Questions and Answers No. 25, Wednesday 8 September 1993

All Hansard & Papers this day

PARLIAMENT OF NEW SOUTH WALES
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY

1993

THIRD SESSION OF THE FIFTIETH PARLIAMENT


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QUESTIONS
AND
ANSWERS

No. 25

WEDNESDAY 8 SEPTEMBER 1993



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[The Questions and Answers Paper published for the first sitting day in each week will contain, by number and title, all unanswered questions, together with questions to which answers have been received on the previous sitting and any new questions. On subsequent days, new questions are printed, as are questions to which answers were received the previous day. Consequently the full text of any question will be printed only twice: when notice is given; and, when answered.]

[Pursuant to the Sessional Order adopted by the House on 24 February 1993, Members shall be permitted to lodge 3 questions on notice per sitting day accumulative over one sitting week, provided that the Leader of the Opposition shall be permitted to lodge 4 questions on notice per sitting day. Ministers shall lodge answers to questions on notice within 15 sitting days after the question is first published and such answer shall be published forthwith.]
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DATE OF PUBLICATION OF QUESTIONANSWER TO BE LODGED BY
Q. & A. No. 10
(Including Question Nos 788 to 820)
8 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 11
(Including Question Nos 821 to 903)
9 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 12
(Including Question Nos 904 to 943)
14 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 13
(Including Question Nos 944 to 976)
15 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 14
(Including Question Nos 977 to 1044)
16 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 15
(Including Question Nos 1045 to 1065)
21 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 16
(Including Question Nos 1066 to 1109)
22 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 17
(Including Question Nos 1110 to 1199)
23 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 18
(Including Question Nos 1200 to 1224)
28 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 19
(Including Question Nos 1225 to 1261)
29 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 20
(Including Question Nos 1262 to 1328)
30 September 1993
Q. & A. No. 21
(Including Question Nos 1329 to 1345)
5 October 1993
Q. & A. No. 22
(Including Question Nos 1346 to 1387)
6 October 1993
Q. & A. No. 23
(Including Question Nos 1388 to 1463)
7 October 1993
Q. & A. No. 24
(Including Question Nos 1464 to 1524)
12 October 1993
Q. & A. No. 25
(Including Question Nos 1525 to 1575)
13 October 1993


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Notice of Question given on the date shown

11 MARCH 1993

(Paper No. 8)

*684 REGISTRAR OF CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETIES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
      What are the staffing levels for the Registrar of Co-operative Societies for the years:
          (a) 1988?
          (b) 1989?
          (c) 1990?
          (d) 1991?
          (e) 1992?
      Answer—
      The staffing levels are all given as at 30 June for each year.
          (a) The staffing level for 1988 was 77. At this time, the Registry was a separate administrative unit with responsibility for all its corporate support activities.
          (b) The staffing level for 1989 was 48. At this time, the Registry had amalgamated with other administrative units to form the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs. Under this departmental structure, the Registrar did not control the corporate support or inspectorial/investigatory functions for the Registry as these were handled elsewhere by the Department.
          (c) The staffing level for 1990 was 46 with the Registry still being part of the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs.
          (d) The staffing level for 1991 was 52. As at 1 July 1991, the Registry of Co-operatives was amalgamated with Local Government to form the Department of Local Government and Co-operatives. With this amalgamation, a proportion of BACA administrative staff were transferred to the Registry to meet corporate support needs.
          (e) The staff level for 1992 remained at 52 until 1 July 1992 when 19 staff and positions were transferred to the Financial Institutions Commission (FINCOM).

*685 MONEY LENDERS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads—
      (1) Has the Department of Consumer Affairs received complaints about the activities of money lenders?
      (2) How many such complaints have been received since April 1992?
      (3) How many of these complaints related to:
          (a) Licensed money lenders?
          (b) Unlicensed money lenders?
      (4) What action has been taken by the Department on these complaints?


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      Answer—
      (1) The term "moneylender" is not used in New South Wales legislation. The Credit Act 1984 refers to "credit providers" and "finance brokers". The Department of Consumer Affairs has received complaints about the services and products provided by credit providers and finance brokers.
      (2) The National Consumer Complaints System (NCCSS) used by the Department identifies complaints by subject matter and type of service or product, not by the occupation of the trader or supplier concerned.
      The question of whether a credit provider or finance broker is licensed or not will usually only arise during the investigation of a complaint when it is established whether or not the supplier is providing regulated credit or housing finance and is actually required to be licensed.
      Compiling the information requested would require detailed examination of all files used in the creation of the NCCSS. This would divert a large portion of the Department's resources away from its core statutory functions and seriously impact on its ability of the Department to perform these functions. I am not prepared to commit these resources.
      (3) See answer (2).
      (4) When the Department receives complaints about any credit providers or finance brokers, they are investigated in the usual manner. The appropriate action is taken in cases of those who are found to be unlicensed, or who are found to be breaching the credit legislation. This action may include applications to the Commercial Tribunal, or administrative action such as requiring undertaking to cease the unlicensed activity and refund moneys.

*718 YEAR OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
      (1) How much funding will be made available by the Government to the Office of Aboriginal Affairs for the promotion, etc., of the Year of Indigenous Peoples?
      (2) How many organisations will receive funding?
      (3) What are these organisations?
      (4) How many requests have been made by organisations for funding for activities and promotion during the Year of Indigenous Peoples?
      (5) What are the organisations which have applied for funding?
      (6) What other programs will be initiated by the Government to support the Year of Indigenous Peoples?
      (7) If so, what form will these take?
      Answer—
      (1) During 1993, the NSW Government distributed $200,000 to a variety of groups to help fund community-based activities. Two releases, each of $100,000, were made, one for the January-June period, the other for the July-December period.
      A further $9,500 was provided to the Torres Strait Islander Corporation and a grant of $5,000 was provided to help finance the Black Vine Concert at the Sydney Town Hall on 3 September 1993.
      (2) 65.
      (3) The Aboriginal Corporation for Homeless and Rehabilitation Community Services, Ashfield; Aboriginal Arts Management Association; Tumut Youth Aboriginal Corporation; Local Aboriginal Land Council, Orange; St Clair Aboriginal Corporation, Singleton; Koori Broadcasters, Armidale; Tranby Aboriginal Co-operative College, Glebe; Allira Aboriginal
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      Childcare Centre, Dubbo; Newman High School Aboriginal Support Network; Koori Bowlers, Armidale; Murray River Koori Inc., Kyalite; Aboriginal Children's Service, Redfern; Yarbirri Aboriginal Arts and Crafts, Coolangatta; Aboriginal Student Support, Muswellbrook; Murrama Aboriginal Graphics and Community Aid, Emerton; Wanarah Local Aboriginal Land Council, Muswellbrook; Yawarra Aboriginal Corporation, Condobolin; Aboriginal Women's Legal Issues Group; Aboriginal Housing Co., Redfern Aboriginal Corporation, NAAMORO, Aunt Polly's, and Murrawina; Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation, Grafton; Local Aboriginal Land Council, Hay; Local Aboriginal Land Council, Forster; Walhallow Aboriginal Corporation, Coroona; Miyay Birray Youth Service, Moree; Mil-Pra Aboriginal Education Consultative Group Inc., Casula; Manning Local Aboriginal Education Consultative Group, Taree; Tranby Aboriginal Co-operative College, Glebe; Mt Austin High School ASSPA Committee, Wagga Wagga; Coomealla Aboriginal Housing Company Ltd, Dareton; Cummeragunja Housing and Development Aboriginal Corporation, Barmah; Pumparoo Euabalong Outreach and Aboriginal Resource Centre; Cawarra Women's Refuge, Penrith; Local Aboriginal Land Council, West Wyalong; Botany Bay Aboriginal Tourist Association, La Perouse; Cobbora Aboriginal Men's Corporation; Broken Bay Aboriginal Corporation; Nuccoorilma Aboriginal Corporation; La Perouse Primary School; Leeton and District Aboriginal Corporation; North Dubbo Public School; Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service; Blacktown Aboriginal Corporation; Weigelli Centre Aboriginal Corporation; Bega Local Aboriginal Land Council; Narromine Local Aboriginal Land Council; Towri MACS Centre; Yota Yota Local Aboriginal Land Council; Onerwal Local Aboriginal Land Council; Kempsey-Macleay Aboriginal Education Consultative Group; Leichhardt Municipal Council; Wollongong Local Aboriginal Education Consultative Group; Giilan Gayi; Coffs Harbour Aboriginal Family Community Care; Karuah Local Aboriginal Land Council; Boorongen Djugun Aboriginal Corporation; Coonabarabran Kooris United; Kulai Pre-School Aboriginal Corporation; Awabakal Newcastle Aboriginal Co-operative Ltd; Ulong Public School Inc. ASSPA Committee; Brewarrina Rugby Festival of the Fisheries Association Inc.; Awabalak Pre-School; Balranald Local Aboriginal Land Council; Brewarrina Rugby League; Boda Mada Koori Women; Worimi Local Aboriginal Land Council.
      (4) 112.
      (5) The applications include the aforementioned 65 and the following 47:
      Western Districts Foundation for Aboriginal Affairs; National Committee to Defend Black Rights; Koori Calendar Project, Wauchope; Peak Hill Bulbandramine Boxing Club; Australia Council; Brewarrina RLFC Senior/Minor League; Aboriginal Health Education Officers, Redfern; NSW Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Rugby League Squad—Under 17s, Waterloo; Nulla Nulla Local Aboriginal Land Council; Aboriginal Deaths in Custody Watch Committee; Central Area Training, Accounting Resource, Aboriginal Corporation, Dubbo; Eastern Region Aboriginal Resource Centre Inc., Matraville; Illawara Aboriginal Corporation Community Development Employment Project; Committee to Defend Black Rights; Brinja-Yuin Research Group, Narooma; Torres Strait Islanders Corporation, Sydney; Mount Druitt Hospital; Minimbah Pre-School Aboriginal Corporation, Armidale; Aboriginal Education Consultative Group, Sydney; Eastern Suburbs Aboriginal Education Consultative Group; Jana Ngalee Local Aboriginal Land Council, Baryulgil; Home Care Service of New South Wales, Dubbo; Kempsey-MacLeay Co-ordinating Committee; Mindaribba Local Aboriginal Land Council, Maitland; Illawarra Aboriginal Corporation, Wollongong; Towri Aboriginal Corporation, Bathurst; Nungera Co-operative Society, Maclean; Noogaleek Children's Centre, Berkeley; La Perouse Sport & Recreation Corporation; Piccadilly Aboriginal Corporation, West Wyalong; Vincentia High School ASSPA Committee; Orange Wiradjuri Culture and Heritage Aboriginal Corporation; University of Western Sydney; St Clair-Singleton Aboriginal Corporation; Goorwook Housing Co-operative, Port Stephens; Moree Aboriginal Promotion
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      Committee; Aboriginal Medical Service/Doonooch Self-Health Corporation, Nowra; Awabakal Newcastle Aboriginal Corporation Ltd, Islington; Aboriginal Arts Management Association, Sydney; Gooriwal Consultancy, Sydney; Awabakal Co-op. Ltd, Islington; North Coast Institute for Aboriginal Community Education, Lismore; Brewarrina Koori Community Consultative Committee; Aboriginal Post-Release Program, Dubbo; Aboriginal Liaison Unit, University of Western Sydney; Albury & District Local Aboriginal Land Council.
      (6) In December 1992, the Premier wrote to Ministers asking them to undertake, within their budgets, some event, activity or project to celebrate or mark the International Year of the World's Indigenous People.
      (7) Agencies have responded to the Premier's request with a range of specific events and ongoing programs or projects, either planned or already staged.
      These include: a major conference on Aboriginal employment opportunities and career paths at the University of Western Sydney, held in July and jointly sponsored by the Treasury and the Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education; the launch in June by the Minister for Housing of "Old Dream: New Future", a video history of Aboriginal housing in New South Wales; the Department of School Education's program of indigenous speakers in New South Wales schools during National Aboriginal and Islander Week, its touring exhibition of art work by Aboriginal students, and its Aboriginal careers expo; two AIDS/HIV conferences run by the Department of Health for isolated Aboriginal communities in south-western New South Wales, the development of departmental profiles on Koori communities in the central west, and the production of an educational video "Making a Difference" for the Department's non-Aboriginal staff; and a detailed, year-long calendar of events from the Ministry of the Arts, covering Aboriginal speakers at the Australian Museum and the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, the Bennelong Program at the Sydney Opera House, the Poignant Regalia Exhibition at the Hyde Park Barracks, an Aboriginal Australia on-the-road museum, Aboriginal films at the State Library of New South Wales, an exhibition of Aboriginal objets d'art at the Powerhouse Museum, and exhibitions concerning the indigenous peoples of New Zealand and Java at the Australian Museum.

*725 CATTLE TICK OUTBREAK—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
      (1) What is the extent of the cattle tick outbreak detected in the northern part of New South Wales?
      (2) How many head of stock are infected?
      (3) Has any tick fever been reported?
      (4) How many properties have been quarantined?
      (5) What are the costs incurred by the Department of Agriculture in dealing with this tick outbreak?
      (6) What are the current procedures for inspection of cattle coming into New South Wales from Queensland?
      Answer—
      (1) The majority of the 69 properties quarantined are in the Baryulgil/Ewingar/Tabulam area. Livestock movements from infected properties in this area have resulted in quarantine of properties in other locations.
      The only other locality where cattle ticks were detected was one property in the Southgate area in the Lower Clarence area. Cattle had been moved from Baryulgil to this property in January 1993.

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      (2) There are 10,653 stock on infected holdings. Not all these stock are infested. Dippings have been carried out to reduce infestations levels.
      (3) No Tick Fever has been reported.
      (4) A total of 69 properties have been quarantined.
      (5) This outbreak will cost the Department approximately $400,000 this financial year and an estimated $600,000 next year.
      (6) The current procedures for introduction of cattle to New South Wales from Queensland are set out in Proclamation 520 under the Stock Diseases Act.
      In summary:
      Cattle that have been in the Tick Free Area of Queensland for more than 35 days can enter without treatment.
      Cattle from the Protected Area of Queensland require one clean treatment.
      Cattle from the Infected Area of Queensland require two clean treatments.
      Due to concerns about meat residues protocols have been developed to allow slaughter stock to be introduced from low risk areas on a clean inspection to approved abattoirs.

*729 CENTRAL TABLELANDS COUNTY COUNCIL—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
      (1) As an inquiry was held into the Central Tablelands County Council in June 1992, why was a second inquiry necessary?
      (2) Why haven't the results of the second inquiry into the Central Tablelands County Council been made public?
      (3) Is there a proposal to eventually replace county councils, such as the Central Tablelands County Council, with a board?
      (4) Would such a board remove the running of local water supplies from the control of locally elected representatives and make their operation directly subordinate to State interests?
      (5) Would this board be in direct contravention of the Government's aims in implementing the new Local Government Act of increasing local autonomy and accountability?
      Answer—
      (1) I have been advised that in early 1991, Central Tablelands County Council commissioned a report into its operations and administration. The report was carried out by Mr R. Rawson, an independent consultant.
      In July 1991, the Hon. R. Webster, M.L.C., Acting Minister for Natural Resources, asked the NSW Water Resources Council to report to him "regarding any need to restructure water supply County Councils to ensure more economic and efficient provision of town water supply services". At the request of the Water Resources Council, the Department of Public Works convened a working group comprising representatives from the Departments of Planning, Water Resources and Local Government and the Local Government and Shires Associations of New South Wales, to review the performance of the water supply County Councils.
      (2) The working group's initial report was presented for consideration of members of the Water Resources Council in September 1992. Five members submitted comments, which were examined in detail by the working group. Minor additions were made to the report and an amended report was submitted to the Water Resources Council meeting of February 1993. Only one additional comment was received, expressing general support for the finalised recommendations. I understand that the May 1993 meeting of the Council agreed to the final report being submitted to the Minister for Natural Resources.

Page 1456
      The Water Resources Council has been advised that the six County Councils have requested copies of the report.
      (3) A term of reference for the working group was to "consider alternative arrangements to County Councils for managing their regional water supplies and the merits of options for restructuring". No evidence came before the working group to demonstrate that a change to the existing structure or administrative arrangements would result in more effective or efficient provision of town water supply services.
      (4) and (5) In view of the reply to question (3), questions (4) and (5) are hypothetical.

30 MARCH 1993

(Paper No. 9)

*759 NOOGOORA BURR—MENINDEE—Mr Beckroge asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
      (1) Is he aware of the threat to grazing lands of the Noogoora burr in the Menindee area following the inundations over the last few years?
      (2) If so, what action is being taken to control the burr in that area?
      Answer—
      (1) Noogoora burr has been a problem in the Menindee area for a number of years. The extent and severity of the Noogoora burr infestations each summer depend on recent flooding (causes dispersal of seeds) and seasonal conditions during spring/early summer (causes germination).
      The wet spring/early summer in 1992 promoted widespread germination and emergence of Noogoora burr throughout southern New South Wales this past summer.
      (2) Graziers in the Menindee area are required to control Noogoora burr as it is a declared noxious weed. Good control is obtained in most years, but in bad burr years such as occurred this past summer, the level of control is often inadequate. Incomplete control occurs because of the cost and time required to control the large areas infested.
      The stem-galling moth, Epiblema strenuana, is slowly gaining control of Noogoora burr along the Darling River in northern New South Wales, but it is having minimal effect to date in southern New South Wales.

*761 LITHGOW BUS/TRAIN TRANSFERS___Mr Clough asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
      (1) What provision, if any, is made for the safeguarding of passengers' luggage transferred from bus to train, or train to bus, at Lithgow during waiting periods?
      (2) Are there any refreshment facilities on Lithgow Station?
      (3) If not, do passengers patronise surrounding outlets?
      (4) Do passengers sometimes have to wait up to 2 hours for connections?
      (5) If so, when?


Page 1457
      Answer—
      (1) If there is a waiting period during the transfer of luggage from coach to train at Lithgow Station, the luggage is safeguarded in the Station Master's office.
      (2) No.
      (3) Yes. There is a cafe located at the end of the overhead concourse at Lithgow Station which passengers patronise.
      (4) The longest wait for a connecting service is 46 minutes. All other interchange times are 20 minutes or less.
      (5) Not applicable.

*762 LITHGOW WEEKEND TRAIN SERVICE___Mr Clough asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
      (1) When the 8.40 a.m. train ex Lithgow on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays was cancelled, was it replaced with a service at 9.09 a.m. ex Mount Victoria?
      (2) Why was the service changed?
      (3) Does this now mean that an electric car set stands unused in the Lithgow yards from 11 p.m. Friday until 4 a.m. Monday?
      (4) Are Lithgow train crews now required to report to Mount Victoria for duty rather than Lithgow?
      (5) What savings, if any, were effected?
      Answer—
      (1) Yes.
      (2) It was changed because of the limited patronage. The adjustment means that Lithgow still has a 2-hourly service on weekends and public holidays which is considered adequate.
      (3) No.
      (4) No.
      (5) This has enabled crews and rolling stock to be used more efficiently.

