of installation of watermains varies between a rate of $167 per metre and $594 per metre.
              (4) No watermains will be replaced in the electorate of Keira in 1994/95 due to other funding priorities.

          *411 ABORIGINAL POLICE OFFICERS—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many Aboriginal police officers are employed in New South Wales?
              (2) Where are Aboriginal police officers stationed?
              (3) What are the present ranks of Aboriginal police officers?
              (4) What plans are there to employ more Aboriginal police officers in 1994?
              Answer—
              (1) The exact number of Aboriginal police officers is not known. It is not mandatory for police to identify their Aboriginal heritage. In 1990, the Office of the Director of Equal Opportunity in Public Employment (ODEOPE) surveyed all NSW Public Sector organisations.
              This survey revealed that 1 per cent of police officers identified as being Aboriginal.
              (2) Those police officers who have identified themselves to the Police Service as being of Aboriginal descent are stationed at the following locations:
                Sydney Police Centre, Lane Cove, Mayfield, Mount Druitt, Penrith, Gulgong, Ashfield, Camden, North Sydney, City of Sydney, Tamworth, Manly, Woy Woy, Campbelltown, Bourke, Lidcombe, Newtown, Police Headquarters, Redfern, Grafton, Raymond Terrace, Revesby and Corrimal.
              (3) Those police officers who have identified themselves to the Police Service as being of Aboriginal descent fall within the ranks of:
                Senior Sergeant, Sergeant, Senior Constable, Constable 1st Class, Constable and Probationary Constable.
              (4) In July 1991, the NSW Police Service Aboriginal Employment Strategy was launched. This strategy reinforces the Police Service's commitment to employ Aboriginals and attempts to overcome employment barriers.
              The identified position of Aboriginal Employment Strategy Co-ordinator was created to facilitate the strategy objectives. EEO Management Plan 1993/1994, project 4, objective 1, was to increase from 2.89 per cent to 4 per cent the proportion of persons recruited as police officers who are Aboriginal. This was exceeded by 0.7 per cent.

          Page 620

          *412 ABORIGINAL POLICE LIAISON OFFICERS—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many Aboriginal police liaison officers are employed in New South Wales?
              (2) Where are Aboriginal police liaison officers stationed?
              (3) What means of transport is provided for Aboriginal police liaison officers to carry out their duties?
              (4) How many Aboriginal police liaison officers have left the Police Service in:
                (a) 1991?
                (b) 1992?
                (c) 1993?
              (5) What plans are there to increase the number of Aboriginal police liaison officers?
              Answer—
              (1) The positions referred to are actually titled Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer. There are presently 38 employed in the Service and there are 40 established positions.
              (2) North Region Coffs Harbour, Kempsey, Lismore, Macksville and Taree.
                North West Region Boggabilla, Bourke, Brewarrina, Dubbo, Moree, Mount Druitt, Orange, Tamworth, Walgett, Wellington and Lake Cargelligo.
                South Region Batemans Bay, Malabar, Nowra and Redfern.
                South West Region Dareton, Griffith, Broken Hill/Menindee, Narrandera and Wilcannia.
              (3) Motor vehicles are provided as required to the Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers at the locations where they are stationed.
              (4) (a) 1.
                (b) 4.
                (c) 6.
              (5) Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers are recruited on a needs basis. Where work volume justifies the establishment of additional positions, this is evaluated within the Human Resources Command and recruitment action is taken.

          *413 CROWN LAND TRANSFERS—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
              (1) How many hectares of Crown land in the Central and Eastern Divisions has been transferred in the financial years 1991/92 and 1992/93 to:
                (a) National Parks and Wildlife Service?
                (b) NSW Forestry?
                (c) Department of Housing?
                (d) Department of Water Resources?
              (2) How many applications for Crown land were approved in 1991/92 and 1992/93 within the Central and Eastern Divisions?
              (3) How many hectares of Crown land were purchased during 1990/91?
              (4) In which local government areas and how many hectares were these purchases located?
              (5) How many hectares of Crown land were purchased by private individuals and organisations in 1991/92 and 1992/93?
              (6) In which local government areas were these private purchases located?


          Page 621
              Answer—
              (1) 1991/92 1992/93
              (a) 5,946 4,839
              (b) 1,838 1,220
              (c) 442 65
              (d) 1.6 2.5
              (2) 1,461 applications for Crown land in 1991/92 and 1,360 applications in 1992/93 were approved in the Eastern and Central Division. The applications included sales, leases, licences and conversions of leases.
              (3) 250,768 hectares were purchased in 1990/91.
              (4) No statistics are recorded on a local government area basis.
              (5) 163,128 in 1991/92 and 106,826 in 1992/93.
              (6) No statistics are recorded on a local government area basis.

          *414 MANLY DAM CROWN LAND SALE—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
              (1) Does the Department of CaLM intend to sell 3.94 hectares of Crown land within the Manly Dam catchment?
              (2) Is this land held in trust by the Spastic Centre of NSW?
              (3) Did CaLM waive the requirement for an environmental impact statement prior to sale?
              (4) Has the Environment Protection Authority expressed concern over the rezoning of this land for medium-density housing?
              (5) Is the Department of CaLM responsible for implementation of Total Catchment Management?
              (6) If so, why has CaLM decided to ignore the implications to the Manly Dam Catchment area as a result of this proposed sale?
              (7) Who will benefit from the proceeds of the sale of this land and in what proportion?
              (8) Will he instruct CaLM to defer the proposed sale pending the completion of a full EIS?
              (9) Has the Government considered the long-term benefit of incorporating this land in the Manly Dam Reserve?
              (10) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) No. Presumably the question relates to an area of 3.64 hectares which is part of Reserve 87651 for charitable organisations, notified 30 January 1970 under the trusteeship of the Spastic Centre of NSW.
              (2) The 3.64 hectares is part of a larger area used for rehabilitation and training by the Centre.
              (3) No.
              (4) I am not aware of any concerns expressed by the Environmental Protection Authority.
              (5) The Minister for the Environment has responsibility for control of Total Catchment Management in urban areas.
              (6) Not applicable.

          Page 622
              (7) The Spastic Centre is to retain 93 per cent of the proceeds of the sale of the land which will be applied to the "Growth Point" project. The sale will provide the financial resources to allow the Spastic Centre to establish much needed facilities in Western Sydney.
              The remaining 7 per cent of the proceeds will supplement the Public Reserves Management Fund which benefits the general community by the provision of funding for public reserve lands.
              (8) The land is to be sold by the Reserve Trust to provide funds for the "Growth Point" project. Future development of the land will be subject to the usual planning controls.
              (9) No. The land was provided in 1970 as a reserve for Charitable Organisations under the trusteeship of the Spastic Centre with the expectation that it would be developed for that purpose.
              The land is physically separated from the Manly Dam reserve by a road and a Water Board pipeline.
              (10) Not applicable.

          *415 SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CHARGES—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
              (1) What was the hourly rate charged by CaLM for soil conservation services prior to July, 1992?
              (2) Was there an establishment fee also charged?
              (3) If so, what was the amount?
              (4) What was the hourly rate charged for soil conservation services after July 1992?
              (5) Was there a corresponding increase in the establishment fee?
              (6) If so, how much?
              (7) What is the current hourly rate for soil conservation services?
              (8) What is the current charge as establishment fee?
              (9) What are the reasons for any increase in these fees?
              (10) Is he aware of complaints by CaLM clients that increased hourly rates are seriously affecting the ability of property owners to continue with soil conservation works?
              (11) Will he instruct CaLM to forego increased hourly rates where property owners have already expended large amounts on soil conservation works and are merely continuing established soil conservation programs?
              Answer—
              (1) $84 per hour.
              (2) No.
              (3) Not applicable.
              (4) $85 per hour.
              (5) Not applicable.
              (6) Not applicable.
              (7) $87 per hour.
              (8) $100 for each job started.
              (9) The increase in the hourly rate was to account for the increase in the CPI (2.3 per cent) since July 1992.
              The establishment fee was introduced to recover part of the bulldozer transport costs, thereby offsetting the need to further increase hourly rates. By not absorbing all the transport costs in the hourly rate (as was previously the case), the costs are spread more equitably over all jobs.
              (10) No.
              (11) No.

          Page 623

          *416 OYSTER LEASES—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) How many oyster leases have been abandoned or surrendered in New South Wales?
              (2) Are any of these abandoned or surrendered oyster leases being utilised illegally?
              (3) If so, where?
              (4) What action is being taken by the NSW Department of Fisheries to prevent the illegal utilisation of abandoned or surrended oyster leases?
              Answer—
              (1) 78 oyster leases have been surrendered and 31 have been cancelled in the last 2 years in New South Wales.
              (2) Yes, there are two known cases of illegal use of oyster leases.
              (3) Both cases are located in Port Stephens.
              (4) The director of NSW Fisheries, Mr Paul Crew, has sent a letter to the proprietor notifying the company to remove their osyters within 44 days or face confiscation of the stock. Fisheries officers regularly inspect oyster farming areas and a new computerised record system at NSW Fisheries head office will stremline regular updates to field officers on the status of oyster leases in their area.

          *417 SMOKY VEHICLE ENFORCEMENT POLICY—Mr Martin asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) Did he announce a proposed 6-month trial by the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) of a differential "smoky vehicle enforcement policy"?
              (2) When was the trial to commence?
              (3) Has the trial been completed?
              (4) In which areas or regions were the trials conducted?
              (5) What was the classification of areas in which trials were to be conducted?
              (6) What classification was used to determine the difference between private and commercial vehicles?
              (7) How many officers of the EPA were involved in conducting the trial/s?
              (8) Were these EPA officers engaged full-time on the trials?
              (9) If not, what was the hours allocated to the trial/s by each EPA officer?
              (10) Were officers of the NSW Police Service or any other authority engaged to assist in the trial/s?
              (11) If so, how many and in what areas or regions?
              (12) What was the total cost of the trial/s to the EPA?
              (13) Were any prosecutions launched as a result of the trial?
              (14) What was the total number of defects detected in vehicles of each classification in each region or area?
              (15) What action was taken in respect of the defects detected during the trial/s?
              (16) As a result of the trial, do you intend to introduce a specific detection procedure by EPA officers?
              (17) When will the procedure commence?
              (18) What are the intended penalties for a breach of the EPA smoky vehicle enforcement policy?


          Page 624
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) The trial commenced on 27 September 1993.
              (3) The trial was scheduled to continue to the end of March 1994 and a preliminary assessment was to be made then. However, the Director-General of the EPA subsequently requested that the trial be extended to allow for the intended training of additional EPA officers across the state to be completed and to provide better information on the success of the initiative.
              (4) The trial was carried out across New South Wales.
              (5) The state is divided into two classifications. The "City" region includes the metropolitan areas of Sydney, Newcastle and Wollongong and their environs.
              The "Country" areas includes the rest of the state.
              (6) Private vehicles are classified as vehicles used substantially for private use.
              Primary producer vehicles are classified as vehicles used substantially for farm work.
              Commercial vehicles are classified as vehicles used substantially for business or commercial purposes or are owned by a business or corporation.
              (7) At least 70 officers have been engaged on the trial. An additional 60 officers were trained in February 1994.
              (8) No officers are engaged full-time on the trial. Smoky vehicle enforcement is a part of the range of duties carried out by officers of the Environment Protection Authority.
              (9) No specific allocation of an officer's time was set aside for the trial. EPA officers report smoky vehicles as a normal part of their duties when travelling to or from work, inspections, meetings, etc.
              (10) No other authorities were involved in the trial.
              (11) None.
              (12) The trial has not been completed, so the costs of the trial have not been ascertained.
              (13) In the period, 7 prosecutions have been initiated in accordance with the policy.
              (14) In the classes of private and primary producer vehicles, 125 smoky vehicles were detected in the "City" area and 30 smoky vehicles detected in the "Country" area.
              In the same period, 731 penalty notices were issued to owners of smoky commercial vehicles.
              (15) The owners of smoky private and primary producer vehicles are required to take their vehicle to a licensed motor vehicle repairer to have appropriate repairs effected.
              Once the repairs are effected, the owner is required to send a completed smoky vehicle repair advice to the EPA within 30 days.
              (16) The procedure for the detection of smoky vehicles is specified in the Clean Air Regulations. I will wait to assess the results of the full trial before considering any change in procedure.
              (17) Not applicable.
              (18) In the "City", an offence occurs if an owner does not repair a vehicle. A $96 penalty notice is issued if after 30 days the smoke repair advice report is not returned to the EPA. In the "Country", an offence occurs if the vehicle is observed again emitting air impurities after the 30-day period of grace has elapsed.
              The owners of commercial vehicles automatically receive a $96 penalty notice.
              The maximum penalty for continuing offences is $10,000 in a local court.


          Page 625
          *418 STUDENT TRAVEL ON BUSES—Ms Nori asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Are students travelling by concession fares on buses required to give up their seats for full-paying adults who are standing?
              (2) If so, why is this rule, along with other rules about passenger travel such as no smoking, not displayed on buses?
              (3) Is the playing of radios, tape players, etc, permitted on buses?
              (4) If so, does this rule apply to bus drivers, excluding base to bus 2-way radios?
              Answer—
              (1) There is no regulation under the Passenger Transport Act 1990, requiring students travelling by concession fares on buses, to give up their seats for full paying adults who are standing.
              Passes issued to students for concession travel on buses, by both the State Transit Authority and the Private Bus Industry, are endorsed on the reverse of the pass, under Conditions of Issue, that "Pass holder must not remain seated whilst adults stand".
              (2) It is not displayed on buses because there is no regulation to enforce this requirement, whereas the requirement for a no smoking sign to be displayed is required under Regulation 16 (2) of the Passenger Transport Act 1990.
              (3) Yes. Providing the playing of radios, tape players, etc., are not causing discomfort to other passengers or the driver.
              (4) Refer to answer (3).

          *419 MOTOR VEHICLE NOISE—Ms Nori asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) For each of the past 3 years, how many convictions have agencies under your administration received for violations of excessive noise generated by motor vehicles?
              (2) Of these, how many have followed investigations based upon reports and complaints from members of the public?
              (3) Of the convictions, whether or not they followed complaints from the public, for how many was the relevant information passed along to the police and/or RTA leading to convictions for performing the modification or passing the vehicle's annual inspection with this defect?
              (4) For each of the past 3 years, how many convictions have been received for violations of excessive smoke generated from motor vehicles?
              (5) Of these, how many have resulted from complaints by members of the public?
              (6) Has he or his predecessors received requests that he not prosecute operators of motor vehicles emitting excessive noise and/or smoke?
              (7) What efforts has the EPA undertaken to promote its role of testing and prosecuting apparent violations of the Clean Air Act and Noise Control Act concerning motor vehicles and encouraging members of the public to report vehicles they perceive to be in violation of these acts?
              (8) What plans does he have to deal with this problem?


          Page 626
              Answer—
              (1) For the period 1 January 1991 to 1 March 1994, 1,131 penalty notices have been issued for offences relating to noisy vehicles and 133 prosecutions have been instigated.
              (2) Prosecutions and penalty notices are not initiated by EPA officers merely as a result of complaints from the public. For prosecutions or penalty notices issued by EPA officers, the offending vehicles must be inspected and tested by an authorised EPA officer at the time of the offence. However, information from members of the public have led to enforcement operations being held in areas where a problem exists. These operations have led to penalty notices and prosecutions being instigated against the owner of offending vehicles.
              (3) Officers take action directly in regard to modifications to exhaust systems and require the vehicles to be repaired.
              Information from the EPA's vehicle inspections is not normally passed to the RTA or police.
              (4) For the period 1 January 1991 to 1 March 1994, 7,271 penalty notices have been issued for offences relating to noisy vehicles and 88 prosecutions have been instigated each year.
              (5) As with noisy vehicles, prosecutions or penalty notices are only issued if a vehicle is observed by an EPA officer.
              (6) Representations have been made from time-to-time from the owners of offending vehicles requesting leniency or prosecutions to be withdrawn. Any representations have been forwarded to the EPA to be assessed on their merits in accordance with the principles set out in the EPA's prosecution guidelines.
              (7) The EPA has initiated press releases regarding the activities and enforcement operations in regard to smoky and noisy vehicles. Television and radio reports on EPA motor vehicle activities have been broadcast from time-to-time.
              EPA publicity campaigns and press releases were instigated on the introduction of unleaded petrol, environmental offences and penalties act tier 3 penalty notices and the differential smoke enforcement policy. The "dob in a dumper" scheme resulted in a number of smoky vehicle reports due to the awareness of pollution problems by the general public.
              In the period 1 January 1991 to 1 March 1994, 3,003 complaints for smoky vehicles and 263 complaints for noisy vehicles were made to the EPA.
              The appropriate action was taken upon receipt of the complaints.
              (8) Additional EPA officers are being trained to detect and rectify motor vehicle offences. The programs will continue to be publicised according to perceived needs and overall environmental priorities.

          *420 KURRI KURRI HOSPITAL—X-RAY FACILITIES—Mr Price asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) When is it intended to upgrade the existing X-ray facilities at Kurri Kurri Hospital?
              (2) Will 24-hour availability, 7 days a week, be maintained once the new machine is installed?
              Answer—
              (1) At an estimated cost of $220,000, a new general purpose X-ray room and a significantly upgraded ultrasound service will be installed at the Kurri Kurri Hospital. The new equipment will be installed early in the 1994/95 financial year.
              (2) Existing on-call arrangements which provide 24-hour, 7 day a week availability will be maintained.


          Page 627
          *421 SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the Southern Sydney Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these, in each month, were day surgery?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each hospital in each area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently, the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a 3-year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.

          *422 NORTHERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the Northern Sydney Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these, in each month, were day surgery?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each hospital in each area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently, the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a 3-year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.

          *423 ILLAWARRA AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the Illawarra Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these, in each month, were day surgery?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each hospital in each area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently, the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a 3-year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.


          Page 628
          *424 EASTERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as effective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the Eastern Sydney Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these, in each month, were day surgery?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each hospital in each area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently, the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a 3-year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.

          *425 CENTRAL SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the Central Sydney Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these, in each month, were day surgery?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each hospital in each area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently, the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a 3-year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.

          *426 CENTRAL COAST AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the Central Coast Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these, in each month, were day surgery?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each Hospital in each Area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently, the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a three year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.


          Page 629
          *427 M5 CYCLEWAY—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Will the RTA seek to have the operators of the M5 Motorway provide a cycleway for the benefit of pushbike riders?
              (2) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) There are no restrictions on cyclists using the road shoulders of the M5 Motorway from Moorebank Avenue to Fairford Road. For road safety reasons, cyclists are not permitted on the two-lane section of the motorway between Fairford Road and King Georges Road.
              Representatives of the RTA, Canterbury Council and Interlink Roads are currently discussing the provision of a cycleway/pedestrian path east of Fairford Road on a route which passes partly within the motorway boundaries and partly on land owned by Council.
              (2) See answer (1) above.

          *428 RURAL ELECTRICITY CUSTOMERS—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              How will rural electricity customers be protected from price increases when the national grid, together with a competitive market for electricity, is introduced in 1995 given that these customers currently enjoy a cross-subsidy which it is presumed will be abolished when the national grid is introduced?
              Answer—
              Currently the pricing of electricity services in New South Wales is a matter for the Government Pricing Tribunal which is responsible for setting maximum prices for all electricity supply industry utilities.
              The Government appreciates that rural electricity customers are concerned with some of the trading arrangements which have been proposed for the operation of the national electricity grid, this is particularly so in respect to network pricing. As the process of developing these arrangements continues, I intend to maintain the position that the NSW Government would not be prepared to accept any reform proposals which may carry with them the potential to impact severely on the financial position of the State's electricity distributors and their customers, particularly those in the rural sector.

          *429 FAULTY TELEVISION SET FIRES—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) Has the Office of Energy received reports regarding faulty television sets which, under certain conditions, catch fire?
              (2) What investigations have been carried out on these reports?
              (3) What is the reason for these fires?
              (4) What action is being taken to address this problem?
              (5) What brands of televisions are involved in these fires?
              (6) What is the origin of/country of the manufacturers of these television sets?


          Page 630
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) Investigations follow the general procedure:
                (a) Establish the make and model number of the set(s) involved, and the address of the manufacture or importer.
                (b) Discuss with the owner, any other investigators (e.g., Fire Investigation Unit of the NSWFB, police or insurance investigator) and examine the set to determine the circumstances and the possible cause of the fire.
                (c) For New South Wales importer, or if the set holds Office of Energy Certification, determine numbers sold, compliance with safety specifications, cause of fire, and the action required to ensure public safety both for similar articles already sold and for those not yet sold, e.g., public recall.
                (d) For interstate importer, refer to interstate regulatory counterpart and monitor response.
              (3) In the majority of cases examined since January 1992, the source of the fire is a manufacturing quality control problem whereby some soldered connections on printed circuit boards show intermittent defects and eventually break down causing localised heat and arcing. In one make of television, the ON/OFF switch was found to be the source of fires. In one instance of a reported television fire, the cause could not be established.
              (4) Where it is established that a particular model of television set may catch fire due to a design fault, the Office of Energy will liaise with the manufacturer or importer to conduct a recall or consumer awareness campaign, and then will monitor the success of the recall. Additional publicity by way of media information is obtained if possible.
              Where a deficiency is identified with the safety standard, future fire risks may be minimised by changing the relevant standards, e.g., AS3250. As a result of recent Office of Energy input, fire tests on television switches and an improvement in fire properties of PCB surrounds are expected to be introduced.
              (5) and (6) The brands, model numbers and countries of manufacture of the televisions in fires investigated since January 1992 are as follows:
                Rover Models NSW8109 and ACN8109 (Taiwan)
                Samsung Models CB515F and CB515Z (South Korea)
                AWA Models C3420 and C3421 (South Korea)
                Philips Model V6820 (Sweden)
                Marantz Model MTV750 (Sweden)
                Akai Models CTK202, CTK207 and CTK108 (South Korea)
                Sanyo Model CPP4012 (Singapore)

          *430 PROPOSED TRANSMISSION AUTHORITY—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) Is the Government proposing the complete separation of generating and transmission functions of Pacific Power?
              (2) If so, when?
              (3) What conditions will apply for transferred employees in relation to existing awards and provisions?
              (4) Will the transmission authority have a separate board?
              (5) What changes will be made to the existing business units in Pacific Power and what structure is proposed for the transmission authority?
              (6) What name will the transmission authority trade under?

          Page 631
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Pacific Power is already structured so that the grid is a separate business unit, financially ring-fenced from generation so that its costs are separately reported from generation. I have also given a commitment in September 1993 to form a separate subsidiary of Pacific Power's grid assets by July 1994. This is currently proceeding to plan. Furthermore, I have indicated a willingness to look at any further separation that may seem appropriate in the lead up to the introduction of the competitive electricity market by July 1995.
              (3) Network subsidiary staff would initially retain existing award/enterprise agreement coverage and all conditions.
              (4) Pacific Power's network subsidiary is intended to operate under its own Board of Directors within Pacific Power's overall corporate structure.
              (5) At this stage, options for further changes to existing business units in Pacific Power are yet to be developed, and no internal structure has been finalised for the network subsidiary.
              (6) The name has not yet been determined.

          *431 PORT KEMBLA COAL TERMINAL—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Why did the Commission of Inquiry into the upgrading of the Port Kembla Coal Terminal:
                (a) Fail to acknowledge the submission from the member for Wollongong?
                (b) Fail to deal with the transport issues raised in the submission from the member for Wollongong?
              (2) Will the Government undertake to address the contribution of the Maldon-Dombarton/ East West rail links and the matter of more coal cartage by rail, as matters of urgency?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) (a) The report prepared by the Commissioners of Inquiry acknowledged Mr Sullivan's submission in appendix 3 of the report. The member for Wollongong raised the issues of noise pollution, air pollution, community amenity and rail and all of these matters are discussed in the issues section of the report.
                (b) The Commissioner's report was unable to provide a firm recommendation on a solution to resolve the current problems associated with coal transport, because of the absence of essential information such as confidential financial information concerning Clutha's operations.
                  The Department of Transport has established a working group to specifically address the transportation of coal from the Burragorang Valley.
                  The problem of noise impacts along Mount Ousley Road could not be resolved through the proposed Port Kembla Coal Terminal expansion. I have asked the Minister for Transport, the Hon. B. Baird, M.P., to consider the erection of noise barriers along Mount Ousley Road as a matter of urgency.
              (2) The option to increase the level of coal haulage from the Burragorang Valley via the existing rail network will be considered by the working group. The commission of inquriy was advised by Freight Rail that there is spare capacity to transport coal via the existing network. There is therefore no requirement for expansion of the rail network to accommodate increased haulage of coal.

          Page 632

          *432 ILLAWARRA TAFE PARKING FEES—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
              (1) Does the NSW Department of TAFE support the introduction of a parking fee at the Illawarra Institute of Technology?
              (2) If so, is the Department aware that the collection of the fee was causing traffic congestion and delays on access roads to TAFE?
              (3) Is the new parking fee, in many cases, a doubling of fees to Illawarra TAFE students?
              (4) What steps can, or has the Department taken, to abolish the fee?
              Answer—
              (1) The introduction of charges for parking in TAFE colleges has been a measure adopted at some TAFE colleges where specific difficulties are experienced in restricting access to legitimate visitors. Some typical examples would be where colleges are located in the vicinity of universities, hospitals, shopping centres or railway stations or where specific control measures are required to address specific local needs. The management and control of parking at the Wollongong campus of the Illawarra Institute has been a problem for some time.
              (2) Details of the introduction of parking charges at the Wollongong campus were provided to local police to enable them to monitor and respond to any traffic problems that may have arisen. While some minor delays were experienced in the first few days of the introduction of the parking charge, these were quickly overcome. Appropriate staffing is provided to accommodate any peak periods to obviate any delays in entry to the premises or potential traffic difficulties.
              (3) The parking charge for students of the Wollongong campus has been set at $1. This rate was set to cover the costs associated with the employment of additional security staff who have been engaged to supervise the parking facilities.
              In developing the parking policy, it was recognised that a form of exemption or concession would be necessary to accommodate students with particular disadvantages. Consistent with existing community practices, an exemption from the parking charges has been granted to persons who hold a Disabled Persons Parking Authority issued by the Roads and Traffic Authority.
          The Campus Manager at Wollongong has also been given authority to grant exemption from the charge on an individual basis to address short-term cases where the issue of a Disabled Persons Parking Authority would not be practical.
              The majority of TAFE students would attend classes on 1 or 2 days per week. In those cases, the cost of parking would not be equivalent to "a doubling of fees".
              (4) The introduction of parking charges and the provision of additional staff to supervise the parking of vehicles at the Wollongong campus of the Illawarra Institute of Technology has satisfactorily resolved the problems previously being experienced. Adequate parking is now available for legitimate users and the safety and security problems have been appropriately addressed. For these reasons, it is not intended that the parking charges be abolished.