*767 NATIONAL CAMPAIGN AGAINST DRUG ABUSE—PROJECT FUNDING— ELECTORATE OF SOUTH COAST___Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Health___
      (1) Has the NSW Drug and Alcohol Directorate cut community development project funding, formerly funded under the National Campaign Against Drug Abuse?
      (2) (a) How many organisations in the electorate of South Coast were receiving funding under this project?
          (b) Of those, how many have been either defunded or funding reduced?
      Answer—
      (1) The NSW State Government contribution to the Community Development Project has not been withdrawn. The Federal Government reduced its share of National Campaign Against Drug Abuse (NCADA) funding by 7.5 per cent in 1992/93, which equated to a reduction of almost $500,000 available for drug and alcohol services in New South Wales. Despite this funding situation, the Drug and Alcohol Directorate set an objective that the withdrawal of Federal funding should not effect services to the public with particular emphasis on treatment services. It was decided that the program's overall goals would be best served by channelling the remaining State funds directly into services, thus enabling community development initiatives to continue in a modified form.

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      (2) (a) The Community Development Officer project was funded on a dollar-for-dollar basis by the NSW State Government and the Federal Government's National Campaign Against Drug Abuse (NCADA) and administered through the Drug and Alcohol Directorate. The Directorate funded this project statewide. This included one Community Development Officer position in the Illawarra Area Health Service, which encompasses the electorate of the South Coast.
          (b) No organisations in the electorate of the South Coast have had their funding withdrawn or reduced as a result of this action.

*768 OFFICE REFURBISHMENTS___Mr Knight asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development___
      In relation to each department or authority under his administration—
      (1) How much was spent on office fitouts or refurbishment in 1991/92?
      (2) What is the estimated expenditure for 1992/93?
      Answer—
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    Page 1460
    *769 OFFICE REFURBISHMENTS___Mr Knight asked the Treasurer and Minister for the Arts___
        In relation to each department or authority under his administration—
        (1) How much was spent on office fitouts or refurbishment in 1991/92?
        (2) What is the estimated expenditure for 1992/93?
        See Explanatory Note in response to Question 768.
        Answer—
        (1) Total expenditure for 1991/92 under the Minister for Finance's administration—N/A.
        (2) Estimated expenditure for 1992/93 is:
              OFM OSR TOTAL
              $284,000 $1,256,000 $1,540,000
        Explanatory Note:
            The NSW Treasury comprises two operational units—the Office of Financial Management (OFM) and the Office of State Revenue (OSR).
            The response to the questions raised is complicated by the fact that no Minister for Finance position existed in 1991/92. The response is, therefore, split on the basis that in 1991/92 the ultimate responsibility for Treasury rested with the Premier and Treasurer and that 1992/93 estimates are provided under the responsibility of the Minister for Finance's administration. The costs are also shown separately covering OFM and OSR.

    *770 OFFICE REFURBISHMENT___Mr Knight asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services___
        In relation to each department or authority under his administration—
        (1) How much was spent on office fitouts or refurbishment in 1991/92?
        (2) What is the estimated expenditure for 1992/93?
        Answer—
        (1) NSW Police Service $562,000
            NSW Fire Brigades $495,500
            NSW Bush Fire Services Nil
            State Emergency Service $61,000
        (2) NSW Police Service $786,000
            NSW Fire Brigades $460,000
            NSW Bush Fire Services $42,000
            State Emergency Service $100,000

    *774 BOARDS OF MANAGEMENT REVIEW___Mr Mills asked the Minister for Health___
        (1) What was the outcome of the Premier's review of the roles and responsibilities of Boards of Management in the various departments and agencies of the NSW Government, announced in early August 1992, at the time when appointment of the Hunter Area Health Service Board was deferred so as to await the review?
        (2) Who carried out the review?
        (3) When was the report of the review presented to the Government?
        (4) What were the recommendations of the report?
        (5) What guidelines and instructions were given to Area Health Boards in general, and the Hunter Area Health Board in particular, as a result of the review?
        (6) When will the report of the review be tabled?
        (7) What fees will be paid to members of the Health Service Boards in each of the ten Area Health Services?

    Page 1461
        Answer—
        (1) to (4) and (6) The review of the roles and responsibilities of Boards of Management in various Government Departments and Agencies was primarily the responsibility of the Premier, the Hon. J. J. Fahey, M.P.
        (5) Not applicable.
        (7) No members of Area Health Service Boards are paid fees.

    *776 HURLSTONE PARK RAILWAY STATION STAFFING___Mr Moss asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
        At what times are staff currently in attendance at Hurlstone Park Railway Station during weekdays, weekends and public holidays?
        Answer—
        Rostered hours of duty for staff at Hurlstone Park Railway Station are from 5.45 a.m. to 9.15 p.m. on weekdays, from 5.45 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturdays, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sundays and from 9.45 a.m. to 8 p.m. on public holidays.

    *777 HURLSTONE PARK RAILWAY STATION PROPOSED STAFFING___Mr Moss asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
        Following the introduction of a ticketing device planned to be installed at Hurlstone Park Railway Station, at what times will staff be in attendance at the station during weekdays, weekends and public holidays?
        Answer—
        Following the introduction of automatic ticketing, stations will continue to be staffed for the same hours of operation as they are currently staffed.

    *778 BANKSTOWN LINE—AUTOMATIC TICKETING DEVICES___Mr Moss asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
        (1) (a) Has Hurlstone Park Railway Station been singled out for an automatic ticketing device on the Bankstown line?
            (b) Why?
        (2) (a) Will other stations on the Bankstown line have automatic ticketing devices installed?
            (b) If so, which stations?
        Answer—
        (1) (a) No.
            (b) All stations on the Bankstown line will be installed with automatic ticketing machines.
        (2) (a) Yes.
            (b) All.


    Page 1462
    *779 SENIOR CITIZENS WEEK OPENING CEREMONY___Mr J. H. Murray asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development___
        (1) How many seats were available for the elderly at the opening ceremony for Senior Citizens Week at Parramatta Park on Sunday 21 March 1993?
        (2) Were any complaints received last year about the lack of seating at the same venue?
        Answer—
        This is a matter which comes within the administration of the Minister for Community Services. However, the answers are as follows:
        (1) 600.
        (2) There were no complaints in 1992.

    *785 CONTROLLED DRINKING PROGRAMS___Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health___
        (1) Were controlled drinking programs conducted in New South Wales by the Health Department in the 1960's and 1970's?
        (2) What was the per client cost of previous programs?
        (3) (a) Were any longitudinal studies conducted to establish the success rates of those programs?
            (b) What did they show?
        (4) Have probation and parol officers at Mount Druitt been instructed to compel offenders with a record of alcohol abuse to attend a controlled drinking pilot program run by Mount Druitt Community Health Centre?
        Answer—
        (1) to (3) No. Controlled drinking programs were conducted by Emeritus Professor Lovibond and Mr Glen Caddy at the University of New South Wales in 1969/70.
        (4) No.

    *786 DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING STOCK—ELECTORATE OF ROCKDALE___Mr Thompson asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing___
        (1) How many Department of Housing pensioner units are located in the electorate of Rockdale?
        (2) How many 1, 2, 3 and 4-bedroom houses and units does the Department of Housing own in the electorate of Rockdale?
        (3) Where are these houses and units located?
        Answer—
        I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable members questions are, as at 30 June 1993:
        (1) 99.
        (2) 99 pensioner units.
        41 one-bedroom units.
        192 two-bedroom units.

    Page 1463
        60 three-bedroom units.
        1 four-bedroom unit.
        55 two-bedroom cottages.
        70 three-bedroom cottages.
        16 four-bedroom cottages.
        15 three-bedroom townhouses/villas.
        4 four-bedroom townhouses/villas.
        ___
        553
        ___
        (3) The accommodation is located in the following suburbs:
        * Arncliffe.
        * Brighton-Le-Sands.
        * Rockdale.
        * Kingsgrove.
        * Bardwell Park.
        * Bexley/Bexley North.
        * Turrella.

    *787 DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING APPLICANTS—ELECTORATE OF ROCKDALE___Mr Thompson asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing___
        (1) How many applications for public housing are current by persons residing in the electorate of Rockdale?
        (2) What is the classification of these applicants?
        (3) What is the average waiting time for Department of Housing applicants for:
            (a) The St George area?
            (b) Other Sydney metropolitan areas?
        Answer—
        I have been advised by the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing that the answers to the honourable member's questions are:
        (1) The Department of Housing does not register applicants for housing by electorate. The electorate of Rockdale forms part of the Department's Southern Metropolitan Regional Office's St George/Sutherland Allocations Zone designated L2.
        As at 4 August 1993, the number of applications for housing from persons residing in the St George/Sutherland Allocations Zone was 3,685.
        (2) The classification of the applicants referred to in (1) by bedroom and dwelling category is as follows:
            One-bedroom pensioner accommodation 687
            One-bedroom community accommodation 810
            Two-bedroom apartment accommodation 379
            Two-bedroom general accommodation 555
            Three-bedroom apartment accommodation 234
            Three-bedroom general accommodation 862
            Four-bedroom general accommodation 158
        (3) Waiting times are variable depending on factors such as vacancy rates and construction activity in any one area. The eligibility date of applicants presently being offered accommodation determines the allocating date for any one area. The allocating date is used as a guide when determining waiting times.

    Page 1464
        The following table shows the allocating dates by bedroom and dwelling category in the 18 Allocations Zones administered by the 3 regions in the Sydney Metropolitan area; the Southern Metropolitan Region, the Western Metropolitan Region and the Central and Eastern Metropolitan Region.

    Page 1465
    31 MARCH 1993

    (Paper No. 10)

    *788 PUMPAROO ABORIGINAL CHILDREN SERVICES___Ms Allan asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs___
        (1) What services does the Euabalong Outreach and Aboriginal Resource Centre or "Pumparoo" provide for Aboriginal children from western and far western New South Wales?
        (2) Has "Pumparoo" applied for additional funding to build a hostel, a residence and a farm to expand its current program for aboriginal children at risk?
        (3) What response has "Pumparoo" received to this submission?
        (4) What evaluation of "Pumparoo" has been conducted by the Office of Aboriginal Affairs?
        (5) How successful has "Pumparoo" been in helping children who, prior to entering the program, may have been in trouble with the law, involved in alcohol abuse and petrol sniffing, suffered from neglect, and may have been physically and sexually abused?
        (6) Why does "Pumparoo" receive funding from the Department of School Education only despite its extensive programs?
        (7) When will "Pumparoo" receive additional Government funding?
        Answer—
        (1) The purpose of Pumparoo is to assist children at risk, by offering an alternative to institutions. Children at risk are those whose education and well-being are endangered by their school and home environment.
        (2) Yes, although the application has been informal, I am advised that they have approached my Department as well as ATSIC and possibly other bodies.
        (3) An application to the Alternate Accommodation and Care Committee has been made so as to shift the focus of the funding relationship between the Department and Pumparoo away from a per capita basis. The focus of program funding will enhance the viability of the program and create the means by which its cultural relevance can be protected.
        (4) Bi-monthly meetings were held with Pumparoo and regional Government officers, with discussions concerning the progress of the children. These talks, with staff and youths, indictated positive programs, with improvements in literacy and numeracy skills, and greater self-esteem and self-worth.
        (5) While youths are at Pumparoo, substance abuse declines dramatically. Educational standards are also improved, as are skill levels in the visual and performing arts. As a result, Pumparoo's youths have performed in schools and shopping centres throughout the State, demonstrating greater confidence.
        Pumparoo has enjoyed a most positive reputation amongst Aboriginal communities as an agency willing to help often in difficult and complex circumstances.
        (6) Pumparoo does not receive funding only from the Department of School Education. The Department of School Education provides one teacher and the premises. The Office of Juvenile Justice and the Department of Community Services provide per capita payments for each child for whom a placement at Pumparoo is negotiated. These arrangements have been long-standing and will continue until such time as the present efforts to develop an appropriate program funding base has been resolved.
        (7) The application before the Alternate Accommodation and Care Committee is currently under consideration and will proceed towards completion as part of the overall strategic plan. I have no information about the progress of applications made to ATSIC.

    Page 1466

    *792 WESTERN SYDNEY AMBULANCE STATIONS___Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Health___
        (1) What are the staffing levels of ambulance stations in the Penrith, Blacktown, Fairfield, Liverpool and Parramatta City Council areas?
        (2) Which stations serve the electorates of Penrith, Londonderry, St Marys, Mount Druitt, Blacktown, Riverstone, Fairfield, Smithfield and Parramatta?
        Answer—
        (1) Local Government Area Ambulance Station Ambulance Officers
              Penrith Penrith 23
                            Colyton 11
              Blacktown Blacktown 20
                            Mount Druitt 13
              Parramatta Parramatta 36
              Liverpool Liverpool 13
                            Green Valley 15
              Fairfield Fairfield 9
        (2) Penrith: Primary response is Penrith, backed up by Springwood, Warragamba, Richmond or Mount Druitt.
              Londonderry: Primary response is Penrith or Richmond, backed up by Mount Druitt.
              St Marys: Primary response is Colyton or Mount Druitt, backed up by Mount Druitt.
              Mount Druitt: Primary response is Mount Druitt, backed up by Colyton, Penrith or Blacktown.
              Blacktown: Primary response is Blacktown, backed up by Mount Druitt, Parramatta or Castle Hill.
              Riverstone: Primary response is Blacktown, backed up by Mount Druitt, Castle Hill, Richmond or Colyton.
              Parramatta: Primary response is Parramatta, backed up by Auburn, Blacktown, Fairfield or Castle Hill.
              Fairfield: Primary response is Fairfield, backed up by Bankstown, Liverpool, Parramatta or Green Valley.
              Smithfield: Primary response is Fairfield, backed up by Parramatta, Liverpool or Green Valley.


        Page 1467
        *794 INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY HEALTH SERVICES—ELECTORATE OF CHARLESTOWN—Mr Face asked the Minister for Health___
            What facilities and services, provided by the Hunter Area Health Service, are operating in the electorate of Charlestown for people with intellectual disabilities?
            Answer—
            The provision of services for people with intellectual disabilities is the responsibility of the Department of Community Services under the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, the Hon. J. A. Longley, M.P.

        *795 HUNTER REGION HOSPITALS ORTHOPAEDIC PROCEDURES___Mr Face asked the Minister for Health___
            (1) What is the average waiting time for public patients waiting for orthopaedic procedures at hospitals in the Hunter that carry out orthopaedic procedures and their location?
            (2) How many orthopaedic operations have been carried out at Hunter hospitals in each month, to the year ending February 1993, from 1990?
            (3) What percentage of these procedures were for pensioners classified as:
              (a) Private patients?
              (b) Public patients?
              (c) Other?
            Answer___
            (1) The waiting time for elective orthopaedic procedures in the Hunter's hospitals varies according to surgeon and hospital and individual requirements of health customers. The Area Health Service has met with surgeons to establish more complete waiting lists to be held by the hospitals.
            Hospitals in the Hunter Area Helath Service carrying out elective orthopaedic procedures include the Mater, Maitland, Cessnock, Royal Newcastle and Belmont Hospitals. At the last Booking List Survey for November 1992, published in January 1993, the average waiting time for elective orthopaedic procedures in the Area was 2.97 months.
            Only acute orthopaedic procedures are carried out at John Hunter Hospital. There is no elective orthopaedic surgery.
            (2) See table below. Additional funding has been provided to the Hunter Area Health Service, under the Hospital Access Program, to increase elective orthopaedic procedures.
            (3) Priority for admission to New South Wales public hospitals is based on clinical need.

        Page 1468
            TAKE IN TABLE No. OF ORTHOPAEDIC PROCEDURES


        Page 1469
        *796 AMBULANCE SERVICES—ELECTORATE OF CHARLESTOWN___Mr Face asked the Minister for Health___
            In relation to the stations which provide ambulance services to the electorate of Charlestown—
            (1) What area stations cover the electorate?
            (2) How many people are serviced in this area of the electorate of Charlestown?
            (3) (a) How many vehicles are currently stationed at the stations that service the electorate?
              (b) What type and age are these vehicles?
            (4) (a) How many staff are currently employed at the stations?
              (b) What are their designations?
            (5) How many paramedics are currently stationed at the stations that service the electorate?
            (6) What is the average response time to emergency calls from stations that service the electorate?
            Answer—
            (1) The electorate of Charlestown is serviced by ambulance stations at Cardiff, Hamilton and Belmont.
            (2) Australian Bureau of Statistics figures show that there is a population of 42,456 in the electorate.
            (3) (a) There are 19 ambulance vehicles currently stationed at the stations servicing the electorate. Included in this number are both primary care and 3 intensive care vehicles.
              (b) Currently there is a mix of Ford F100 and Ford F250 ambulance vehicles at the 3 stations. The age of these vehicles range from 1985 through to 1990 models.
            (4) (a) 90 staff are employed at the stations.
              (b) The composition of the staff employed at the stations is:
                                  Advanced
              Station Station Paramedic Life Ambulance
                Officer Support Officer
              Cardiff 1 11 2 5
              Hamilton 8 12 17 22
              Belmont 1 — 2 9
              There are 3 Paramedic Station Officers included in these numbers who are available to service the electorate.
            (5) There are currently 23 Paramedics stationed at Cardiff and Hamilton Stations. There are also 3 Paramedic Station Officers stationed at Hamilton Station who are utilised for on-road duties.
            (6) Advice from the Hamilton Co-ordination Centre indicated that the average response time for the 3 stations is between 6 to 8 minutes, depending on which station responds and where in the electorate the emergency calls come from.

        *798 RAIL FREIGHT TONNAGE___Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
            In 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991 and 1992, what tonnage of freight was carried by State Rail:
              (a) Sydney to Brisbane?
              (b) Brisbane to Sydney?

        Page 1470
            Answer—
            The tonnage of freight carried by State Rail over this period to and from Brisbane is listed for the following financial years:

        1988/891989/901990/911991/92
        (a) Sydney-Brisbane1,451,0001,392,5001,191,6261,113,038
        (b) Brisbane-Sydney 610,000 609,500 557,408 582,643
        *799 NORTHERN RAIL LINE KYOGLE UPGRADING WORKS___Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
            What upgrading work, if any, is to be carried out in the area 20.117 metres each side of the centre line of the track, in the approximate vicinity 856.7 km to 858.2 km on the Sydney to Brisbane line, over:
              (a) The next 12 months?
              (b) The next 3 years?
              (c) The next 5 years?
            Answer—
            New steel walkways have recently been constructed on the bridges between The Risk and Border Loop on the North Coast line to improve access and safety for track staff.
            It is also understood that the National Rail Corporation intends to lay concrete sleepers under the track from 858.040 km to 866.170 km, commencing in the latter part of 1994. It is estimated the work will take 6 weeks to complete. Furthermore, maintenance repairs will be carried out over the next 3 years at two geotechnical sites located at 856.960 km and 857.046 km.

        *800 TRACKFAST___Mr Langton asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
            (1) To date, how many SRA staff involved in TrackFast have been offered and have accepted redundancies?
            (2) Have TrackFast and/or SRA business managers in the North Coast, Western New South Wales/Dubbo, South Coast/Illawarra areas been retained to provide liaison with private haulage contractors?
            (3) If so, how long will this arrangement be kept in operation?
            (4) If so, are private haulage contractors reimbursing the SRA on a pro rata basis for services provided?
            Answer—
            (1) As at 30 April 1993, 157 staff had accepted redundancies.

        Page 1471
            (2) The following three managers have been retained:
                Manager North Coast Newcastle to Queensland border.
              Manager Tamworth Tamworth to North West, i.e., Moree, Gunnedah, Armidale,
                            Dubbo, Orange and Bathurst.
                Manager Cootamundra Southern Region and Far South Coast.
            (3) Positions are regularly reviewed. No time limit has been placed on retention of the positions.
            (4) No. The managers are not there for the purpose of assisting the financial return of contractors, but are responsible for managing TrackFast operations in country regions, ensuring contractual arrangements are met, ensuring financial procedures are followed and liaising with customers.

        *801 STATE WARDS—Mrs Lo Po' asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
            (1) Who supervises State Wards:
              (a) Sleeping arrangements?
              (b) Education arrangements?
              (c) Medical arrangements?
            (2) How many State Wards are street kids?
            (3) Has the Government got an intervention program for State Wards who are street kids?
            Answer—
            (1) The Department of Community Services currently cares for 2,021 State Wards and will expend approximately $16 million in the 1992/93 financial year in providing care and services to them. In the Department's 1992/93 budget, $68.07 million was provided to assist services which help care for children, including wards, who cannot be cared for within their own families.
              (a) The majority of State Wards are cared for by departmental foster carers. The rest are cared for by departmental staff, non-Government foster carers or agency staff, relatives or parents. These adults supervise their sleeping arrangements.
              (b) The vast majority of State Wards attend some form of educational facility, with the day-to-day supervision being provided by the child's carer. The Department oversees these arrangements and provides supervision and financial assistance when appropriate.
              (c) State Wards receive medical and dental services no differently to other children in the community. The arrangements are generally attended by the child's usual carer, with supervision and financial assistance provided by the Department whenever it is required.
            (2) The Department of Community Services provides a placement for every State Ward. However, there is a very small number of young persons who of their own accord leave their placement. The majority of those young persons either return to their parents, or make accommodation arrangements of their own. A small percentage pursue the "street life". The Department makes every attempt to settle these young persons either back into their usual placement, or to find suitable alternative care. Departmental staff seek to locate any missing wards as soon as possible, and to provide them with the necessary guidance, support and supervision.

        Page 1472
            (3) The Department is concerned for "street kids", whether or not they are wards. Programs have been developed to meet the needs of these extremely mobile young persons who come from very difficult circumstances. The departmental unit "Ormond" at Thornleigh has been utilised to stabilise young persons in departmental care prior to a community placement being organised.
            The Kings Cross Adolescent Team was created to work constructively with other agencies, police, health, etc., in providing help to those young persons who gravitate to that area, and to divert young people away from that area and back to their homes, or at least their local area.
            Additionally, the Department spends $21.7 million, which includes the Youth Social Justice Strategy assistance, to fund 172 community organisations across the State to provide a range of services to homeless young people.
            Following a review of substitute care services, I announced on 10 April 1993 a 3-year plan for the transition to new arrangements. The plan is based on the following principles:
                •Services will be available as close as possible to where children and families live.
                •Services will be designed to cause the least possible disruption to families.
                •Services will recognise and respect a child's cultural needs and family and social contexts.
                •Each child will have a caseplan based on a comprehensive assessment of the child's current and changing needs.
                •Service providers will make a commitment to the ongoing care of the child and to continuity and stability of care.
                •Planning will be on a co-operative basis between the non-Government service providers and the Government to ensure an appropriate range of services and the avoidance of duplication.
                •All service providers will agree to participate in independent, external evaluation of services.
            Implementation of this 3-year plan for substitute care services demonstrates the Government's ongoing commitment to the well-being of children and young people in New South Wales.

        *803 RAIL EXCURSION FARES FOR PENSIONERS___Mr McBride asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
            (1) Will he give an assurance that the conditions for the use of $2 excursion fares for pensioners using rail travel on the Central Coast (i.e., stations from Morriset to the Hawkesbury River), will be retained in their present form?
            (2) If not:
              (a) Why not?
              (b) When will the change take effect?
              (c) What will be the change to the pricing structure of excursion fares?
              (d) What will be the change to the conditions for the use of pensioner excursion fares?
              (e) Will any measures be put in place to compensate pensioners for the loss of this benefit?
            Answer—
            (1) The conditions for the use of $2 pensioner excursion fares will be retained in their present form.
            (2) Not applicable.


        Page 1473
        *806 TERTIARY SERVICES ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM GRANTS___Mr Mills asked the Minister for Health___
            (1) What bids were submitted recently to the Department of Health for grants under the Tertiary Services Enhancement Program from each of the ten Area and six Regional Health Services?
            (2) When will the grants be announced?
            (3) Why has the announcement of grants been delayed for nearly 2 months?
            (4) What are the titles, descriptions, purposes and dollar amounts of each of the grants to be made in each of the ten Area and six Regional Health Services?
            (5) Which of these grants have been made with a view to reduction of long waiting lists and in which specialty?
            (6) What is the estimated impact of each of the grants in (5) above on the target waiting list by area and specialty?
            Answer—
            (1) Over 120 applications were submitted from around the State.
            (2) The grants were announced in June 1993.
            (3) At a project committee meeting held on 23 March 1993, five projects were chosen for funding. Prior to formally announcing the grants, the Department had to (a) analyse the budgets, and (b) determine evaluation strategies of the successful projects.
            (4) Project 1: "SWSAHS/PHH Joint Coronary Care Project"
                Increase access for residents of SWSAHS to tertiary cardiac referral services.
                Allocated funds: $1,964,700 p.a.
              Project 2: "Networking Cancer Treatment Services in Western and Wentworth AHSs"
                Enhancement of the existing cancer treatment service networks between Westmead, Nepean, Blacktown and Mount Druitt Hospitals.
                Allocated funds: $766,000 in 1993/94; $641,000 p.a. thereafter.
              Project 3: "SWSAHS/ESAHS Joint Oncology Project"
                To enhance the current oncology service at Liverpool in partnership with the estabnlished tertiary referral services within the ESAHS.
                Allocated funds: $1,845,000 in 1993/94; $1,956,340 p.a. thereafter.
              Project 4: "Enhancement of Referral Renal Services in Southern and Western NSW"
                To provide a network of home training facilities in the SE Region, Orana and Far West Region, Illawarra AHS and SWSAHS that provide immediate access to home training of all patients with end-stage renal failure.
                Allocated funds: $1,924,600 p.a.
              Project 5: "Northern Sector Nephrology Network"
                To substantially redress the identified deficiencies and greatly enhance patient care in the developing nephrology network of northern NSW.
                Allocated funds: $1,103,600 in 1993/94; $1,093,000 in 1994/95; $993,600 p.a. thereafter.


        Page 1474
            (5) and (6) While each successful submission will have a positive effect on waiting times, the reduction of waiting lists is not the primary goal of this project. Tertiary Services, due to their reliance upon highly skilled multidisciplinary teams in the management of complex medical problems, cannot be simply or quickly transferred without causing significant service disruption. However, there must be a change in the service mix provided by some Areas in order to facilitate the development of services in regions of population growth. One solution is the establishment of networks between the already existing tertiary services programmes and the under-provided regions to ensure and co-ordinate better access, orderly development and, where appropriate, the transfer of services over a period of time. As such, monies were provided to primarily facilitate the development and networking of tertiary services, particularly to growth areas.

        *807 LIDCOMBE HOSPITAL___Mr Nagle asked the Minister for Health___
            Will he intervene to save and preserve Lidcombe Hospital?
            Answer—
            I have approved as of 17 June 1993, the consolidation of the Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital onto the one site at Bankstown and the consequent eventual closure of the Lidcombe Campus. The Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital will be redeveloped to 454 beds on the Bankstown site.
            It should be noted that the Lidcombe Campus is not programmed to close until 1997, when the redevelopment is scheduled for completion.

        *809 ROZELLE MARSHALLING YARDS___Ms Nori asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
            (1) Can he ensure that the SRA will maintain its commitment to scale down its Rozelle marshalling yards operations to the same level it was prior to the closing of the Enfield yards?
            (2) Does the SRA intend to redevelop the Enfield yards as previously announced?
            (3) When will the Rozelle yards be scaled down?
            (4) Why were the Enfield yards closed for redevelopment so much earlier than required?
            Answer—
            (1) Yes. Following the reopening of Enfield Yards, the State Rail Authority will scale down its marshalling operations at Rozelle to the same level that existed prior to June 1992, when State Rail moved its operations from Enfield.
            (2) Yes.
            (3) The State Rail Authority Board is looking at options for the redevelopment of Enfield Marshalling Yard with a view to calling tenders for the new terminal on the basis that the marshalling operations at Rozelle can be scaled down by September 1994.
            (4) The announcement by the National Rail Corporation that it was to construct an intermodal terminal was the catalyst for State Rail to vacate the Enfield site to allow for the redevelopment. However, delays in the establishment of the NRC resulted in slower progress than anticipated.


        Page 1475
        *810 SURGERY PATIENT THOMPSON___Ms Nori asked the Minister for Health___
            (1) Why has Mr J. W. Thompson of McArthur Street, Ultimo, had to wait 13 months so far to gain admittance to St Vincent's Hospital for surgery?
            (2) How much longer will he have to wait?
            (3) If Mr Thompson was privately insured would he have been attended to by now?
            Answer—
            (1) Mr John Whitehead Thompson was first put on a waiting list for a left varicose vein procedure on 1 February 1992. A varicose vein procedure is a non-urgent operation and therefore more urgent and life threatening conditions take priority. Mr Thompson has been advised that if he felt his condition had deteriorated he should make an appointment with his specialist for a clinical assessment to determine if his operation should be given priority.
            (2) Mr Thompson has advised the Bed Allocation Officer at St Vincent's Hospital that he no longer wished to have the procedure at St Vincent's Hospital and therefore his name was removed from the waiting list.
            It is mentioned that Mr Thompson could have been treated at other nearby public hospitals such as Prince Henry, Royal Prince Alfred, Royal North Shore and Manly Hospitals.
            (3) No. Priority for admission to New South Wales public hospitals is based on clinical need.

        *815 DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE POLLUTION___Mr Price asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
            (1) What steps have the SRA taken to reduce the exhaust pollution of the 44 Class and 48 Class diesel locomotives currently being used in the lower Hunter?
            (2) What is the engine maintenance cycle for these locomotives in terms of running hours?
            (3) Where is the maintenance undertaken?
            (4) (a) Will he ensure that spot checks are undertaken, in respect of air pollution and noise pollution, between Thornton and the Clyde Street crossing gates at Islington?
              (b) What were the results of the spot checks?
            Answer—
            (1) State Rail is presently phasing out these engines and introducing engines with more sensitive fuel injection systems. In the meantime, locomotives are examined regularly and if above normal smoke emission is noted they undergo injector changes, air filter changes and examination of the turbo supercharger, as necessary.
            All engine drivers have received instruction on correct throttle notch use to avoid unnecessary smoke emissions. Also, during regular train management courses, drivers are instructed and examined on this subject.
            (2) The engine maintenance cycle for these locomotives in terms of days in operation is:
                14 days—minor servicing.
                56 days—medium servicing.
                112 days—major servicing.
            (3) Broadmeadow Locomotive Maintenance Centre.
            (4) (a) Spot checks of smoke emissions and noise pollution have been undertaken between Woodville Junction and Waratah Station. Noise checks have also been undertaken at the Cardiff Locomotive Workshops.

        Page 1476
              (b) The black smoke emission was present for a few seconds as the locomotives throttled up on trains heading uphill, away from Newcastle. Trains heading downhill did not emit smoke. Noise levels were found to be within prescribed environmental limits.

        *817 TRAIN CANCELLATION___Mr Thompson asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
            Why was the 1.02 p.m. Sydenham to Bankstown train cancelled on 26 March 1993?
            Answer—
            This train service was cancelled due to damage sustained as a result of graffiti and vandalism.

        *818 ROCKDALE GOVERNMENT BUS PASSENGERS___Mr Thompson asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
            How many passengers were carried on each Government bus route servicing Rockdale Railway Station for each year from 1983 to 1992?
            Answer—
            Prior to the installation of State Transit's Automated Ticketing System (STATS), the collection of annual data for individual routes, including patronage, was measured only through ticket sales and revenue. This information is not readily available and would take considerable resources to produce.
            However, data is available for the most recent periodic manual passenger count on all routes through Rockdale Railway Station. This count was conducted between January and April this year. The data collected, which will assist with future route planning, included accurate numbers of passengers utilising the service between specific sections and during certain times.
            Average passengers loads during the morning peak period was measured at 23 passengers while evening services had an average patronage of 24 passengers.
            The automated ticketing system, STATS, shows that a total of 72,261 passengers boarded all of the 8 services through Rockdale during March 1993, excluding those passengers using flash passes, such as schoolchildren and bus/rail passengers.

        *820 RAILWAY STATION TICKET SALES___Mr Ziolkowski asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads___
            How many rail tickets have been sold each month since December 1987 from the following stations:
              (a) Wentworthville?
              (b) Westmead?
              (c) Parramatta?
              (d) Granville?
            Answer—
            CityRail statistics are compiled on the basis of 13 accounting periods each financial year. The average number of tickets issued per accounting period from 1987/88 to 1992/93 is shown below in respect of the stations concerned:

        Page 1477
            Wentworthville 21,341 1987/88
                    20,727 1988/89
                  20,533 1989/90
                    21,124 1990/91
                    20,359 1991/92
                    19,243 1992/93
            Westmead 28,233 1987/88
                    27,091 1988/89
                    27,696 1989/90
                    29,731 1990/91
                    30,585 1991/92
                    31,624 1992/93
            Parramatta 125,371 1987/88
                    124,245 1988/89
        120,110 1989/90
        123,020 1990/91
                    125,918 1991/92
                    122,959 1992/93
            Granville 55,807 1987/88
                    53,720 1988/89
                    54,383 1989/90
                    54,043 1990/91
                    54,421 1991/92
                    53,221 1992/93

        1 APRIL 1993

        (Paper No. 11)

        *823 FIRST PONDS CREEK POLLUTION—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
            (1) What complaints has the Environment Protection Authority received about effluent discharges from the Rouse Hill Caravan Park?
            (2) What environmental impact are such discharges having on "First Ponds Creek"?
            (3) What action has the EPA taken to ensure that no pollution of the creek or neighbouring properties is occurring from the Rouse Hill Caravan Park?
            Answer—
            (1) The EPA has received only two complaints about waste water discharges from the caravan park at Rouse Hill known as OK Caravan Corral.
            (2) There is no evidence that the discharge from the caravan park is adversely affecting the First Ponds Creek.
            (3) The discharge of treated effluent from the caravan park into First Ponds Creek is licensed under the Pollution Control Act. Regular monitoring is carried out to ensure compliance with licence conditions.


        Page 1478
        *824 SUFFOLK PARK—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
            (1) Is he aware of community concern about environmental degradation at Taylor's Lake, Suffolk Park, near Byron Bay?
            (2) Has degradation occurred since Byron Shire Council approved a development application for Lot 36, D.P. 209520, Suffolk Park, Byron Bay?
            (3) Is this site part of an area recommended by the National Parks and Wildlife Service in 1985 for inclusion in the Broken Head Nature Reserve?
            (4) If so, why was it recommended for protection?
            (5) What action will he take to protect the area from further environmental degradation?
            Answer—
            (1) Yes.
            (2) The National Parks and Wildlife Service is unaware of any degradation at Taylor's Lake, Suffolk Park, Byron Bay since council granted development consent for Lot 36, D.P. 209520.
            (3) Lot 36, D.P. 209520 was included in an area of about 60 hectares of private and Crown land referenced to relevant Government authorities in May 1986.
            (4) The National Parks and wildlife Service has made submission to Byron Shire Council relating to the development application in this regard.
            The Department of Conservation and Land Management has yet to consent to the Crown land component of the addition proposal and no formal recommendations have been made by the service to date.
            (5) As a result of council consent, the proponent has an expectation that development of Lot 36 will proceed. However, given the likelihood of endangered fauna occurring within the area, the service recently recommended to the proponent that he prepare a Fauna Impact Statement (FIS) in terms of the Endangered Fauna (Interim Protection) Act 1991. An FIS, would avoid the likelihood of possible litigation against the proponent at a later date.

        *825 GREYSTANES, PENDLE HILL AND TOONGABBIE CREEKS—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
            (1) How many complaints have been made to the Pollution Hotline relating to Greystanes, Pendle Hill and Toongabbie Creeks?
            (2) What has been the nature of those complaints?
            (3) How long does it take EPA officers to investigate the complaints?
            (4) What has been the nature of these investigations?
            (5) What has been the outcome of these investigations?
            (6) What prosecutions have resulted from the investigations?
            Answer—
            (1) Between 1 January 1992 and 30 April 1993, there were 2 complaints made to the Environment Protection Authority's pollution line relating to Greystanes, none for Pendle Hill Creek, and 18 in the Toongabbie Creek Catchment, 10 of which were in the Toongabbie area with the remainder in the Blacktown area.
            (2) The complaints referred to odour, surface oils, colour, suspected sewage or fish kills.
            (3) The EPA's response to complaints varies depending on the nature of the complaint and the likely environmental impact.

        Page 1479
            (4) EPA officers endeavour to identify the source of any pollution. The nature of the investigations varies, but would generally include inspection of the area and any potential sources, as well as collection and analysis of samples when necessary to aid the investigations. Regular surveillance is carried out within the catchments in order to identify and control such sources.
            (5) The EPA's investigations of the reported fish kill lead to the source of pollutant discharge being identified. Sources were not identified following investigations in response to the reports concerning oils and discolouration. Discharges of oily wastes and substances that discolour the waters generally come from surface runoff from the industrial areas within these catchments. Odours are usually caused by stagnant waters.
            (6) The company responsible for the discharge of high pH water, which caused the fish kill, was fined $600 by issue of a tier 3 penalty notice.