          Page 633
          *433 YOUTH LAWLINE PROJECT—ILLAWARRA—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              (1) What budgetary restraints have been imposed on the Legal Aid Commission which prevents it from providing funds for youth legal education and the Youth Lawline Project in the Illawarra?
              (2) What budgetary restraints have been imposed on the Department of Juvenile Justice which prevents if from providing funds for youth legal education and the Youth Lawline Project in the Illawarra?
              Answer—
              (1) The government has not placed budgetary restraints on the Legal Aid Commission which is itself responsible for its recurrent budget. The allocation made by the Commission for the Community Legal Centre Funding and Special Welfare Rights Programs under which the Illawarra Legal Centre has already received $201,500 during the financial year, has been fully committed for the 1993/94 financial year.
              (2) The budget of the Department of Juvenile Justice is not "restrained" in terms of providing funds for youth legal education and the Youth Lawline project in the Illawarra.
              The Department's budget does not have a separate component to allow for consideration of applications/the grant of funds for community projects.

          *434 WOLLONGONG OFFICE OF BIRTHS, DEATHS AND MARRIAGES—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              (1) Is the Wollongong Office of Births, Deaths and Marriages to be restructured or reorganised?
              (2) If so, what are the details of the restructure or reorganisation?
              (3) What impact will these proposals have on the:
                (a) Issuing of records?
                (b) Employees?
                (c) Chapel and the marriage celebrants?
                (d) Impact of costs to the public including fares, or additional travelling time, or additional difficulties with communication?
              Answer—
              (1) In 1993, both regional offices of the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages were linked to a new computer system. This provided an opportunity to:
                  •improve service for local clients; and
                  •evenly share processing workloads between the regional offices in Newcastle and Wollongong and the Sydney office.
              Following a request from Wollongong for temporary replacement staff, a comparative review of workload in all three offices was conducted by the registry to identify the most efficient use of resources.
              (2) No firm decision has been made in relation to a restructure. The review suggests staff numbers in the Wollongong regional office are adequate but supervisors appear to be engaged in routine tasks which are undertaken by lower graded officers in Newcastle or Sydney.

          Page 634
              (3) (a) No impact. Introduction of the integrated computed network provides improved services for Wollongong residents through faster processing of registrations and greater access to certificates for events not registered locally.
                (b) Further consultation with staff in Wollongong is proposed to ensure that the daily duties of all officers are consistent with those undertaken in Newcastle and Sydney. This may result in a flatter supervisory structure in the Wollongong regional office.
                (c) No change proposed.
                (d) No impact, as services will continue to be provided locally.

          *435 COMMUNITY LAW SERVICES—ILLAWARRA—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
              (1) What State Government funds are presently provided for community law services in the Illawarra region?
              (2) What funds does the Department of Community Services provide for youth education on the subject of civil rights and other aspects of the law in the Illawarra region?
              Answer—
              (1) These programs are administered by the Legal Aid Commission of New South Wales.
              (2) This matter would be more appropriately addressed to the Hon. Virginia Chadwick, M.L.C., Minister for Education and Youth Affairs.

          *436 WOMEN'S INCEST SUPPORT HOUSE—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
              (1) Is the Department of Community Services taking any measures to assist and ensure that the Women's Incest Support House (WISH) in Wollongong, finds or is provided with, secure accommodation?
              (2) If so, how?
              (3) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) The service has submitted an application through the Department to the NSW Property Services Group which operates the Properties for Community Purposes Program. Under this Government-wide program, surplus State Government premises can be made available for use by eligible non-profit non-Government organisations.
              (3) Not applicable.
          3 MARCH 1994

          (Paper No. 3)

          *437 HUNTER WATER CORPORATION TAX ADVANTAGES—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) What taxes are payable to the Commonwealth Government and to the State Government by the Hunter Water Corporation?

          Page 635
              (2) How are these taxes levied and collected?
              (3) Is the Hunter Water Corporation exempt from sales tax on equipment, materials, fuel and vehicles?
              (4) If the corporation is not exempt from sales tax on the aforementioned items, what rate of tax is applicable to such items purchased by the corporation?
              (5) How does this rate compare with the rate paid by those working in the private sector?
              (6) Is the Hunter Water Corporation engaging in competition with private enterprise?
              (7) Is this competition considered to be unfair due to the corporation's lower overheads?
              (8) Will he take steps to protect the interests of those employers and employees whose livelihood is at risk due to the corporation competing in the private sector?
              (9) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) The Hunter Water Corporation pays:
                  •To the Commonwealth Government—
                  Payroll tax;
                  Fringe benefits tax;
                  Sales tax on external sales;
                  Financial institutions duty;
                  Prescribed payments tax.
                  •To the State Government—
                  Company income tax equivalent;
                  Sales tax equivalent;
                  Land tax;
                  Stamp duties;
                  State debit tax.
              (2) Taxes are levied and collected in accordance with relevant legislation and procedures by the Australian Taxation Office, Financial Institution, the Office of State Revenue, etc.
              (3) No. The Hunter Water Corporation is levied sales tax in accordance with the Sales Tax Exemptions and Classifications Act. Exemptions are granted in accordance with the Act for aids to manufacturing.
              (4) The rates of tax applicable to such items are those established under the Sales Tax Exemptions and Classifications Act.
              (5) The rates paid by the corporation under the Act are those payable by the private sector.
              (6) Yes.
              (7) No. The corporation is operating and competing on a level playing field basis.
              (8) No. As indicated above, the corporation is operating and competing on a level playing field basis. It is therefore appropriate that the corporation operate in the marketplace in areas where it is efficient. By so doing, it is creating employment opportunities.
              (9) Not applicable.

          *438 AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE INDUSTRIES SITE—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Is the Government interested in residential development of the 1,535-hectare Australian Defence Industries (ADI) site at St Marys?
              (2) Is residential development of about 10,000 lots planned for the site?

          Page 636
              (3) How will the existing infrastructure cope with this increased loading?
              (4) Will an upgraded St Marys sewage treatment plant be able to cope with the increased input?
              (5) Will the water quality of South Creek—which feeds into the Hawkesbury/Nepean System—be at risk from the sewage treatment plant?
              (6) Is the site prone to flooding from South Creek?
              (7) Will the increased run-off from residential development increase the likelihood of flooding in other areas?
              (8) Have the Blacktown and Penrith City Councils intimated their willingness to rezone their respective sections of the site to allow the residential development?
              (9) If not, why not?
              (10) Will the land be developed by ADI in partnership with the private sector?
              (11) If so, will he ensure that all economic levels of housing are catered for?
              (12) Will he ensure that recreational, cultural and multicultural facilities are incorporated in planning, funding and provision of human services?
              (13) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) to (7) The Government incorporated the ADI site in the Urban Development Program in 1993. Consideration is now being given to the commencement of planning studies and preparation of a draft REP for the site, in conjunction with Blacktown and Penrith City Councils. These studies will address all of the critical issues, including the extent and form of development for residential, employment and recreational purposes, water cycle management (including drainage, flooding, stormwater and sewage effluent) and the provision of physical and human services.
              (8) and (9) Penrith City Council resolved on 7 February 1994 that it was prepared to participate in the preparation of a Regional Environmental Study and draft Regional Environmental Plan for the ADI site, subject to several conditions. I am advised that it is expected that Blacktown City Council will address this issue during April.
              (10) and (11) I am not aware of the details of what arrangements ADI proposes to enter into. The issue of housing provision will be addressed in the planning studies.
              (12) and (13) Refer to answers to question parts (1) to (7).

          *439 NORTH OCEAN SHORES—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Is he aware of the development proposal for North Ocean Shores on the New South Wales North Coast?
              (2) Is he aware of the environmental, economic, social and heritage consequences of such a development?
              (3) Was the area referenced as a nature reserve proposal by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service in 1990?
              (4) Was most of the North Ocean Shores area recommended for environmental protection zoning by Commissioner William Simpson in 1990?
              (5) Why has the Heritage Council twice failed to place an interim conservation order on the land in 1993?

          Page 637
              (6) Are the designated wetlands in danger of being destroyed?
              (7) Can he supply details of environmental studies carried out to assess the impact of development on the native flora and fauna of the area?
              (8) Will he also supply details of how the wildlife corridors which reinforce the regional biotic diversity of the area will be protected?
              (9) Do different archaeological sites exist in the area?
              (10) Are sacred Aboriginal sites endangered due to this proposed development?
              (11) Will he advise as to why he has neglected the North Ocean Shores area and allowed illegal clearing activities to proceed?
              (12) Will he issue an interim conservation order on the North Ocean Shores area as a matter or urgency?
              (13) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) There are currently two development applications before Byron Council that affect lands within the North Ocean Shores area. One is an application for a proposed subdivision and the other deals with the clearing of noxious weeds.
              (2) More details are required to determine what proposed development is being referred to in this instance.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) Yes, an LEP Amendment No. 14 was gazetted on 8 January 1993 to give effect to this recommendation.
              (5) An interim conservation order was placed on the land in 1985. It was allowed to lapse in 1987 because the area was considered to be adequately protected by State Environmental Planning Policy No. 14—Coastal Wetlands and the draft local environmental plan being prepared by Byron Council.
              In September 1993, claims were received that illegal clearing was taking place and action under the Heritage Act was requested. The allegations were investigated, and the Heritage Council was advised that the activities had ceased and that Byron Council had taken action against the owners of the land in respect of clearing activities. It was also advised that:
                  •Council was intending to prepare an environmental study of the area and a new local environmental plan to control development within it; and
                  •National Parks and Wildlife Service was negotiating with the owners to secure a Conservation Agreement.
              In view of these factors, the Heritage Council advised the Minister that it considered that action under the Heritage Act was not necessary at that time, but that progress of the various initiatives should be monitored
              Further requests for an interim conservation order have been received recently. The Department of Planning is examining the requests and the matter will be considered by the Heritage Council at its April meeting.
              (6) Any development proposed for wetlands designated under SEPP 14 will be addressed in accordance with the provisions of that planning instrument which includes the preparation and exhibition of an EIS, the consent of council, and the concurrence of the Director of Planning.

          Page 638
              (7) Byron Council has recently resolved to prepare a local environmental plan for the whole of the North Ocean Shores area to try to ensure that the boundary between the Rural and Habitat zones accurately reflects the vegetation distribution. Because part of the land is within 1 kilometre of the coast, the NSW Coast: Government Policy applies and Council has been advised than an environmental study is required.
              (8) The environmental protection zones included in Byron LEP are intended to provide adequate protection for important natural areas.
              (9) The National Parks and Wildlife Service has identified a bora ring and a number of other sites including several middens in the area.
              (10) The National Parks and Wildlife Service has temporarily fenced the bora ring and is responsible for protecting Aboriginal sites.
              (11) The owner agreed in writing at a meeting with council officers in November 1993 not to carry out any further clearing of noxious weeds on the land until a development application for such clearing and the rehabilitation of already cleared areas has been approved by council. A development application was lodged, placed on public exhibition, and is currently being considered by the council.
              (12) and (13) The Minister will consider whether action under the Heritage Act is necessary on receipt of advice from the Heritage Council and Byron Council.

          *440 FLUORIDE REFERENDUM—BLUE MOUNTAINS CITY COUNCIL—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) Has the Health Department endorsed the Local Government referendum on fluoride in Ward One of the Blue Mountains City Council?
              (2) Have in excess of 70 per cent of residents voted against fluoridation?
              (3) Why has the Health Department refused to acknowledge its legal responsibilities to comply with majority wishes after a referendum?
              (4) Why were Blue Mountains residents never fully consulted by the Health Department about fluoridating the water supply?
              (5) Why is the Department allowing fluoridation of Blue Mountains water supplies to proceed against the wishes of the people?
              (6) Will he direct the Health Department to instruct the Water Board to cease fluoridation of Blue Mountains water supplies?
              (7) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) The Health Department provided information for residents prior to the poll of residents conducted by the Blue Mountains City Council at the time of a Council by-election. The Department did not endorse the poll and indeed did not agree with the wording of the questions asked.
              (2) Yes.
              (3) The poll that was conducted by the Blue Mountains City Council does not have the legal status of a referendum and the results are not binding on the City Council or the Health Department.
              The Water Board, in undertaking fluoridation of all water supplies under its control, is acting in accordance with Cabinet directions of former Governments. The issue of fluoridation also received bipartisan support when the Act was debated in 1989.

          Page 639
              (4) Blue Mountains residents have been informed that the water supplies would be fluoridated since the Water Board was given responsibility for management of the water supplies in 1980.
              Further information was provided by the Board in 1990 when upgrading of the water treatment plants was announced.
              (5) Blue Mountains water supplies were fluoridated in April 1992 over a year before the poll was taken of the residents. Fluoridation, as a public dental health measure, is to continue throughout all water supplies under control of the Water Board.
              (6) No.
              (7) At the time of the poll in May last year, the Department was undertaking a major survey of dental health of children in both the Upper Blue Mountains and in the Hawkesbury Local Government area, where children have had lifelong exposure to water fluoridation.
              Those who participated in the poll did not have full knowledge of the dental health status of their children. The study has now been published and has conclusively shown that children in the Blue Mountains had approximately two and one half times as many teeth affected by dental decay as their Hawkesbury counterparts. Not only were more teeth decayed but the extent of decay was three times greater in Blue Mountains children.
              The levels of decay seen is cause for concern as it presents a major dental public health problem in the Blue Mountains.
              Water fluoridation continues to be the most effective means of reducing the levels of dental decay and, I am advised, there are no adverse general health effects at the levels of fluoride used.
              The Department is working with local residents through the council's fluoridation committee to introduce an active health promotion campaign so that Blue Mountains residents may make informed choices about their children's health.

          *441 SEVEN HILLS POLICE STATION—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Is a new police station to be built at Seven Hills?
              (2) When will the new police station be built?
              (3) What will be the location of the new station?
              (4) What is the estimated cost of the new premises?
              Answer—
              (1) The recent construction of a new temporary police station at Seven Hills has considerably improved conditions. A new permanent station to replace the current demountables is listed on the NSW Police Service Capital Investment Strategic Plan for Major Works.
              (2) It is not envisaged that construction of police facilities at Seven Hills can be addressed in the next few years as other priorities are currently being addressed in line with budget capacity.
              (3) Two accommodation strategies are currently proposed:
                (a) A new station constructed on a new site at a location to be determined.
                (b) Current premises maintained (subject to agreement with Department of School Education) with creation of a new sector station within the Seven Hills Patrol area, preferably near Parklea.
              (4) The current preliminary budget cost is $2.4 million with an additional $0.4 million for the purchase of a new site.


          Page 640
          *442 ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS ASSAULT—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) How safe is the Royal Botanic Gardens for women walkers and joggers?
              (2) What safety precautions have been taken since the sexual assault of a 25-year-old woman in broad daylight on 25 February 1994?
              (3) How many assaults occurred in the gardens in 1992 and 1993?
              Answer—
              (1) The Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain are large public spaces and therefore experience a range of problems common to the wider community. However, as the figures below indicate, the number of incidents reported are very small as a proportion of the average 3 million visitors to the sites each year.
              (2) Increased police bicycle patrols of the area.
              (3) Reported incidents
                Type of Incident 1992 1993
                  Gardens Area:
          Bag snatching 1 Nil
                  Threatened assault 1 Nil
                  Spitting Nil 1
                  Domain Area:
                  Bag snatching Nil 1
                  Male assaulted by males 5 Nil
                  Fights between members of the public 2 Nil
                  Threatened assault 2 1
                  Assault with robbery Nil 2
                In terms of sexual assaults none were reported in the years 1992 and 1993.

          *443 MANLY SCENIC WALKWAY—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) Is the Manly scenic walkway to be extended through Reef Beach?
              (2) Will a sum in excess of $150,000 be spent on this project?
              (3) Why is this extension necessary given that the bypass track to Reef Beach is well cared for and signposted?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) The Government has committed funds of $158,000 for the project subject to the review of environmental factors (Ref) for the construction of the deviation in the walking track being favourably determined.
              (3) The walking track is part of a package of measures involving the change of status of Reef Beach which Cabinet decided should be developed to open up the area and make it more publicly accessible.


          Page 641
          *444 AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE INDUSTRIES SITE—FAUNA AND FLORA—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) Is, or was, the Australian Defence Industries site at St Marys inhabitated by some 150 kangaroos?
              (2) If so, what method or methods were, or will be, utilised to remove these animals from the site?
              (3) What will be the likely disposal area for these kangaroos?
              (4) Has any application been received by the National Parks and Wildlife Service to cull the kangaroos?
              (5) If such an application has been received, what decision has been reached relative to the application?
              (6) What other fauna is present on the site?
              (7) Of the animals inhabitating the site, are any considered to be in the endangered or rare category?
              (8) What flora is present on the site?
              (9) Are any items of flora to be found on the site considered to be rare or endangered?
              (10) What actions has, or will, he take to preserve any protected fauna and flora on the site?
              Answer—
              (1) Australian Defence Industries has advised the Director-General of the National Parks and Wildlife Service that between 150 and 500 kangaroos (consisting of at least three species) inhabit the St Marys site.
              (2) Australian Defence Industries have proposed a number of options, including euthanasia of those kangaroos which are deformed or suffering ill health as a result of in-breeding and relocation of healthy kangaroos to suitable sites.
              (3) Australian Defence Industries must find an appropriate means of removing the animals and suitable locations which are satisfactory to the Director-General of the National Parks and Wildlife Service. If euthanasia is pursued, the appropriate disposal of carcasses will be subject to licensing.
              (4) Yes.
              (5) The matter is being considered by the Director-General of the National parks and Wildlife Service.
              (6) and (7) Australian Defence Industries has advised that there are 15 to 20 emus on site.
              Very little information is available regarding other fauna which may be present as access is restricted for defence reasons.
              (8) and (9) A small area of the site has been surveyed by the Service and botanists from the Royal Botanic Gardens. 37 species listed by the Royal Botanic Gardens as being of high conservation significance were found.
              Four species which are on the national list of rare or threatened Australian plants were also found.
              (10) At present, Australian Defence Industries are conducting "defence related activities" which come under Commonwealth law.
              The National Parks and Wildlife Service will liaise with Australian Defence Industries, the Department of Planning and the Environment Protection Authority to ensure that the conservation of flora and fauna on the site continues.
              The Service has informed the Australian Nature Conservation Agency and the Commonwealth Environment Protection Authority of the presence of rare species and these authorities are ensuring that the provisions of the Commonwealth endangered species legislation are fully applied to defence related activities.

          Page 642

          *445 WINTER OLYMPICS MEDAL WINNERS—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) What recognition does he intend to give to the members of the Australian ice-skating team who won Australia's only ever medal at the Winter Olympics?
              (2) Will he co-operate with Blacktown City Council in celebrating the team's bronze medal victory?
              Answer—
              (1) The Hon. J. J. Fahey, M.P., Premier, and myself will host a reception on Tuesday 12 April 1994 in the Premier's Suite at Parliament House. This reception is in recognition of Australia's Winter Olympics medal winners and Winter Paralympics medal winners.
              (2) My office has not received any approaches from Blacktown City Council

          *446 ROOTY HILL—TRAFFIC COUNTS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) What have been the results of traffic counts conducted on the Rooty Hill Road South, between the Great Western Highway and Eastern Road, in each month since the opening of the BHP Steel Mill at Rooty Hill?
              (2) What are the results of corresponding surveys on Doonside Road?
              Answer—
              (1) The Roads and Traffic Authority has not conducted traffic counts on Rooty Hill Road South, between the locations specified by the member.
              (2) Traffic counts have not been undertaken on Doonside Road.

          *447 CONVEYANCERS LICENSING COMMITTEE—Mr Amery asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              (1) What is the name of each member of the Conveyancers Licensing Committee?
              (2) Which members represent the NSW Law Society?
              (3) Which members represent the Association of Property Conveyancers?
              (4) Who are the consumer representatives on this committee and in which suburbs do they reside?
              (5) What consumer organisations were consulted prior to the appointment of the consumer members?
              (6) What credentials do these representatives have in the consumer field to be so appointed?
              Answer—
              (1) Mrs Hylda Rolfe, Mr John Marsden, Mr Edward Boyce, Mr Dale Turner, Mr Alan West, Mrs Anna Boskovitz and Mr Stuart Jacobson.
              (2) Mr John Marsden and Mr Edward Boyce have been nominated by the Law Society of NSW.
              These members do not represent the Society but participate as members of the Committee in the conduct of the Committee's statutory functions.

          Page 643
              (3) Mr Dale Turner and Mr Alan West have been nominated by the Association of Property Conveyancers.
              These members do not represent the Association but participate as members of the Committee in the conduct of the Committee's statutory functions.
              (4) Mrs Anna Boskovitz and Mr Stuart Jacobson are the consumer representatives on the Committee. They reside at Mosman and Bondi respectively.
              (5) Expressions of interest were sought through press advertisements in relation to the consumer representatives' positions on the Committee. No consumer organisations responded.
              (6) The background of each respondent was examined to determine the most suitable for appointment. Mrs Boskovitz is a consumer representative on the Commercial Tribunal and has completed courses in mediation training, communication training and conflict resolution and is a bilingual consultant with the Commonwealth Department of Multicultural Affairs. Mr Jacobson's background has included extensive involvement in focusing banking services to consumer needs at branch and head office level. Upon appointment, Mr Jacobson communicated with the Executive Officer of the Australian Consumers Association to establish a rapport and to obtain advice as to other consumer organisations that should be contacted.

          *448 LIVERPOOL HOSPITAL—NON-HEALTH PROFESSIONALS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many staff, and in what categories, are currently employed at Liverpool Hospital who are not health professionals?
              (2) How have those staffing levels changed in each category for each financial year since 1988/89?
              (3) How many nurses, and in what categories, are currently employed at Liverpool Hospital?
              (4) How have those staffing levels of nurses changed in each category for each financial year since 1988/89?
              Answer—
              (1) to (4) Information regarding staffing numbers by categories is not easily accessible in terms of full-time equivalents. To provide the information in any other format is misleading, and to collect it for this purpose would require considerable hospital staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health System.

          *449 BUSH FIRE SALARIES COSTS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Arising from the bush fire crisis in January 1994, what amounts were expended by each police patrol on:
                (a) Shift allowances?
                (b) Overtime?
              (2) What amount had been allocated for the 1993/94 financial year to each police patrol for:
                (a) Shift allowances?
                (b) Overtime?
              (3) What amount had been expended as at 31 December 1993, by each police patrol on:
                (a) Shift allowances?
                (b) Overtime?
              (4) To each patrol, what amount of supplementation:
                (a) Has been provided?
                (b) Will be provided?

          Page 644
              Answer—
              (1) to (4) The information requested would take considerable time and resources to collate and is not warranted in view of the other priorities of the Police Service.

          *450 PROSECUTION COSTS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              (1) What has been the total cost per annum of the Director of Public Prosecutions assuming responsibility for the prosecution of committal hearings in New South Wales?
              (2) (a) Are any Local Courts in New South Wales not provided with such a service?
                (b) If so, which courts?
              (3) (a) How many staff have been and are currently required to fulfil this role?
                (b) How many are or were solicitors?
                (c) What annual salaries are applicable?
              (4) What is the estimated costs for the Director of Public Prosecutions to assume the role currently undertaken by police prosecutors in New South Wales?
              Answer—
              (1) The Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions assumed responsibility for the prosecution of committal hearings in 1990. The annual Treasury allocation for prosecuting committal hearings has been $3,452,000 in 1990/91, $4,885,000 in 1991/92 (including $1,682,000 by way of allowance to witnesses), $4,992,000 in 1992/93 (including $1,731,000 by way of allowance to witnesses) and $5,019,000 in 1993/94 (including a $1,773,000 by way of allowance to witnesses).
              (2) The Director of Public Prosecutions assumes responsibility for prosecuting all committals at all Local Courts in New South Wales.
              (3) (a) 50.
                (b) 38.
                (c) $2,390,000.
              (4) There have been no estimates prepared as to what the costs would be for the Director of Public Prosecutions to assume the role currently undertaken by police prosecutors in New South Wales.

          *451 CENTRAL WEST RAILWAY WORKS—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Has the Government recently indicated it will spend more than $4 million upgrading signalling between Lithgow and Bathurst?
              (2) Will this mean the loss of nine railway jobs at Wallerawang, four at Tarana, and five at Bathurst West Signal Box?
              (3) Will the present double track link between Tarana and Bathurst be retained?
              (4) Will the work be carried out by railway personnel or by contract?


          Page 645
              Answer—
              (1) Yes. The NSW Government is investing $7 million in signal upgrading between Wallerawang and Bathurst.
              (2) The positions will become surplus and the State Rail Authority will offer staff redeployment, retraining or voluntary redundancy.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) The work will be performed by railway personnel.

          *452 BATHURST RAILWAY WORKSHOP—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Did Freight Rail, in a memorandum from the Fleet Manger Coal Grain and Minerals to the General Manager Coal Grain and Minerals, indicate that Bathurst workshop is repairing NHTF waggons?
              (2) Did he also indicate that 50 NHFF and 30 NHCF waggons will go to tender on 16 February for repairs but this tender will not be let until mid-March?
              (3) Did he also cast doubts on whether Bathurst would be still available to "undertake Level 4 waggon repairs"?
              (4) Did he indicate that a lot more work outside after 1993/94 will need to be placed and changed in budget allocation to accommodate industry involvement in Level 4 repairs?
              (5) (a) Does this mean that there is doubt about the continued operation of Bathurst workshop as a waggon repair unit?
                (b) If so, what happens to the current staff at Bathurst workshop?
              (6) Why is it necessary to seek outside involvement when Bathurst workshop has proven it can do the work and do it at a competitive price?
              (7) (a) Where are the extra 100 jobs for Bathurst workshop coming from?
                (b) When will they come into place?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) Yes.
              (3) The Fleet Manager indicated he would continue to provide wagons to Bathurst Workshop until it moved to undertaking locomotive maintenance.
              (4) Wagon maintenance work will continue to be given to State Rail workshops to enable them to operate at full capacity. To overcome a backlog of wagon maintenance, external contractors will be used to supplement existing workshop capacity.
              (5 (a) The Workshops Business Plan proposes that Bathurst be progressively modified over several years to take on locomotive repairs. This is expected to lead to an increase in jobs.
                (b) Every effort will be made to retain and retrain the current staff at Bathurst Workshop for its new role.
              (6) Bathurst Workshop is currently maintaining wagons at its full capacity. Outside involvement is necessary at this time as a consequence of the wagon repair workload which significantly exceeds the capacity at Bathurst Workshop.
              (7) (a) About 100 jobs will be created with the transfer of locomotive work from Chullora to Bathurst.
                (b) Over the next 2 to 3 years. Transfer of the locomotive work from Chullora will occur progressively.

          Page 646

          *453 LITHGOW CORRECTIONAL CENTRE—PRISONER ATTACK—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              (1) Was a prisoner severely wounded in Lithgow Correctional Centre towards the end of January this year?
              (2) What is his current condition?
              (3) Who were responsible for the attack and was anyone else wounded?
              (4) How many prisoners were transferred to other gaols immediately after the incident?
              (5) Why was this necessary?
              (6) Has any report been made public of the affair?
              (7) Is it intended to publicise the details?
              Answer—
              I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) Two inmates were wounded during a fight at Lithgow Correctional Centre on 2 February 1994.
              (2) One inmate suffered a punctured lung and liver. He has been recuperating at the Long Bay Hospital and it is anticipated that he will be returned to normal routine before the end of March.
              The other inmate suffered a punctured bowel. He has been returned to normal routine.
              (3) It has not been possible to confirm exactly what occurred because the inmates involved in the incident have refused to co-operate with the police. Only the two inmates were injured.
              (4) The two injured inmates were immediately transferred to Lithgow Hospital. They were subsequently transferred to Prince Henry Hospital, Little Bay. Four other inmates were subsequently transferred.
              (5) The injured inmates required urgent medical treatment.
              Two of the four inmates subsequently transferred may have been at risk if they had remained at Lithgow. The other two inmates were transferred because they posed a threat to the good order and discipline of Lithgow Correctional Centre.
              (6) No.
              (7) No.

          *454 HUNTER VALLEY COAL LINES—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is the Government still in negotiations over the sale of the Hunter Valley coal lines?
              (2) If so, what is the current assessed value of the coal lines?
              (3) What is the amount spent on these lines in the last 5 years in:
                (a) Maintenance?
                (b) Track upgrading?
                (c) Signals upgrading?


          Page 647
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Coal industry participation in rail haulage continues to be discussed but it is not intended that any lines will be sold.
              (3) (a) Maintenance investment for the last 3 years to March 1994 is approximately $30 million. Prior to this, the budget was not location specific.
                (b) $40.8 million.
                (c) $9.3 million.

          *455 FULLERTON COVE SAND EXTRACTION—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              In relation to sand extraction at Fullerton Cove—
              (1) Have officers of your Department sighted the Development Consent issued by Port Stephens Shire Council on 25 May 1976?
              (2) If this consent is valid, why is a further development application being lodged by Boral for its operators on portion 3, County of Stowe, Cox's Lane, Fulleton Cove?
              (3) Has the Department sighted any management plan produced by Boral for its operations on this land?
              (4) Will the Department seek to have a management plan prepared and placed on public exhibition to enable public discussion on current developments taking place on portion 3?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) No.
              (2) This question should be directed to Port Stephens Council.
              (3) No.
              (4) No. This is a matter for Port Stephens Council.

          *456 FERN BAY REZONING—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) Is the Department of Local Government investigating the processes involved in the decision by Port Stephens Council to recommend rezoning of land at Fern Bay?
              (2) Were all the decisions in relation to approval and recession made correctly in terms of section 372 of the Local Government Act at the meetings of 14 December 1993, 21 December 1993, 25 January 1994, 27 January 1994 and 1 February 1994?
              (3) If not, what impact does this have on the decision of council?
              Answer—
              (1) At this stage, the Department is conducting preliminary enquiries on the matters raised by the complaints. I will await its assessment prior to making a decision on what further action, if any, is warranted.
              (2) While the Department has provided advice to council on section 372 of the Local Government Act, the validity of any decision made by council at these meetings can only be tested before and determined by the Supreme Court.
              (3) Given the answer to (2) above, this would be a matter for the Supreme Court to determine.

          Page 648

          *457 FULLERTON COVE SAND EXTRACTION—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              In relation to sand extracting on portion 3, Cox's Lane, Fullerton Cove—
              (1) On what dates were schedules of mining operations lodged at the Department of Mineral Resources following permission to commence mining operations in May 1976?
              (2) Which periods of operation did those schedules cover?
              (3) Which company supplied the schedules at each date?
              (4) When was the last schedule supplied?
              (5) What was the longest period in which no schedule was supplied?
              (6) Did consent remain valid if the company ceased lodging schedules or ceased mining operations?
              Answer—
              (1) This sand extraction operation (currently operated by Boral Resources Pty Ltd) was not required to have schedules by the Department of Mineral Resources. Sand, as such, is not a prescribed mineral under the Mining Act 1973 or Mining Act 1992.
              The operation came within our jurisdiction under the Mines Inspection Act 1901 whereby we ensured compliance of the operation with the Health and Safety legislation.
              (2) to (5) Not applicable.
              (6) Not applicable. I have been informed by current operators, Boral Resources, that the operation had not ceased nor been abandoned in that area since May 1976.

          *458 BAYEH CASE—Mr Gibson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) In the Louis Bayeh case, why did the ICAC refuse to call evidence in relation to the $12,000 bribe which was paid to a certain detective?
              (2) Why did the ICAC not call or investigate the detective who was named?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The honourable member should address his question to the Independent Commission Against Corruption.

          *459 BAYEH WITNESSES—Mr Gibson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) In relation to a shooting episode which took place at Bayeh's home on 12 July 1993, why did the police not use information which was given to them about the people who conducted the shooting and also the motor vehicle they were driving?
              (2) Why have those witnesses, whose names were given to police, not been interviewed?
              Answer—
              (1) I am advised that police conducted their inquiries from information received and two offenders were arrested, interviewed and charged. Both offenders were committed for trial.
              The offenders' motor vehicle was examined by Physical Evidence Police, however, no evidence was obtained from the vehicle to link the offenders to the shooting.

          Page 649
              (2) There were no eye witnesses to the incident. At the time, all known witnesses were interviewed. There were also a number of persons who offered information on the matter. However, their evidence was hearsay or otherwise inadmissible.

          *460 BAYEH—POLICE INQUIRY—Mr Gibson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Has there been an inquiry into the police mentioned when on 24 June 1993 Mr Louis Bayeh was acquitted on drug charges on the basis that the magistrate said the police had fabricated the evidence against him?
              (2) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes. An Internal Affairs investigation, under Part 4 of the Police Regulation (Allegations of Misconduct) Act was conducted by Detective Inspector Golowenko who, at that time, was attached to the Professional Integrity branch.
              (2) Not applicable.

          *461 PEAK HOUR TRAINS—FAIRFIELD—Mr Irwin asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Has the 7.45 a.m. train from Fairfield to the City been reduced to four cars in recent weeks?
              (2) Has this train been unable to take on passengers at Yennora and Guildford due to overcrowding?
              (3) When will eight-car trains be restored to this service?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes, twice.
              (2) When reduced to four carriages, the train may become crowded until Granville where many travellers alight.
              (3) The train is a scheduled eight-car service and is only reduced in unforeseen circumstances.

          *462 NIGHTRIDER BUS—RICHMOND LINE—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Does the Nightrider bus service the Richmond line?
              (2) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) The Richmond line (i.e., Blacktown to Richmond) is not serviced by Nightride. However, the N70 Nightride service, which runs between the City and Penrith, does travel through Blacktown.
              (2) Nightride services were re-tendered in the second half of 1993. Research undertaken in conjunction with the re-tendering process showed that there would be insufficient patronage on the Richmond line to justify the extension of Nightride services beyond Blacktown.

          Page 650

          *463 KILLARA RAILWAY STATION—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is he aware that Killara Station is identified on the Register of the National Estate as having national heritage significance?
              (2) Why does the design prepared for the upgrading of Killara Station not take the heritage significance into account?
              Answer—
              (1) No. Enquiries of the Australian Heritage Commission indicate that it is not on the register.
              (2) The station's roof was damaged by fire some years ago and subsequently altered, greatly diminishing the heritage value.

          *464 WAHROONGA RAILWAY STATION—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Has an SRA consultant, Paul Davies, identified Wahroonga Station as having State heritage significance?
              (2) Why does the design prepared for the upgrading of the station not take the heritage significance into account?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) It does.

          *465 DRIVER LICENCE TESTING—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Has the Roads and Traffic Authority been instructed to privatise all facets of the Driver Licence Testing program?
              (2) Has the RTA recently retrained over 300 staff to carry out all classes of driver testing?
              (3) How will current driver testing standards be maintained in a privatised program?
              Answer—
              (1) No.
              (2) About 300 RTA staff received additional training in January and February 1993 to implement the Driving Ability Road Test for car drivers. Testing officers have not been re-trained to administer tests for other classes of vehicles.
              (3) The Competency Based Training and Assessment Scheme for heavy vehicle licence classes, the introduction of which I announced on 1 March 1994, will replace about 9 per cent of the RTA's driver testing operations. In this regard, strict auditing and monitoring systems will be implemented to ensure that testing standards are maintained at a high level.
              This Government initiative prescribes training and experience under a variety of conditions, and will ensure higher skill levels in new licence holders operating heavy vehicles.


          Page 651
          *466 TRAIN BRAWL—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Was a City-bound train terminated at Hurstville Station on the evening of Sunday, 16 January 1994, because a brawl had broken out among a large group of passengers?
              (2) Were any Transit Police patrolling the Cronulla line at this time?
              (3) Will he ensure adequate policing of trains on weekends on all lines?
              Answer—
              (1) No.
              (2) Yes.
              (3) The responsibility for this rests with my colleague, the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services. However, Transit Police closely liaise with the State Rail Authority to ensure the best possible coverage of the CityRail network.

          *467 NIGHTRIDER BUS DRIVERS BEHAVIOUR—Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is he aware of a memorandum from the station master Blacktown, to the line manager west, concerning the behaviour of Nightrider bus drivers servicing the line?
              (2) Is an investigation underway into the passenger's allegations that drivers are overcharging fares and not honouring valid City Rail tickets?
              (3) What action will he take to ensure the fair treatment of passengers?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) An investigation has been undertaken with the assistance of the operator of the N70 service, Westbus. No irregularities in fare collection have been detected to date. However, drivers will continue to be monitored to ensure correct fare collection practices are employed.
              The passenger also advised that his full fare single Blacktown to Emu Plains rail ticket was not accepted on Nightride. Only return and periodical rail tickets are valid for use on Nightride and the passenger has been advised of this policy.
              (3) The provision of Nightride services is monitored by the Department of Transport on an on-going basis and passenger concerns investigated. If operators breach contractual conditions their contracts may be terminated.

          *468 SCHOOL ASSEMBLY HALLS—Mrs Lo Po' asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
              (1) In which electorates has this Government built assembly halls in the last 6 years?
              (2) Which established schools have been given assembly halls in the last 6 years?
              (3) Which electorates will receive assembly halls in established schools in the 1993/94 financial year?


          Page 652
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The Department of School Education has a clear commitment to excellence in New South Wales schools, providing for more than 750,000 young people currently enrolled in the Government school system.
              The Department's efforts are directed to improving educational standards in schools, improving parental choice and participation and increasing learning opportunities for all. To provide the detailed information requested in the Member's question would impinge on the resources and time of Senior Departmental Officers. As a consequence, I am not willing to move resources from the Department's core responsibility to meet this request.
              General statistical information on the Department of School Education's capital works programs is available in the Budget Papers and the Department's annual reports.
              (3) Schools receiving halls in the 1993/94 financial year are Wallerawang Public School, Moruya High School, Berinda Public School, St Helens Park Public School, Kurnell Public School, Eastwood Public School, Fairfield Public School, Oakville Public School, Comleroy Road Public School, Hannans Road Public School, Barnsley Public School, Telarah Public School, Eden High School, Quakers Hill High School, Bradfordville Public School, Dunheved High School, Castle Hill Public School, Muswellbrook Public School and Cammeray Public School.

          *469 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              With regard to the electorate of The Entrance:
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly related or associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure since 1990/91, why?
              Answer—
              (1) to (3) The time take to compile this data is felt to be too great to justify such an exercise.
              (4) These will be announced in the forthcoming State Budget.
              (5) The time taken to compile this data is felt to be too great to justify such an exercise.

          *470 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Health—
              With regard to the electorate of The Entrance—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly related or associated with the provision of those services?

          Page 653
              (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure since 1990/91, why?
              Answer—
              (1) to (5) Health services and facilities are not provided on an electorate basis. The electorate of The Entrance is part of the Central Coast Area Health Service (CCAHS), and thus residents of The Entrance have access to all the services and facilities provided by the Central Coast Area Health Service.
              In 1992/93, the Central Coast Area Health Service:
                  •provided services in 5 public general hospitals, 7 Community Health Centres and 12 Early Childhood Health Centres;
                  •employed, on average, 2,415 Full Time Equivalent staff;
                  •expended almost $122 million on the provision of health services (gross operating payments);
                  •provided 40,419 admissions and 598,455 non-inpatient occasions of service.
              Recent initiatives, that have benefited all residents of the Central Coast Area Health Service, include:
                  •enhancement of Dental, Aged Care Assessment, Mental Health, Renal, Adolescent, Community Nursing and Specialist Medical Services;
                  •opening of a new and expanded Children's ward; and
                  •refurbishment of a number of medical wards at various hospitals in the Central Coast.

          *471 SERVICES AND FACILITIES—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice—
              With regard to the electorate of The Entrance—
              (1) What services and facilities are provided by agencies which operate within his portfolio area?
              (2) How many staff are directly related or associated with the provision of those services?
              (3) What were the budget projections and actual expenditures on services and facilities for:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
                (d) What are the budget projections for 1993/94?
              (4) What new/additional services and facilities will be provided during 1993/94?
              (5) Where there has been a decline in expenditure since 1990/91, why?


          Page 654
              Answer—
              (1) to (5) With respect to the electorate of The Entrance, the Ethnic Affairs Commission of NSW provides the same services and facilities as it does to every other electorate in the State. However, none of its offices or services are actually located in the electorate of The Entrance.
              The electorate of The Entrance falls within the Ethnic Affairs Commission's Hunter Region and is serviced through staff of the Newcastle Regional Office and through the Commission's head office located at Ashfield.
              The Regional Co-ordinator at the Newcastle office is part of the Commission's Policy and Liaison Division and has primary responsibility for the Hunter region. This position works closely with local communities and Government agencies to implement the Commission's policies and to respond to issues of concern whilst also co-ordinating seminars and consultations.
              A number of liaison staff, based at the Commission's head office, are responsible for liaising with specific ethnic communities wherever they reside throughout the State and regardless of electorate or other boundaries.
              The electorate of The Entrance also benefits from the operations of the Commission's Language Services Division which provides professional interpreting and translating services to the NSW Government and the public.
              Seven staff operate from the Commission's Newcastle office whilst the Head Office Policy and Liaison Division currently consists of twenty-one officers. In addition, the constituents of the electorate of The Entrance have access to the full complement of Commission interpreters and translators.
              Since none of the EAC's offices or facilities are located in the electorate of The Entrance, questions (3), (4) and (5) are not applicable.

          *472 COACH TV 1681—Mr Harrison asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) Is he aware of a letter from the EPA to Kiama Coachlines, dated 11 January 1994, advising of a suspension of registration of TV 1681 until the coach had been repaired and/or inspected?
              (2) Is he also aware that this notice was posted out 31 days after the coach had been inspected and cleared by an officer of the EPA?
              (3) Can he explain why this letter was not delivered but was found by a shopper on the floor of Coles Supermarket in Nowra on 17 January 1994, 6 days after it was posted?
              (4) Will any other such notices sent to operators of coachlines be hand delivered or sent out by registered mail to ensure that they reach their destination, thereby protecting bus operators from the possibility of having unregistered (and therefore uninsured) coaches on the road?
              (5) Will he ensure that where vehicles are cleared by the EPA as roadworthy, immediate advice of this is given to the Department of Motor Transport?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) Yes. This occurred as the advice of the inspection, sent from the EPA Wollongong, was not received by the motor vehicle branch at Lidcombe.
              (3) The letter was correctly posted by the EPA, so the reason it was not delivered correctly is not known.
              (4) The pollution Acts allow for the service of notices to owners of offending vehicles by ordinary mail. It is common practice for the EPA, RTA and other authorities to send notices by ordinary mail.

          Page 655
              The question presumes a problem that does not exist. As stated in the notice sent to Kiama Coachlines, the suspension of registration does not take effect until it is received by the owner of the vehicle.
              The suspension of registration does not affect the vehicle's compulsory third party insurance in any way.
              (5) The problems experienced by Kiama Coachlines are very infrequent. This problem was immediately rectified and an apology was extended to Mr King of Kiama Coachlines for any inconvenience caused.
              Steps have been taken to prevent such an occurrence in the future.
              The RTA was advised of the clearance of the registration suspension as soon as the problem was highlighted.

          *473 NORTHERN DISTRIBUTOR—BULLI—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is it intended to extend the Northern Distributor to Bulli?
              (2) If so:
                (a) When is this work expected to commence?
                (b) What is the planned timetable for this work to be carried out?
              (3) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) At this stage, there are no plans to further develop the road project. However, the proclaimed road boundaries shown on the Local Environmental Plan will be preserved.
              (2) (a) Not applicable.
                (b) Not applicable.
              (3) Extension of the distributor to Bulli, estimated to cost up to $20 million, would be a major undertaking that could not be justified at this time, having regard to the proximity of the Princes Highway and the many other high priority works throughout the State which are awaiting funding.

          *474 ILLAWARRA WATER BOARD REGIONAL CUSTOMER COUNCIL—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) What is the role of the Illawarra Water Board Regional Customer Council?
              (2) What are the names of the members of the Illawarra Regional Customer Council?
              (3) What is the nature of his relationship with the Illawarra Regional Customer Council?
              (4) What access does the public have to the Regional Customer Council?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) The role of the Illawarra Regional Customer Council is to provide an opportunity for members of the community to have valuable input into the services and programs of the Illawarra region of the Water Board.

          Page 656
              (2) Councillor Joyce Wheatley.
                Anne Clark.
                Warren Steele.
                Dorothy Johnston.
                Robert Astill.
                Neville Costello
                Peter Costigan.
                Victor Watts.
                Shirley Massey.
                Colin Flanagan.
              (3) I have no relationship with the Illawarra Regional Customer Council beyond my normal relationship with the Water Board.
              (4) The public have access to all Regional Customer Council members either directly or through the organisations they represent.

          *475 ILLAWARRA STATE RECREATION AREA—Mr Markham asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) What is the current area of the Illawarra State Recreation Area?
              (2) Does the Government intend to increase the size of the Illawarra State Recreation Area?
              (3) If so, what areas will be added to the Illawarra State Recreation Area?
              (4) Has he approached coal companies in order to have redundant mine lease sites on the escarpment included in the Illawarra State Recreation Area?
              (5) If not, why not?
              (6) What is the Government policy regarding redundant mine lease sites on the Illawarra escarpment?
              Answer—
              (1) 1,266 hectares.
              (2) Yes, as acquisition funds permit.
              (3) Lands that are deemed to have significant natural and/or cultural heritage conservation values.
              (4) It has not been the general practice to approach coal companies to have redundant mine lease sites on the escarpment included in the State Recreation Area, unless the sites have significant conservation value.
              (5) and (6) If the mine lease sites are deemed to be redundant by the coal companies, they may offer such lands to the service. If this occurs, the service would review the merits of including these lands on conservation grounds having regard to statewide priorities and the availability of funds.

          *476 PORT STEPHENS COUNCIL—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) Has the Department of Local Government received representations from Councillor/s of Port Stephens Council expressing concerns with the Mayor of Port Stephens?
              (2) Have representations also been made by Councillor/s of Port Stephens Council expressing concern at Council's handling of a rezoning of land from 1a to 2d at Fern Bay?

          Page 657
              (3) Is the Department aware that at a Port Stephens Council meeting on 14 December 1993 the Mayor declared an interest in the Fern Bay rezoning and refrained from chairing or voting at the meeting?
              (4) Is the Department also aware that at a Special Meeting of Port Stephens Council on 21 December 1993 called as a result of a rescission motion regarding the earlier decision on Fern Bay rezoning, the Mayor chaired the meeting and voted for the rescission motion?
              (5) Is the Department aware of accusations that the Mayor approached certain councillors and intimated them with threats that the developer intended to summons them?
              (6) If so, will he instruct the Department to investigate the complaints?
              (7) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) It is not the policy of the Department of Local Government to identify complainants. However, the Department has advised that it has received several complaints, some of which relate to the conduct of the Mayor of Port Stephens Council.
              (2) The Department has advised that several complainants have expressed concern about Council's decision to rezone land at Fern Bay. The Department has also advised that the merit of Council's decision to rezone land at Fern Bay is ultimately a matter for the Minister for Planning pursuant to the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) Yes.
              (5) Yes.
              (6) The Department is conducting preliminary enquiries on the matters raised by the complaints and will provide its assessment to me. I will await this assessment prior to making a decision on what further action, if any, is warranted.
              (7) Not applicable given the answer to (6) above.

          *477 OYSTER LEASES—WAGONGA INLET—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) Have Fisheries officers issued 15 section 20E notices in respect of an oyster farmer's 17 leases in Wagonga Inlet?
              (2) Have Fisheries officers subsequently issued section 78 letters in respect of four of those leases?
              (3) Were these notices issued in respect of an infestation of Pacific oysters?
              (4) What other action has the Department of Fisheries officers taken against this oyster farmer as a result of the gigas outbreak?
              (5) Have other oyster farmers whose leases are also located in Wagonga Inlet suffered gigas outbreaks?
              (6) What action has been taken by the Department against those leasees?
              (7) Did Fisheries suggest to the Office of the Ombudsman that the Pacific oyster is well established sub-tidally in large numbers in various southern New South Wales waterways and that in those estuaries the control program is a lost cause?
              (8) If so, why are departmental officers persisting in the persecution of one particular oyster farmer?


          Page 658
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) Two Section 78 notices were issued on 7 October 1993. A further two were issued on 30 November 1993 and a further seven on 29 December 1993.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) The oyster farmer concerned satisfactorily cleaned up two of his leases. The remaining six leases were not cleaned and each of these was cancelled.
              (5) Yes, but these leases all had relatively light infestations and clean-up action has been undertaken. The leases which have been cancelled were all heavily affected and contained most of the Pacific oyster broodstock present in Wagonga Inlet.
              (6) Section 20E notices were issued, and follow up action undertaken.
              (7) No. The Department has concerns over the level of subtidal infestation in the Crookhaven River and is currently surveying the extent of these populations. The Department has no such concerns about other estuaries.
              (8) Any talk of persecution of an oyster farmer is nonsense. This particular farmer has not complied with the conditions on his leases and has not controlled the Pacific oyster. His leases contain most of the Pacific oyster broodstock present in the inlet and these broodstock are spawning and the spat catching on other farmers' leases. Other farmers' livelihoods are being affected by this one farmer's mis-management. In the circumstances, the Department had no choice but to apply the full letter of the law.

          *478 FISHERIES RESEARCH FUNDS—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) Did the Commonwealth, through the Fisheries Research Development Corporation (FRDC), make available the sum of $750,000 in a New South Wales trust account?
              (2) Was this money to be directed towards research that the New South Wales fishing industry considered to be high priority?
              (3) Is the only constraint on spending that New South Wales establish a Fisheries Research Advisory Board (FRAB) with a majority membership of New South Wales fishing industry representatives?
              (4) When was the offer made?
              (5) Has a FRAB been established in New South Wales?
              (6) If so, what are the names of the chairman and members and what sections of the industry do they represent?
              (7) Have there been any meetings of FRAB and if so, how many since inception?
              (8) Are minutes of meetings kept and circulated to FRAB members?
              (9) Is the chairman of the FRAB also a member of FRDC?
              (10) If so, does this constitute a conflict of interest?
              (11) Is he aware of complaints by members of the fishing industry that they have been constantly frustrated in attempts to secure funding for projects they feel are of high priority?
              (12) Why are these much needed research funds not being used for research on the estimation of total allowable catch in the Government's proposed property rights program, e.g., snapper?
              Answer—
              (1) The sum made available was $700,000.
              (2) The money is to be allocated to quality research projects which are in line with priorities set by industry, fisheries managers and researchers.

          Page 659
              (3) In addition to recommendation from an appropriate NSW Fisheries research advisory body, expenditure of funds requires the formal approval of FRDC on a project by project basis.
              (4) 15 October 1993.
              (5) Yes.
              (6) Names of the chairman and members and their appropriate affiliations are as follows:
                  Dr John Kenny (Chairman) Independent
                  Mr Ross Abercrombie NSW Commercial Fishing Advisory Council
                  Mr Andy Derwent Oyster Farmers' Association of NSW
                  Mr Peter Goadby NSW Recreational Fishing Advisory Council
              Dr Bob Kearney NSW Fisheries
                  Mr Vince McDonall NSW Commercial Fishing Advisory Council
                  Mr Glenn Murray NSW Commercial Fishing Advisory Council
                  Mr Paul O'Connor NSW Fisheries
                  Mr Martin Palmer Master Fish Merchants Association
                  Mr Ron Snape NSW Commercial Fishing Advisory Council
              (7) Yes, two.
              (8) Yes.
              (9) No.
              (10) Not applicable.
              (11) The Chairman of the NSW/FRAB has advised that he is not aware of any such concerns by members of the New South Wales fishing industry.
              (12) Money from the trust fund has not been spent to date because the advisory committee has not yet indicated its priorities. Should this committee suggest that estimation of total allowable catches is a high priority and FRDC agree that quality projects have been put forward, then the NSW trust fund can be used for this purpose.