        *826 CREDIT ACT CIVIL PENALTY RECEIPTS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads—
            (1) How much money has been obtained from financial institutions, by way of civil penalties, for breaches of the Credit Act in the periods:
              (a) Financial year ending 30 June 1992?
              (b) Between 1 July 1992 and 31 March 1993?
            (2) (a) From which institutions were these civil penalties paid?
              (b) What was the amount from each institution?
            Answer—
            The civil penalty to which the honourable member refers is set out in section 42 of the Credit Act. This section provides that for certain breaches of the legislation by the credit provider, the debtor is not liable to pay to the credit provider the credit charge under a contract affected by such breach. The civil penalty operates, however, subject to an application that may be made by the credit provider to the Commercial Tribunal seeking reinstatement of the affected credit charge. The Tribunal then determines whether to increase the liability of the debtor under an affected contract by reinstating in total or in part the credit charge under that contract.
            Where the Tribunal reinstates in part only the level of the credit charge, the debtor may be either entitled to a refund from the credit provider, or an adjustment to his or her liability under the contract, depending upon whether the contract has been paid out. The order of the Tribunal determines the liability of each debtor under an affected contract. There is no order in the form of a general sum of money made against the credit provider. In some cases, credit providers are prepared to forego the credit charge under a contract which attracts the civil penalty instead of lodging an application with the Commercial Tribunal.
            It is therefore near to impossible to ascertain the total amount of civil penalties which have been foregone by financial institutions.
            However, in a recent decision of the Commercial Tribunal involving the Westpac Bank, the Tribunal endorsed a joint proposal by the parties to reinstate in total the credit charges under an estimated 100,000 contracts which attracted the civil penalty. One of the bases for the Tribunal endorsing the proposal was that Westpac would offer to debtors a refund or an adjustment to the credit charge under an affected contract equivalent to 1 per cent of the credit charge. The offer was made to each debtor by way of newspaper advertisement, an appropriate course given the likely expense involved in notifying personally up to 100,000 debtors. A fund in the vicinity of $2.2 million was set aside to meet any claims. The balance
        Page 1480
        of the fund unclaimed by debtors, estimated to be about $2.1 million, is to be paid into a trust fund to be used for financial counselling services.

        *828 SOUTH WEST SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE CONTRACTS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Health—
            (1) Were funds provided to South West Sydney Area Health Service to allow the Service to enter contracts with private hospitals in Liverpool to provide treatment to public patients awaiting elective surgery at Liverpool Hospital?
            (2) When were these arrangements to commence and with which private hospitals in Liverpool?
            (3) How many beds per day were involved for each private hospital?
            (4) What proportion of these beds were to permit orthopaedic procedures to be undertaken?
            (5) (a) Have the contracted private hospital resources been fully utilised?
              (b) If not:
                (i) What has been the cause of any under-utilisation?
                (ii) What steps have been taken to ensure the contracts are fully undertaken?
            Answer—
            (1) Funds were allocated to South Western Sydney Area Health Service for the Hospital Access Program and these funds were subsequently allocated by the Area to a number of hospitals including Liverpool. The Executive of Liverpool Hospital negotiated access for public patients to a private hospital as part of the Hospital Access Program.
            (2) Bigge Street Private Hospital. To commence from 11 March 1993.
            (3) 16 beds. In addition 2 beds or cots in a paediatric room were to be made available.
            (4) This was not specified.
            (5) (a) No.
              (b) (i) Causes of under-utilisation include:
                  • Objections by some Visiting Medical Officers to transfer of patients to the private hospital.
                  • Reduced orthopaedic activity levels.
                  • Impact of the Hungerford Determination.
                  • Inability to recruit additional registrars.
                (ii) The issues have been extensively discussed with Visiting Medical Officers. Notwithstanding these discussions, it is anticipated that full uptake of contracted beds will not occur due to objections of Visiting Medical Officers to treatment of public patients in private hospitals.

        *830 AZUCENA POLLARD DISAPPEARANCE—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
            (1) What steps have been taken by NSW Police to locate Azucena Pollard and her son since their disappearance in June 1987?
            (2) (a) Will he post a reward for information that might lead to their location?
              (b) If not, why not?
            (3) (a) Is the matter still under active investigation?
              (b) If not, when did the investigation cease?

        Page 1481
            Answer—
            (1) There has been an ongoing police investigation. Inquiries were conducted as recently as 10-11 May 1993.
            (2) (a) No.
              (b) A reward at this stage would be inappropriate.
            (3) (a) Yes.
              (b) Not applicable.

        *832 HOME CARE SERVICE—ELECTORATE OF LIVERPOOL—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
            (1) In the electorate of Liverpool:
              (a) How many people have been refused Home Care service?
              (b) How many people are receiving Home Care?
              (c) For the years 1989, 1990, 1991 and 1992, how many people received Home Care?
            (2) (a) Has Home Care funding been reduced for the current year and in 1992?
              (b) If so, for what reason and by what amount?
            (3) (a) Are people requiring maintenance and/or housekeeping services being refused services or having to wait long periods before the services are provided?
              (b) If so, why?
            Answer—
            (1) (a) No record is available of the number of applicants to Home Care in the electorate of Liverpool.
              (b) As at April 1993, 555 households in the electorate of Liverpool were receiving assistance from Home Care. There will be an estimated 57,839 hours and $1,197,000 spent in the 1992/93 financial year.
              (c) Year Households Hours Total Dollars
                1989/90 612 57,101 $1,043,000
                1990/91 634 58,802 $1,015,000
                1991/92 637 56,790 $1,137,000
            (2) (a) In the electorate of Liverpool, Home Care funding has increased by over $52,000 between 1991/92 and 1992/93.
              (b) Not applicable.
            (3) People who are accepted for Home Care service have no delay in service provision.

        *834 MARSHALL GREEN INQUEST—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
            (1) Did the Coroner hearing the inquest on 25 May 1992, touching the death of Marshall James Green at Crowdy Head on 7 January 1992, find a prima facie case of culpable driving against a person?
            (2) Did the Coroner refer the matter to the Director of Public Prosecutions for consideration as to whether a bill should be filed in relation to the charge of culpable driving?
            (3) What is the result of that referral and when will Mrs Green be advised?


        Page 1482
            Answer—
            (1) Yes.
            (2) Yes.
            (3) The result of the referral to the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions is that on an examination of the police brief, the Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions concluded (in line with comments made by the Coroner) that a jury would be most unlikely to convict the defendant in all the circumstances of the case. In this conclusion, the Deputy Director is supported by the Senior Deputy Director and the Director of Public Prosecutions.
            Accordingly, a decision was made not to proceed by way of an ex officio indictment.
            I understand that Mrs Green was advised of this decision on 7 April 1993.

        *838 DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED GROUP HOMES—BLACKTOWN—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
            (1) How many developmentally disabled are living in group homes within the Blacktown Local Government area?
            (2) How many group homes for the developmentally disabled are there in the Blacktown Local Government area?
            Answer—
            (1) Fifty-five.
            (2) Twelve.

        *849 INTELLECTUALLY DISABLED ACCOMMODATION—HUNTER REGION—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
            (1) Does the Department of Community Services maintain a waiting list of intellectually disabled persons seeking accommodation in departmental cottages in the Hunter region?
            (2) If so, how many persons are on that list?
            (3) How many accommodation places are provided for intellectually disabled persons in departmental cottages in the Hunter region?
            (4) How many vacancies exist in these cottages?
            (5) Has the Department of Community Services undertaken research to determine the number of intellectually disabled persons who may require accommodation in Hunter region Department of Community Services cottages in the future?
            (6) If not, will he authorise such a project to take place?
            Answer—
            (1) The Department of Community Services does not maintain a waiting list of persons with an intellectual disability seeking accommodation in departmental cottages in the Hunter region. The Newcastle/Hunter Valley Placement Committee does however, maintain information concerning persons with an intellectual disability who are seeking permanent accommodation in facilities operated by the Government and non-Government sectors, such as those provided by the Challenge Foundation.
            (2) I suggest that the honourable member for Newcastle contact the Newcastle/Hunter Valley Placement Committee direct in order to obtain the information which he is seeking.
            (3) 149 permanent places and 20 respite places.

        Page 1483
            (4) There are no vacancies existing in houses in the Newcastle/Hunter Valley area, at present.
            (5) and (6) The Area Managers of Hunter Valley and Newcastle areas are currently, through the Area Placement Committee, seeking to identify future acommodation needs in the Newcastle and Hunter Valley areas.
            The results obtained will be used by each Area Manager to assist in preparing their Area Plans for the year 1993/94.

        *850 EMU SLAUGHTERING—Mr Harrison asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
            Will he give a firm assurance that the Government will not move to legalise the slaughter of emus in New South Wales for human consumption or the pet food industry?
            Answer—
            This is a matter that falls under the control of the Hon. Chris Hartcher, M.P., Minister for the Environment.

        *855 COMMERCIAL SERVICES GROUP CONFERENCES—Mr Knight asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
            (1) How much did the Commercial Services Group conference for senior staff at Leura (where T-shirts and caps were provided to participants) cost in total?
            (2) What was the exact location?
            (3) What other conferences, seminars or similar activities have been organised for Commercial Services Group staff?
            (4) On what dates?
            (5) At what venues?
            (6) What was the total cost of each such activity?
            Answer—
            (1) I am advised that the total cost of the 1991/92 Commercial Services Group Corporate Planning Conference was $32,345. This includes the cost of conference facilities and extensive preparation and facilitation by expert advisors.
            (2) Fairmont Resort Hotel, Leura.
            (3) to (6) The Commercial Services Group is a large and diverse commercial organisation with revenues exceeding $340 million and over 9,000 employees.
            It comprises 11 different business units with activities ranging from purchasing, cleaning and mail delivery to telecommunications.
            In accordance with its commercial operation and its charter as a service organisation, the Group periodically conducts seminars, conferences, training sessions, etc. These cover topics from corporate and business planning to preparation for enterprise agreements to Total Quality Service.
            As a result of this commercial approach the Group has been able to markedly improve the standard of service it provides while at the same time significantly reduce the cost to Government.


        Page 1484
        *856 OFFICE REFURBISHMENTS—Mr Knight asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
            In relation to each department or authority under her administration—
            (1) How much was spent on office fit-outs or refurbishment in 1991/92?
            (2) What is the estimated expenditure for 1992/93?
            Answer—
            Department of School Education
            (1) The Actual Expenditure 1991/92 for office fit-outs or refurbishment was $4,660,249.86.
            (2) The Estimated Expenditure 1992/93 for office fit-outs or refurbishment is $2,510,000.
            These totals include expenditure on relocations or fit-outs in all 10 of the Department's regional offices and refurbishment of the 3 sites making up the State Office. Specific areas of expenditure include the distance education facilities at Ryde, amalgamation of the in-service library, facilities for quality assurance staff, data cabling and an education resource centre.
        Ministry of Education and Youth Affairs
            (1) The Actual Expenditure 1991/92 for office fit-outs or refurbishment was $159,000.
            (2) The Estimated Expenditure 1992/93 for office fit-outs or refurbishment is $392,000.
            These figures include the relocation of the Office of Youth Affairs and the Music Examinations Advisory Board following the restructure of the Ministry.
            Board of Studies
            (1) The Actual Expenditure 1991/92 for office fit-outs or refurbishment was $26,227.
            (2) The Estimated Expenditure 1992/93 for office fit-outs or refurbishment is $95,440.
            These figures include the refurbishment of the Board of Studies offices at North Sydney.
            New South Wales TAFE Commission
            (1) The Actual Expenditure 1991/92 for office fit-outs or refurbishment was $3,986,000.
            (2) The Estimated Expenditure 1992/93 for office fit-outs or refurbishment is $1,011,000.
            In relation to TAFE expenditure, part of this relates to the relocation of the TAFE Commission head office to 601 Pacific Highway, St Leonards and Herbert Street, St Leonards. It should be noted that the relocation involves TAFE receiving a substantial rent free incentive which means that the cost of fit-out for these premises is not only covered but in fact a surplus will result.
            Similarly, in relation to the Open Training and Education Network (OTEN) lease in the TNT Tower in Redfern, the lease incentive more than covers the full cost of the fit-out.

        *857 OFFICE REFURBISHMENTS—Mr Knight asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women—
            In relation to each department or authority under her administration—
            (1) How much was spent on office fit-outs or refurbishment in 1991/92?
            (2) What is the estimated expenditure for 1992/93?


        Page 1485
            Answer—
            WORKCOVER
            (1) In 1991/92, WorkCover Authority spent $1,118,000 in office fit-outs and refurbishment. Over $1 million of this amount was due to the relocation to Kent Street.
            (2) In 1992/93, it is estimated that $156,000 will be spent.

            DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND FURTHER EDUCATION
            (1) The total expenditure within the portfolio for the Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education for 1991/92 was:
              Capital expenditure $667,000
              Non-Capital expenditure $ 53,848
                          ________
              $720,848
                          ________
            (2) The estimated expenditure within the portfolio for the Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education for 1992/93 is:
              Capital expenditure $1,007,000
              Non-Capital expenditure $ 750,000
                          __________
                $1,757,000
                          __________
            The increase from 1991/92 to 1992/93 is due to a large number of departmental leases falling due over the same period, coupled with office relocations under the Department's regionalisation program.

        *865 TERRIGAL FIRE STATION—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
            (1) What area is covered by the Terrigal Fire Station?
            (2) How many people are serviced in this area?
            (3) (a) How many vehicles are currently stationed at the Terrigal facility?
              (b) What type and age are these vehicles?
            (4) (a) How many staff are currently employed at the Terrigal Station?
              (b) What are their designations?
            (5) How many rescue vehicles are currently stationed at Terrigal?
            (6) What is the average response time to emergency calls to the Terrigal Fire Station?
            Answer—
            (1) Terrigal, Wamberal, North Avoca and Erina Heights.
            (2) 16,000 based on the 1991 Census Report.
            (3) (a) One.
              (b) A pumper: 12 years.
            (4) (a) Twelve.
              (b) • Captain.
              •Deputy Captain.
              •Engine Keeper.
              •Volunteer Firefighters (9).
            (5) None.

        Page 1486
            (6) 7.4 minutes—this is the average response time from when the alarm is received to the time of brigade arrival at the incident.

        *866 THE ENTRANCE FIRE STATION—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
            (1) What area is covered by The Entrance Fire Station?
            (2) How many people are serviced in this area?
            (3) (a) How many vehicles are currently stationed at The Entrance facility?
              (b) What type and age are these vehicles?
            (4) (a) How many staff are currently employed at The Entrance Station?
              (b) What are their designations?
            (5) How many rescue vehicles are currently stationed at The Entrance?
            (6) What is the average response time to emergency calls to The Entrance Fire Station?
            Answer—
            (1) North Entrance, The Entrance, Long Jetty, Shelley Beach, Bateau Bay and Forresters Beach.
            (2) 19,000 based on the 1991 Census Report.
            (3) (a) Two.
              (b) A pumper: 9 years.
                A water tanker: 14 years.
            (4) (a) Fourteen.
              (b) • Station Officer.
              •Captain.
              •Deputy Captain.
              •Engine Keeper.
              •Volunteer Firefighters (10).
            (5) None.
            (6) 7 minutes—this is the average response time from when the alarm is received to the time of brigade arrival at the incident.

        *874 MYALL LAKES NATIONAL PARK—Mr Martin asked the Minister for the Environment—
            (1) Did the National Parks and Wildlife Service recently increase the camping fees at the Myall Lakes National Park?
            (2) What were the fees in:
              (a) 1988?
              (b) 1989?
              (c) 1990?
              (d) 1991?
              (e) 1992?
              (f) 1993?
            (3) What services are provided by the Service for this fee?
            (4) What is the average family charge for two adults and two children for camping fees in other national parks?
            (5) Will additional services be provided in Myall Lakes National Park from the proceeds of increased fees?
            (6) If so, when?

        Page 1487
            (7) Will additional access to Myall Lakes National Park be provided as a result of increased fees?
            (8) If so, when?
            (9) Will the sewage pump-out service in Myall Lakes National Park be continued?
            (10) Will he allocate $55,000 per hectare for the Myall Lakes National Park as has been suggested for land at Fame Cove?
            Answer—
            (1) Yes.
            (2) and (3) From 1988 to 1992 camping fees were $4 per night for the first two persons plus $1 per additional person. From 1 February 1993 the service introduced a three tiered camping fee structure based on the level of facilities provided. The fees are:
              Upper Level Fee $15 per site per night.
              Mid Range Fee $10 per site per night.
              Basic Camping Fee $5 per site per night.
            The fee attached to specific sites is dependent on the provision of and the type of facilities available such as showers, toilets, fire places, barbecues, tables, etc.
            The site fees relate to the first two persons with each additional person attracting a fee of $2. A $7.50 park use/administration fee applies for the first night's camping only. Children under 5 years are free and there is a limit of six persons per site.
            (4) Camping fees in other national parks across the State are the same as those applying at Myall Lakes National Park.
            (5) and (6) The costs associated with facility improvement are generally beyond the capacity of being met from the existing fee structure. New facilities and up-grading of existing facilities are generally met from the district's maintenance and capital works allocations which are supplemented by funds derived from camping fees.
            (7) Significant improvements have already been made to the access roads in Myall Lakes National Park. Revenue from camping fees is not able to directly meet the substantial costs of new roadworks but will continue to contribute to the maintenance of existing facilities.
            (8) Refer to answer (7) above.
            (9) Planning for a shore-based sewage pumpout facility at Legges Camp has been completed and determination of the review of environmental factors is now proceeding.
            (10) I am not aware what suggestion is referred to.

        *877 NATIONAL PARKS AND ABORIGINAL OWNERSHIP (AMENDMENT) BILL—Mr Mills asked the Minister for the Environment—
            (1) Has the Government considered the report, dated November 1992, of the Legislation Committee upon the National Parks and Wildlife (Aboriginal Ownership) Amendment Bill?
            (2) Will legislation be introduced to give effect to the recommendations of the Committee?
            (3) If so, when?
            (4) If not, why not?
            Answer—
            The Government is currently considering the proposed legislation and the recommendations of the Legislation Committee.


        Page 1488
        *884 ANIMAL WELFARE ADVISORY COMMITTEE—Mr Page asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
            (1) Did he request a report from the Animal Welfare Advisory Committee on cat control?
            (2) When was this request made?
            (3) Has the report been completed?
            (4) Has the report been forwarded to him?
            (5) When will the report be released?
            (6) If it is not to be released, why not?
            (7) Did he, without reference to and without knowledge of the Animal Welfare Advisory Committee, have the Department prepare material for legislation?
            (8) Why did he ignore the expert panel in this animal welfare area?
            Answer—
            (1) Yes.
            (2) 6 March 1992.
            (3) Yes.
            (4) Yes.
            (5) The matter is under consideration.
            (6) See above.
            (7) No announcement has been made on any proposed legislation.
            (8) Not applicable.