          *479 RECREATIONAL FISHING—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) Has the Australian Fishing Tackle Association (AFTA) advised you that it rejects the principle of fisheries property rights?
              (2) Did he or the NSW Department of Fisheries consult with members of AFTA or other recreational organisations about the discussion document "Sharing the Resource"?
              (3) If not, why not?
              (4) If so, who were the people or organisations contacted?
              (5) Were copies of "Sharing the Resource" mailed to licensed fishers in the State?
              (6) Were copies of "Sharing the Resource" mailed to every fishing club and fishing tackle outlet in the State?
              (7) If not, why not?
              (8) Were public meetings organised throughout the State to discuss the Government's property rights proposal with commercial fishers?
              (9) Were similar meetings organised with recreational anglers and other users of the resource?
              (10) If not, why not?
              (11) What is the Government's policy in respect of the rights of recreational anglers to the fishing resources of this State?
              (12) What scientific data will be used to establish the share of resource allocated to recreational fishing under the Government's proposal?
              (13) On what resource impact statistics is the proposed total allowable recreational catch based?

          Page 660
              Answer—
              (1) The Australian Fishing Tackle Association (AFTA) has voiced some concern over selected aspects of the proposal. These concerns have been addressed by NSW Fisheries in letters to AFTA.
              (2) Yes. Recreational fishing organisations were consulted and John Dunphy, President of AFTA, met with senior Fisheries officers (Steve Dunn and Gary Henry) on 29 March 1994.
              (3) Not applicable.
              (4) Consultations were held with the peak recreational fishing body in New South Wales (NSW Recreational Fishing Advisory Council) and with a number of affiliated organisations.
              (5) Yes.
              (6) Copies of "Sharing the Resource" were mailed to all affiliated fishing clubs, all non-affiliated fishing clubs on NSW Fisheries mailing lists and all clubs that requested copies.
              (7) Not applicable.
              (8) Yes, public meetings were held in seven regions along the New South Wales coast which were attended by commercial and recreational fishers.
              (9) Meetings were held to discuss property rights with recreational fishers and senior fishing officers have been accepting all invitations to club meetings to speak on the topic.
              (10) Not applicable.
              (11) The Government will not restrict the recreational sector in favour of commercial fishers. Recreational fishers will not be excluded from commercial fishing grounds, anglers will not be excluded from taking commercial species and an angling licence is not proposed. New South Wales recreational fishers will continue to enjoy all the entitlements that are currently available to them.
              (12) The best scientific data that is available will be used to establish the recreational catch. This will include omnibus surveys, tagging studies and creel surveys undertaken by the Fisheries Research Institute.
              (13) The responsible commercial and recreational fishers in New South Wales are telling manager that fish catch rates are declining. A management plan is required to address these allegations. It is necessary to have the management plan in place as soon as possible, rather than wait until there are no fish left.

          *480 TAFE STUDENT BUS PASSES—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is he aware that many high school students undertake part of their HSC studies at nearby TAFE colleges?
              (2) What are the reasons why the Department of Transport refuses these students eligibility for the free bus pass scheme for travel between school and TAFE, and TAFE and home?
              (3) Will eligibility for the scheme be reviewed to remove the injustice for these students?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) The School Student Transport Scheme provides free travel by eligible students between the student's home and school only. The benefits of the scheme do not extend to such school related activities as attendance at TAFE Colleges.

          Page 661
              The Joint Secondary Schools TAFE Program is available as an elective for many senior school students. The Department of School Education provides a subsidy in some instances, for Joint Secondary Schools TAFE students attending State schools whose travel costs are excessive, and in some instances schools also organise transport for these students.
              Half fare concessions are available to any of these students using SRA and STA services. The NSW Bus and Coach Association also recommends that the private bus industry offer concessions to Joint Secondary Schools TAFE students, though there is no reimbursement to the operators by the Government for loss of revenue.
              (3) No. It is not possible to broaden the scope of the free travel scheme for students attending these courses, particularly having regard to the concessions already available to these students.

          *481 FIRE ENGINE FLEET—NEWCASTLE AND MAITLAND—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many "fire engines" are employed by New South Wales Fire Brigades in each of the following regions:
                (a) Newcastle?
                (b) Maitland?
              (2) What is the average age of the vehicles in each of the above regions?
              (3) What is the cost of maintenance of the fire engine fleet in each of the past 3 years in each of the above regions?
              (4) How many motors required replacement during the recent bush fire emergency in the 18 days from Boxing Day 1993, in each of the above regions?
              (5) What was the time out of service in each of the above cases?
              (6) Does he consider it satisfactory that reconditioned motors from the manufacturer are not supplied as "pre-tested"?
              (7) (a) Will policy be changed to allow NSW Fire Brigades regions to keep pre-tested replacement truck and pump motors ready for emergencies?
                (b) If not, why not?
              (8) How many new fire engines were commissioned by NSW Fire Brigades in each of the past 2 years?
              (9) How many of these new units were put into service as new in each of the Newcastle and Maitland regions?
              (10) If none:
                (a) Where were the new engines put into service?
                (b) What are the reasons why none were installed in Newcastle and Maitland?
              (11) Are new fire engines now fitted with diesel motors for the truck and the pumps?
              (12) How many diesel motors for trucks and pumps are installed in fire engines in each of the Newcastle and Maitland regions?
              (13) What is the breakdown rate for petrol motors compared with diesel motors?
              (14) What is the principal cause of failure of petrol motors?
              (15) What plans exist to upgrade the motors in the fire engine fleet in the NSW Fire Brigades regions of Newcastle and Maitland?
              (16) How many fire engines were transferred into each of the Newcastle and Maitland regions during each of the last 2 years?
              (17) From what regions were they transferred?
              (18) What was the cost of repairs of such transferred units before they could be put into service in the Newcastle and Maitland regions?


          Page 662
              Answer—
              (1) (a) 37.
                (b) 4.
              (2) 10 years for the Newcastle vehicles and 14.6 years for the Maitland vehicles.
              (3)
          1991/921992/93
          Newcastle$686,335$413,345
          Maitland $10,345 $98,170
              (4) One in the Newcastle region.
              (5) 2 days.
              (6) Yes. There is a relatively insignificant number of engine failures, particularly of rebuilt engines of this type.
              (7) No. Equipment failures are monitored. Regional contractors provide service and exchange parts. The pumps have traditionally been reliable. Spare units are generally available.
              (8) 1992 9 appliances.
                1993 5 appliances.
                1994 26 appliances as at 28 March 1994.
              (9) None.
              (10) (a) The Sydney Fire District.
                (b) Installation priority is based upon a number of factors, principally the number of incidents to which each station responds. The priorities are regularly reviewed.
              (11) New fire engines are now fitted with diesel motors for the truck. Most are fitted with pumps that are driven directly from the engine. Where separate pumps are employed, diesel powered units are preferred, although not always practicable, as a vehicle may be petrol-engined.
              (12) Newcastle 5.
                Maitland None.
              (13) Petrol engines break down more often than diesel. The overall reliability of the Brigades' petrol-engined appliances is nevertheless high. The breakdown rate has decreased following a recent statewide upgrade program.
              (14) Electrical and fuel delivery problems.
              (15) There is a well developed reallocation program in place which includes upgrading the fleet in Newcastle and Maitland.
              (16)
          19921993
          Newcastle22
          MaitlandNoneNone
              (17) The Sydney Fire District.
              (18) $22,372 for work carried out in Sydney on the four vehicles prior to reallocation to Newcastle and Maitland.


          Page 663
          *482 ETHNIC AFFAIRS COMMISSION STAFF DEPARTURE—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice—
              (1) How many staff:
                (a) Resigned; and
                (b) Otherwise separated from the Ethnic Affairs Commission during the—
                (i) 6 months to 31 December 1992?
                  (ii) 6 months to 30 June 1993?
                  (iii) 6 months to 31 December 1993?
              (2) What are the grades of these staff in each of the above periods?
              (3) How many have been replaced, and at what grades, from each of the above periods?
              Answer—
              (1) (a) The total Commission staff who resigned were:
              (i) 6 months to 31 December 1992 7
                  (ii) 6 months to 30 June 1993 10
          (iii) 6 months to 31 December 1993 6
              (b) The total Commission staff who otherwise separated were:
                (i) 6 months to 31 December 1992 9
                (ii) 6 months to 30 June 1993 7
                (iii) 6 months to 31 December 1993 13
              (2) The grades of Commission staff departing is shown in columns 1 and 2 in Tables 1, 2 and 3.
              (3) The total number of Commission staff recruited were:
                (i) 6 months to 31 December 1992 22
                (ii) 6 months to 30 June 1993 11
                (iii) 6 months to 31 December 1993 11
              The grades of Commission staff recruited for each of the requested periods is shown in column 1 of Tables 4, 5 and 6.

          TABLE 1
              Ethnic Affairs Commission
              Staff Departures
              Period: 1 July 1992 to 31 December 1992


          Grade of Officer:
          Resignation
          Grade of Officer:
          Otherwise Separated
          Employment Status:
          Permanent or Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 4Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 3Permanent
          P/T Interpreter, Grade 2Temporary
          P/T Interpreter, Grade 2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 2Temporary
          Page 664Clerk, Grade 2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 5/6Permanent
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 3Permanent
          Interpreter, Grade 2Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Permanent
          Clerical Officer, Grade 3Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Total Resign—7Total Other—9Perm.—5 Temp.—11

          TABLE 2
              Ethnic Affairs Commission
              Staff Departures
              Period: 1 January 1993 to 30 June 1993

          Grade of Officer:
          Resignation
          Grade of Officer:
          Otherwise Separated
          Employment Status:
          Permanent or Temporary
          Translator, Grade 4Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 6Permanent
          Australian TraineeTemporary
          Clerk, Grade 7/8Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 5/6Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 6Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 4Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 5/6Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 5/6Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 7/8Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 9/10Permanent
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Officer In ChargePermanent
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 9Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 9 Permanent
          Total Resign—10Total Other—7Perm.—10 Temp.—7
          Page 665

          TABLE 3
              Ethnic Affairs Commission
              Staff Departures
              Period: 1 July 1993 to 31 December 1993


          Grade of Officer:
          Resignation
          Grade of Officer:
          Otherwise Separated
          Employment Status:
          Permanent or Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 6Temporary
          P/T Interpreter, Grade 3Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 9/10Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 7Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 6Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 4Temporary
          Officer In ChargePermanent
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 7Temporary
          Interpreter, Grade 3Temporary
          Australian TraineeTemporary
          Clerk, Grade 7/8Temporary
          Translator, Grade 4Temporary
          Australian TraineeTemporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 3Permanent
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 5Temporary
          Total Resign—6Total Other—13Perm.—4 Temp.—15

          Page 666
          TABLE 4
              Ethnic Affairs Commission
              Staff Recruitment
              Period: 1 July 1992 to 31 December 1992

          Recruitment Grade PermanentTemporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 3Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 4Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 5Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 5/6Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 6Permanent
          Clerical Officer, Grade 3Temporary
          Interpreter, Grade 3Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 4Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 6Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 6Permanent
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 5/6Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 4Permanent
          Interpreter, Grade 3Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 9Permanent
          Clerk, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 5/6Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 4Temporary
          Total Recruited—22Total Permanent—5Total Temporary—17




        Page 667
        TABLE 5
          Ethnic Affairs Commission
          Staff Recruitment
          Period: 1 January 1993 to 30 June 1993
        Recruitment GradePermanentTemporary
        Australian TraineeTemporary
        Clerk, Grade 4Temporary
        Australian TraineeTemporary
        Clerk, Grade 5/6Temporary
        Interpreter/Translator, Grade 3Temporary
        Australian TraineeTemporary
        Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
        Australian TraineeTemporary
        Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
        Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
        Clerk, Grade 9Permanent
        Total Recruited—11Total Permanent—1Total Temporary—10

          TABLE 6
              Ethnic Affairs Commission
              Staff Recruitment
              Period: 1 July 1993 to 31 December 1993


          Recruitment GradePermanentTemporary
          Clerk, Grade 9Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 5/6Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 7/8Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 7/8Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 8Temporary
          Clerical Officer, Grade 1/2Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 7/8Temporary
          Interpreter, Grade 3Temporary
          Translator, Grade 4Temporary
          Clerk, Grade 4Temporary
          Interpreter, Grade 3Temporary
          Total Recruited—11Total Permanent—0Total Temporary—11

          Page 668
          *483 ROAD FUNDING—ELECTORATE OF CESSNOCK—Mr Neilly asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) How much of the State Budget funding allocations to each of the Local Government areas in the electorate of Cessnock was expended in the financial years ended 30 June:
          (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
              (2) How much of the funding referred to above was via Federal Government grants?
              Answer—
              (1) Expenditure totalled:
                (a) 1989/90 Cessnock $7.635 million
                      Muswellbrook $2.060 million
                      Singleton $8.082 million
                (b) 1990/91 Cessnock $8.686 million
                      Muswellbrook $2.120 million
                      Singleton $11.793 million
                (c) 1991/92 Cessnock $4.985 million
                      Muswellbrook $0.984 million
                      Singleton $8.883 million
                (d) 1992/93 Cessnock $5.819 million
                      Muswellbrook $1.571 million
                      Singleton $8.581 million
              (2) Expenditure of Commonwealth funds totalled:
                  1989/90 Cessnock $1.076 million
                      Muswellbrook $0.888 million
                      Singleton $5.578 million
                  1990/91 Cessnock $0.873 million
                      Muswellbrook $0.553 million
                      Singleton $7.605 million
                  1991/92 Cessnock $0.154 million
                      Muswellbrook $0.079 million
                      Singleton $5.162 million
                  1992/93 Cessnock $0.571 million
                      Muswellbrook $0.126 million
                      Singleton $3.177 million


          Page 669
          *484 HUNTER AREA ASSISTANCE SCHEME—Mr Neilly asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) What were the allocations from the Hunter Area Assistance Scheme to each of the electorates covered by the scheme during each of the financial years ended 30 June:
                (a) 1989?
                (b) 1990?
                (c) 1991?
                (d) 1992?
                (e) 1993?
                (f) 1994 (to date)?
              (2) What were the allocations to each of the Local Government areas covered by the scheme referred to above during the respective financial years?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) The allocations from the Hunter Area Assistance Scheme to each of the electorates covered by the Scheme during each financial year from 1989 to 1994 were:

          Year Electorate Amount
                1989 Cessnock $62,325
                              Charlestown $60,000
                Lake Macquarie $99,995
                              Maitland $98,930
                              Myall Lakes $42,324
              Newcastle $154,986
                  Port Macquarie $162,647
                  Port Stephens $51,407
              Swansea $45,070
                  Upper Hunter $209,966
              Waratah $80,170
                  Wallsend $61,006
                1990 Cessnock $113,567
                  Charlestown -
              Lake Macquarie $135,045
                  Maitland $195,960
              Myall Lakes $36,712
                  Newcastle $192,669
              Port Macquarie $164,310
                  Port Stephens $235,291
                  Swansea $66,039
                              Upper Hunter $137,254
                  Waratah $4,575
                  Wallsend $16,594


          Page 670
                1991 Cessnock $137,871
                  Charlestown $33,240
              Lake Macquarie $203,115
                  Maitland $139,845
              Myall Lakes $75,302
                  Newcastle $291,715
              Port Macquarie $21,000
                  Port Stephens $164,686
                  Scone $28,676
                  Swasea $43,732
                  Upper Hunter $43,803
                  Waratah -
                  Wallsend $29,606
                1992 Cessnock $85,326
                              Charlestown $47,166
              Lake Macquarie $126,174
                Maitland $56,809
              Myall Lakes $148,128
                  Newcastle $239,528
          Port Macquarie $6,662
                  Port Stephens $54,964
                  Swansea $61,252
                  Upper Hunter $108,132
              Waratah $71,254
                  Wallsend $54,660
                1993 Cessnock $61,694
                  Charlestown $45,166
              Lake Macquarie $53,187
                  Maitland $69,639
              Myall Lakes $31,480
                  Newcastle $297,961
              Port Macquarie $66,605
                  Port Stephens $96,902
              Swansea $44,708
                  Upper Hunter $142,180
              Waratah -
                  Wallsend $77,890
                1994 Cessnock $85,282
                  Charlestown -
              Lake Macquarie $145,762
                  Maitland $52,608
              Myall Lakes $83,873
                  Newcastle $159,185
              Port Macquarie $82,311
                  Port Stephens $66,000
              Swansea -
                  Upper Hunter $115,452
                  Waratah $59,593
                  Wallsend $38,946

          Page 671
              (2) The allocations from the Hunter Area Assistance Scheme to each of the local government areas covered by the Scheme during each financial year from 1989 to 1994 were:
                Year Local Government Area Amount
                1989 Cessnock $51,377
                  Dungog $29,000
              Cloucester $18,020
                  Great Lakes $17,944
              Lake Macquarie $264,825
                  Maitland $69,920
              Merriwa $7,950
                  Murrurundi $1,906
              Muswellbrook $22,446
                  Newcastle $216,882
              Port Stephens $51,407
                  Scone $35,000
              Singleton $10,948
                  Greater Taree $24,140
              Regional and Subregional $340,611
              1990 Cessnock $70,067
                  Dungog $26,800
              Gloucester -
                  Great Lakes $26,712
              Lake Macquarie $209,636
                  Maitland $159,160
              Merriwa -
                  Murrurundi -
                              Muswellbrook $20,380
                  Newcastle $91,976
              Port Stephens $235,291
                  Scone $23,917
              Singleton $43,500
                  Greater Taree $45,830
              Regional and Subregional $344,747
              1991 Cessnock $98,871
                  Dungog $900
              Gloucester $5,374
                  Great Lakes $59,559
              Lake Macquarie $280,087
                  Maitland $138,945
              Merriwa $4,554
                  Murrurundi $20,375
              Muswellbrook $18,874
                  Newcastle $130,257
              Port Stephens $164,686
                  Scone $28,676
              Singleton $39,000
                  Greater Taree $31,369
              Regional and Subregional $191,064

          Page 672
              1992 Cessnock $69,326
                  Dungog $18,700
              Gloucester $29,396
                  Great Lakes $71,378
              Lake Macquarie $292,791
                  Maitland $38,109
              Merriwa $11,336
                  Murrurundi $29,860
              Muswellbrook $20,228
                  Newcastle $250,103
              Port Stephens $54,964
                  Scone $9,803
              Singleton $16,000
                  Greater Taree $54,016
              Regional and Subregional $101,584
              1993 Cessnock $51,694
                  Dungog $23,700
              Gloucester $24,906
                  Great Lakes $6,574
              Lake Macquarie $177,063
                  Maitland $45,939
              Merriwa $11,000
                  Murrurundi $10,553
              Muswellbrook $2,922
                  Newcastle $192,948
              Port Stephens $96,902
                  Scone $13,800
              Singleton $10,000
                  Greater Taree $66,605
              Regional and Subregional $252,806
              1994 Cessnock $24,452
                              Dungog $18,199
                              Gloucester $5,260
                              Great Lakes $62,680
                  Lake Macquarie $145,762
                  Maitland $34,409
                  Merriwa $14,000
              Murrurundi $3,876
                  Muswellbrook $5,100
              Newcastle $148,089
                  Port Stephens $66,000
              Scone $24,914
                  Singleton $17,975
              Greater Taree $66,421
                  Regional and Subregional $157,642


          Page 673
          *485 SPORT AND RECREATION CAPITAL GRANTS TO THE HUNTER REGION—Mr Neilly asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) How much was allocated to each of the electorates in the Hunter Region by way of Department of Sport and Recreation capital grants during each of the financial years ended 30 June:
                (a) 1989?
                (b) 1990?
                (c) 1991?
                (d) 1992?
                (e) 1993?
                (f) 1994 (to date)?
              (2) What were the allocations to each of the Local Government areas in the region referred to above during the respective financial years?
              Answer—
              (1) The detail requested in the member's question would require the undue diversion of the Department's time and resources from their core responsibilities. General statistical information relating to CAP grants may be found in the Department's annual reports.
              (2) See answer to question (1)

          *486 CABRAMATTA TRAIN SERVICES—Mr Newman asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) How many fast trains are scheduled for weekday mornings for Cabramatta to Sydney between the hours of 6 a.m. and 9 a.m.?
              (2) How many "all stations" trains are scheduled for the same period?
              (3) What is the average time for each journey for each type of service?
              (4) How many fast trains are scheduled for Sydney to Cabramatta between the hours of 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.?
              (5) How many "all stations" trains for the same period?
              (6) What is the average time of each type of journey?
              Answer—
              (1) 17.
              (2) 3.
              (3) Approximately 44 and 52 minutes respectively.
              (4) 19.
              (5) 2 trains with an average journey time of 52 minutes.
              (6) Approximately 44 minutes for fast trains.

          *487 LIVERPOOL HOSPITAL SERVICES—Mr Newman asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) To what extent has the Liverpool Hospital had a staff increase in accordance with increased bed numbers and services?
              (2) What new services over the past 10 years have received adequate staff allowances to compensate for the extra work?


          Page 674
              Answer—
              (1) There have been marginal variations from year-to-year associated with the Hospital's redevelopment. Increased staffing has been related to the enhancement of specialist services.
              (2) New services introduced at Liverpool Hospital over the past 10 years and associated with additional staff have included: major trauma services, intensive and high dependency care, ophthalmology, cardiology, oncology, aged care and rehabilitation, migrant (refugee) screening, domiciliary midwifery, perioperative ward, renal services and obstetrics and gynaecology. Each of these services has been enhanced with appropriate staffing.

          *488 AMBULANCE SERVICES—CABRAMATTA—Mr Newman asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) What ambulance services are available to the population of Cabramatta?
              (2) What has been the total staffing of ambulance officers at the Fairfield and Liverpool Ambulance Stations for each year in the past 10 years?
              (3) What number of ambulances are available on day and evening rosters at each respective station?
              (4) What is the average waiting time for emergency and non-emergency call out to the Cabramatta area?
              Answer—
              (1) Residents of the Cabramatta area are serviced by three ambulance stations. These are Liverpool, Fairfield and Green Valley.
              (2) Fairfield Ambulance Station has had 13 ambulance officers since 1985. Liverpool Ambulance Station had 22 officers from 1985 to 1991, and 13 officers since the transfer of the Rescue module to Bankstown in 1991. Green Valley Ambulance Station has 24 ambulance officers.
              (3) Liverpool and Fairfield Ambulance Stations generally have two ambulances available on day shift and one ambulance on night shift over a 7-day period. Green Valley Ambulance Station generally has four ambulances available on day shift and two ambulances on night shift over a 7-day period.
              (4) Emergency response or waiting times in the Cabramatta area have been identified as 7.16 minutes. Non-emergency response or waiting times vary and are influenced by a number of factors including the emergency workload.

          *489 ETHNIC GROUP FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE—ELECTORATE OF CABRAMATTA—Mr Newman asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice—
              (1) What financial assistance has the Department provided to ethnic groups in the electorate of Cabramatta?
              (2) What are the names of the organisations and grants provided?
              (3) How much of any financial aid came from Federal sources?
              Answer—
              (1) The Ethnic Affairs Commission has provided a total of $65,000 for the Electorate of Cabramatta during the financial year 1993/94.

          Page 675
              (2) (a) Cabramatta Electorate:
                  Organisation: Cabramatta Community Centre.
                Amount: $35,000.
                Year: 1993, Community Advancement Program.
                Project: Fairfield language aid project.
                  Organisation: Khmer Community of NSW Inc.
                Amount: $14,000.
                Year: 1994, Community Advancement Program.
                  Project: Khmer women support group to address issues of social isolation and depression.
                  Organisation: NSW Spanish and Latin American Association for Social Assistance.
                Amount: $16,000.
                Year: 1994, Community Advancement Program.
                  Project: To produce a Spanish Speaking Employment Alternatives Resource Manual.
              (3) None of the financial aid provided came from Federal sources.
              Details of grants in previous years are contained in the annual reports of the Ethnic Affairs Commission which have been tabled in Parliament.

          *490 FIREPAC VEHICLES—Mr Price asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many of the new purpose-built Firepac vehicles will be located in the Sydney region for the NSW Fire Brigades?
              (2) Will any of these units be located in the Hunter and the Illawarra region?
              (3) If not, why not and when can these new vehicles be expected to be located in these major industrial centres?
              Answer—
              (1) 55.
              (2) No.
              (3) Allocation of new appliances is based upon a number of factors, principally the number of incidents to which each station responds. The priorities are regularly reviewed.
              The Brigades' program of cascading fire engines from the busiest to the quietest stations will mean that stations in the Hunter and Illawarra will have their appliances upgraded by vehicles now being transferred out of Sydney. For the immediate future, the Firepacs will be stationed in the Sydney area.

          *491 HUNTER AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the Hunter Area Health Service in each month from September 1993 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these in each month were day surgery?


          Page 676
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each hospital in each area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a 3-year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.

          *492 WESTERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the Western Sydney Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these in each month were day surgery?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each hospital in each area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a 3-year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.

          *493 SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the South Western Sydney Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these in each month were day surgery?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each hospital in each area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a 3-year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.

          *494 EXPORT STEAMING COAL—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) Is Pacific Power, or a representative of Pacific Power, involved in the current price negotiations with the Japanese for the sale of export steaming coal?
              (2) Has any minimum price been set for the purpose of such negotiations?


          Page 677
              Answer—
              (1) Powercoal Pty Ltd, the wholly-owned coal mining company of Pacific Power, does not have any term contracts with Japanese power utilities, and as such is not part of the current negotiations.
              (2) Not applicable.

          *495 PACIFIC POWER EXPORT COAL—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) What was the quantity of coal sold by each of the Pacific Power collieries on the export market during 1993?
              (2) Was coal exchanged between Pacific Power collieries to accomplish exports in 1993?
              (3) What was the composition between contract sales and spot sales of the coal sold by each of the Pacific Power collieries on the export market during 1993?
              (4) What are the forecast estimates for export coal sales by Pacific Power collieries for 1994?
              (5) How much of the forecast estimates for export coal sales by Pacific Power collieries for 1994 is by contact arrangements?
              Answer—
              (1) Coal sold directly on the export market during 1993 was:
                  Newstan 232,000 tonnes
                  Awaba 125,000 tonnes
                  Myuna 57,000 tonnes
              (2) Yes.
              (3) Only 24,000 tonnes were sold under contract, the remainder was by trial shipments, spot sales or coal sold to other coal companies for blending to make a product suitable for export.
              (4) The forecast for 1994 is one million tonnes. This tonnage is a mixture of contracted tonnage, spot tonnage, trial shipments and coal sold to other coal companies for blending to make a product suitable for export.
              (5) 450,000 tonnes.