        *888 AMBULANCE SERVICE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR REVIEW—Mr Scully asked the Minister for Health—
            (1) Is the NSW Ambulance Service currently reviewing the maintenance and repair operations of the service?
            (2) (a) Why and for what purpose is the maintenance and repair operation being reviewed?
              (b) Who ordered the review?
              (c) Who is conducting the review?
            (3) Is it an option that the maintenance and repair operations of all or part of the Ambulance Service be contracted out to the private sector?
            Answer—
            (1) The Ambulance Service has now completed a review of its maintenance and repair operations.
            (2) (a) As part of the overall restructuring of the Ambulance Service of New South Wales the purpose was to determine whether present workshop facilities area ideally located and to determine whether the operations are being managed in an economical manner.
              (b) The Ambulance Service Board ordered the review.
              (c) The review was conducted internally by staff of the Ambulance Service of New South Wales.
            (3) With the current fleet mix, the Service does not envisage an increase in the contracting out of maintenance and repair operations. However, should the Service alter its fleet mix in the future, as a result of its long-term vehicle replacement program, the possibility of some further contracting out of services exists.

        Page 1489

        *891 STAFF EQUIPMENT—Mr Sullivan asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
            With reference to the Director General of the Premier's Department—
            (1) Does his immediate staff have the use of a photocopy machine?
            (2) If so, what is the brand and model?
            (3) Who is responsible for:
              (a) The selection of the photocopier?
              (b) Determining the time of replacement?
              (c) The payment of servicing and maintenance and other associated costs?
            (4) Does the present photocopier have:
              (a) Automatic document feeder?
              (b) Duplex document feeder?
              (c) (i) Large capacity cassette?
                (ii) If so, what capacity?
              (d) (i) Duplex unit?
                (ii) If so, what capacity?
              (e) (i) Paper size selection?
                (ii) If so, what range of paper sizes?
              (f) (i) Magnification selector?
                (ii) If so, is it automatic?
              (g) Reduction and enlargement?
              (h) Interruption capability?
              (i) Page by page copying?
              (j) Frame erasure?
              (k) Punch hole erasure?
              (l) Cover mode?
              (m) Image shifter?
              (n) Program memory?
              (o) Built-in editing?
              (p) Multiple sheet bypass?
              (q) (i) Bin sorter?
                (ii) If so, what capacity?
              (r) (i) Other than black colour copying?
                (ii) If so, what colours?
            (5) (a) Does the Director General of the Premier's Department have the use of:
                (i) A modular phone?
                (ii) A car phone?
              (b) If so, in each or either case, what is the brand name and model of the phone(s)?
              (c) If yes, in each or either case, who pays for:
                (i) The purchase and installation costs?
                (ii) Each call made?
                (iii) Repairs and maintenance costs?
            Answer—
            (1) Yes.
            (2) to (4) Not relevant.
            (5) (a) (i) Yes.
                (ii) Yes.

        Page 1490
              (b) Not relevant.
              (c) The cost of official phones is met by the Government.

        *892 STAFF EQUIPMENT—Mr Sullivan asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
            With reference to the Premier's Chief of Staff—
            (1) Does his immediate staff have the use of a photocopy machine?
            (2) If so, what is the brand and model?
            (3) Who is responsible for:
              (a) The selection of the photocopier?
              (b) Determining the time of replacement?
              (c) The payment of servicing and maintenance and other associated costs?
            (4) Does the present photocopier have:
              (a) Automatic document feeder?
              (b) Duplex document feeder?
              (c) (i) Large capacity cassette?
                (ii) If so, what capacity?
              (d) (i) Duplex unit?
                (ii) If so, what capacity?
              (e) (i) Paper size selection?
                (ii) If so, what range of paper sizes?
              (f) (i) Magnification selector?
                (ii) If so, is it automatic?
              (g) Reduction and enlargement?
              (h) Interruption capability?
              (i) Page by page copying?
              (j) Frame erasure?
              (k) Punch hole erasure?
              (l) Cover mode?
              (m) Image shifter?
              (n) Program memory?
              (o) Built-in editing?
              (p) Multiple sheet bypass?
              (q) (i) Bin sorter?
                (ii) If so, what capacity?
              (r) (i) Other than black colour copying?
                (ii) If so, what colours?
            (5) (a) Does the Premier's Chief of Staff have the use of:
                (i) A modular phone?
                (ii) A car phone?
              (b) If so, in each or either case, what is the brand name and model of the phone(s)?
              (c) If yes, in each or either case, who pays for:
                (i) The purchase and installation costs?
                (ii) Each call made?
                (iii) Repairs and maintenance costs?
            Answer—
            (1) Yes.

        Page 1491
            (2) to (4) Not relevant.
            (5) (a) (i) Yes.
                (ii) Yes.
              (b) Not relevant.
              (c) The cost of official phones is met by the Government.
        20 APRIL 1993

        (Paper No. 12)

        *905 ROYAL NATIONAL PARK DEER—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
            (1) What advice has he received from the National Parks and Wildlife Service concerning damage to the Royal National Park from exotic deer?
            (2) In the light of revelations on “Media Watch” on 19 April 1993 concerning the membership of the NSW Shooters' Association by The Sydney Morning Herald, will he rescind his moratorium on poisoning deer in the Royal National Park?
            Answer—
            (1) Continued monitoring and studies conducted for the National Parks and Wildlife Service have indicated that smaller native animals were competing with the deer for food. Deer directly compete with wallabies (Wallabia bicolor) for food, particularly in winter when there is a 50 per cent overlap in feeding areas and in times of drought or stress the competition is even more intense.
            As the deer habitually destroy areas of vegetation to create "wallows", it is possible that they may be having other, unrecognised, impacts on native fauna.
            The Service's attempts at regenerating coastal heathland in the park are also being hampered by the deer as they continue to graze on the replantings.
            (2) Alternative control measures are being pursued which protect native species while also providing for the humane removal of the deer.

        *909 EMU CULLING—Mr Beckroge asked the Minister for the Environment—
            (1) (a) As the National Parks and Wildlife Service is issuing licences for the destruction of large numbers of emus in New South Wales, such as one licence for the destruction of 1,000 emus at Tandou in 1992, is your Department keeping a tally of total emu numbers culled across the State in this and recent years?
              (b) If so, what impact is this culling having on the estimates for total emu population numbers in New South Wales?
            (2) Is this information readily available to the public?
            Answer—
            (1) (a) Files are kept in each district.
              (b) Emus are common across their natural range, which includes the whole of western New South Wales. The species occasionally congregate in sufficient numbers to cause economic hardship to property owners. In these cases, licences to cull can be issued.
            (2) Yes.

        Page 1492

        *910 BROKEN HILL BIRTH AND DEATH CERTIFICATES___Mr Beckroge asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice—
            (1) Does the Broken Hill local court no longer issue birth and death certificates?
            (2) If so, does this mean Broken Hill persons must write to Newcastle to get copies of these documents?
            Answer—
            (1) and (2) In September 1992 delays in the introduction of the new computer system at the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages forced the development of an interim system. Changes with the introduction of this interim system were misinterpreted as a discontinuance of Registry services in rural areas. This was not the case.
            Birth and death certificates for events registered prior to 1 September 1992 are still available at country court houses including Broken Hill Local Court.
            For births and deaths registered after 1 September 1992, certificates are available from the Registry's offices in Sydney, Newcastle or Wollongong. Certificates can be obtained within 5 days providing the birth or death has already been registered.
            The new Registry computer system has real advantages for both country and city people. In the past it took 5-6 weeks before a newly registered duplicate birth or death record was available at the local court house. Now deaths are being processed in 3-5 working days and births are registered in under 10 working days.

        *918 LEGAL AID APPLICATIONS___Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice___
            (1) How many applications were made for Legal Aid in:
              (a) New South Wales in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (b) The Hunter in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (c) The electorate of Newcastle in 1992, 1991, 1990?
            (2) How many applications for Legal Aid were granted in:
              (a) New South Wales in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (b) The Hunter in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (c) The electorate of Newcastle in 1992, 1991, 1990?
            (3) What were the number of applications for Legal Aid (Civil Matters) in:
              (a) New South Wales in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (b) The Hunter in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (c) The electorate of Newcastle in 1992, 1991, 1990?
            (4) What were the number of applications granted for Legal Aid (Civil Matters) in:
              (a) New South Wales in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (b) The Hunter in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (c) The electorate of Newcastle in 1992, 1991, 1990?
            (5) What were the special purpose breakdown of all applications granted for Legal Aid (other than Civil Matters) in:
              (a) New South Wales in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (b) The Hunter in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (c) The electorate of Newcastle in 1992, 1991, 1990?

        Page 1493
            (6) What were the costs of Legal Aid (Civil Matters) in:
              (a) New South Wales in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (b) The Hunter in 1992, 1991, 1990?
              (c) The electorate of Newcastle in 1992, 1991, 1990?
            Answer—
            (1) (a) The total number of legal aid applications received by the Legal Aid Commission seeking assistance across all jurisdictions for proceedings conducted in New South Wales was as follows:
                In 1992 a total of 82,581 applications were received.
                In 1991 a total of 87,496 applications were received.
                In 1990 a total of 80,026 applications were received.
              (b) The total number of legal aid applications received by the Commission from applicants residing in the Hunter region was as follows:
                In 1992 a total of 6,619 applications were received.
                In 1991 a total of 7,012 applications were received.
                In 1990 a total of 6,183 applications were received.
              (c) The total number of legal aid applications received by the Commission from applicants residing in the electorate of Newcastle was as follows:
                In 1992 a total of 1,440 applications were received.
                In 1991 a total of 1,560 applications were received.
                In 1990 a total of 1,268 applications were received.
            (2) (a) In New South Wales:
                In 1992 a total of 64,565 applications were granted.
                In 1991 a total of 67,262 applications were granted.
                In 1990 a total of 59,873 applications were granted.
              (b) In the Hunter region:
                In 1992 a total of 5,042 applications were granted.
                In 1991 a total of 5,493 applications were granted.
                In 1990 a total of 4,537 applications were granted.
              (c) In the Newcastle region:
                In 1992 a total of 1,197 applications were granted.
                In 1991 a total of 1,316 applications were granted.
                In 1990 a total of 979 applications were granted.
            (3) (a) The total number of legal aid applications received by the Commission throughout New South Wales in the civil law jurisdiction was as follows:
                In 1992 a total of 4,845 applications were received.
                In 1991 a total of 7,076 applications were received.
                In 1990 a total of 6,176 applications were received.
              (b) The total number of legal aid applications received by the Commission in the civil law jurisdiction from applicants residing in the Hunter region was as follows:
                In 1992 a total of 356 applications were received.
                In 1991 a total of 531 applications were received.
                In 1990 a total of 501 applications were received.
              (c) The total number of legal aid applications received by the Commission in the civil law jurisdiction from applicants residing in the electorate of Newcastle was as follows:
                In 1992 a total of 56 applications were received.
                In 1991 a total of 117 applications were received.
                In 1990 a total of 99 applications were received.

        Page 1494
            (4) (a) The total number of legal aid applications granted by the Commission throughout New South Wales in the civil law jurisdiction was as follows:
                In 1992 a total of 1,454 applications were granted.
                In 1991 a total of 1,674 applications were granted.
                In 1990 a total of 1,897 applications were granted.
              (b) The total number of legal aid applications granted by the Commission in the civil law jurisdiction from applicants residing in the Hunter region was as follows:
                In 1992 a total of 117 applications were granted.
                In 1991 a total of 144 applications were granted.
                In 1990 a total of 185 applications were granted.
              (c) The total number of legal aid applications granted by the Commission in the civil law jurisdiction from applications residing in the electorate of Newcastle was as follows:
                In 1992 a total of 25 applications were granted.
                In 1991 a total of 39 applications were granted.
                In 1990 a total of 36 applications were granted.
            (5) (a) In New South Wales:
                1992 Criminal Law applications approved 52,203
                    Family Law applications approved 8,276
                    Administrative Law applications approved 272
                    Specialist Services applications approved 2,360
                    Total 63,111
                1991 Criminal Law applications approved 53,629
                    Family Law applications approved 9,121
                    Administrative Law applications approved 260
                    Specialist Services applications approved 2,578
                    Total 65,588
                1990 Criminal Law applications approved 45,377
                    Family Law applications approved 10,926
                    Administrative Law applications approved 242
                    Specialist Services applications approved 1,431
                    Total 57,976
              (b) The Hunter region:
              1992 Criminal Law applications approved 4,004
                    Family Law applications approved 761
                    Administrative Law applications approved 9
                    Specialist Services applications approved 151
                    Total 4,925
              1991 Criminal Law applications approved 4,218
                    Family Law applications approved 935
                    Administrative Law applications approved 14
                    Specialist Services applications approved 182
                    Total 5,349
              1990 Criminal Law applications approved 2,908
                    Family Law applications approved 1,350
                    Administrative Law applications approved 15
                    Specialist Services applications approved 79
                    Total 4,352

        Page 1495
              (c) In the electorate of Newcastle:
              1992 Criminal Law applications approved 1,024
                    Family Law applications approved 114
                    Administrative Law applications approved 3
                    Specialist Services applications approved 31
                    Total 1,172
                1991 Criminal Law applications approved 1,115
                    Family Law applications approved 124
                    Administrative Law applications approved 1
                    Specialist Services applications approved 37
                    Total 1,277
                1990 Criminal Law applications approved 712
                    Family Law applications approved 207
                    Administrative Law applications approved 2
                    Specialist Services applications approved 22
                    Total 943
                NB: The category of Specialist Services referred to above includes grants in such areas of specialist legal services as the:
                    Children's Legal Service;
                    Child Support Service;
                    Prisoners' Legal Service;
                    Mental Health Advocacy Service;
                    Supreme Court Bail Service;
                    Veterans' Advocacy Service;
                  and includes grants conducted by private solicitors in these areas.
              (6) (a) The Legal Aid Commission's budgeting and financial reporting systems are prepared on a program basis over financial year periods. Accordingly, it is not possible to provide civil law program costs for New South Wales over the requested calendar years.
                In the alternative, the following financial year net costs of the civil law program for New South Wales are presented:
                    Financial year Net cost*
                    1989/90 $ 8.5 m
                    1990/91 $13.2 m
                    1991/92 $ 4.8 m
                *Note: Net cost is the actual cost of service delivery of the program, inclusive of all resource allocations, expenditures and receipts, relating to the program.
                (b) With regard to the requests for information on civil law costs for the Hunter region and the electorate of Newcastle, the Legal Aid Commission does not budget net program costs for civil law matters originating from applicants in particular geographical areas. Accordingly, it is not possible to provide the information requested.

        *924 GOSFORD TAFE COLLEGE COURSES—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
            (1) What courses available at Gosford TAFE College in 1992 are not available at this college in 1993?

        Page 1496
            (2) What reasons are advanced for cancellation?
            (3) How many students were enrolled in each of these courses in 1992?
            (4) How many students were enrolled in Gosford TAFE in the years 1991, 1992 and the present year?
            (5) How many courses were conducted at Gosford TAFE in the years 1991 and 1992?
            (6) How many courses are currently being conducted at Gosford TAFE?
            (7) How many teachers were employed at Gosford TAFE in the years 1991 and 1992?
            (8) How many teachers are currently employed at Gosford TAFE?
            Answer—
            The information requested by the honourable member for The Entrance is lengthy, statistical and mainly tabular in nature. The material could be more efficiently obtained by direct reference to the Hunter Institute of Technology.
            The Director, Mr Dick Jordan, may be contacted on telephone No. (049) 61 7222. The address of the Institute office is Newcastle College of TAFE, Maitland Road, Tighes Hill.

        *927 WOLLONGONG TAFE COLLEGE COURSES—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
            (1) What courses which were available at Wollongong TAFE College in 1992 are not available in 1993?
            (2) Why were these courses cancelled?
            (3) How many students were enrolled in these classes in 1992?
            (4) Were any students unable to continue their courses in the Illawarra region due to these cancellations?
            (5) How many courses were conducted at Wollongong TAFE College in:
              (a) 1991?
              (b) 1992?
            (6) How many courses are currently being conducted at Wollongong TAFE College?
            (7) How many teachers were employed at Wollongong TAFE College in:
              (a) 1991?
              (b) 1992?
            (8) How many teachers are currently employed at Wollongong TAFE College?
            Answer___
            The information requested by the honourable member for The Entrance is lengthy, statistical and mainly tabular in nature. The material could be more efficiently obtained by direct reference to the Illawarra Institute of Technology,
            The Director, Mr Brendan O'Reilly, may be contacted on telephone No. (042) 26 4723. The address of the Institute is Level 3, Transport House, 1 Rawson Street, Wollongong.

        *928 EUROPEAN WASP ERADICATION—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
            (1) Is the Department of Agriculture advising people seeking assistance in the eradication of the European wasp that they must deal with the matter personally?

        Page 1497
            (2) Have members been advised that this situation has arisen because the officer with the expertise on the European wasp has retired and the Department is unable to inspect outbreaks of European wasp because of staff shortages?
            (3) If so, will he ensure the Department of Agriculture employs a qualified person to inspect outbreaks of European wasp and advise people of the methods of eradication?
            (4) Will he instruct the Department of Agriculture to give a high priority to an effective eradication programme?
            (5) Will he instruct the Department of Agriculture to set up a small group of Department officers to work in co-operation with local government to trace and destroy this introduced pest?
            (6) Will he instruct the Department of Agriculture to set up an eduction program for schools and a media campaign to increase the public's awareness of this pest and the need for its elimination?
            Answer—
            (1) People seeking advice from NSW Agriculture on controlling European wasps are told that next destruction is a hazardous operation that should only be attempted by experienced people such as pest controllers. If specific instructions for destroying nests are requested, these are provided, along with warnings about the hazards involved and specific safety instructions.
            (2) After the retirement of Mr Dennis Payne in 1992, Mr Michael Heesom, Technical Officer (Scientific), was designated as the office, responsible for European wasp nest destruction in situations were NSW Agriculture was the appropriate body to treat nests. He is extremely competent, has considerable experience in nest destruction and has destroyed several large nests in emergency situations since assuming this extra duty. Departmental policy is that the responsibility for destroying European wasp nests rests with the owners of occupiers of the property on which a nest occurs. The Department would, however, destroy nests in certain situations, such as emergencies involving schools, hospitals and homes for the elderly. This policy is still in operation today and NSW Agriculture continues to meet its obligations under it.
            (3) NSW Agriculture currently provides information on European wasp control through a number of sources, including pamphlets, the Entomology Inquiry Officer at the Biological and Chemical Research Institute, Rydalmere, and most recently, a 0055 recorded information service.
            (4) The Department attempted to contain European wasp by destroying all nests reported to it from 1978 to 1990. Two full-time staff members were dedicated to this program. Nest numbers remained low until 1985, when they increased dramatically, and have continued to increase since then. This increase occurred despite an unchanged commitment by the Department to nest destruction.
            Subsequent analysis of the relationship between the number of wasp nests and annual rainfall between 1978 and 1990 suggests that nest numbers may have remained low in the early part of the control campaign due to low rainfall and may not have been greatly influenced by the nest destruction campaign. This finding casts doubt on the ability of any control campaign utilising available technology to eradicate European wasp.
            (5) Past experience has shown that a small group of people destroying European wasp nests will have little overall impact on wasp numbers. The most efficient way of dealing with the European wasp problem is for the owners and occupiers of land to take responsibility for destroying nests. NSW Agriculture will continue to assist householders in dealing with the wasp by providing advice on wasp biology, control and first-aid treatment of wasp stings
        Page 1498
        through the production of pamphlets, the Entomology Inquiry Officer and a 0055 recorded information service.
            (6) In 1985, NSW Agriculture (then the Department of Agriculture) embarked upon a community awareness program to help the public understand the threat posed by European wasp and how it should be dealt with. A brochure on European wasp was produced which was, and still is, distributed free of charge. A video and static display were also put together and loaned to schools and councils. In addition, departmental entomologists have spoken to pest controllers, beekeepers and community groups about European wasp. Most recently, a 0055 recorded information line was established to assist with the dissemination of accurate information.
            I believe that the Department's efforts in increasing public awareness of European wasp have been far-sighted, well-resourced and highly successful.