          *496 NEWVALE COLLIERY—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) Subsequent to the closure of Pacific Power's Newvale Colliery, what were the major items of equipment sold at auction, sold by private treaty or transferred to other Pacific Power collieries?
              (2) What was the sale price for each item referred to in (1) sold by auction or by private treaty?
              (3) What was the transfer value for each item referred to in (1) and to which Pacific Power collieries has this equipment been transferred?
              (4) How was the valuation determined for each item of major equipment transferred to other Pacific Power collieries?
              (5) Has the equipment transferred to other Pacific Power Collieries been installed?
              (6) Was any major item of equipment designated for sale or transfer written off following failure to attract a bidder at auction or following further inspection?
              (7) What are the major items of equipment written off or remaining unsold?


          Page 678
              Answer—
              (1) Subsequent to the closure of Newvale Colliery, all major items have either been sold at auction or transferred to mines owned by Powercoal Pty Ltd. Major items transferred included two remote controlled continuous miners, four shuttle cars, four breaker line supports and one fan drive and control.
              (2) Mine equipment not transferred to other mines achieved $1.65 million at auction.
              (3) and (4) The transfer and installed value from the utilisation of Newvale equipment in other Powercoal mines was $7.6 million. This was valued in accordance with the formula tabled during the Parliamentary Inquiry.
              (5) Most transferred equipment has been installed at the respective sites. Face production equipment including continuous miners, shuttle cars and breaker line supports have been refurbished and are now part of improved and high productivity mining systems.
              Major items such as the drift conveyor and the men and materials haulage winch (winder) require extensive pre-installation works which are proceeding.
              (6) No equipment has been written off because it failed to be sold or transferred.
              (7) There are no remaining items of equipment written off or remaining unsold.

          *497 SHELLHARBOUR HOSPITAL—CHILDREN'S WARD—Mr Rumble asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) What would be the capital cost and the annual recurrent expenditure to reopen the children's ward of the Shellharbour Hospital?
              (2) What is the breakdown of the expenditure?
              Answer—
              (1) The cost of opening a children's ward at Shellharbour Hospital cannot be measured in dollars. Expert clinical opinion is that the cost of a children's ward at Shellharbour would be staff who, as a result of an insufficient number of children requiring care, would not be able to maintain the required clinical expertise.
              The Shellharbour children's ward was closed by the previous Labor Government. This Government supports that decision of the previous Labor Health Minister, and has no intention of overturning his decision.
              (2) Not applicable.

          *498 DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING—BUDGETS—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) What has been the budget surplus for the Department of Housing for the financial years:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?
              (2) What were Department of Housing maintenance budgets for the I15 and I16 regions for the financial years:
                (a) 1990/91?
                (b) 1991/92?
                (c) 1992/93?


          Page 679
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) (a) $43.156 million
                (b) $105.421 million
                (c) $63.632 million
              (These results refer to the Department's operating results after rental rebates and before abnormal or extraordinary items).
              (2) Budgets are not allocated by Allocation Zone. The zones I15 and I16 fall within the Department's South Eastern Regional Office. These figures refer to the repairs and maintenance expenditure of the Region:
                (a) $6.598 million
                (b) $7.325 million
                (c) $5.483 million

          *499 HOMEFUND BORROWERS COSTS—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Is the Department of Housing asking HomeFund borrowers in category A to pay the following expenses when they are forced to refinance their loans with a bank:
                (a) Bank application fees of $600 or more?
                (b) Title searches which can vary between $30 and $100?
                (c) Bank registration fees?
              (2) Is the Department of Housing asking HomeFund borrowers in category A to pay the following expenses when they are forced to refinance their loans:
                (a) Section 149 certificates from local councils costing $40 or more?
                (b) Solicitors fees for representation in cotract preparation and other legal work of over $500?
              (3) Is the Department of Housing asking HomeFund borrowers in category A to pay a $211 building society discharge fee payable to the co-operative building society through whom they borrowed their HomeFund loan expense when they are forced to refinance their loans?
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) (a) to (c) HomeFund borrowers in Category A are not being forced to refinance. They are given a choice. HomeFund borrowers electing to refinance their loans with a bank are responsible for any application fees, title searches and bank registration fees imposed by the bank. The Home Purchase Assistance Authority will not reimburse borrowers for these expenses. Actual fees charged vary widely from bank to bank. During the past 2 years, over 26,000 borrowers have left the HomeFund Scheme, the majority having successfully refinanced with banks.
              (2) (a) and (b) The costs of obtaining section 149 certificates and any legal representation are payable by the borrower. Legal costs vary, but in many cases would be much less than $500.
              (3) HomeFund borrowers in Category A electing to refinance their loans may incur a mortgage discharge fee payable to the Co-operative Housing Society which manages their HomeFund loan. The maximum amount that may be charged by a Co-operative Housing Society is $56. Any legal costs incurred by the Co-operative Housing Society to discharge the mortgage are also payable by the borrower.

          Page 680

          *500 ILLAWARRA HOSPITAL WAITING LISTS—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) To what extent are hospital waiting lists in the Illawarra caused by the $7.9 million budget cutback in the hospital budgets in the Illawarra since 1990/91?
              (2) What were the official waiting lists as at November of the following years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
              Answer—
              (1) High levels of quality care and the effects of the recession have brought more people into public hospitals in the Illawarra and contributed to the decline in chargeable patients. In 1990, 30.9 per cent of admissions were chargeable—this has been reduced to 22.2 per cent as of November 1993. The number of admissions has increased by 6,920 over the same period.
              In 1992/93, the Area received $800,000 and in 1993/94 $500,000 of Hospital Access Program funding to reduce waiting lists.
              (2) This information is available from the annual Performance Survey, released at the beginning of each year.

          *501 DESTRUCTION OF NEWCASTLE POLICE RECORDS—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Is the destruction of records and culling of files at Newcastle Police Station, since the publication of the article on 19 February 1994 by a Sergeant Brian Finn, officially sanctioned?
              (2) If not, why is such culling taking place?
              (3) If it is sanctioned, what is the purpose of such cull prior to an audit on the departure of Superintendent Cleary to North Region office?
              (4) (a) Who gave such direction?
              (b) What is the name, rank and location of duty of the person?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) Not applicable.
              (3) I am advised that it is a routine reduction of accumulated, outdated records, in accordance with Commissioner's Instructions. It has no relationship to any audit of the Patrol.
              (4) (a) and (b) Inspector Scaysbrook, Acting Patrol Commander, Newcastle.

          *502 CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT MOELLER—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Has Chief Superintendent Moeller publicly stated that the manner in which the arrest was handled as imprudent and the case is now before the Police Commissioner and the Ombudsman to determine what action should be taken?
              (2) As no inquiry was in train at that date, why did Superintendent Moeller make this remark?
              (3) Is it to be taken that Chief Superintendent Moeller now speaks for the Commissioner of Police and has authority to do so?

          Page 681
              (4) Did Chief Superintendent Moeller have the authority of the Ombudsman to make such a statement?
              (5) (a) Has Chief Superintendent Moeller gone outside his authority?
              (b) If so, what action is proposed by the Commissioner and the Ombudsman's Office?
              Answer—
              (1) to (5) The issues the questions address are subject to a departmental investigation. It would not be appropriate to speculate on the outcome of that investigation at this time.

          *503 SUPERINTENDENT CLEARY—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Has a direction been given to Superintendent Ian Cleary that he must not under any circumstances speak to the media on any issue concerning himself, the Police Service or anything?
              (2) (a) Why was this direction given?
          (b) By whom and on what date and in what form?
              (3) (a) Was Chief Superintendent Moeller given the same direction in a written form?
              (b) If not, why not?
              (4) Since publication in the Newcastle Herald of 29 February 1994, who in the Police Service has given information to cause the Cleary family to be excluded from their home because of TV media blocking their entry?
              (5) What member of the Police Service (name, rank and location of duty) issued a statement concerning Superintendent Cleary being relocated from Newcastle to TV station NBN3?
              (6) Will he refer the matter of media contact to the Commissioner for immediate investigation as to double standards between the direction given to Cleary and other members of the Police Service?
              Answer—
              (1) Superintendent Cleary has been directed not to have any contact with media representatives without prior written approval.
              (2) (a) To facilitate a proper and unhindered departmental investigation of the issues.
                (b) At the direction of the State Commander, Senior Assistant Commissioner Gibson, a memorandum signed by the Region Commander, North, Assistant Commissioner Donaldson, was served on Superintendent Cleary on 22 February 1994.
              (3) (a) Chief Superintendent Moeller has been personally directed by the Region Commander, North, Assistant Commissioner Donaldson, not to make any public comment on the issues. He has complied with this direction.
                (b) See response (3) (a) above.
              (4) If any member of the Police Service did so, the identity of such person is unknown.
              (5) If any member of the Police Service did so, the identity of such person is unknown.
              (6) No. The prohibition against individual public comment on the issues applies equally to Superintendent Cleary and other officers concerned, pending finalisation of the departmental investigation.


          Page 682
          *504 CONSTABLE GREG CLEARY—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Was a threat made by Chief Superintendent Moeller that Constable Greg Cleary would not graduate from the Police Academy if his father did not drop off the incident of 13 November 1993?
              (2) What was the purpose of such threat to Superintendent Ian Cleary?
              (3) Was Constable Greg Cleary confirmed as a constable on 22 January 1994?
              (4) (a) Is there any investigation into Constable Greg Cleary as a result of the incident on 13 November 1993?
              (b) If not, why was such a suggestion made?
              (c) If so, why was not this matter raised prior to his graduation?
              (5) Was Constable Greg Cleary mentioned in the Newcastle Herald on 19 February 1994 as being under investigation?
              (6) Were the actions of involving him by inference and threat unwarranted?
              (7) What action will be taken?
              Answer—
              (1) The circumstances surrounding this incident are the subject of investigation. This particular issue is encompassed in the investigation being conducted.
              (2) See response (1) above.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) (a) The circumstances surrounding the incident on 13 November 1993 is the subject of investigation. Constable Cleary was at the scene of the incident.
                (b) See response (4) (a) above.
                (c) The focus of the complaint which had been received was principally directed at Superintendent Cleary and at the relevant time there was a strong prospect that the matter could be resolved by conciliation.
              In the circumstances then prevailing, it was not considered appropriate to impede Constable Cleary's confirmation.
              (5) Yes.
              (6) As the matter is subject to investigation, it is not appropriate for me to comment.
              (7) As the matter is subject to investigation, it is not appropriate for me to comment.

          *505 CONCILIATION BY THE OMBUDSMAN—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Did the Ombudsman conciliate in a matter involving a Udo Fries as a result of his arrest at the South Steyne floating restaurant on 13 November 1993?
              (2) Did Inspector Bill Smith from North Region Internal Affairs undertake the conciliation process?
              (3) If this was a conciliation process, did it constitute any investigation as well as conciliation?
              (4) If it was construed to be an investigation, what are the names and addresses of those who were interviewed by Inspector Bill Smith for the purpose of investigation?
              (5) If it was not an investigation, who did Inspector Bill Smith speak to in relation to the conciliation process and their names and addresses?
              (6) If it was only a conciliation process, what was the final outcome and was there any document signed constituting a conciliation document and a deed of release?
              (7) What is the legality of such deed of release?

          Page 683
              Answer—
              (1) to (6) The Ombudsman has not advised the Police Service that he considers the complaint satisfactorily conciliated.
              Detective Inspector Smith, Internal Affairs, North, initially undertook the investigation of the complaint. In accordance with normal practice, an attempt was made to conciliate the complaint. Mr and Mrs Fries ultimately signed statements withdrawing their complaints.
              Pending a satisfactory resolution of the complaint, the investigation of it continued. Some fifteen people had been interviewed by Detective Inspector Smith, from most of whom statements had been taken, prior to publication of an article in the Newcastle Herald on 19 February 1994 concerning the incident. The identification of these persons at this time would be inappropriate.
              The withdrawal of informations preferred against Mr Fries was accompanied by the execution of a Deed of Release by him.
              (7) The Deed of Release was executed in respect of the charges preferred against Mr Fries and not as part of the conciliation process. The legality or otherwise of the document would be a matter for determination by a Court of Law.

          *506 POLICE INVESTIGATION—SOUTH STEYNE—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Was there no Police Service inquiry whatsoever into the incident on 13 November 1993 until 22 and 23 February 1994 that is in contrast to an article that appeared on 19 February 1994 in the Newcastle Herald indicating that an inquiry or an investigation at that time was taking place?
              (2) Has Superintendent Cleary complained repeatedly about the withdrawal of this matter and not having it dealt with by a magistrate would pervert the course of justice?
              (3) What action has the NSW Police Service taken in this regard?
              (4) Was Assistant Commissioner Donaldson, North Region, advised correctly into section 103 of the Liquor Act 1982 especially subsection (4)?
              (5) If so, why did he not act in accordance with this?
              (6) Has Superintendent Cleary indicated to some senior police that he had obtained several legal advice that his actions were correct in regard to section 103 (4).
              (7) If so, why has this been ignored?
              (8) Why to date has Jane Cleary, who has been a victim of this incident, never been interviewed or consulted at all with regard to the circumstances of the withdrawal of the matter from the courts?
              (9) Did a Sergeant Phillip Lloyd, a prosecutor attached to Newcastle, have the passage of withdrawal of proceedings against Fries?
              (10) If so:
              (a) Who authorised him to act in that capacity?
              (b) Is he satisfied his legal advice was correct?
              (c) Who instructed him to deal with Fries?
              (d) Has there been a stubborn refusal by Lloyd to accept section 103 (4) of the Liquor Act?
              (e) (i) Did Sergeant Lloyd deal with any other persons surrounding this incident?
                (ii) If so, what are the names and addresses of the persons and the relevance to this incident?


          Page 684
              Answer—
              (1) Detective Inspector Smith, Internal Affairs (North), initially undertook the investigation of the complaint. In accordance with normal practice, an attempt was made to conciliate the complaint. Mr and Mrs Fries ultimately signed statements withdrawing their complaints.
              However, pending a satisfactory resolution of the complaint, the investigation of it continued. Some fifteen people had been interviewed by Detective Inspector Smith, from most of whom statements had been taken, prior to publication of an article in the Newcastle Herald on 19 February 1994 concerning the incident.
              (2) to (10) These issues are currently the subject of investigation. I am therefore not prepared to comment on these matters at this time.

          *507 SOUTH STEYNE FLOATING RESTAURANT—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many police were called to the incident on 13 November 1993 involving Jane Cleary in addition to Superintendent Cleary and his son, Constable Greg Cleary?
              (2) What were the names, ranks and location of duty of the police that came to the scene of this incident?
              (3) Are all of the police that came to the scene still in the Police Service?
              (4) If any police have left the Police Service by resignation, what is the name and rank at the time of departure of that police person and why did the person exit from the Police Service?
              (5) Were is the resigned police person now employed?
              (6) In addition to a person arrested, Fries, were there any other persons spoken to or dealt with that were not arrested and what were their names and addresses?
              (7) Were there female persons near the incident and did they use extensive unbecoming language to Mrs Cleary and Miss Cleary?
              (8) If so, why were they not charged and what are their names and addresses?
              (9) Is the person Fries the same person Mr Udo Fries that was involved in an incident at Singleton involving a threat of a firearm?
              (10) Was there police involvement in the Singleton incident and what were the circumstances surrounding this matter?
              (11) What was the outcome of any such incident.
              Answer—
              (1) 2.
              (2) Senior Constable Michael Pont and Constable 1st Class Karen Bush, both attached to Newcastle Patrol.
              (3) No.
              (4) Senior Constable Michael John Pont resigned on 1 January 1994. He did not indicate the reason for his resignation.
              (5) A Newcastle Insurance Company.
              (6) to (8) Numerous other persons were spoken to at the South Steyne Restaurant on the evening of 13 November 1993. The circumstances surrounding that incident are the subject of the current investigation and it would not be appropriate to publicly identify, by disclosure of names and addresses, the identity and places of residence of those persons pending finalisation of the investigation.
              (9) Yes.

          Page 685
              (10) and (11) On 24 December 1992, Mr Fries made a complaint to police at Singleton concerning an incident at his workplace involving another employee. He was directed to the Local Court where on his application an ex parte interim Personal Violence Order was made against a fellow worker. Police later served that notice on another person concerned and at that time took into their possession a number of firearms.
              When the matter came before the Court for hearing on 27 January 1993, it was dismissed on terms the Court ordered not to be disclosed. The Court also ordered police to return the firearms and that order was carried out. Police had no further involvement in the matter.

          *508 LIQUOR ACT ADVISINGS—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Have any investigations been held by the Police Service either at a local or Internal Affairs level as to whether any off-duty police person was on the South Steyne floating restaurant on the evening of 13 November 1993?
              (2) If no inquiries have been held at any level, will one be instigated because of continued speculation within the Police Service locally that an off-duty police person was on the South Steyne on that evening and has failed to come forward with information surrounding the incident?
              (3) (a) Did Superintendent Ian Cleary on Monday 6 December 1993 speak with a Senior Sergeant Brian Bourne and a Sergeant Phillip Lloyd about court proceedings concerning Udo Fries?
                (b) Did Senior Sergeant Bourne advise Superintendent Cleary that his actions were correct under section 103 (4) of the Liquor Act?
                (c) Why did Sergeant Lloyd only act on section 103 (1), (2), (3) and ignore (4)?
              (4) Did Senior Sergeant Brian Bourne supply to Superintendent Cleary a page of the Liquor Act 1982 concerning section 103, highlighting subsection (4) of the Act at the 6 December meeting?
              (5) Who then was the police person, name, rank and location of duty that gave an advising contrary to section 103 (4) of the Liquor Act that proceeded towards the withdrawal of the charge of Udo Fries to Assistant Commissioner Donaldson?
              (6) Was any other legal interpretations or advice sought by the prosecutors at Newcastle concerning the matter of 13 November 1993 and the Liquor Act?
              (7) If so, what were the names, ranks and location of duty of any police person and in the case of a public servant or indepentant advice, what were the names of those persons from whom the advice was sought?
              (8) What is the name, rank and location of duty of the Principal Brief Handling Manager at Newcastle who would have forwarded the brief concerning Udo Fries and forwarded it to the Legal Services Section at Newcastle at the Commissioner of Police's instructions or direction?
              (9) If no brief was forwarded, why not?
              (10) Whose responsibility would it have been to do so?
              (11) In the case of police the rank, name and location of duty; if a public servant, their name and position within the Police Service?
              (12) Did Superintendent Cleary ask a Senior Constable Ford of Newcastle, court process in the presence of a witness for court papers concerning Udo Fries on 18 February 1994?
              (13) Did Senior Constable Ford produce those papers to Superintendent Cleary on that date or any other date subsequent to and if not, why not?
              (14) Are the papers in this matter missing and will an urgent investigation as to their whereabouts be instigated?
              (15) Could these papers be unlocatable as a consequence of the clean-up and culling of material by Sergeant Brian Finn prior to Superintendent Cleary's transfer?

          Page 686
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) No complaint or allegation has been received regarding the conduct of any "off duty" police officer on the South Steyne floating restaurant on 13 November 1993, other than that relating to Superintendent Cleary and the then Probationary Constable Cleary.
              Nonetheless, as in any investigation, efforts will be made to identify and interview all witnesses.
              (3) to (11) The circumstances surrounding the withdrawal of charges preferred against Mr Fries is now subject to formal investigation. It would not be appropriate to pre-empt the results of that investigation.
              (12) Yes.
              (13) No. The file dealing with the withdrawal of charges preferred against Mr Fries had been returned to the office of the Legal Services Branch, North Region, located at Gosford.
              (14) The file referred to is not "missing".
              (15) Not applicable.

          *509 POLICE INQUIRY INTO SUPERINTENDENT CLEARY—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) What police involvement on an official level took place into the article appearing in the Newcastle Herald on Saturday 19 February 1994 involving Superintendent Cleary about an incident that took place on 13 November 1993?
              (2) What are the names and rank and location of any police officer who had input into the article?
              (3) What is the name and position of any public servant that had input into the article?
              (4) Did Chief Superintendent Moeller, District Commander, have input into the article?
              (5) Did an interview take place at police headquarters in Newcastle on Thursday 17 February 1994?
              (6) On what basis did that interview take place and was official permission sought for such interview?
              (7) Were any papers shown to a journalist or journalists from the Newcastle Herald and on what basis were those papers shown to the journalist or journalists?
              (8) Were any of the papers of a confidential nature, given or shown, that would not be for general distribution outside police personnel?
              (9) If not, what was the nature of the papers shown or given?
              (10) Were any sections of such papers a contravention of the Privacy Act in regard to personal details about anyone?
              (11) If so, who were the persons named in the papers that were police, their names, ranks and locations of duty?
              (12) If they were not police, what were their names and addresses and why were they so named in the papers used by the Newcastle Herald?
              (13) Was an operational briefing sent to the Commissioner or State Commander concerning the interview with the Newcastle Herald by Chief Superintendent Moeller?
              (14) Was such briefing as a result of previously sought official permission to be interviewed by the Newcastle Herald?
              (15) If not, was such briefing sent to acquaint the State Commander or Commissioner that he had had an interview and acted on his own volition?
              (16) Did Chief Superintendent Moeller, or any other person, make notes or have somebody present to take a transcript of any verbal conversation with the Newcastle Herald in addition to the printed and other material that was either shown or given to the Newcastle Herald?

          Page 687
              (17) (a) Did a Sergeant Bill Patterson reveal to police at Newcastle headquarters on Friday 18 February 1994 that he had expected the article to run that day?
                (b) What was his purpose in doing so?
              Answer—
              (1) to (17) The circumstances surrounding police involvement in the publication of the article specified is the subject of the current investigation. It would be inappropriate to pre-empt the outcome of that investigation.

          *510 CENTRAL RAILWAY STATION STALLHOLDERS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) How many stallholders are permitted to sell goods on Central Railway Station?
              (2) Are these stallholders required to display the registered address of their business or residence?
              (3) Is he aware of concerns that stallholders have refused to supply their name and address to prospective customers?
              (4) What avenues are available for consumers to lodge a complaint or a claim against the business?
              (5) What are the details of the arrangement that exists between the stallholders and the State Rail Authority?
              Answer—
              (1) The State Rail Authority currently has 47 retail outlets at Central Station/Sydney Terminal. In addition, the private company which handles the authority's outdoor advertising, Pearl & Dean, has granted three short-term leases at Central.
              (2) No.
              (3) Yes, of one complaint.
              (4) Depending on the nature of the complaint, the State Rail Authority, the Department of Consumer Affairs, Pearl & Dean, Sydney City Council or the police.
              (5) The authority's retail premises are subject to registered leases. In order that details may be provided, the particular outlet concerned would need to be specified.

          *511 SENIORS CARDS—ELECTORATE OF MOUNT DRUITT—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
              (1) How many Seniors Cards have been issued to constituents in the electorate of Mount Druitt as at November 1993?
              (2) At what date were cards first issued in the electorate of Mount Druitt?
              (3) (a) What is the most recent total of Seniors Cards issued in the electorate of Mount Druitt?
                (b) On what date was that figure reached?
              Answer—
              (1) There are currently 6,896 people who live at addresses with postcodes which fall within the Mount Druitt electorate who hold seniors cards. While it is a good guide to the number of card holders in the Mount Druitt electorate, it is not possible to provide an exact figure as some electorates share postcodes.

          Page 688
              (2) Seniors Cards have been issued progressively across the State since the introduction of the scheme on 1 July 1992. The current total of card holders by postcode is the only figure available.
              (3) (a) 6,896.
                (b) 15 March 1994.

          *512 SENIORS CARDS—GOVERNMENT CONCESSIONS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
              What are the concessions offered by the State Government to holders of Seniors Cards (who do not hold a Health Benefit Card or receive Department of Social Security pension or part pension) in relation to—
                (a) Car registration?
                (b) Transport concessions?
                (c) Access to:
                  (i) National Parks?
                  (ii) Art Galleries?
                  (iii) Museums?
                (iv) Opera House?
                (d) Any other service offered by the Government or its instrumentalities?
              Answer—
                (a) Discussion ideas about this proposal are underway.
                (b) The Seniors Card entitles holders to Special Excursion Tickets and Half-Fare Travel as follows:
                  •One Dollar ($1) Excursion Ticket on Government rail, bus and ferry travel within the Sydney suburban area.
                  •One Dollar ($1) Excursion Ticket for Newcastle suburban area.
                  •Two Dollar ($2) Sydney and Outer Metropolitan Excursion Ticket.
                  •Three Dollar ($3) Excursion Ticket for travel within the area bounded by Sydney, Lithgow, Goulburn and Wollongong.
                  •Two Dollar ($2) Country Excursion Ticket. This ticket allows seniors to make a single return or economy class journey between any two country stations or locations on any day of the week providing the journey does not exceed 129 kilometres and is entirely outside the boundaries of the Sydney and Newcastle suburban areas and the outer metropolitan area.
                  •Half-fare Travel—Government services. Half-fare travel within New South Wales only on all State Rail train and coach services, Sydney and Newcastle bus services, and Sydney Harbour and Stockton ferry services.
                  •Half-fare Travel—Private services. The Seniors Card may also be recognised on privately operated bus and ferry services throughout New South Wales for half the adult fare.
                The Department of Transport pays a subsidy to the operated bus and ferry services throughout New South Wales for half the adult fare.
                The Department of Transport pays a subsidy to the operators of private services to reimburse fares foregone for providing half-fare concessions to pensioners, retired seniors and other groups.

          Page 689
                (c) (i) Discussions about this proposal are underway.
                (ii) Art Gallery of New South Wales—concession rate, varies with each exhibition.
                (iii) Australian Museum $1.50 admission.
                    Museum of Contemporary Art—$4 ($3 between 2.30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday to Friday).
                    Powerhouse Museum—$2 admission.
                (d) • Historic Houses Trust of Australia—$3 admission except $2 for Justice and Police Museum.
                    •Chinese Garden, Darling Harbour—50 cents admission.
                    •Sydney Cove Authority—10 per cent discount off The Rocks ticket.
                    •Taronga Zoo—Free cup of tea or coffee at selected outlets.
                    •Public Trust Office—Wills and Powers of Attorney prepared free of charge.
                    •NSW Agriculture—25 per cent discount off publications.
                    •NSW Government Information Bookshop—10 per cent discount off legislation and publications.

          8 MARCH 1994

          (Paper No. 4)

          *513 STATE MINE GULLY—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
              (1) Was a promise recently made to a Mr Joe Maginnes of Lithgow that an amount of $200,000 would be made available for a project to rehabilitate State Mine Gully?
              (2) Who made the promise?
              (3) What is Mr Maginnes role in the rehabilitation project?
              (4) Was the promise made as part of the Total Management Catchment plan?
              (5) If so, is the local committee aware of it?
              Answer—
              (1) No. Support was given to Mr Maginnes in preparing an application for $199,140 to the Environmental Restoration and Rehabilitation Trust by the Upper Cox's River Catchment Management Committee, Greater Lithgow Council and the Departments of Mineral Resources, Water Resources and CaLM.
              (2) Not applicable.
              (3) Mr Maginnes is President of the Greater Lithgow Mining Museum Inc., the applicant.
              (4) Support was given to the application as the project will address a major source of land degradation and sediment in the catchment.
              (5) Yes.

          *514 LAND INFORMATION CENTRE—BATHURST—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
              (1) Were employees of the Land Information Centre at Bathurst recently told that they could not be guaranteed employment past June of this year?
              (2) If so, how many?
              (3) Has the Land Information Centre a national and international reputation for excellence in its field?
              (4) If so, why are staff facing retrenchment?
              (5) Will he guarantee that all jobs will be maintained at the Land Information Centre until June 1995?

          Page 690
              Answer—
              (1) At a staff meeting on 9 December 1993, in response to a question relating to the employment of temporary employees, some temporary employees were told that they could not be guaranteed employment past June of this year.
              (2) 11 temporary staff are employed to fill vacancies caused by the extended absence of permanent staff. 53 temporary staff are employed to accelerate the capture of the Digital Cadastral Data Base.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) There are no plans to retrench permanent staff at the centre. There may be a reduction in the number of temporary staff as the projects from which they are funded near completion.
              Temporary staff employed to fill vacancies caused by the extended absence of permanent staff will cease employment on the return of the permanent employee.
              Employment of temporary staff to accelerate the capture of the Digital Cadastral Data Base is funded from a specific allocation for that project. Staff are employed on a needs basis for the duration of the project
              (5) There are no plans to downsize the Land Information Centre between now and June 1995.

          *515 RURAL ACTION MOVEMENT—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) Is he aware that the Rural Action Movement in New South Wales represents a large number of farmers who have debt problems with various banks and lending institutions?
              (2) Are a number of rural counsellors located throughout New South Wales offering advice to them?
              (3) Would he be prepared to recommend to the Premier and the Treasurer that provision be made in the Budget estimates for funds to appoint a counsellor within the Rural Action Movement?
              Answer—
              (1) I am aware that there are a number of groups in New South Wales operating as the Rural Action Movement. These groups do represent some farmers in financial difficulty but I am not sure as to what extent.
              (2) There are presently 26 rural counselling services operating throughout New South Wales. These services are jointly funded by the Commonwealth and State Governments, with the Commonwealth providing 50 per cent, the State 25 per cent, and the community the remaining 25 per cent of the funds. The services are managed by the local community group to ensure that the service continues to meet the needs of the local farm families. These rural counsellors are available to assist individual farm families with financial difficulties, including those represented by the Rural Action Movement.
              (3) The NSW Government, through my Department, allocated $609,000 to the NSW Rural Counselling Service in 1993/94. A commitment has been made to continue to provide funding for rural financial counselling services operating in New South Wales on the basis of 50 per cent in the first year of operation and 25 per cent in second and subsequent years.
              This funding is presently linked to that provided by the Commonwealth Government, through the Department of Primary Industries and Energy. I see no reason to change this system. If it wishes to form a community group, the Rural Action Movement can make application for funding under this scheme through the Department of Primary Industries and Energy.

          Page 691

          *516 CITY OF LAKE MACQUARIE CYCLEWAYS—Mr Face asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) What plans exist for the Roads and Traffic Authority to design and build connections to cycleways already in the City of Lake Macquarie?
              (2) Will consideration be given to ensuring that proper cycleway connections are made in the City of Lake Macquarie?
              (3) What plans exist to complete cycleways within the City of Lake Macquarie?
              Answer—
              (1) Cycleways in the area are the responsibility of Lake Macquarie Council. The Roads and Traffic Authority does not design or construct new cycleways or connections.
              (2) Yes.
              (3) Council has a local cycleway network plan, and the Authority and council have reached agreement on a regional cycleway network. Funding is made available to councils for works on a needs basis, in accordance with the priorities of councils. The Authority's 1993/94 program includes $213,000 for works in the City of Lake Macquarie.

          *517 FORMER SENIOR SERGEANT THOMAS COLQUHOUN—FIREARMS—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Has concern been expressed that the then Senior Sergeant Colquhoun being given back his service pistol whilst under investigation because of fears for safety?
              (2) Will the Police Service object because of those expressions of concern if Senior Sergeant Colquhoun applies for a gun licence or any licence to have a firearm as a consequence of employment?
              Answer—
              (1) During the latter period of 1992, Senior Sergeant Colquhoun was interviewed by Detective Inspector Hobden concerning his conduct after complaints by Constables Middlebrook and MacPherson of the Lake Macquarie and Newcastle Police Citizens Youth Clubs.
              In January 1993, Constable MacPherson expressed concerns that Colquhoun may harm her, although there had been no threats made by Colquhoun. At the time, Colquhoun was on leave and Detective Inspector Hobden of North Region Internal Affairs, arranged for Colquhoun's service revolver, which had been left at Charlestown Police Station, not to be returned to him without the Detective Inspector's authority.
              It was ascertained on or about 29 January 1993 that Colquhoun's revolver had been returned to him by a Constable at Charlestown Police Station. Detective Inspector Hobden made immediate arrangements for Colquhoun's revolver to be taken from him.
              Senior Sergeant Colquhoun's appointments were then placed in the safe of the Commander, Federation of Police Citizens Youth Clubs. On a number of occasions approval was given for the former Senior Sergeant to wear his appointments because of the necessity to leave the Federation head office in full uniform. It was considered inappropriate for Colquhoun to perform duty outside the office without his appointments.
              An inquiry was held into the return of the revolver and the Constable involved denied that he saw the note attached to the revolver indicating the action required. The Constable was counselled in respect of his actions.

          Page 692
              (2) Former Senior Sergeant Colquhoun has made an application for a licence under the Security (Protection) Industry Act.
              The application is still under consideration and I have arranged for the Commissioner of Police to advise me as to his decision in respect of the application.

          *518 RACECOURSE DEVELOPMENT FUND—Mr Face asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) When was the Racecourse Development Fund established?
              (2) What is its source of income?
              (3) Since its inception, how much money has it allocated to galloping clubs either by grant or loan?
              (4) What have been the amounts so allocated to the following clubs:
                (a) Australian Jockey Club?
                (b) Sydney Turf Club?
                (c) Gosford Race Club?
                (d) Wyong Race Club?
                (e) Murrumbidgee Race Club (Wagga Wagga)?
                (f) Clarence River Jockey Club (Grafton)?
                (g) Bathurst Turf Club?
                (h) Dubbo Turf Club?
                (i) Port Macquarie Race Club?
              (5) Which of the above clubs have the following client facilities:
                (a) Grandstands?
                (b) Covered betting rings?
                (c) Electronic semaphoring?
              Answer—
              (1) 1 January 1972.
          (2) At the present time the principal source of income for the Fund is:
          (a) a percentage of the annual surplus of the Totalizator Agency Board of NSW as determined by the Board from time-to-time; and
          (b) repayment of principal and interest from outstanding loans.
          N.B. In the event that the amount mentioned at (a) above is not paid into the Fund, it would form part of the overall surplus and be distributed to racing clubs in accordance with the approved scheme of distribution.
              (3) to (5) The detail requested in the Member's question would unduly impinge on the Department's time and resources and is not warranted within the core responsibilities of the Department. I refer the Member to the Department's and the Racecourse Development Committee's annual reports.

          *519 FULLERTON COVE—SAND EXTRACTION—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Has the Department of Planning sighted the report to Port Stephens Council contained in the report of the Manager Development and Building in relation to sand extraction at Cox's Lane, Fullerton Cove [3850—12 Pt 1]?
              (2) If so, are the current operations on the site proceeding with valid development consent?


          Page 693
              Answer—
              I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) and (2) The Department of Planning is not aware of the report referred to.

          *520 SCHOOL CLEANING SPECIFICATIONS—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
              With regard to contract cleaning companies specifications laid down by the Department of School Education—
              (1) What are the details of these cleaning specifications?
              (2) Are they the same as those applied to the former Government Cleaning Service in terms of standard of cleaning?
              (3) If not, what variations have occurred?
              (4) What activities are to be carried out in each room on each day by cleaners?
              (5) Does the contract permit "spot cleaning of rooms, i.e., attention given only to areas of obvious dirt or litter?
              (6) What role are principles to play in ensuring that the cleaning standards are maintained?
              Answer—
              (1) to (6) This matter falls under the responsibility of the Minister for Administrative Services, the Hon. Anne Cohen, M.P. I suggest that you direct your questions to the relevant Minister.

          *522 BILLINDUDGEL TO CHINDERAH MOTORWAY—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) What is the total area of land to be acquired for the proposed Billinudgel to Chinderah Motorway?
              (2) How much of this land is existing or potential caneland?
              (3) How much existing or potential caneland will be alienated as a result of the construction of the proposed Billinudgel to Chinderah Motorway?
              (4) Has an economic impact statement on the future viability of the sugar industry, should this proposed motorway be constructed, been completed?
              (5) If so, what were the findings of that study as regards the immediate and long-term economic effects on the sugar industry of the motorway proposal?
              (6) Have studies been undertaken on the likely flood impact of the proposed motorway on the whole of the Tweed Valley?
              (7) If so, what was the result of that study?
              (8) Have the following reports been prepared:
                (a) Value Management Study by Sinclair Knight/RTA?
                (b) Hydrology Report by WBM Oceanics?
                (c) Economic Impact Study Report by Professor Abelson?
                (d) Report on Acid Sulphate Soils by Dr Mike Melville and Dr Ian White?
              (9) If so, will he make unabridged copies available to the NSW Sugar Milling Co-operative Ltd?
              (10) If not, why not?

          Page 694
              Answer—
              (1) Construction of the motorway would require the acquisition of approximately 240 hectares.
              (2) Approximately 60 hectares would be existing cane farming land.
              (3) Farmland will not be denied access to the existing road network.
              (4) A statement on the sugar and other industries will be completed in the near future.
              (5) The study findings will be available when the statement has been finalised. In this regard, the statement will be included as a working paper in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the motorway, which will be publicly exhibited in April 1994.
              (6) Yes.
              (7) The report will be included as a working paper in the EIS.
              (8) (a) The report is being prepared and will be included as a working paper in the EIS.
                (b) As indicated in (7) above, the report will be included as a working paper in the EIS.
                (c) As indicated in (4) and (5) above, the report is being finalised and will be included as a working paper in the EIS.
                (d) The report is not a direct part of the motorway project. However, the EIS for the motorway will comprehensively deal with any impact of the proposed road on acid sulphate soils.
              (9) The specialist reports completed for the motorway project will be included as working papers in the EIS. The EIS will be available to all members of the public.
              (10) Not applicable.

          *523 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—WAGES AND SALARIES INCREASES—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) Has the Department of Agriculture sought advice from the Public Employment Industrial Relations Authority (PEIRA) in respect of the application of the Industrial Commission's decision of 24 December 1993 with respect to the 10 per cent award applications lodged by the Public Service and Professional Officer Associations of New South Wales?
              (2) Does the new Award apply to employees who are presently covered by Enterprise Agreements?
              (3) Has the Department of Agriculture concluded an Enterprise Agreement with the Public Service Association and the Professional Officers Association as well as the Association of Professional Engineers in respect of its scientific, veterinary, engineering and library officers?
              (4) If so, how long does the Enterprise Agreement operate and what is its termination date?
              (5) Does this mean that in terms of the PIERA Circular No. 2 of 24 January 1994, those agreement rates will not vary in line with the 4 per cent and 3 per cent decision?
              (6) Does the Industrial Commission's decision of 24 December 1993 apply to the industrial instruments previously applicable to staff now covered by the Department of Agriculture Professional Officer Enterprise Agreement?
              (7) Will the Department of Agriculture's failure to pass onto staff the Industrial Commission's judgement of 24 December 1993 jeopardise the prospects of concluding enterprise agreements in the future?
              (8) Has the Treasurer advised him that Treasury will not provide extra funds to the Department for the 4 per cent and 3 per cent pay increase awarded in December 1993?
              (9) Did the Treasurer advise him or the Department that extra funding of 3 per cent for 1993/94, plus 3 per cent in July 1994 plus 3 per cent in July 1995 if the Department obtained enterprise agreements to cover pay rates and which last for 3 years?

          Page 695
              (10) If so, how is the Department to fund the pay increases awarded in December 1993?
              (11) Has the Government indicated to the Department that it will provide money for enterprise agreements and redundancies?
              (12) If so, why has the Government refused to provide funds to pay for increases awarded in December 1993?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) In terms of Circular No. 2 of 1994, the 4 per cent + 3 per cent decision to increase salaries does not automatically apply to the Professional Officers Enterprise Agreement or any other enterprise agreement. However, section 122 of the Industrial Relations Act 1991, which provides minimum conditions of employment including rates of pay, may impact upon the enterprise agreement. The Department is currently considering the effect of section 122 on the Professional Officers Enterprise Agreement.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) 12 months. The enterprise agreement expired on 2 March 1994.
              (5) Please see answer to question (2).
              (6) Yes.
              (7) No. The Department has received advice from PEIRA in respect of strategies for the future negotiation of departmental enterprise agreements which should satisfy the concerns so far expressed by the PSA/POA.
              (8) No.
              (9) Yes.
              (10) Funding by way of a grant from Treasury if the Department succeeds in placing staff on enterprise agreements by 31 December 1994, or by way of a loan from Treasury if this is not possible.
              (11) Yes.
              (12) The Government has not refused to provide funds.

          *525 WENTWORTH AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE SURGERY—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals in the Wentworth Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to December 1993, inclusive?
              (2) How many of these in each month were day surgery?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) Information by each hospital in each Area by month on operations is not collected centrally. Currently the only centrally available data on booking lists is provided in the Annual Booking List Survey.
              To provide this information over a 3-year period would require considerable staff time which is not warranted within the priorities of the NSW Health Department.


          Page 696
          *526 PAMBULA HOSPITAL—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health—
              (1) Will the Director of Nursing at Pambula Hospital continue to be employed at the hospital?
              (2) Are psychiatric, drug and alcohol related patients being referred to the Community Health Centre, not the hospital?
              (3) What is the current waiting list for elective surgery at Pambula Hospital?
              (4) Are there any plans for the closure of Pambula Hospital?
              (5) Why is Pambula Hospital being told not to purchase any stores at present?
              Answer—
              (1) The Director of Nursing at Pambula Hospital will continue to be employed with an enhanced statement of duties to include the overall daily management of hospital services. The position will be known as Nursing Manager/Executive Officer.
              (2) The Community Health Centre provides an outpatient professional counselling service for mental health patients and a drug and alcohol service. If any mental health or drug and alcohol patients need overnight monitoring, they are admitted to the hospital under the care of a medical practitioner.
              (3) The current waiting list for general surgery at Pambula Hospital is 4 weeks.
              (4) There are no plans to close Pambula Hospital.
              (5) I am advised that Pambula Hospital has received no instruction informally or formally to cease purchase of stores. Pambula Hospital is on budget and is anticipated to be within budget at 30 June 1994.

          *527 GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION—Mr Rogan asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
              (1) What measures are being introduced in conjunction with the Commonwealth Government to meet the agreed targets of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions following the Commonwealth Government's signing of the International Convention on Climate Change at the Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit?
              (2) What discussions have been held with the Commonwealth and other State Governments on this issue?
              (3) What plan of management is in place to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gases?
              Answer—
              (1) Measures
              The NSW Government, in conjunction with the Commonwealth Government and other State Governments, is actively participating in the implementation of the National Greenhouse Response Strategy (NGRS). The strategy was endorsed by all Heads of Government in December 1992, and represents the principal means by which Australia will meet its obligations under the International Framework Convention on Climate Change.
              The NGRS contains a suite of measures applying to all levels of Government and across jurisdictions. A progress report on the implementation of measures under the NGRS was endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments in February 1994 and copies of the report may be obtained from the Commonwealth Department of the Environment, Sport and Territories.

          Page 697
              (2) Discussions
              Discussions with the Commonwealth and other State Governments on the complex and technical issues associated with greenhouse and climate change matters are being conducted continuously in forums such as the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC), the Australian and New Zealand Minerals and Energy Council (ANZMEC) and the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Committee. The principal forum for discussions is the Intergovernmental Committee on Ecologically Sustainable Development (ICESD), which meets regularly to monitor and progress both the NGRS and the National Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable Development (the ICESD replaces the intergovernmental ESD and Greenhouse Steering Committees).
              (3) Plan of Management
              The NGRS is the basis on which greenhouse gas emission issues are addressed in New South Wales. The NSW Government actively supports the NGRS, which is the agreed State and Commonwealth policy position on greenhouse gas emissions. The NGRS provides a timetable and implementation plan for Australia to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

          *528 POWER AND WATER SHARING AGREEMENT—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) Has agreement been reached between the New South Wales, the Victorian and the Federal Governments on power and water sharing from the Snowy River Hydro Electricity Scheme?
              (2) (a) What progress can he report on?
                (b) What will be the benefits to New South Wales of any agreement?
              (3) What are the details of the final or proposed agreement?
              Answer—
              (1) Arrangements for the sharing of power and the release of water from the Snowy Mountains Hydro-electric Scheme are provided for in the Snowy Mountains Hydro-electric Agreements Act 1958, No. 20.
              (2) (a) An inter-government committee is currently in the process of developing an agreed set of principles for Snowy Reform. The determination of equity in the Scheme is the major issue in the review.
                (b) The NSW Government supports the objective of improving the financial management of the Scheme and rationalising the Scheme's institutional arrangements for greater efficiency through corporatisation of the Scheme.
              (3) Final agreement on these issues has still to be reached. However, the people of New South Wales may be assured that any final agreement will not disadvantage the State with respect to its current position regarding benefits from the Snowy Scheme.

          *530 RTA OFFICE—WOLLONGONG—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Was the Roads and Traffic Authority office in Burelli Street, Wollongong, closed on 24 February 1994 "due to staff shortages"?
              (2) For each day that the office has been open in the last 6 months, how many people transacted business at the Burelli Street Roads and Traffic Authority office?
              (3) What was the cause of the "staff shortage"?
              (4) How often has any of the offices of the Roads and Traffic Authority in the Illawarra been closed due to "staff shortages" in the last 6 months?

          Page 698
              Answer—
              (1) Yes. A notice was displayed at the office directing customers to nearby motor registries at Kembla Street, some 600 metres from Burelli Street, and at Corrimal.
              (2) An average of 220 transactions per day were processed at the office over the 6-month period from September 1993 to March 1994.
              (3) Sudden illness of senior staff.
              (4) No other offices have been closed.

          *531 PORT KEMBLA POLICE STATION—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) What are the details of the damage caused to Port Kembla Police Station by the recent storms on the night of Sunday and Monday, 6 and 7 March 1994?
              (2) What is the current policy or decision with regard to the report entitled Port Kembla Police Station Feasibility Study prepared by the State Projects Public Buildings Group for the Properties Branch of the NSW Police Service in March 1992?
              (3) Does he intend to proceed with the 1993 recommendation of the Police Department Buildings Branch that the existing Port Kembla Police Station be demolished and completely rebuilt?
              (4) If so, when will construction commence?
              Answer—
              (1) Due to heavy rain and blocked stormwater pipes, some internal flooding was experienced in the rear corridor and exhibit room. No damage was caused to any property or equipment.
              The flooding was primarily caused by blocked guttering and downpipes. These have now been cleaned and action taken to lop trees which are overhanging the guttering. An electric eel has been used to ensure that the stormwater drains are clear and the total drainage system is being investigated.
              (2) As a result of the report, this project has been included in the Capital Investment Strategic Plan.
              (3) The most favoured option in the feasibility study is for the demolition of the existing police station and to build a new complex. However, a formal decision has not yet been reached.
              (4) I have been advised that this project has been nominated for inclusion in the 1998/99 program in priority order behind other programs.
              Should funding be available to satisfy other projects, as per plan, then this program will continue.

          *532 ILLAWARRA ABORIGINAL MEDICAL SERVICES—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
              (1) Has he been consulted and given endorsement to the current administrative arrangements between the Illawarra Area Health Service and the Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service for the disbursement of funds from the NSW Aboriginal Health Unit?

          Page 699
              (2) Do these administrative arrangements entail the managers of the Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service access to funds from the NSW Aboriginal Health Unit by turning up in person at the Illawarra Area Health Service administration building in Military Road, Port Kembla, and personally presenting all accounts before cheques will be issued and accounts paid?
              (3) Have the financial difficulties of the Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service been overcome?
              (4) Is he aware that:
                (a) The Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service has now cleared its former overdraft?
                (b) That the management of the Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service has arrangements in place so that it is fully and regularly informed of the organisation's financial situation?
                (c) Will he press for a more appropriate method of funding, such as i.e., the Aboriginal Health Unit's funds being paid directly into the account of the Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service, being established?
              (6) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) to (6) This is a matter for the Minister for Health. My Department has no responsibility for administration of the funds between the Illawarra Area Health Service and Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service.
              The administration of funds of the Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service is the responsibility of the Minister for Health and the (Commonwealth) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, to whom this question might be more appropriately addressed.

          9 MARCH 1994

          (Paper No. 5)

          *533 CAR THEFTS—SEVEN HILLS COMMUTER CARPARK—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              How many cars have been stolen from the Seven Hills commuter carpark since its opening?
              Answer—
              24 as at 28 March 1994.

          *535 APEX SCANDURA PTY LTD AIR EMISSIONS—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) Is he aware of continuing complaints about air emissions from Apex Scandura Pty Ltd at Girraween?
              (2) Are local residents suffering health problems because of these emissions?
              (3) What hazardous chemicals, and in what quantities, does Apex Scandura use in the production of conveyor belts on site?
              (4) What action has the EPA taken to deal with residents' complaints?


          Page 700
              Answer—
              (1) Yes. The Environment Protection Authority received four complaints in the month of December and four since production recommenced on 24 January 1994.
              (2) This question should be referred to my colleague, the Minister for Health.
              (3) The company advises that the chemicals used to produce conveyor belts are not regarded as hazardous.
              (4) The Environment Protection Authority has responded to complainants verbally and as the Environment Protection Authority has suggested in meetings with the company and its air consultants, there has been modelling, process review, air ducting, stack testing and further consultation.

          *536 BLACKTOWN POLICE STATION—VEHICLE THEFT CASES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many motor vehicles were reported stolen at the Blacktown Police Station for the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
              (2) How many persons were charged with car theft at the Blacktown Police Station for the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
              Answer—
              (1) (a) 1,342.
                (b) 1,174.
                (c) 935.
                (d) 812.
              (2) (a) 37.
                (b) 40.
                (c) 40.
                (d) 35.

          *537 MOUNT DRUITT POLICE STATION—VEHICLE THEFT CASES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many motor vehicles were reported stolen at the Mount Druitt Police Station for the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?

          Page 701
              (2) How many persons were charged with car theft at the Mount Druitt Police Station for the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
              Answer—
              (1) (a) 1,434.
                (b) 1,499.
                (c) 1,277.
                (d) 962.
              (2) (a) 69.
                (b) 69.
                (c) 90.
                (d) 70.

          *538 MOUNT DRUITT POLICE STATION—BREAK, ENTER AND STEAL CASES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many reports of break, enter and steal were made at the Mount Druitt Police Station for the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
              (2) How many persons were charged with break, enter and steal at the Mount Druitt Police Station for the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
              Answer—
              (1) (a) 2,200.
                (b) 2,120.
                (c) 2,569.
                (d) 1,397.
              (2) (a) 70.
                (b) 87.
                (c) 158.
                (d) 80.

          *539 SPEED CAMERAS—ELECTORATE OF SWANSEA—Mr Bowman asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) At what locations are speed cameras used in the electorate of Swansea?
              (2) What number of infringement notices were issued at each location during 1993?

          Page 702
              (3) What was the total value of the penalties attaching to these infringement notices at each location during 1993?
              (4) What number of road accidents occurred at and adjacent to these locations in the years:
                (a) 1991?
                (b) 1992?
                (c) 1993?
              Answer—
              (1) (i) Pacific Highway Marks Point Road and Avonlea Streets, both eastern and western sides of Highway.
                  (ii) Wommara Avenue Warrior and Nulkara Streets, Belmont, on southern side of street.
              The speed camera is not fixed at one location but can be moved to any location between these cross streets.
              (2) It is assumed that the honourable member is referring to speed camera infringements.
                  (i) Pacific Highway 158.
                  (ii) Wommara Avenue Nil infringements.
              (3) (i) Pacific Highway $24,196.
                (ii) Wommara Avenue Nil.
              (4) (a) to (c)
                  (i) Pacific Highway 117.
                (ii) Wommara Avenue 6.
                Statistics of the yearly breakdown of accidents at individual intersections are not kept.