        *929 EGG PRICING—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
            (1) Why are similar sized eggs in supermarkets all the same price as at 1 March 1993?
            (2) Who was the Director of the former Egg Corporation?
            (3) Who is the Chairman of the NSW Egg Co-operative?
            (4) Does the NSW Egg Co-operative manipulate the wholesale price of eggs to supermarkets by manipulating the volume of supply?
            (5) Why are eggs more expensive than at the time of deregulation?
            (6) Which producers are reaping the profits from the wholesale price of eggs?
            (7) (a) Did any of these producers receive payments from the Government at the time of deregulation?
              (b) If so, what amounts?
            (8) Are egg prices being fixed in the majority of supermarkets by the NSW Egg Producers Co-operative?
            (9) Are retailers to blame for egg profiteering after deregulation of the egg industry?
            (10) If so, does he condone the actions of the NSW Egg Producers Co-operative in fixing the wholesale price in supermarkets?
            (11) If not, what action will he take to stop the practice?
            (12) Is he aware of incidents involving the stoppage of competitors' egg trucks by the NSW Egg Co-operative?
            (13) Does he condone this practice?
            (14) What action will he take to prevent a repetition of such incidents?
            Answer—
            (1) In deregulating the New South Wales egg industry in July 1989, I placed eggs on the same footing as most other food products marketed and distributed in New South Wales. The price of eggs is now subject entirely to the forces of supply and demand.
            (2) The Chairman of the NSW Egg Corporation at the time of deregulation was Mr Max Moore Wilton, who had held the position since September 1987. The Managing Director of the Egg Corporation at the time of deregulation was Mr Graham Forster.
            (3) This organisation is not answerable to me.
            (4) This organisation is not answerable to me.
            (5) NSW Agriculture's egg price survey shows that the nominal farmgate and retail prices of eggs is still below the level just prior to deregulation nearly 4 years ago. When one takes account of inflation in the intervening period, this means that there have been substantial falls in the real (farmgate and retail) price of eggs.

        Page 1499
            (6) This information is not available.
            (7) (a) All New South Wales egg producers holding egg quota at the time of deregulation received compensation. It follows that a significant proportion of current industry participants received compensation.
              (b) The compensation amounted to $15 per hen quota.
            (8) This organisation is not answerable to me.
            (9) This organisation is not answerable to me.
            (10) This organisation is not answerable to me.
            (11) This organisation is not answerable to me.
            (12) This organisation is not answerable to me.
            (13) This organisation is not answerable to me.
            (14) This organisation is not answerable to me.

        *932 TAFE COURSE WAITING LISTS—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
            (1) Are there close to 40,000 TAFE students on waiting lists?
            (2) Has the cutting of Stream 1000 courses created a large pool of under-employed TAFE teachers?
            (3) What measures have been taken to retrain these teachers in areas such as computer studies, hospitality and business studies which have long waiting lists?
            Answer___
            (1) As at 12 March 1993, the number of people unable to gain admission to the course of their first choice stood at 39,077. The figure for the same period last year was 51,750.
            As has been the case in past years, many of these students have since enrolled in other courses or at alternative colleges/campuses. Others will find opportunities in new classes now being started or in classes to be opened in Semester 2.
            Inevitably, some students will remain unplaced, for example where the number of applicants for a particular course does not meet the minimum required to operate a class.
            In certain cases, however, demand outstripped the capacity of the system to provide places and the capacity of industry to provide employment to future graduates.
            Total TAFE enrolments are on target to reach a record 450,000 by the end of the year.
            (2) No—Two years ago, the Government took the deliberate decision to move Stream 1000, or "hobby", courses away from the TAFE sector and to offer them through the Adult and Community Education (ACE) system. This has freed the TAFE Commission to direct its effort more effectively towards its core business—the provision of vocational education and training. The result has been a significant expansion in employment-related courses and an increase in vocational enrolments.
            TAFE NSW has implemented this decision without giving rise to a large pool of under-employed TAFE teachers. The delivery of Stream 1000 courses only ever represented a small part of most full-time teachers' total work load. The reduction in Stream 1000 courses has allowed all teachers to concentrate on vocational areas. The transition has occurred smoothly and without major industrial tension or disruption.
            (3) Over the last 2 years, TAFE NSW has substantially expanded its provision of vocational education and training in key growth areas, including computer studies, hospitality and business studies.

        Page 1500
            New teachers have been recruited, the teaching loads of existing staff have been extended, new facilities have been constructed and every effort has been made to increase the capacity of the system to handle the controlled growth of enrolments in these areas.
            Where appropriate, full-time staff qualified in other contracting areas have been retrained for deployment in high demand areas, such as computing and pre-vocational education courses.
            However, there are limitations on this approach, including the need for industry experience and expertise, the preference of the individual staff member and the time required to retrain staff to an appropriate standard.

        *934 SYDNEY MARITIME MUSEUM—Ms Nori asked the Treasurer and Minister for the Arts—
            (1) (a) Has the Sydney Maritime Museum an agreement for lease with the Darling Harbour Authority to operate for 10 years from January 1988 with an option for an additional 10 years?
              (b) If so, why does the Darling Harbour Authority want to accelerate the departure of the Sydney Maritime Museum?
            (2) (a) Has the Sydney Maritime Museum expressed a wish to exercise its option?
              (b) If so, what action has been taken by the Darling Harbour Authority?
            (3) As the Darling Harbour Authority, the Maritime Services Board, the National Maritime Museum and the Ministry for the Arts have all offered to help the Museum find alternative accommodation, why has no long-term solution been found yet?
            (4) Has the Darling Harbour Authority suggested that the Sydney Maritime Museum should simply anchor the former Sydney ferry Kanangra and the James Craig in mid-stream?
            (5) (a) Is it Government policy that the Sydney Maritime Museum should be handed over to the Commonwealth and incorporated within the Australia National Maritime Museum?
              (b) If so, what is the nature and extent of the consultation with the bodies concerned?
            Answer—
            (1), (2) and (4) The Darling Harbour Authority falls within the responsibility of my colleague, the Hon. R. J. Webster, M.L.C., Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing.
            (3) I have spent considerable time and effort to assist the Sydney Maritime Museum find a long-term accommodation solution. None of the proposals put forward was acceptable to the Museum's Board.
            (5) (a) No.
              (b) Not applicable.

        *935 PROTECTIVE COMMISSIONER___Ms Nori asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice___
            (1) What is the role and terms of reference to the Office of the Protective Commissioner?
            (2) (a) Does its duties include ensuring that their clients, who are in institutions like nursing homes, are properly cared for?
              (b) If not, why not?
            Answer—
            (1) The Protective Commissioner operates under the provisions of the Protected Estates Act 1983 and Part 76 of the Supreme Court Rules.

        Page 1501
            The role of the Protective Commissioner is to manage the affairs of those persons who are incapable of managing their own affairs and whose affairs have been formally committed to management by order under the Protected Estates Act, and to direct, supervise and enforce the performance and duties of private managers appointed by the Court to manager the affairs of those persons.
            (2) (a) The Protective Commissioner ensures that clients in nursing homes and other such institutions are properly cared for. Close liaison is maintained with the client's family and friends, and staff members frequently make personal visits to clients in nursing homes.
                In appropriate cases, the Protective Commissioner may seek a report from a Court Visitor appointed under section 79 of the Protected Estates Act, as to the condition of and care received by a client in an institution.
                As a result of these enquiries and reports, the Office of the Protective Commissioner frequently arranges the provision of specifically designed beds and chairs to give greater comfort and organises specialist medical reports or a paid companion to take the person out of the institutional environment for a period of time.
                In other cases, subject to the views of the client and his or her family and friends, the report results in the client being transferred to some more appropriate nursing home.
              (b) Not applicable.

        *942 STAFF EQUIPMENT—Mr Sullivan asked the Treasurer and Minister for the Arts—
            With reference to the Secretary of the Ministry of Arts—
            (1) Does his immediate staff have the use of a photocopy machine?
            (2) If yes, what is the brand and model?
            (3) Who is responsible for:
              (a) The selection of the photocopier?
              (b) Determining the time of replacement?
              (c) The payment of servicing and maintenance and other associated costs?
            (4) Does the present photocopier have:
              (a) Automatic document feeder?
              (b) Duplex document feeder?
              (c) Large capacity cassette—if yes, what capacity?
              (d) Duplex unit—if yes, what capacity?
              (e) Paper size selection—if yes, what range of paper sizes?
              (f) Magnification selector—if yes, is it automatic?
              (g) Reduction and enlargement?
              (h) Interruption capability?
              (i) Page by page copying?
              (j) Frame erasure?
              (k) Punch hole erasure?
              (l) Cover mode?
              (m) Image shifter?
              (n) Program memory?
              (o) Built-in editing?
              (p) Multiple sheet bypass?
              (q) Bin sorter—if yes, what capacity?
              (r) Other than black colour copying—if yes, what colours?
            (5) Does the Secretary of the Ministry of Arts have the use of:
              (a) A modular phone?
              (b) A car phone?

        Page 1502
            (6) If yes, in each or either case, what is the brand name and model of the phone(s)?
            (7) If yes, in each or either case, who pays for:
              (a) The purchase and installation costs?
              (b) Each call made?
              (c) Repairs and maintenance costs?
            Answer—
            (1) Yes.
            (2) to (4) Not relevant.
            (5) (a) Yes.
              (b) No.
            (6) Not relevant.
            (7) The cost of official phones is met by the Government.

        21 APRIL 1993

        (Paper No. 13)

        *946 NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICE PARK RANGERS—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
            (1) What is the total number of employees of the National Parks and Wildlife Service?
            (2) How many of these employees are designated as park rangers?
            (3) Of those employees designated as park rangers, how many are based outside of those national parks?
            (4) Of those employees designated as park rangers, how many work from an office inside a national park?
            (5) Since 1988, how many national parks have had resident rangers removed or reduced in number?
            (6) What parks have been affected by such reductions?
            (7) Which national parks in New South Wales had resident rangers within the parks' boundaries as at March 1988?
            (8) Which national parks had resident rangers within the parks' boundaries as at March 1993?
            (9) In the case of a ranger or rangers being withdrawn from residence, why was this action deemed necessary?
            Answer—
            (1) 1,155.
            (2) 181.
            (3) 115.
            (4) 62.
            (5) 2.
            (6) Dharug National Park, Brisbane Water National Park.
            (7) Blue Mountains, Dharug, Brisbane Water, Bouddi, Munmorah, Myall Lakes, Booti Booti, Royal, Ku-ring-gai Chase, Marramarra, Lane Cove, Garigal, Cattai, Sydney Harbour, Botany Bay, Kinchega, Mootwingee Warrumbungle, Mungo, Morton, Kosciusko.

        Page 1503
            (8) Blue Mountains, Dharug, Brisbane Water, Bouddi, Munmorah, Myall Lakes, Booti Booti, Royal, Ku-ring-gai Chase, Marramarra, Lane Cove, Garigal, Cattai, Sydney Harbour, Botany Bay, Kinchega, Mootwingee Warrumbungle, Mungo, Morton, Kosciusko, Wollemi.
            (9) No rangers have been withdrawn from residences. Residences that became vacant because of ranger transfers are now occupied by field officers, also known as park workers.

        *948 SPEEDING OFFENCES—MOUNT DRUITT AND BLACKTOWN PATROLS___Mr Amery asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services___
            (1) What are the five most successful locations (based on infringement notices issued for speeding offences) in the Mount Druitt Police Patrol and the Blacktown Police Patrol?
            (2) What is the number of infringements issued, to the year ending 31 March 1993, at these locations?
            Answer—
            (1) and (2) The success of the speed camera program is not based on individual locations. Rather, it is part of an overall strategy to improve driver behaviour on our roads.
            Speed cameras were introduced in New South Wales in April 1991. The road toll for 1991 and 1992 was reduced to 663 and 649 respectively.
            The success of this initiative is evidenced by the fact that the State's road toll in 1992 was the lowest since 1951 and showed a remarkable improvement from its peak of 1,253 in 1982.

        *949 COMMUNITY ARTS EXPENDITURE—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Treasurer and Minister for the Arts—
            (1) How much has been allocated for expenditure and actually been spent on Community Arts in this State in:
              (a) 1988?
              (b) 1989?
              (c) 1990?
              (d) 1991?
              (e) 1992?
            (2) What is expected to be spent on Community Arts programs in New South Wales in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
            (3) How does the expenditure on Community Arts compare to that of other States of Australia in the years 1988 to 1992, inclusive?
            Answer—
            (1)
        1987/88Ministry for the Arts
                  Community Arts Program
                  Capital Assistance Program
                  Carnivale

        Total
          $
        703,678
        85,500
        458,000

        1,247,178
        Page 1504
        1988
        NSW Bicentennial Council
                  Commemorative Program
                  Arts and Entertainment
                  Local Government Initiatives Grants
        $
        48,752,846
        5,875,542
        6,245,106
        A significant proportion of Council grants were allocated to community arts projects and events.
        The total NSW Government allocation for Bicentennial Programs was $82 million.
        1988/89Ministry for the Arts
                  Community Arts Program
                  Carnivale

        Total
          $
        652,971
        560,000

        $1,212,971
        1989/90Ministry for the Arts
                  Community Arts Program
                  Capital Assistance Program
                  Carnivale

        Total
          $
        666,820
        75,929
        533,000

        $1,275,749
        1990/91Ministry for the Arts
                  Service Organisations Program
                  Capital Assistance Program
                  Carnivale

        Total
          $
        620,453
        53,780
        446,000

        $1,119,233
        1991/92Ministry for the Arts
                  Service Organisations Program
                  Capital Assistance Program
                  Carnivale

        Total
          $
        693,301
        30,638
        445,000

        $1,168,939
        1992/93Ministry for the Arts
                  Service Organisations Program
                  Capital Assistance Program
                  Carnivale
                  Area Assistance Scheme/Ministry for the Arts
                  pick-up funding
                    Total
          $
        723,400
        22,500
        455,000
        127,617

        $1,328,517
          The figures are based on actual total expenditure in the Ministry for the Arts annual reports for the relevant financial years, and the NSW Bicentennial Council Reports to the NSW Government April 1989.

          Page 1505
          The figures do not include indirect Government assistance for community arts through the State's cultural institutions, or indirect Ministry for the Arts assistance through other art form grant programs that overlap and benefit community arts development in New South Wales and other Government Departments.

          (2)


          1992/93Ministry for the Arts—allocated
                    Service Organisations Program
                    Creative Cultures
                    Multicultural Arts Program
                    Ministry pick-up funding Area Assistance Scheme
                    Carnivale

          Total
          $
          637,720
          100,000
          120,000
          238,532
          455,000

          $1,551,252
          1993/94Ministry for the Arts—estimated
                    Service Organisations Program
                    Creative Cultures
                    Multicultural Arts Program
                    Ministry pick-up funding Area Assistance Scheme
                    Carnivale

          Total
            $
          638,000
          100,000
          120,000
          307,116
          455,000

          $1,620,000
                (3) Very favourably. New South Wales leads the nation in the range and diversity of Government expenditure and support for community arts development and the overall level of Government expenditure on the arts.
                The Ministry for the Arts has been advised by the Statistical Advisory Group of the Cultural Ministers' Council that there are no comparative figures for State Government expenditure in community arts available at present. Funding for community arts is allocated differently in each state as community arts funding tends to overlap with other traditional art form funding, particularly in the performing arts, visual arts, festivals and the relatively new area of Government support for multicultural arts development.
                The Statistical Advisory Group's most recent published figures for State and Territory Governments cultural funding are for the years 1988/89*. Though these figures relate to all cultural funding they do indicate the context and relative levels of State Government expenditure on the arts; and show quite clearly the strength of this Government's support for the arts in general and support for community arts.

            Page 1506


























                *Cultural Funding. Cultural Ministers' Council Statistical Advisory Groups. Australia Council publication March 1991, page 18.


            *952 BATHURST CITY COUNCIL—GENERAL MANAGER___Mr Clough asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives___
                (1) Is Bathurst City Council currently considering appointing a General Manager to its staff?
                (2) If so, what is the salary range being considered?
                (3) Will this position replace the present Town Clerk position?
                (4) What other senior council officer position would be affected by the appointment of a General Manager?
                (5) What savings would occur?
                Answer—
                The Bathurst City Council advised on 12 August 1993 as follows:
                (1) Council appointed Mr Chris Pitkin as General Manager on 21 July 1993.
                (2) The salary package applicable to the position is $125,000.
                (3) Yes.
                (4) None.
                (5) Not known (if any) at this stage.


            Page 1507
            *954 OBERON SHIRE CLERK—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
                (1) Has the Shire Clerk of Oberon Shire recently indicated he will retire?
                (2) When would he normally be eligible to retire?
                (3) Are arrangements being made to pay the Shire Clerk a special redundancy package?
                (4) Where did this proposal originate and was it supported by elected members of Council?
                (5) What is the amount of the proposed package?
                (6) Is it over and above the Shire Clerk's normal entitlements?
                Answer—
                (1) No. However, the Oberon Shire Council has advised that the position of Shire Clerk be declared redundant from 30 June 1993. The Shire Clerk, Mr Colin Pritchard, has accepted the Council's redundancy package in accordance with the terms and conditions contained in the copy of the attached signed agreement between the parties.
                (2) The Oberon Shire Council has advised that the Shire Clerk would be eligible to retire whenever he chooses.
                (3) Yes. See answer to question (5).
                (4) The Oberon Shire Council has advised that these matters were the subject of confidential discussions between the Shire President and the Shire Clerk. The proposals were drawn to the Council's attention in a Presidential Minute to an Ordinary Meeting of the Council on 5 April 1993. The attached agreement was drawn up on the recommendation of the NSW Division of the Institute of Municipal Management. The agreement was ratified by the Council at its Ordinary Meeting on 3 May 1993 in the Committee of the Whole.
                (5) The Oberon Shire Council has advised that the terms of the redundancy package referred to as Annexure "A" (not disclosed by the Council) in the agreement refers to normal leave entitlements and a concessional payment not exceeding the maximum prescription contained in section 97 of the Local Government Act.
                (6) See answer to question (5).

            *957 LEGAL AID COMMISSION MONIES OWED TO NEWCASTLE/LAKE MACQUARIE BASED LAWYERS___Mr Face asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice___
                (1) What amount of money is owed by the Legal Aid Commission, as at 31 December 1992, to lawyers based in Newcastle and Lake Macquarie cities?
                (2) How many firms and/or sole practitioners are owed money?
                (3) For what periods of time have the payments been owed?
                (4) What is the reason for the delay in payment?
                (5) When will the payments be made?
                Answer—
                (1) As at 31 December 1992, 594 separate claims, made to the Legal Aid Commission of New South Wales by solicitors based in the Newcastle and Lake Macquarie areas, were outstanding. The total value of these claims was $1,133,654.10.
                However, the Commission estimates that approximately $907,000 of that amount was actually owed.

            Page 1508
                The reason for this variation is the fact that accounts in many matters are calculated and initially recorded by the Commission on the basis that 100 per cent of scale fee is payable to the solicitor. In fact, 80 per cent of the scale fee is the percentage generally payable.
                (2) The 594 claims referred to above had been made by a total of 82 firms and/or sole practitioners.
                (3) As at 31 December 1992:
                      •148 claims (totalling $186,737.60) had been outstanding for 30 days or less.
                      •157 claims (totalling $234,869.84) had been outstanding for up to 60 days.
                      •125 claims (totalling $192,264.30) had been outstanding for up to 90 days.
                      •56 claims (totalling $117,112.44) had been outstanding for up to 120 days.
                      •108 claims (totalling $402,669.92) had been outstanding for over 120 days.
                (4) The Legal Aid Commission constantly monitors outstanding claims. In view of the fact that the Commission must operate within a budget and treat all practitioners equitably, it is essential that payments occur in an orderly manner. Claims that have remained outstanding for a period of time are usually awaiting further advice from a practitioner, reassessment or final approval. There is generally only a short delay between approval for payment and actual payment.
                (5) By 30 April 1993, 132 of the 594 claims (made by 13 firms and/or sole practitioners) remained outstanding. The total value of outstanding claims had been reduced to $371,851.15. Payments will be made once the remaining claims have been assessed and approved.

            *958 BUSINESS AWARDS—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Small Business and Minister for Regional Development—
                (1) Does the NSW Government provide awards for initiatives by business in New South Wales in the following areas of enterprise:
                  (a) Small business?
                  (b) Manufacturing?
                  (c) Export development?
                  (d) Import replacement?
                (2) If so, which Departments auspice such awards?
                (3) If not, which private sector or Federal Government awards systems are facilitated by the Department of State Development?
                (4) Does the Department of State Development actively promote these award systems as a means of promoting business initiative in New South Wales?
                (5) How does this promotion take place?
                Answer—
                (1) The NSW Government sponsors the annual NSW Awards for Small Business in recognition of the contribution this sector makes to our economy. The Government's sponsorship this year is $65,000 for the Small Business of the Year and eleven regional awards. The awards are open to small businesses throughout the State, competing in nine industry and eleven regional categories.
                Through its participation in the National Industry Extension Service (NIES), the NSW Government also supports companies which participate in a wide variety of special industry awards, such as the VAM-M Award for Excellence, the Export Achievement Award and the NSW Exporter of the Year Award.
                (2) The Office of Small Business is a co-sponsor of the Small Business Awards and the National Industry Extension Service (NIES) provides sponsorship and financial assistance for manufacturing and export awards.

            Page 1509
                (3) These Awards are all in partnership with private sector and other Government organisations. The Small Business Awards are jointly facilitated by the Office of Small Business, The Daily Telegraph Mirror newspaper, the Commonwealth Bank, GIO, the Institute of Chartered Accountants, the Department of Employment, Education and Training, the State Chamber of Commerce, Apple Computers, Telecom and the NSW Chamber of Manufactures.
                (4) Yes.
                (5) The Office of Small Business promotes the Small Business Awards through advertising and editorials in the print media throughout the State and by regional radio. Entry forms are available throughout the metropolitan and regional offices of the new Department.
                The VAM-M Award is promoted to potential applicants by NIES Industry Advisers and by distribution of brochures.
                Export Achievement and Exporter of the Year Awards are promoted by NIES Industry Advisers to potential applicants and through seminars and by direct mail.

            *962 AINSWORTH COMPLAINTS___Mr Hatton asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services___
                (1) (a) Have the NSW Police any figures on the separate number of individual complaints, during the past 11 years, against Detective Sergeant L. Hanrahan and Detective Sergeant R. C. Clark by Leonard Hastings Ainsworth?
                  (b) If so, what are the complaints against each officer over the period referred?
                (2) Have any of the Ainsworth complaints made alleged that either Clark and/or Hanrahan personally received any corrupt payments, or advantage of any type, as a direct result of their official police investigations into the Ainsworth group of companies?
                (3) Did the former Ombudsman establish a bribe offer made on behalf of Ainsworth of $500,000 had been made to Hanrahan in May 1983, designed to influence the outcome of pending court proceedings against Ainsworth?
                (4) Did Detective Sergeant Hanrahan subsequently report the bribe offer to Internal Affairs through normal police procedural channels?
                (5) (a) Has there ever been any allegation against Hanrahan/Clark suggesting they are/have been corruptly motivated in their investigations of either Ainsworth or the Ainsworth group of companies?
                  (b) If so, what are:
            (i) The exact allegations?
            (ii) The complainants?
                    (iii) The responses to the allegations/assertions?
                (6) Have Clark, Hanrahan, Vincent or Burden, Special Licensing/Task Force 2 (serving and/or former members of the NSW Police), ever been:
                  (a) Complained about to the Internal Affairs by other than the Ainsworth related complaints?
                  (b) Complained about to the NSW Police by other than the Ainsworth related complaints?
                (7) If so, what was:
                  (a) The finding of the complaint?
                  (b) The penalty, if applicable, in each case?
                (8) (a) Did the former NSW Ombudsman find any complaints against either Hanrahan and/or Clark sustained?

            Page 1510
                  (b) If so, what are the deatils of the:
                  (i) Exact complaint as sustained?
                  (ii) Exact nature of the former Ombudsman's recommendation in respect to the complaints?
                (9) During the Hanrahan defamation case, did Leonard Hastings Ainsworth give evidence in the course of the proceedings that could be sufficient grounds to review his company's suitability to hold a licence under the provisions of the Liquor Act?
                Answer—
                (1) (a) The number and complexity of the complaints against both police over a number of years has made it almost impossible to ascertain the exact number of individual complaints levelled against Detective Sergeant Clark and Sergeant Hanrahan.
                  (b) Not available.
                (2) No.
                (3) Mr Masterman, the former Ombudsman in his "Ombudsman Report No. 2" dated 14 October 1986, found that a bribe offer had been made to Sergeant Hanrahan on 24 May 1983.
                (4) Yes.
                (5) (a) The number and nature of complaints made by Mr Ainsworth infer corrupt actions on behalf of Hanrahan and Clark. The issues of complaint levelled against these two police officers indicate a general allegation that they have been corruptly motivated in their dealings with Ainsworth and his group of companies.
                  (b) (i) There are no specific allegations, only inferences can be drawn from the tenor of the complaints.
                    (ii) No specific complaints.
                    (iii) Both Sergeant Hanrahan and Detective Sergeant Clark have always steadfastly claimed that their investigations into Ainsworth and his group of companies have been carried out properly and ethically.
                (6) (a) With the exception of the Ainsworth matters, Clark, Burden and Vincent have no complaints recorded. Hanrahan has one complaint recorded on 29 March 1989 of "Fail to take necessary/appropriate action".
                  (b) As above.
                (7) (a) The complaint against Hanrahan was finalised "NOT SUSTAINED" on 22 October 1990.
                  (b) Not applicable.
                (8) (a) Yes.
                  (b) (i) and (ii) The previous Ombudsman, Mr George Masterman, found during his investigation into the supply of certain material to staff employed by the former Leader of the Opposition, Mr Nick Greiner, M.P., that Sergeants Hanrahan and Clark had breached Rules 50 and 51 of the Rules made pursuant to the Police Regulation Act 1899, and in so doing acted "contrary to law within the meaning of the Act".
                      However, the Ombudsman stated in that report, "in my view the circumstances disclosed in evidence and discussed in topics in this report were exceptional. I believe that taken in combination (including the diary entry itself) these circumstances reasonably gave rise in the minds of Sergeant Hanrahan and Detective Sergeant Clark to a strong suspicion that powerful forces (possibly including some very senior members of the NSW Police Force) were ranged against their investigation. I believe that Sergeant Hanrahan and Detective Sergeant Clark were dedicated honest police officers. In all the circumstances, I propose to recommend that no action should be taken against them".

            Page 1511
                (9) I am advised by the Commissioner of Police that there could be sufficient grounds to review Mr Ainsworth's companys suitability to hold a licence under the provisions of the Liquor Act.
                  The Police Service is currently examining the issue to determine whether there are grounds for a review.

            *964 INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY HEALTH SERVICES—CENTRAL COAST___Mr McBride asked the Minister for Health___
                What facilities and services, provided by the Central Coast Area Health Service, are operating in the electorates of The Entrance, Gosford, Peats and Wyong for people with intellectual disabilities?
                Answer—
                The provision of services for people with intellectual disabilities is the responsibility of the Department of Community Services under the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, the Hon. J. A. Longley, M.P.
                However, the Central Coast Area Health Service does support the Department of Community Services with the provision of Allied Health Services, particularly to Glenvale School and the East Gosford Physically Handicapped Unit.

            *965 WYONG TAFE COLLEGE COURSES—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What courses available at Wyong TAFE College in 1992 are not available at this college in 1993?
                (2) What reasons are advanced for cancellation of these courses?
                (3) How many students were enrolled in each of these courses in 1992?
                (4) How many students were enrolled in Wyong TAFE in the year:
                  (a) 1991?
                  (b) 1992?
                  (c) 1993 to date?
                (5) How many courses were conducted at Wyong TAFE in the year:
                  (a) 1991?
                  (b) 1992?
                (6) How many courses are currently being conducted at Wyong TAFE?
                (7) How many teachers were employed at Wyong TAFE in the year:
                  (a) 1991?
                  (b) 1992?
                (8) How many teachers are currently being employed at Wyong TAFE?
                Answer—
                The information requested by the honourable member for The Entrance is lengthy, statistical and mainly tabular in nature. The material could be more efficiently obtained by direct reference to the Hunter Institute of Technology.
                The Director, Mr Dick Jordan, may be contacted on telephone No. (049) 61 7222. The address of the Institute office is Newcastle College of TAFE, Maitland Road, Tighes Hill.

            Page 1512

            *967 NEWCASTLE FISH KILL—Mr Martin asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) Did a fish kill occur off Newcastle on Thursday 11 February 1993?
                (2) Did officers of the Environmental Protection Authority investigate the incident?
                (3) (a) Were water samples in the vicinity of the fish kill taken for analysis?
                  (b) Were fish samples taken for analysis?
                (4) Has the cause of the fish kill been determined as a result of the analysis of water samples or post mortems of fish?
                (5) If not, when will the results be known?
                (6) If the results are known, what was the cause of the fish kill?
                (7) Is any action being taken against whoever was responsible?
                (8) If so, what is the extent of the action?
                (9) What procedures are contemplated by the Environmental Protection Authority to prevent a similar occurrence?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Yes.
                (3) (a) Yes.
                  (b) Yes.
                (4) No.
                (5) Results of all tests have been made public through press releases and a public meeting convened and chaired by the EPA.
                (6) The cause of the fish deaths has not been identified.
                (7) No. There is no evidence that anyone was responsible.
                (8) Not applicable.
                (9) As the cause is not known, there are no measures that can be taken to prevent a similar occurrence.

            *969 "GET STARTED" PROGRAM—LAKE MACQUARIE AND NEWCASTLE—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) To date, how many young people in the Lake Macquarie and Newcastle Local Government Areas have participated in "Get Started" programs funded by the Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education?
                (2) How many of these participants are:
                  (a) In full-time employment?
                  (b) In permanent part-time employment?
                  (c) In casual employment?
                  (d) Unemployed but in full-time further education?
                  (e) Unemployed but undertaking part-time further education?
                  (f) Unemployed and not undertaking further education?
                Answer—
                (1) The statistical returns from the Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education, North/West Region, to date show that of the four projects in the Lake Macquarie and Newcastle area, 321 young people have participated.

            Page 1513
                (2) Of the 321 “Get Started” participants in the Lake Macquarie and Newcastle area, 159 or approximately 50 per cent of participants gained employment/further training placements at the end of the 6-week training or within a 3 and/or 6-month follow-up.
                  (a) 56 gained full-time employment.
                  (b) 51 gained part-time employment.
                  (c) 3 gained casual employment.
                  (d) 34 entered full-time further education.
                  (e) 15 entered part-time further education.
                  (f) The remaining unemployed 162 “Get Started” participants who completed the 6-week training are receiving post-program assistance from either “Get Started” Project Officers or Workplace Officers which will assist them to obtain employment or undertake further education or vocational training.

            *970 SCHOOLS REAL PROPERTY—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) As $4 million was spent on the site of the Correspondence School in William Street, Kings Cross, why in 1992 was this building sold for a little over $3 million?
                (2) Why in 1990 was it proposed to relocate the Open High school, the Learning Materials Production Centre, and a branch of the Government Printing Service to the Drummoyne Boys' High School site and then plans for this proposed relocation rescinded?
                (3) What was the cost involved in such a move in regards to stationery changes and subsequent termination?
                (4) How much was spent on the Drummoyne Boys' High School site in regards to telephone and technological installations?
                (5) Why was the Drummoyne Boys' High School site then discarded and the schools were relocated to Ryde High School?
                (6) What was the cost in preparing Ryde High School for these schools?
                (7) Why will these schools be moved again in July 1993?
                (8) What will be the cost of the packing and removal costs for this proposed move in July 1993?
                (9) What will the Ryde site be used for from July 1993?
                (10) Will the schools be relocated to Strathfield in early 1995?
                Answer—
                (1) The Correspondence School was purchased in 1965 for $1,061,500. In 1980/81 there were major alterations at a cost of $4 million, to the basement and lower ground floors to create a mezzanine area, conference area and studios. These alterations also provided necessary fire stairs and air-conditioning was extended to all floors.
                At the time of sale in 1992 for $4 million there were outstanding maintenance costs for the building of $2 million.
                (2) Relocation to the Drummoyne site was proposed in order to utilise vacant school accommodation. Considerable refurbishing was planned in order to accommodate the needs of the new distance education units. The decision was subsequently rescinded when more suitable accommodation at Ryde became available without the need for the extensive refurbishing envisaged at Drummoyne.
                (3) No costs were incurred with respect to stationery changes.

            Page 1514
                (4) Installation of the switchboard at Drummoyne cost $91,036. The equipment will be used in another section of the Department.
                (5) The Ryde site offered more appropriate accommodation at much less cost than the planned conversion at Drummoyne. Ryde was not available at the time the initial decision to decentralise the service was taken.
                (6) $220,000 was expended at Ryde. Approximately 50 per cent of this sum was for computer cabling. This will remain in the building and be used by the next occupants.
                (7) The amalgamation of TAFE's OTEN and DSE LMPC and OHS necessitate close collaboration to ensure that of the advantages for the management, production and delivery of Open/Distance Learning are released as speedily as possible. Co-location of all elements on the present OTEN site at Redfern will achieve this goal.
                (8) Tenders have not yet been called for the relocation.
                (9) It is intended that some sections of the Department of School Education presently accommodated in leased office space in the city will be relocated to Ryde towards the latter half of 1993. This coincides with the expiration of the city leases and will result in significant savings.
                (10) It is intended that the revamped OTEN will relocate to the new OTEN facility in Strathfield in 1995.

            *972 WALLSEND POLICE STATION—Mr Price asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                With regard to the recent announcement of the impending closure of the Wallsend Court House upon construction of the Toronto Court House—
                (1) What action is currently being taken to improve the working conditions for police at the Wallsend Police Station?
                (2) When will the Government replace the condemned holding cells at Wallsend Police Station that were closed as a result of the "Deaths in Custody" inquiry?
                (3) Will the Government take over the adjacent Court House site and construct a new adequate and functional 24-hour police station on the consolidated site?
                Answer—
                (1) Provision has been made in the Police Service's Capital Investment Strategic Plan (10 Year Capital Works Program) for a major work at Wallsend at a preliminary budget cost of $2.2 million in 1998/99, subject to funding and further reviews of priority.
                In the interim, a second demountable building formerly used by the Sheriff's Officers has alleviated the accommodation problems for the present. Regular maintenance is carried out to ensure the buildings are in a safe and serviceable condition.
                (2) Subject to an operational decision about cell requirements at Wallsend, refurbishment/rebuilding will occur either as part of the proposed major work or earlier, dependant on funding and further reviews of priorities.
                (3) I have been advised that the Department of Courts Administration (DOCA) proposed, subject to funding, to construct a new court house at Toronto and to close Wallsend Court House. The Police Service has written to DOCA seeking the opportunity to participate in feasibility studies for the DOCA owned Toronto site.
                If Wallsend Court House is declared surplus by DOCA, that study would also consider whether the court house could effectively be used in a new police station development.
                A statewide survey of accommodation in 1990 by the NSW Police Service identified that a feasibility study would be needed to confirm whether the current Wallsend site is adequate to support the necessary additional accommodation.