          *540 MUNMORAH STATE RECREATION AREA INCOME—Mr Bowman asked the Minister for the Environment—
              At Munmorah State Recreation Area, what was the total income derived from:
                (a) Admission charges?
                (b) Camping fees?
              in the fiscal years:
              (i) 1990/91?
              (ii) 1991/92?
              (iii) 1992/93?
              Answer—
              (a) and (b) Income derived from admission charges which includes the purchase of annual entry permits:
          1990/91 $111,080
          1991/92 $107,711
          1992/93 $112,933
              Income derived from camping fees:
          1990/91 $27,290
          1991/92 $39,977
          1992/93 $46,280


          Page 703
          *542 WITNESSES COMPENSATION—Mr Bowman asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              I have been advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answer to the honourable member's questions is:
              (1) What is the daily compensation (fees and any other entitlements) for witnesses in New South Wales courts?
              (2) When was this last revised?
              Answer—
              I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:

          (1) (i) CRIMINAL MATTERS—determined by the Governor upon the recommendation of the Attorney General).
                Ordinary Witnesses
                  Loss of Working Time:
                  (a) Up to 4 hours, not exceeding $23.00 per day
                  (b) More than 4 hours $46.00 per day
                  Members of Professions and Experts summoned to give expert evidence
          (Period of absence from home, office, etc.)
                  (a) First 2 hours or part thereof $49.50 per day
                  (b) Each additional 1/2 hour or part $9.50 per 1/2 hour
                  (c) Note: Maximum daily fee $100.00 per day
                  (d) In addition, where evidence is expert $6.50 per case

          Sustenance (all witnesses)
                  (1) All meals $11.15 per meal
                  (2) Where distance prevents travel to court and return on the same day:
                  (a) For each day of 24 hours $109.50 per day
                  (b) Any additional part of day $4.56 per hour
                  (c) Where absent overnight but less than 24 hours paid as for full day.
                  (3) Children: As above if aged 5 years and over; nil if under 5 years.
                Conveyance
          (1) Actual cost of public transport (not to be reimbursed for plane travel unless prior approval given to this method).
              (2) Private Vehicle where unable to travel by public conveyance: 10 c/km.
                (ii) CIVIL MATTERS—determined by the Legal Fees and Costs Board.
                  Note: This Table specifies the maximum amount that a successful litigant may recover from his unsuccessful opponent in respect of witness' charges, subject to s. 194 (3) of the Legal Profession Act 1987. Section 194 (3) provides that any such determination does not limit the powers of the court or taxing officer of the court to determine, in any particular case, the amount of costs payable in respect of any contentious business.

          Page 704
                  1. Barristers, solicitors, accountants, medical practitioners, surveyors, architects, pharmacists and other professional persons attending to give evidence:
                              $160-$300
                        or per hour $125-$200
              1.1 Whenever a barrister, solicitor, accountant, architect, pharmacist, or other professional person not being a medical practitioner prepares a report, the fee for the preparation of such report shall be allowed at a rate per hour or part thereof: $125-$200.
          2. Whenever the persons mentioned in Item 1 are called to give expert evidence and not evidence of fact:
              2.1 Attending to give expert evidence, including travelling to court, where period from departure from home, hospital, place of practice, office, place of employment or other place to return thereto from attendance at court does not exceed one and a half hours: $250-$400.
          2.2 For every full hour after the first hour and a half or a proportion thereof if not for a full hour: $125-$200.
          2.3 The maximum amount payable per day under items 1 and 2 above, shall be such a sum that is the total of the number of hours that reasonably involved a witness at the rate applicable in items 1 and 2.
              3. Travelling and other allowances:
                  3.1 Payment to be made at the rate of $1 per kilometre one way after the first kilometre up to and including 80 kilometres, plus reasonable parking fees.
              3.2 Exceeding 80 kilometres: the reasonable costs thereof plus the costs of reasonable accommodation, meals and parking.
                  4. Other witnesses:
                  4.1 Such allowance as is commensurate with the witnesses' remuneration or circumstances but not exceeding the allowances provided under items 1 and 2.
              4.2 Such additional amount as is reasonable for travelling expenses and sustenance and in cases where accommodation is required such further amount as having regard to all the circumstances is reasonable and has been paid in respect thereof.
              (2) (i) In respect of criminal matters, March 1985, with the exception of the sustenance allowances, which were last revised on 1 December 1991.
                (ii) In respect of civil matters, 31 July 1992, with the exception of item 1.1 above, which is effective from 5 November 1993.

          *545 GLENROCK STATE RECREATION AREA—Mr Face asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) Was a plan proposed to close three roads into the Glenrock State Recreation Area?
              (2) What was this proposal aiming to achieve and prevent?
              (3) Was a deferral period put forward by user groups?
              (4) What is hoped for by the deferral?
              (5) What percentage of the total monies expended each year are used to clean up and repair this State recreation area because of dumping, theft and vandalism?
              (6) Will this matter be reviewed again?


          Page 705
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) The prevention of the undesirable practices of rubbish dumping, vandalism and drug abuse which are prevalent in the State Recreation Area (SRA).
              (3) After the initial meeting with user groups in December 1993, all parties agreed to consider the matter and defer the decision pending a further meeting in February 1994. Following the public meeting with various interest groups in February, it was agreed to close the Gun Club Road at night. The Service agreed to defer night closure of the Scout Camp and Dudley Roads for another 12 months.
              (4) Deferral will allow time for a community caretaker group to be established to oversee various clean-up and surveillance activities to supplement the Service's management of the SRA.
              (5) Estimated percentage of 1993/94 budget for Glenrock SRA is 27.9 per cent.
              (6) Yes.

          *546 GLENROCK STATE RECREATION AREA PLAN MANAGEMENT—Mr Face asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) Are dogs allowed at present into the Glenrock State Recreation Area?
              (2) If so, under what conditions?
              (3) Is the issue of dogs being allowed into or to be excluded from the Glenrock State Recreation Area addressed in the plan of management?
              (4) Are dogs considered a problem, especially unregistered dogs, at Dudley Beach in the State Recreation Area?
              (5) Does Lake Macquarie City Council deal with unregistered dogs in the State Recreation Area?
              (6) If not, who does?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) Visitors are expected to keep their dogs under control.
              (3) Yes.
              (4) Yes.
              (5) No.
              (6) The National Parks and Wildlife Service is responsible for the control of all dogs in the SRA.

          *551 FORESTRY MINI-GRANTS PROGRAM—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
              (1) Did he issue a memorandum dated 17 January 1994 to Government MP's and MLC's advising them of the availability of Forestry Mini-Grants?
              (2) Did he advise all members of Parliament of the availability of Forestry Mini-Grants by memorandum dated 24 February 1994?
              (3) Why did he delay advising other members of the availability of these grants?
              (4) Will he instruct State Forests to defer consideration of applications so that all MP's and MLC's have been afforded equal time to bring the Forestry Mini-Grants Program to their constituents attention?

          Page 706
              (5) If not, why not?
              (6) How many years has the Forestry Mini-Grants Program been operating?
              (7) Which electorates were recipients last financial year?
              (8) What was the total amount of grants in each electorate last financial year and who were the recipients?
              Answer—
              (1) The memorandum of 17 January 1994 was directed to Government MP's & MLC's with forestry interests.
              (2) All members were advised of the program on 24 February 1994.
              (3) The delay between memorandums arose through a regrettable administrative oversight.
              (4) The closing date for applications is 29 April 1994. This will afford ample time for all interested parties to submit applications. These will then be forwarded to State Forests for unbiased assessment and recommendation. This date similarly allows State Forests enough time to accurately assess all applications and provide prompt recommendations to ensure only a minimal delay in providing funding for deserving applicants.
              (5) Not applicable—see answer (4).
              (6) This is the first year of operation.
              (7) Not applicable—see answer (6).
              (8) Not applicable—see answer (6).

          10 MARCH 1994

          (Paper No. 6)

          *560 CO-OPERATIVES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) How many co-operatives were established with financial assistance from the State Government during:
                (a) 1992?
                (b) 1993?
              (2) What are the names and locations of these co-operatives?
              (3) How much money was involved by way of financial assistance?
              (4) Are any requests for assistance outstanding?
              Answer—
              (1) (a) During calendar year 1992, seven co-operatives were established with financial assistance from the Co-operatives Development Fund.
              (b) During calendar year 1993, five co-operatives were established with financial assistance from the Co-operatives Development Fund.
              (2) (a) 1992:
                  (i) Coonamble Wool Processing Co-operative Ltd
          (Coonamble 2829)
                (ii) Tweed Valley Rural and Community Advancement Co-operative Ltd
          (Breg Valley 2484)
          (iii) The Yeoval Community Hospital Co-operative Ltd
          (Yeoval 2868)

          Page 707
          (iv) Mount Druitt Food Co-operative Ltd
          (Emerton 2770)
          (v) Shepherds Producers Co-operative Ltd
          (Wagga Wagga 2650)
          (vi) Australian Pulse Co-operative Ltd
          (Parkes 2870)
          (vii) Murray Grey Beef Marketing Co-operative Ltd
          (Dubbo 2830)
          (b) 1993:
          (i) Mudgee Woolgrower's Manufacturing Co-operative Ltd
          (Mudgee 2850)
          (ii) New England Wool Marketing and Promotion Co-operative Ltd
          (Armidale 2350)
          (iii) Ausgro Co-operative Ltd
          (Mudgee 2850)
          (iv) Coonamble Feedlot and Beef Marketing Co-operative
          (Coonamble 2829)
          (v) Australian White Cypress Sawmillers Co-operative Ltd
          (Windsor 2756)
          (3) (a) 1992 $206,653
              (b) 1993 $240,650
              (4) Yes. A request for funding ($5,000) was received from the proposed Gloucester Fisheries Co-operatives on 17 March 1994. The application is being processed.

          *561 BLACKTOWN POLICE STATION—BREAK, ENTER AND STEAL CASES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many reports of "break, enter and steal" were made at the Blacktown Police Station for the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
              (2) How many persons were charged with "break, enter and steal" at the Blacktown Police Station for the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
              Answer—
              (1) (a) 1,581.
                (b) 1,393.
                (c) 1,411.
                (d) 1,045.
              (2) (a) 83.
                (b) 60.
                (c) 79.
                (d) 39.

          Page 708

          *565 POLICE—HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS TRAINING—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) What initial and ongoing training is given to NSW Police in the identification of, and appropriate response to, hazardous chemicals warning signs?
              (2) What steps are taken to ensure compliance with the instructions issued to police in this regard?
              Answer—
              (1) Student police officers undertaking the Police Recruit Education Program (PREP), receive instruction in the identification of hazardous chemical warning signs during Phase III of the training program. This instruction includes the correct use of the NSW Police Service HAZCHEM card which is retained on personal issue to each recruit.
              This training, and the appropriate response to hazardous chemical situations, is tested by participation in a major case study relating to a serious accident involving a vehicle carrying a dangerous load (LPG cylinders) and a loaded minibus.
              A comprehensive debrief of this exercise includes viewing a film on disaster psychology and a simulation during which students re-enact their intervention in the case of the minibus and semi-trailer.
              Assessment prior to attestation as probationary constables and confirmation as constables includes testing on the correct response to incidents involving hazardous chemicals/dangerous goods.
              In-service training in the identification of hazardous chemicals and the appropriate response to incidents involving chemicals or dangerous goods are provided to a number of specialist groups within the Police Service.
              Training for police involved in traffic management and operations is assisted by officers of the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) which supplies educational material for distribution to students.
              Training for Highway Patrol officers includes instruction on the identification of hazardous chemicals and response procedures and the personal issue of the NSW Police Service Hazchem card.
              Patrol Traffic Services officers receive instruction from officers of the Environmental Protection Agency and undertake a site inspection of a fuel storage depot as part of this course.
              The training of traffic police at local level is also supplemented by the involvement of EPA officers in the delivery of Heavy Vehicle Seminars which are conducted by trained police at District locations.
              The Police Service also conducts two in-service courses specifically dealing with Emergency Management.
              The Emergency Management Course is of 5 days duration, conducted on a field-based format and concentrates on meeting the needs of operational constables, supervisors and managers in emergency situations, including the identification of hazardous chemical warning signs and appropriate responses to incidents involving hazardous chemicals.


          Page 709
              The Senior Emergency Management Course is a residential course conducted at the Police Academy, designed to meet the needs of local and District Emergency Operations Controllers. This course involves an examination and discussion of the HAZMAT PLAN—a sub-plan of the NSW State Disaster Plan (DISPLAN) and other issues related to hazardous chemical identification and management.
              Additional ongoing training and reference material is provided to serving police officers through the publication and distribution of educational material throughout the Service. Two existing on-the-job training packages on dealing with dangerous chemicals have been supplemented by instructional material on natural gas emergency procedures published in the Policing Issues and Practice Journal (January 1993 Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 35-40) which was provided to each sworn officer in the State.
              (2) The efforts of the Police Service are directed to the prevention of incidents involving hazardous chemicals in collaboration with other emergency service agencies.
              Local Commanders are assisted in this regard by the completion of a threat assessment for each Patrol and the development of on-the-job training plans identified as a result of this assessment.
              Should an emergency situation arise, the responsibilities of police are clearly outlined under the State Rescue and Emergency Management Act 1989 which nominates the senior member of the Police Service present at an emergency operation to control and co-ordinate activities of all responding agencies.
              The training programs, previously described, are designed to provide police officers with the skills and knowledge to properly fulfil this legislative requirement.
              As the majority of emergency situations are responded to by a number of agencies, a debrief and analysis of the incident is generally conducted as a matter of course. Any deficiencies in the response which is identified through this process is addressed through a review of the administrative, operational or training strategies involved.

          *571 JOHN DAVID—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              (1) When was inmate John David transferred from John Morony Correctional Centre to Cessnock Correctional Centre?
              (2) Why was he transferred?
              (3) (a) In view of the ill-health of his wife, will consideration be given to transferring him back to John Morony Correctional Centre?
                (b) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              I am advised by the Attorney General and Minister for Justice that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
              (1) 24 February 1994.
              (2) The John Morony Correctional Centre is a working institution with a strictly limited number of places available for inmates participating in full-time education courses. Due to Mr David's ill health and inability to work, and as there were no vacancies in the education section, he was transferred from the John Morony Correctional Centre.

          Page 710
              (3) (a) and (b) No. Unfortunately there are many inmates with similar family situations as Mr David, who wish to be placed in a metropolitan correctional centre. Whilst the Department of Corrective Services attempts to place inmates at correctional centres in close proximity to their families, this is not always possible due to an inmate's security classification or there being no vacancy of accommodation at a particular security level.
                  As a result of the representations from Mr David's family, it was decided that Cessnock Correctional Centre was the most appropriate centre for Mr David at the present time. Consideration will be given to transferring Mr David to a metropolitan correctional centre at his next classification and placement review in June 1994.

          *572 CHARLESTOWN AND BELMONT POLICE PATROLS—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Are any administrative changes contemplated to be made to Charlestown and Belmont Police Patrols?
              (2) Are any manning change proposals being contemplated to Charlestown and Belmont Police Patrols?
              (3) If so, will the members for Charlestown and Swansea be consulted before any proposals or changes are made?
              Answer—
              (1) Not at this stage.
              (2) Not at this stage.
              (3) In the event that any changes are planned, the members for Charlestown and Swansea will be consulted.

          *574 POLICE SERVICE REVIEW—Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) During the past 2 years, how many police patrols have been reviewed by the NSW Police Establishment Control Branch?
              (2) Will he identify each patrol referred to, and of each patrol, advise:
                (a) How many under authorised strength?
                (b) Over authorised strength?
                (c) Recommendations for increase in staff?
                (d) Recommendations for relocation of over strength staff?
                (e) How many police patrols (beyond the reviews of the patrols referred to above by the Police Establishment Control Branch) are currently overstrength/understrength?
              (3) What is the current strength of the NSW Police Service (excluding the Public Service component)?
              (4) What percentage of the NSW Police Service is:
                (a) On restricted duties?
                (b) On long-term hurt on duty leave?
                (c) On long term sick leave?
                (d) Performing non-operational duties (i.e., administrative functions)?
              (5) How does the analysis of the information in question (4) compare with the same period in 1991/92?
              (6) How many applications were received in 1993/94 by the Service from police seeking medical exit from the Service?

          Page 711
              (7) How many applications referred to above were received from police including and below the rank of Senior Sergeant?
              (8) How many were received from police above the rank of Senior Sergeant?
              (9) Of the applications within question (7) above, how many were:
                (a) Rejected by the Service?
                (b) Accepted on first application by the Service?
                (c) How many appealed to the Government and Related Appeal Tribunal on the basis of rejection by the Service during 1993 and 1994 (to date)?
              (10) Will he provide similar data referred to in question (9) for those police referred to in question (8)?
              (11) In the case of those applications that were accepted on first application by the Service, will he nominate the rank the applicant held at the time of the application?
              (12) For those whose application was accepted upon first application, what was the time period between lodgement of application and approval, in each case?
              (13) Will he review the workload of the Nowra Crime Scene Police, versus similar statistical data recently released concerning Queanbeyan and Goulburn, and determine the need for additional Crime Scene Police and a Fingerprint Police officer for Nowra?
              (14) What are the names of the extra police officers that brought Nowra Patrol up to authorised strength of 60, referred to in his ministerial advice dated 25 February 1994 (RML 26639)?
              Answer—
              (1) to (14) The information requested would take considerable time and resources to collate and is not warranted in view of the other priorities of the Police Service.

          *585 ETHNIC FUNDING—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice—
              (1) What financial assistance has the Minister's department provided to ethnic community groups in the electorate of The Entrance?
              (2) What are the names of these organisations?
              (3) How much money was provided?
              (4) How much of these funds came from Federal sources?
              Answer—
              In the current financial year, one application for financial assistance has been received from an ethnic community group in the electorate of The Entrance. On the recommendation of the Ethnic Affairs Commission of NSW, I have approved a grant of $14,000 for the 1994 calendar year under the EAC's Community Advancement Program to the Wyoming Community Centre Inc. of 147 Maiden's Brush Road, Wyoming.
              The grant is to assist the Centre to provide information to people of non-English speaking background in the Central Coast area and to encourage them to access mainstream services and become part of community support and social groups.
              The Community Advancement Program is funded entirely by the NSW Government; no Federal money is involved.
              Details of grants to ethnic community organisations in The Entrance electorate which were made prior to the 1993/94 financial year can be found in the annual reports of the Ethnic Affairs Commission, which have been tabled in Parliament at the conclusion of each financial year.

          Page 712

          *605 PORT KEMBLA POLICE STATION FLOODING—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) As a result of the storms on Sunday 6 March and Monday 7 March 1994, how many ceiling leaks were identified at Port Kembla Police Station?
              (2) What was the extent of those leaks?
              (3) Did police officers wear raincoats inside the station?
              (4) (a) Was there water in the offices of the police station?
                (b) If so, to what depth?
              (5) Were court exhibits damaged?
              (6) Were the toilets flooded?
              (7) Was there sandbagging by emergency services personnel outside the station to divert water?
              Answer—
              (1) 27.
              (2) The ceiling leaks were confined to the hallway, toilet and meal room areas.
              (3) No.
              (4) (a) No.
              (4) (b) Not applicable.
              (5) No.
              (6) Yes.
              (7) The State Emergency Services were called to sandbag an area in the rear yard of the station to stop stormwater entering the exhibit room.

          15 MARCH 1994

          (Paper No. 7)

          *613 CIBA-GEIGY SPILL—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) Did Ciba-Geigy Australia Ltd at Pendle Hill have a spill of a toxic chemical, Nucidol 200EC, over the weekend of 12 and 13 March 1994?
              (2) Did local residents complain about the odour coming from the site over the weekend?
              (3) What response did the EPA give to residents' complaints?
              (4) Will the EPA prosecute Ciba-Geigy for the spill?
              (5) If not, why not?
              Answer—
              (1) Ciba-Geigy Australia Ltd advised the EPA that, at some time over the weekend of 12 and 13 March 1994, a spill of dog wash formulation called Nucidol 200EC occurred inside a building on the premises.
              (2) A total of five complaints were received through the EPA pollution line from 11.05 a.m. on Monday 14 March 1994.
              (3) An EPA officer inspected the premises on the morning of Monday 14 March. All complainants were contacted over the period Monday 14 March to Wednesday 16 March. Complainants were told that a dog wash formulation had been spilt and that the EPA is conducting an investigation into the incident.

          Page 713
              (4) An investigation is under way and a decision regarding prosecution will be made when the investigation is completed.
              (5) See answer (4) above.

          *631 KURRI KURRI POLICE PATROL—Mr Price asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) What is the police patrol strength in the Kurri Kurri area between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.?
              (2) What is the average response time for calls during these night hours to places within the patrol area such as Heddon Greta?
              (3) What are the present station hours of the Kurri Kurri Police Station?
              (4) When will Kurri Kurri Police Station be available, fully manned, on a 24-hour, 7-day week, basis?
              Answer—
              (1) Two police vehicles, each containing two police officers, patrol the Kurri Kurri Sector on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.
              Three police are rostered nightly at Cessnock, two patrolling in a police vehicle and one remaining in the Station. On Friday nights, there is an additional police vehicle on patrol with two police officers.
              In addition, Highway Patrol Police are rostered on late shift from 6 p.m. to 2.30 a.m. on a regular basis, particularly on Friday and Saturday nights.
              (2) Five minutes on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. On other nights, response time from Cessnock is approximately 20 minutes.
              (3) 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily, with a mobile unit operating between 11 p.m. to 7.30 a.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.
              (4) There are no plans for Kurri Kurri Police Station to be operated on a 24-hour basis.

          *635 LIDDELL STATE COAL MINE—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) What were the estimated coal reserves of Liddell State Mine when it was sold by Pacific Power?
              (2) Is he aware of recent reports in which Mrs Helen Dalton, one of the joint owners of what is now Cumnock No. 1 Colliery, stated that "in 2 years a mine that was going to die has become one with a 40-year lifespan"?
              (3) What is his response to this statement?
              (4) Has the State disposed of a mine which might have retuned good dividends to the State?
              Answer—
              (1) Estimated coal reserves of Liddell State Coal Mine which were sold by Pacific Power were 55.6 million tonnes recoverable. These reserves were part only of the colliery holding.
              (2) No.
              (3) This is a matter of conjecture and may be Mrs Dalton's view.
              (4) The mine was sold for a value within the range established by independent consultants and the sales process was reviewed by the Parliamentary Select Committee.


          Page 714
          *636 POWER FAILURES—SYDNEY ELECTRICITY—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) What was the cause of a power failure which blacked out more than 15,000 homes and businesses for 35 minutes in inner Sydney on 31 January 1994?
              (2) How many blackouts, due to equipment or line failure, have occurred in Sydney Electricity facilities over the past 12 months?
              (3) Is this an increase for similar failures over past years?
              (4) Are records compiled and kept as to the reason for these faults?
              (5) In summary, what are the reasons for the power failures and faults as referred to in (2) above?
              (6) How many of these failures are due to Sydney Electricity pursuing a policy of risk management and the reduction of maintenance procedures and staff?
              Answer—
              (1) An 11,000 volt underground cable in New South Head Road, Bellevue Hill, failed in service interrupting approximately 15,000 Sydney Electricity customers. The cable was installed in 1973.
              Investigations carried out on the cable revealed that the failure was due to galvanic corrosion.
              Supply was restored to customers in 35 minutes, which is well below the targeted average of 70 minutes.
              Customers affected on 31 January 1994, last experienced an interruption to electricity supply in 1988. The Sydney Electricity published service target for reliability of supply is an average loss of supply time of less than 100 minutes per customer per year.
              (2) The number of interruptions due to equipment/line failure:
                  1 July 1993 to 28 February 1994 1,501 (includes New South Wales bushfires)
                  1 July 1992 to 30 June 1993 1,827
                  1 July 1991 to 30 June 1992 1,988
                  1 July 1990 to 30 June 1991 2,499
              There is a significant downward trend in the number of interruptions, as a result of high voltage undergrounding policy, the introduction of advanced overhead construction technology (e.g., aerial bundled conductor, enclosed pole mounted switches and fault indicators) and an extensive tree trimming policy.
              (3) No. The reliability index which is the minutes per year per customer interruption time has steadily decreased. The reliability index for 1992/93 was 81 minutes and for the previous period 1991/92 was 86 minutes.
              This can be attributed to the planning, construction and maintenance of Sydney Electricity's network. In addition, the automated Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system provides sophisticated monitoring and remote switching capability of the network.
              (4) Sydney Electricity has a computerised faults, outages and defectives system for recording the details and causes of all interruptions and unusual occurrences that affect the supply system. These records are entered daily.
              These records ensure corrective action is carried out and re-occurring incidents identified.
              (5) Interruption classifications indicate that equipment failure accounts for approximately 20 per cent of all interruptions. The major cause of interruptions being the impact of weather on the network.

          Page 715
              Equipment failures can be further identified as follows:
                Overhead construction .2 per unit of the total equipment failures
                Underground construction .25 per unit of the total equipment failures
                Switchgear .5 per unit of the total equipment failures
                Transformers .02 per unit of the total equipment failures
                Protection Equipment .02 per unit of the total equipment failures
                Miscellaneous .01 per unit of the total equipment failures
              Statistics indicate that these figures have been similar over recent reporting periods, i.e., 18 per cent for 1 July 1992 to 30 June 1993 and 21 per cent 1 July 1993 to 28 February 1994. The latter period includes the January 1994 New South Wales bushfires.
              (6) Of the 1,501 failures (1 July 1993 to 28 February 1994), 316 were due to equipment failures. These failures were spread across a network which consists of 33,168 km of mains and 14,123 substations.
              These statistics show the reliability of Sydney Electricity's equipment and plant have improved although the network complexity has increased.

          16 MARCH 1994

          (Paper No. 8)

          *644 KANGAROO MEAT SALES—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) Have sales of kangaroo meat to consumers fallen below industry and Government expectations?
              (2) If so, why?
              (3) What is the average price of a kilo of kangaroo meat compared to beef?
              (4) What subsidies, if any, does the kangaroo meat industry receive?
              Answer—
              (1) Kangaroo meat first became available for human consumption in New South Wales in June of 1993. After its introduction, there was a steady increase in demand until the Christmas/New Year period when it suffered from competition with traditional foods such as pork and poultry.
              Since February, the demand has again been steadily improving to the pre-Christmas level.
              There has been a significant increase in the demand for kangaroo meat on the export market. This has been attributed by industry to the acceptance of the product on the domestic market for human consumption.
              (2) See above.
              (3) It is difficult to compare the price per kilo between beef and kangaroo. Obviously with beef there is a greater range of cuts and prices can range from $7 for rump steak to $17 for fillet.
              With kangaroo the demand at the present is mainly for fillets and rumps and these average about $13 per kilo.
              (4) The kangaroo industry receives no subsidies whatsoever. The only company in New South Wales processing kangaroo for human consumption, Southern Game Meats, has been extensively involved in promotion of the product entirely at its own expense.


          Page 716
          17 MARCH 1994

          (Paper No. 9)

          *689 TRAFFIC FLOW PLANS—F3 FREEWAY—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Do the NSW Police and Emergency Services have management plans to minimise the impact on traffic flows resulting from accidents or emergencies that partially block or otherwise impede traffic flows on the F3 Freeway between Berowra and Wyong?
              (2) If so, what are the plans?
              (3) If not, will he request the respective services to examine such plans?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) Diversion of traffic via alternative routes, off-ramps and turnarounds, to provide an effective and free flow of traffic movement from the closed area of the freeway.
              The plans permit unrestricted movement of emergency vehicles to the affected closure area, and are regularly updated. The District Emergency Management Officer, Newcastle, is advised of any changes.
              (3) Not applicable.

          *692 CORRIMAL POLICE STATION—BREAK, ENTER AND STEAL CASES—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) How many reports of break, enter and steal were made at the Corrimal Police Station in:
                (a) 1991?
                (b) 1992?
                (c) 1993?
                (d) So far in 1994?
              (2) How many persons were charged with break, enter and steal at the Corrimal Police Station in:
                (a) 1991?
                (b) 1992?
                (c) 1993?
                (d) So far in 1994?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2)
        YearBreak, Enter and Steal
        offences reported
        Persons charged
        199188163
        199284466
        19931,04866
        As at 22 March 1994773

          Page 717
          *715 WOLLONGONG FIRE BRIGADE—RESCUE ACCREDITATION—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Has he been requested to meet with a deputation from the NSW Fire Brigade Union to discuss the issue of primary rescue accreditation of the Wollongong Fire Brigade?
              (2) If so, when will he meet with this deputation?
              (3) If he does not intend to meet such a deputation, why has he taken this decision?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) I don't intend to meet with the NSW Fire Brigade Employees' Union on this issue.
              (3) I have accepted the advice of the State Rescue and Emergency Services Board that the rescue needs of the Illawarra area are adequately serviced by the existing arrangements whereby the Police Rescue Squad and Ambulance Service in Wollongong are accredited as the primary rescue units and the Wollongong Fire Station as the secondary unit.
              In addition, I have also accepted the Board's recommendation that a number of items of rescue equipment which had been removed from Wollongong Fire Station be returned. Those items are now in place at the Station.

          *716 SRESB COMMITTEE—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) When assessing recommendations from the SRESB, does he attempt to gauge the degree of balance and appropriateness of such recommendations?
              (2) Will he confirm that when the SRESB was reviewing the rescue accreditation for the Illawarra:
                (a) Some members of the SRESB Committee were refused permission to vote on matters relating to the rescue accreditation in the Illawarra?
                (b) That this was the Chairman's ruling?
              (3) Why did the Chairman make this ruling when the SRESB was reviewing the rescue accreditation in the Illawarra?
              (4) On how many occasions has the Chairman given a ruling that some members of the SRESB are not to be permitted to vote on matters relating to rescue accreditation?
              Answer—
              (1) Yes.
              (2) (a) No members of the SRESB were refused permission to vote on matters relating to the rescue accreditation in the Illawarra area.
                (b) Not applicable.
              (3) Not applicable.
              (4) None.


          Page 718
          12 APRIL 1994

          (Paper No. 10)

          740 BUILDING SERVICES CORPORATION INSURANCE—Mr Amery to ask the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads and Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport—
              (1) What is the total amount collected by the Building Services Corporation by way of all insurance premiums during the years:
                (a) 1991?
                (b) 1992?
                (c) 1993?
              (2) What is the total amount paid out to building consumers as a result of claims lodged during the years:
                (a) 1991?
                (b) 1992?
                (c) 1993?

          741 HOUSEHOLD FINANCIAL SERVICES—Mr Amery to ask the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads and Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport—
              (1) Is she aware of pamphlets being distributed in various areas of the State by an organisation called Household Financial Services?
              (2) Has any investigation been carried out into the operations of this company which offers a personal line of credit up to $10,000 for which applications can be submitted without any interest rate being quoted?
              (3) Will the Department of Consumer Affairs be taking any action against this company?

          742 MRS DOROTHY SPENCE—Mr Beckroge to ask the Minister for Health—
              Will the Government investigate the circumstances surrounding the unsuccessful application of Mrs Dorothy Spence for the position of Health Services Manager, Level 2, at the Cobar District Hospital?

          743 BROKEN HILL MINES REHABILITATION—Mr Beckroge to ask the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) Will the Minerals, Mining & Metallurgy mining company relinquish its leases in Broken Hill in June or later this year?
              (2) If so, what rehabilitation of the area will be required?

          744 BOMBO QUARRY BALLAST—Mr Clough to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is ballast from the railway quarry at Bombo being transported to Lithgow by road?
              (2) How many truck movements per day does this represent?
              (3) Why isn't the SRA using its own trains to transport the ballast?


          Page 719
          745 MAYOR OF BATHURST—Mr Clough to ask the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Did Bathurst police receive a complaint that a shot or shots had been fired near the home of the mayor of Bathurst?
              (2) Was the complaint investigated?
              (3) What was the result of the investigation?
              (4) Have all possible steps been taken to safeguard the mayor and her family?

          746 BANKSTOWN-CITY 7.50 A.M. SERVICE—Mr Davoren to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is the 7.50 a.m. CityRail service to the City from Bankstown a four-car Tangara?
              (2) Will he direct the SRA to ensure that this service is always an eight-car train?

          747 ORIGINAL FILE—SOUTH STEYNE INCIDENT—Mr Face to ask the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Where is the original signed brief located concerning the incident at the South Steyne restaurant on 13 November 1993?
              (2) (a) If there is no original, are there only copies in existence now?
                (b) How many copies are there?
                (c) (i) Where are they located and in whose possession are they?
                  (ii) If police, what is the name and rank of the police officer?
                (d) If a public servant, their name?
              (3) (a) Is there a schedule of the document?
                (b) If so:
                  (i) Where is the schedule located?
                  (ii) Who are the police or public servants who have been in possession of the document since the events of 13 November 1993?
              (4) (a) If the brief has been destroyed or lost, when did such loss or destruction take place?
                (b) Was it prior to the destroying and culling process undertaken prior to the audit when Superintendent Cleary was transferred?
                (c) Was it during that period?
                (d) Has it been since that period?
              (5) Whose responsibility has it been for such original signed document since the period of 13 November 1993, name and location of duty?
              (6) (a) Have any requests or demands been made at any time since 13 November 1993 for the original signed brief, document or its schedule?
                (b) If so:
                  (i) What is the name, rank and location of duty of any police officer?
                  (ii) Any other person, public servant or otherwise?
              (7) If the original signed brief/document is misplaced, lost or destroyed, would its non-availability enable a conviction to be proceeded with before the courts against any person concerning the circumstances of the South Steyne incident on 13 November 1993?
              (8) Will an urgent and extensive inquiry be held into the location of this document?


          Page 720
          748 "OPERATION CHOCKE" HELD BY HUNTER POLICE—Mr Face to ask the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Was an operation conducted called "Operation Chocke" in the Hunter Region as a consequence of the 1989 earthquake?
              (2) What was the purpose of such operation?
              (3) At whose request was it set up?
              (4) What was the starting date of "Operation Chocke" and its completion date or disbandment?
              (5) What were the guidelines for "Operation Chocke"?
              (6) What was the total cost to the Police Service of "Operation Chocke"?
              (7) Were there any costs attributed to any body or agency other than the Police Service?
              (8) What was the total personnel attached to "Operation Chocke"?
              (9) Where were the personnel located throughout the duration of "Operation Chocke"?
              (10) What were the names, rank and location of duty of those police involved in "Operation Chocke"?
              (11) What length of time was each of these personnel involved in "Operation Chocke"?
              (12) Where are each of the police personnel now located since the disbandment of "Operation Chocke"?
              (13) Has any person who was involved in "Operation Chocke" left the NSW Police Service by resignation or dismissal?
              (14) What is the name of any person who has resigned or been dismissed since "Operation Chocke"?
              (15) If it is not of a private or confidential nature, where are they employed, if known, since leaving the Police Service?
              (16) Did two of the personnel involved in "Operation Chop" remove from the Newcastle Building Centre at Broadmeadow a well-known and respected architect in the Newcastle area during a prominent seminar involving the earthquake?
              (17) If so:
                (a) What was the purpose of his removal?
                (b) Why was it chosen to do it in that way?
                (c) Is he a well-known person residing in the area and would not have been difficult to locate?
                (d) Who were the two police officers involved in such removal, their names and location of duty?
                (e) Are the police personnel involved still members of the Police Service?
                (f) Was any apology tendered to the architect and the organisers of the gathering?

          749 AUTOMATIC TURNSTILES—Mr Langton to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is he aware that the automatic turnstiles on railway stations register bags and luggage as a person passing through the gates?
              (2) Is he aware that in cases were people put their bags through the gates before themselves, the automatic gates in the turnstiles closed on the person?
              (3) What action will be taken to prevent this occurrence?


          Page 721
          750 ROADWORKS POLICY—NORTHERN REGION—Mr Langton to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is it Roads and Traffic Authority policy in the Northern Region to contract out all road construction services presently performed by RTA staff?
              (2) Has the RTA Grafton zone office announced that all future surveys for roadworks in the area will be put out to private contract?
              (3) Have RTA staff been barred from tendering for this work?
              (4) If so, why?
              (5) Have RTA staff been told to look for RTA jobs in other areas?
              (6) Why were staff not consulted on this decision?

          751 RTA-CONTRACTED OWNER/DRIVERS—ELECTORATE OF BARWON—Mr Langton to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is the Minister aware of the case of 15 RTA-contracted owner/drivers in the electorate of Barwon who have been told they have been placed on a standby list for 2 years, as the haulage work they used to do has been given to another company?
              (2) Does the company which won the contract against the local haulage co-operative register their trucks in Queensland?
              (3) Were the Barwon owner/drivers specifically directed by the RTA to use rigid body tippers that would cart between 5 and 11 cubic metres of material?
              (4) Has the contract now been awarded to a haulage company whose trucks do not meet these criteria?
              (5) Why were the Barwon RTA-contracted drivers given a directive which subsequently precluded them from effectively competing for roadworks in the electorate?
              (6) Does the RTA pay the Barwon contractors holiday pay, public holidays and long service leave?
              (7) If so, why doesn't the RTA recognise them as employees?
              (8) Is he aware that many of the Barwon contractors have had to seek assistance from the Commonwealth Employment Service?
              (9) When told by the CES that they needed a clearance from the RTA stating they were no longer receiving payments from the RTA, did the RTA refuse to issue Barwon contractors with a termination clearance claiming the drivers were still on a 2-year standby?
              (10) What action will he take to assist these people?

          752 HOUSING DEPARTMENT CENTRAL COAST OFFICES—TENANTS RENTAL PAYMENTS—Mr McBride to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              With respect to the Gosford and Wyong offices of the Department of Housing—
              (1) Will the offices be subject to departmental changes which will require rent to be paid direct from the bank accounts of tenants if they so approve or at Australia Post offices?
              (2) Will tenants be able to pay rent at the respective offices?
              (3) If not, why not?


          Page 722
          753 HOUSING DEPARTMENT CENTRAL COAST OFFICES—Mr McBride to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              With respect to the Gosford and Wyong offices of the Department of Housing—
              (1) (a) Has the Department considered any proposals to reduce the administrative responsibilities of the above offices?
                (b) If so, to what extent?
              (2) Do these proposals include transferring the administration of allocation of housing accommodation to departmental offices at Maitland?
              (3) Do these proposals include transferring the processing of applications for tenancy to departmental offices at Maitland?
              (4) Should these proposals proceed, would people currently applying for tenancy through the above offices be included on waiting lists currently administered by the Maitland office?
              (5) Will he guarantee that these proposals will not proceed?
              (6) If not, why not?

          754 GORDON TOWNSEND HOME CARE APPLICATION—Mr McBride to ask the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for the Ageing—
              With respect to the application for assistance from the Home Care Service of Mr Gordon Townsend of 16 Waterview Street, Long Jetty—
              (1) Did the Wyong Shire Branch Manger, Mr Kevin Fiddock, state in a letter dated 22 September 1993, to Mr Townsend that "we recognise your need for service and understand that your request for help with your housework is not unreasonable"?
              (2) Did Mr Fiddock also state in that said letter that "Home Care does not have sufficient financial resources to provide services to all those who require it"?
              (3) Will he act immediately to ensure that Home Care's Wyong Shire branch is allocated with sufficient funds to provide Mr Townsend with his recognised need for service?
              (4) If not, why not?

          755 RAIL CONCESSION TICKET SALES—Mr McManus to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) On average, how many rail concession tickets are being sold per week in Sydney following the introduction of automatic fare collection?
              (2) Prior to the introduction of automatic ticket machines, on average, how many concession tickets were sold per week?

          756 SCONE FIRE DAMAGE—Mr McManus to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Is he aware of correspondence from Mr Stuart Carter of Scone, concerning a fire on SRA land which caused damage to Mr Carter's property?
              (2) What action will he take to ensure that Mr Carter is adequately compensated?
              (3) What action will the SRA take to ensure this type of situation does not occur again?


          Page 723
          757 SRA TRACKWORK—COMMUTER ARRANGEMENTS—Mr McManus to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) When trackwork is being carried out on metropolitan lines, what steps are taken to ensure the smooth transition of commuters on to buses?
              (2) Is he aware that on the Illawarra line on 12 January 1994, CityRail staff at Town Hall and Central Railway Stations were unable to advise commuters of the quickest way to reach Hurstville (indicator boards and staff giving conflicting advice, notices not placed, etc.)?
              (3) Given that such work is planned, why is it not possible to better inform commuters of the alternative arrangements?
              (4) Who is responsible for co-ordinating commuters on these days?

          758 DEEP OCEAN OUTFALL MONITORING PROGRAM—Mr Martin to ask the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
              (1) Was the Deep Ocean Outfall Monitoring (DOOM) program of the NSW Fisheries Research Institute (FRI) funded by New South Wales taxpayers through the Water Board and the Environment Protection Authority?
              (2) Was the DOOM program to continue for 10 years?
              (3) Was the program to include monitoring of the abundance of fish species before the operation of the ocean outfalls and after the deepwater outfalls had commenced discharging into the ocean environment?
              (4) Has the Environment Protection Authority announced that the program will be cut short by half?
              (5) If so, why?
              (6) Have results to date shown the deepwater ocean outfalls have created a detrimental impact on the abundance and distribution of fish species?
              (7) Have the study methods been shown to be inappropriate and unable to detect differences?
              (8) What was the total allocation of funds to the DOOM program?
              (9) How much of this amount was spent supporting administrative costs of the FRI?
              (10) Why has funding been stopped?
              (11) (a) Has the principal investigator been transferred?
                (b) If so, why?

          759 ENDANGERED SPECIES LEGISLATION—Mr Martin to ask the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) When did he or the Department seek public comment in respect of proposed endangered species legislation?
              (2) Was a joint submission prepared by Ocean Watch and the Commercial Fishing Advisory Council (CFAC)?
              (3) Did Messrs Vince McDonall and Duncan Leadbitter attend an inquiry on the matter?
              (4) What was the essence of the fishing industry submission?
              (5) Has he recently released a draft bill that indicates the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) will be the agency responsible for fish listed as endangered, rare, vulnerable or insufficiently known?
              (6) Is this in accordance with the submission by the fishing industry?
              (7) If not, why?

          Page 724
              (8) Which authority does the Government consider has the greater scientific expertise in respect of fish species and habitat, NPWS or NSW Fisheries?
              (9) Has the Minister for Fisheries had any input in the formulation of this bill?
              (10) If so, which authority did the Minister for Fisheries consider should be the agency in respect of fish listed as endangered, rare, vulnerable or insufficiently known?
              (11) Are submission from the public and interested organisation currently being sought?
              (12) When was the proposed bill presented to Cabinet and when did it receive Cabinet's approval?

          760 DIRTY WATER TESTING—Mr Markham to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) When the Water Board receives a complaint from a householder about dirty water, are tests carried out in every case to:
                (a) Determine whether water is safe to drink?
                (b) Measure water colour?
                (c) Measure turbidity?
                (d) Determine whether tap water meets the National Health and Medical Research Council and Australian Water Resources Council guidelines?
              (2) If so:
                (a) What tests are carried out?
                (b) How are these tests implemented?
                (c) Are householders advised of results of these tests?
              (3) If not, why not?

          761 ILLAWARRA BEACH WATER QUALITY MONITORING—Mr Markham to ask the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) What tests are carried out by the Environment Protection Authority at Bellambi Beach, Corrimal Beach, Towradgi Beach, Fairy Meadow Beach and North Wollongong Beach to determine possible levels of E.coli and faecal coliforms present in the water?
              (2) How often were these tests carried out in:
                (a) 1992?
                (b) 1993?
                (c) So far in 1994?
              (3) What were the results of these tests in:
                (a) 1992?
                (b) 1993?
                (c) To date?
              (4) Are these tests carried out at Bellambi Creek and Lagoon, Fairy Creek and Towradgi Creek, to measure possible levels of E.coli and faecal coliforms?
              (5) If so, how often were these tests carried out in:
                (a) 1992?
                (b) 1993?
                (c) To date?
              (6) If not, why not?


          Page 725
          762 JUNEE PRIVATE PRISON—Mr Markham to ask the Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice—
              (1) How many prisoner inmates are there at Junee Private Prison?
              (2) What prisoner classifications are incarcerated at Junee Private Prison?
              (3) How many Aboriginal prisoners are incarcerated at Junee Private Prison?
              (4) From what areas of New South Wales do these Aboriginal prisoners come from?
              (5) What criteria are used for Aboriginal prisoners to be incarcerated in Junee Private Prison?
              (6) If there are Aboriginal prisoners incarcerated in Junee Private Prison who come from other areas of New South Wales where prisons are located, why are they not placed in these prisons in line with recommendations of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody?
              (7) What provisions are made and assistance given to families and friends of Aboriginal prisoners to visit and stay overnight in Junee?
              (8) What are the sentencing terms for Aboriginal prisoners in Junee Private Prison?
              (9) How many prison officers are employed at Junee Private Prison?
              (10) How many shifts are worked by prison officers employed at Junee Private Prison?
              (11) How many prison officers are employed on each shift at Junee Private Prison?

          763 SCHOOL CROSSING SUPERVISORS—Mr Mills to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) How many volunteer (unpaid) civilian school crossing supervisors are engaged in each of the RTA regions across New South Wales?
              (2) What are the guidelines covering their engagement?
              (3) How many sponsored civilian school crossing supervisors are engaged in each of the RTA regions across New South Wales?
              (4) What are the guidelines covering their engagement?
              (5) Which companies or organisations sponsor civilian school crossing supervisors and how many each?

          764 YOUTH WEEK GRANTS—Mr Mills to ask the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
              (1) What grants were made to which organisations, for how much, and for what purpose, by the NSW Office of Youth Affairs in connection with Youth Week 1994?
              (2) What grants were made by the NSW Office of Youth Affairs, to which organisations or persons, for how much in the budget year 1993/94, other than for activities connected with Youth Week 1994?

          765 CARDIFF AND LAMBTON POLICE STRENGTHS—Mr Mills to ask the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) At each of Lambton and Cardiff Police Stations, what are the:
                (a) Current staffing strengths?
                (b) Authorised staffing strengths?
              (2) What are the reasons for any shortfall in current staffing?
              (3) When will any shortfalls be addressed?

          Page 726

          766 PARRAMATTA RIVER—SWIMMING REPORT—Mr J. H. Murray to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Did Concord Council receive advice from the Water Board relating to appropriate swimming areas in the Parramatta River?
              (2) Was this advice provided to councillors at the council's meeting of 22 March 1994?
              (3) Can he make this report available to the Member for Drummoyne?
              (4) If not, why?

          767 CHEWING GUM—Mr J. H. Murray to ask the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
              (1) Is he aware that chewing gum deposited on upgraded footpath pavements in shopping centres is costing local government large sums of money to remove?
              (2) Is chewing gum banned from public school buildings?
              (3) Will he bring forward legislation banning the sale of chewing gum in New South Wales?

          768 TRAIN SERVICE SYNCHRONISATION—Mr Nagle to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
              (1) Why can't the train services between Martin Place be synchronised with the train services to Lidcombe, Auburn, Parramatta, Granville and Liverpool via Regents Park?
              (2) Similarly, can these abovementioned western suburbs stations be synchronised with Town Hall Station to Martin Place and to Bondi Junction?

          769 INDUSTRIAL INSPECTIONS—Mr Nagle to ask the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women—
              (1) Does she support the enforcement of industrial agreements and/or awards?
              (2) Does she support officers of the Department of Industrial Relations inspecting employment records?
              (3) Does she support union officials assisting departmental inspectors in inspecting employment records?

          770 SINGLETON POLICE PATROL—Mr Neilly to ask the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
              (1) Did the Regional Commander North Region, Staff Officer Personnel North Region, District Commander Maitland, and the Patrol Commander Singleton, meet with Singleton Council in March 1992 to discuss manning requirements for the Singleton Police Patrol?
              (2) As an outcome of the meeting referred to, was an undertaking provided to Singleton Council to conduct a survey of the policing needs of the Singleton Police Patrol?
              (3) Was such a survey undertaken, and when was it undertaken?
              (4) What were the policing needs of the Singleton Police Patrol indentified by the survey?
              (5) How did the outcome of the survey compare with the authorised and required strengths of the Singleton Police Patrol at that time?
              (6) When is the next evaluation of workload and staffing levels of the Singleton Police Patrol due to take place?


          Page 727
          771 MONEYS SPENT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SPORT, RECREATION AND RACING— ELECTORATE OF BLIGH—Mr Neilly to ask the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) What are the total amounts of Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Works moneys that have been made available to the electorate of Bligh in the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
                (e) To date in 1994?
              (2) Were there any special Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Grants made over and above the usual round of grants that are made each 12 months?
              (3) Were there any additional sporting grants made to the electorate?
              (4) (a) Were there any other grants or moneys, other than Gifted Sports Persons and those type of allocations, made to the electorate in those last 5 years?
                (b) If so, what was each specifically for?

          772 MONEYS SPENT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SPORT, RECREATION AND RACING— ELECTORATE OF BAULKHAM HILLS—Mr Price to ask the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) What are the total amounts of Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Works moneys that have been made available to the electorate of Baulkham Hills in the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
                (e) To date in 1994?
              (2) Were there any special Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Grants made over and above the usual round of grants that are made each 12 months?
              (3) Were there any additional sporting grants made to the electorate?
              (4) (a) Were there any other grants or moneys, other than Gifted Sports Persons and those type of allocations, made to the electorate in those last 5 years?
                (b) If so, what was each specifically for?

          773 MONEYS SPENT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SPORT, RECREATION AND RACING— ELECTORATE OF BEGA—Mr Price to ask the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) What are the total amounts of Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Works moneys that have been made available to the electorate of Bega in the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
                (e) To date in 1994?
              (2) Were there any special Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Grants made over and above the usual round of grants that are made each 12 months?
              (3) Were there any additional sporting grants made to the electorate?

          Page 728
              (4) (a) Were there any other grants or moneys, other than Gifted Sports Persons and those type of allocations, made to the electorate in those last 5 years?
                (b) If so, what was each specifically for?

          774 MONEYS SPENT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SPORT, RECREATION AND RACING— ELECTORATE OF BURRINJUCK—Mr Price to ask the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) What are the total amounts of Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Works moneys that have been made available to the electorate of Burrinjuck in the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
                (e) To date in 1994?
              (2) Were there any special Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Grants made over and above the usual round of grants that are made each 12 months?
              (3) Were there any additional sporting grants made to the electorate?
              (4) (a) Were there any other grants or moneys, other than Gifted Sports Persons and those type of allocations, made to the electorate in those last 5 years?
                (b) If so, what was each specifically for?

          775 HEPATITIS C PATIENTS—Dr Refshauge to ask the Minister for Health—
              (1) What programs will the State Government be initiating this year to respond to the present and imminent needs of Hepatitis C patients?
              (2) What public education programs are planned to alert GP's, specialists and the general public to the presence of Hepatitis C and to help sufferers find help?

          776 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH PAYOUTS—Dr Refshauge to ask the Minister for Health—
              (1) Over the last 5 years, how many Department of Health SES Officers leaving the Department have received payouts?
              (2) How long had they filled the position which they left?
              (3) What was the payout in each case?

          777 WOLLONGONG, PORT KEMBLA AND SHELL HARBOUR HOSPITAL BEDS—Mr Rumble to ask the Minister for Health—
              (1) In respect of the Wollongong, Port Kembla and Shellharbour Hospitals, how many beds are available to be occupied in all of the various wards?
              (2) What were these figures for the last 4 years?

          778 GARFORTH APPEAL COSTS—Mr Rumble to ask the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
              (1) What was the cost of the appeal in the Court of Criminal Appeal involving Andrew Garforth on 31 March 1994?
              (2) What is the breakdown of the components of the total cost?


          Page 729
          779 MONEYS SPENT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SPORT, RECREATION AND RACING— ELECTORATE OF ALBURY—Mr Thompson to ask the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) What are the total amounts of Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Works moneys that have been made available to the electorate of Albury in the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
                (e) To date in 1994?
              (2) Were there any special Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Grants made over and above the usual round of grants that are made each 12 months?
              (3) Were there any additional sporting grants made to the electorate?
              (4) (a) Were there any other grants or moneys, other than Gifted Sports Persons and those type of allocations, made to the electorate in those last 5 years?
                (b) If so, what was each specifically for?

          780 MONEYS SPENT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SPORT, RECREATION AND RACING— ELECTORATE OF BALLINA—Mr Thompson to ask the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) What are the total amounts of Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Works moneys that have been made available to the electorate of Ballina in the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
                (e) To date in 1994?
              (2) Were there any special Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Grants made over and above the usual round of grants that are made each 12 months?
              (3) Were there any additional sporting grants made to the electorate?
              (4) (a) Were there any other grants or moneys, other than Gifted Sports Persons and those type of allocations, made to the electorate in those last 5 years?
                (b) If so, what was each specifically for?

          781 MONEYS SPENT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SPORT, RECREATION AND RACING— ELECTORATE OF BARWON—Mr Thompson to ask the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
              (1) What are the total amounts of Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Works moneys that have been made available to the electorate of Barwon in the years:
                (a) 1990?
                (b) 1991?
                (c) 1992?
                (d) 1993?
                (e) To date in 1994?

          Page 730
              (2) Were there any special Sport, Recreation and Racing Capital Grants made over and above the usual round of grants that are made each 12 months?
              (3) Were there any additional sporting grants made to the electorate?
              (4) (a) Were there any other grants or moneys, other than Gifted Sports Persons and those type of allocations, made to the electorate in those last 5 years?
                (b) If so, what was each specifically for?






































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