            Page 1515

            *973 WAITING LIST REDUCTIONS___Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Health___
                For each Area Health Service and region—
                (1) What is the amount spent from the Medicare allocation on reducing waiting lists?
                (2) How much will be spent in each specialty?
                (3) How many extra patients will be treated in each specialty as a result?
                (4) What reduction in average waiting times is expected in each case?
                Answer—
                (1) South West Sydney AHS $5.0 million
                  Wentworth AHS $3.0 million
                  Southern Sydney AHS $3.0 million
                  North Coast Region $2.0 million
                  Hunter AHS $1.75 million
                  Illawarra AHS $0.75 million
                (2) Information is detailed in attachment 1.
                (3) Information is detailed in attachment 2.
                (4) It is not possible to accurately measure the impact that the Hospital Access Program will have on average waiting times as other factors such as current and future demand for elective services and hospital throughout levels also impact upon average waiting time.

            Page 1516
            ADDITIONAL ADMISSIONS TARGETED THROUGH H.A.P.—1992/93 FUNDING*
            Position as at 30 April 1993






















                  * Denotes total additional admissions targeted using 1992/93 funds. Not all of these will be achieved in 1992/93 financial year. Some Areas/Regions will still be completing these admissions during the first quarter of 1993/94.



            *974 STAFF EQUIPMENT—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
                With reference to the Minister's Chief of Staff—
                (1) Does his immediate staff have the use of a photocopy machine?
                (2) If yes, what is the brand and model?
                (3) Who is responsible for:
                  (a) The selection of the photocopier?
                  (b) Determining the time of replacement?
                  (c) The payment of servicing and maintenance and other associated costs?
                (4) Does the present photocopier have:
                  (a) Automatic document feeder?
                  (b) Duplex document feeder?
                  (c) Large capacity cassette—if yes, what capacity?
                  (d) Duplex unit—if yes, what capacity?
                  (e) Paper size selection—if yes, what range of paper sizes?
                  (f) Magnification selector—if yes, is it automatic?
                  (g) Reduction and enlargement?
                  (h) Interruption capability?

            Page 1517
                  (i) Page by page copying?
                  (j) Frame erasure?
                  (k) Punch hole erasure?
                  (l) Cover mode?
                  (m) Image shifter?
                  (n) Program memory?
                  (o) Built-in editing?
                  (p) Multiple sheet bypass?
                  (q) Bin sorter—if yes, what capacity?
                  (r) Other than black colour copying—if yes, what colours?
                (5) Does the Minister's Chief of Staff have the use of:
                  (a) A modular phone?
                  (b) A car phone?
                (6) If yes, in each or either case, what is the brand name and model of the phone(s)?
                (7) If yes, in each or either case, who pays for:
                  (a) The purchase and installation costs?
                  (b) Each call made?
                  (c) Repairs and maintenance costs?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Not relevant.
                (3) Not relevant.
                (4) Not relevant.
                (5) (a) Yes.
                  (b) No.
                (6) Not relevant.
                (7) The cost of official phones is met by the Government.

            22 APRIL 1993

            (Paper No. 14)

            *983 ROAD SAFETY___Mr Anderson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Roads___
                (1) When will the RTA commence an education campaign to educate motorists to keep left unless overtaking on multi-laned roads, freeways and tollways?
                (2) What form will the education campaign take?
                (3) For what period will the education campaign be undertaken?
                (4) How much has been allocated for expenditure on the education campaign in:
                  (a) 1992/93?
                  (b) 1993/94?
                (5) (a) What is the justification for each variation from a speed limit of 110 kph on the M4 in both directions between the eastern end of the M4 and the Nepean River?
                  (b) Who determines those speed limits?
                (6) (a) What changes to the speed limits applicable to the M4 have been instituted since the tollway opened?
                  (b) When and why were those changes made?

            Page 1518
                Answer—
                (1) At this stage, the Roads and Traffic Authority has no plans for such an education campaign. However, the matter will be reviewed during the 1993/94 financial year.
                No doubt the honourable member is well aware that freeways and tollways in this State have been adequately furnished with signs directing motorists to keep left unless overtaking.
                (2) See Answer (1) above.
                (3) See Answer (1) above.
                (4) (a) See Answer (1) above.
                  (b) See Answer (1) above.
                (5) (a) The speed limits which apply to various sections of the M4 Motorway have been determined in the interests of road safety.
                    The limits take into account the traffic conditions which prevail on each section of the road. The lower speed limits of 70 and 90 km/h have been introduced to reduce the incidence of accidents.
                  (b) Speed limits are determined following consultation between the police and the RTA.
                (6) (a) The speed limit of 90 km/h between 0.7 km west of Parramatta Road, Concord, and Burnett Street, Mays Hill, with the exception of a 70 km/h section on each approach to the toll plaza, was introduced on the opening of the M4 Motorway in May 1992.
                    The limit of 110 km/h between Burnett Street and the Cumberland Highway was reduced to 90 km/h in December 1992.
                    West of the Cumberland Highway to 1.4 km east of Russell Street, Emu Plains, the limit has remained at 110 km/h. The speed limit of 80 km/h which applied on the bridge over the Nepean River was extended to 110 km/h following the opening of the M4 extension to Lapstone.
                  (b) See Answer (6) (a) above.

            *988 M4 "KEEP LEFT UNLESS OVERTAKING" INFRINGEMENTS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) How many infringement notices did police issue for breaches of the "keep left unless overtaking" rule detected on the M4:
                  (a) During March 1993?
                  (b) From 20 April 1993?
                (2) When was the promised "blitz" by police on this offence carried out on the M4 since 1 March 1993, as promised by police in Western Regional newspapers?
                (3) Of the more than 180 crashes on the M4 since the toll road was opened, how many do police attribute to a driver breaching the "keep left unless overtaking" rule?
                (4) What response did police receive (from the RTA) to their approach for a public education campaign regarding the necessity for drivers to keep left unless overtaking on multi-laned roads, freeways and tollways?
                Answer—
                (1) (a) 40.
                  (b) 35 as at 6 May 1993.
                (2) The claim of a promised "blitz" would appear to be without foundation. However, police patrols and enforcement are dedicated to road safety and the apprehension of motorists who breach the Traffic Act.
                (3) 5 as at 6 May 1993.

            Page 1519
                (4) I have been advised that the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) are not planning a public education campaign in relation to the "Keep Left Unless Overtaking" rule at this stage. However, consideration will be given to this proposal in the next financial year.

            *989 VICTIMS COMPENSATION TRIBUNAL DELAYS___Mr Anderson asked the Minister for the Environment representing the Attorney General and Minister for Justice___
                (1) Has the Victims Compensation Tribunal failed to finalise File Nos 91/2107A and 91/2108A?
                (2) What is the reason for the delay in each case?
                (3) As these matters relate to severe injuries sustained on 28 August 1990 and 30 January 1991, when will each matter be determined?
                Answer—
                (1) The matters C91/2107 and C91/2108 have not yet been finalised.
                (2) In relation to application C91/2107, the Victims Compensation Tribunal could not consider this matter until court proceedings involving the offender were finalised.
                The Tribunal was notified on 9 February 1993 that the case was completed and the offender had been convicted.
                In relation to application C91/2108, the Victims Compensation Tribunal made a determination against the applicant on 10 June 1992.
                The applicant then lodged an appeal with the Parramatta District Court on 20 November 1992. The appeal was allowed and the matter was remitted to the Tribunal for determination.
                The Tribunal has recently received a statement of the reasons for the judgement, and the case is currently being prepared.
                (3) On 4 May 1993, both matters were listed for determination on 21 June 1993.

            *990 SCHOOLS ELECTRICITY TARIFFS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) (a) Will the Government be providing additional funds to schools in the electorate of Liverpool to ensure they are not financially disadvantaged by the abolition of institutional electricity tariffs?
                  (b) If not, why not?
                (2) (a) Was the Minister for Education consulted about the financial ramifications of the Government endorsing the abolition of institutional electricity tariffs?
                  (b) If so, when?
                (3) What is the estimated cost, based on current charges, of the abolition of the institutional tariff by 1 July 1995 to:
                  (a) Schools in the electorate of Liverpool?
                  (b) Schools throughout the State?
                (4) (a) Does he support those increased electricity charges being paid from school fees?
                  (b) If not, how does the Minister suggest schools will pay the increased charges?
                (5) Was Liverpool Girls' High School forced to alter the long-standing electricity meter arrangements because of the Government's education policy of global budgeting?


            Page 1520
                Answer—

                (1) I can assure the member for Liverpool that the Government will sympathetically consider the effect of changes in electricity tariff policy on Government schools.
                (2) The changes to electricity tariffs policy result from the Government's desire to make these tariffs more cost reflective. Whilst there was no specific consultation with myself, the Treasury has indicated that any impact on the Department's budget would be sympathetically considered.
                (3) The honourable member would be aware that the Government's Pricing Tribunal on electricity has only established guidelines for increases in tariffs for 1993/94.
                Further, I am aware that there is to be a review of electricity tariffs in 1993/94 which may impact on tariff structures affecting schools. Therefore, I cannot indicate the final costs to the school system.
                I can assure the Member for Liverpool that the Government will sympathetically consider the impact of changes in the electricity tariff policy on Government schools.
                (4) Increased electricity charges would not be paid from school fees. A Regional Reserve is available. If the Regional Office does not receive a supplementation request from schools, this reserve is issued to all schools at the end of each semester.
                (5) Liverpool Girls' High School negotiated with Liverpool Boys' High School to alter the electricity meter arrangements in order to better manage the dual site. This was a school-based decision. It was understood that the efficient energy management practices adopted by the school would result in savings. A review of the school's 1992 Annual Financial Statement suggests that when comparing school-based grants to reported expenditure across utilities items, savings have been made. These savings are available at the school level for redistribution according to need.

            *992 ARTS FUNDING—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Treasurer and Minister for the Arts—
                (1) How much has been received from the Federal Government each year for expenditure on the Arts since 1988?
                (2) How much has been allocated from the State Budget for expenditure on the Arts each year since 1988?
                Answer—
                (1) The NSW Government has received nothing from the Federal Government for expenditure on the arts since 1988, although numerous New South Wales arts organisations have, of course, received funding from Commonwealth sources, mainly the Australia Council.
                (2) Since 1988, the Government has allocated $666,778,000 from the State Budget for recurrent and capital expenditure on the arts.
                  1988/89 $127,413,000
                  1989/90 $129,099,000
                  1990/91 $141,270,000
                  1991/92 $136,429,000
                  1992/93 $134,567,000


            Page 1521
            *994 SPORT AND RECREATION GRANTS—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing—
                (1) What has been allocated for Sport and Recreation grants each year since 1988?
                (2) What were the specific grants and funds provided under the Sports and Recreation grants programmes each year to the electorates of Mulgoa and St Marys since 1988?
                Answer—
                (1) Details of grants provided from the Capital Assistance Programme administered by the Department of Sport, Recreation and Racing since 1988 are provided hereunder:
                  1992/93 413 grants totalling $3,877,340
                  1991/92 371 grants totalling $3,736,175
                  1990/91 343 grants totalling $3,986,565
                  1989/90 336 grants totalling $4,164,035
                  1988/89 303 grants totalling $4,231,769
                (2) Mulgoa Electorate
                  Year Amount Recipient Organisation
                  1988/89 $15,500 Colyton/St Clair Baseball Club
                Samuel Marsden Road, Orchard Hills
            Construction of a baseball complex
                  1988/89 $2,500 Nepean and District Pony Club
                    Samuel Marsden Road, Orchard Hills
            Clubhouse and kiosk
                  1988/89 $4,400 Riding For The Disabled
                    Samuel Marsden Road, Orchard Hills
            Excavation and filling of dressage area
                  1989/90 $35,000 Penrith City Council
                John Batman Avenue, Werrington County
            Construction of two tennis courts and amenities
                  1990/91 $20,000 Penrith City Council
            John Batman Avenue, Werrington County
            Lighting and upgrading
                  1990/91 $7,000 Werrington Little Athletics
            Corner Francis and Herbert Streets, Werrington County
            Extension to existing amenities and storage
                  Six grants provided in the Mulgoa Electorate from 1988/89 to 1990/91 totalling $84,400.
                  St Marys Electorate
                  Year Amount Recipient Organisation
                  1991/92 $6,250 St Marys RSL Youth and Amateur Swimming Club
            St Marys Swimming Pool Complex
            Extension to clubhouse, kitchen and office area

            Page 1522
                  1991/92 $20,000 Don Bosco Youth and Recreation Centre
            Mamre Road, St Marys
            Recreation hall, carpark and social mixing area
                  1992/93 $5,000 St Marys Tennis Club and Hall Committee
            Charles Hackett Drive, St Marys
            Extension to existing kiosk.
                  1992/93 $5,000 St Marys Tennis Club and Hall Committee
            Charles Hackett Drive, St Marys
            Installation of automatic watering system.
                  1992/93 $10,000 Cambridge Gardens Public School
            Trinity Drive, Cambridge Park
            Construction of a multipurpose court.
                  1992/93 $12,000 The Penrith Hockey Centre Inc.
            Second Avenue, Kingswood
            Upgrading amenities block
                  Six grants provided in the St Marys Electorate from 1991/92 to 1992/93 totalling $58,250.

            *996 BATHURST CITY COUNCIL STONESTREET PLACE DEVELOPMENT___Mr Clough asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives___
                (1) Did Bathurst City Council recently deal with a development application seeking to build duplex homes in Stonestreet Place, Bathurst?
                (2) Was the application refused?
                (3) Has Bathurst City Council recently advised the developer that it requires a re-submission of the proposal?
                (4) If so, why?
                (5) Did the Minister for Planning recently visit the Council and have discussions with the Town Clerk and Mayor on the provisions of SEPP 25?
                (6) Were the discussions held in a confidential mode?
                (7) Is any elected member of Council employed in the office of the solicitor representing the developer?
                (8) If so, will he ensure that no conflict of interest has or will occur?
                Answer—
                The Bathurst City Council advised on 12 August 1993 as follows:
                (1) Council's determination refusing the application was issued on 5 January 1993.
                (2) Yes. Council resolved to refuse DA920238 on 16 December 1992.
                (3) Council resolved on 17 March 1993 that the applicants be invited to lodge a fresh development application.
                (4) Council resolved to invite a fresh development application following consideration of a report from its Town Planner.
                (5) Yes.
                (6) No.
                (7) Yes.
                (8) The elected member declared an interest during all council and committee meetings where a question of pecuniary or conflict of interest arose and will continue to do so.


            Page 1523
            *1000 CHARLESTOWN TAFE COLLEGE COURSES___Mr Face asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier___
                (1) What courses which were available at Charlestown TAFE College in 1992 are not available in 1993?
                (2) Why were these courses cancelled?
                (3) How many students were enrolled in these classes in 1992?
                (4) Were any students unable to continue their courses in the Hunter region due to any cancellation?
                (5) How many courses were conducted at Charlestown TAFE College in:
                  (a) 1991?
                  (b) 1992?
                (6) How many courses are currently being conducted at Charlestown TAFE College?
                (7) How many teachers were employed at Charlestown TAFE College in:
                  (a) 1991?
                  (b) 1992?
                (8) How many teachers are currently employed at Charlestown TAFE College?
                Answer—
                The information requested by the honourable member for Charlestown is lengthy, statistical and mainly tabular in nature. The material could be more efficiently obtained by direct reference to the Western Sydney Institute of TAFE.
                The Director, Mr Dick Jordan, may be contacted on telephone No. (049) 61 7222. The address of the Institute office is Newcastle College of TAFE, Maitland Road, Tighes Hill.

            *1003 HAMILTON, MAYFIELD AND NEWCASTLE POLICE PATROL STRENGTH—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) What is the authorised strength of each police patrol in the Hamilton, Mayfield and Newcastle police patrols as at 22 April 1993?
                (2) What is their actual strength?
                (3) What changes are proposed in policing numbers in these patrols following the recent announcement regarding use of Corrective Services officers in prisoner transfers?
                Answer—
                (1) Hamilton 54 as at 24 May 1993
                  Mayfield 54 as at 24 May 1993
                  Newcastle 108 as at 24 May 1993
                (2) Hamilton 60 as at 24 May 1993
                  Mayfield 54 as at 24 May 1993
                  Newcastle 111 as at 24 May 1993 (including 5 probationary constables)
                (3) I have been advised that commencing in June, 7 full-time and 4 part-time Corrective Services Officers will be phased in over a period of a few months. Police released from court duties will be utilised within the district.
                No information is currently available concerning Belmont and Wallsend Courts. If police become available they will be used to provide these two patrols with beat policing.

            Page 1524

            *1019 HUNTER AREA HEALTH SERVICE ORTHOPAEDIC BEDS___Mr Mills asked the Minister for Health___
                (1) How many orthopaedic beds were closed for the Easter holiday period in the Hunter Area Health Service at:
                  (a) John Hunter Hospital?
                  (b) Royal Newcastle Hospital?
                  (c) other hospitals?
                (2) When did Easter closures commence?
                (3) When did Easter closures cease?
                (4) How many operations were delayed at each of the above hospitals?
                (5) What are the reasons given by the Hunter Area Health Service for closing beds in orthopaedics when that specialty has the highest waiting list times in the Hunter?
                (6) Why were half the beds in the orthopaedic wards at Royal Newcastle Hospital unoccupied on Wednesday 17 March?
                Answer—
                (1) (a) No orthopaedic beds closed at John Hunter Hospital during Easter holiday period.
                  (b) 32 beds were closed at Royal Newcastle Hospital over the Easter holiday period.
                  (c) No other hospitals in the Hunter Area Health Service had orthopaedic bed closures over the Easter holiday period.
                (2) and (3) Of the 32 orthopaedic beds which closed over the Easter holiday period at the Royal Newcastle Hospital, 20 beds closed on 7 April and re-opened on 19 April 1993, and 12 beds closed on 7 April and re-opened on 15 April 1993.
                (4) No operations were delayed at the Royal Newcastle Hospital.
                (5) Beds were closed at the Royal Newcastle Hospital because there were insufficient numbers of patients in hospital to require beds to be staffed. Two orthopaedic surgeons were also on annual leave.
                (6) The occupancy rate for the orthopaedic wards at the Royal Newcastle Hospital on 17 March 1993 was 71.2 per cent. Both orthopaedic theatres were open as usual and 13 operations were performed.
            *1020 NEWCASTLE DISTRICT SPEED CAMERA INFRINGEMENTS—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                How much revenue has been raised and from how many infringement notices utilising speed cameras in the Newcastle Police District?
                Answer—
                Statistics are not available on actual revenue raised from each camera location. However, during the period 1 April 1991 to 31 March 1993 a total of 48,942 infringements were issued in the Newcastle district for speed camera offences.

            *1025 BASS HILL POLICE PATROL—Mr Nagle asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) What is the authorised strength of each police patrol in the Bass Hill district?
                (2) What is the actual strength of each police patrol in Bass Hill district?

            Page 1525
                (3) Is there a need for more police in this area?
                (4) What is the highway patrol strength?
                Answer—
                Bass Hill patrol is in the Georges River District. The following strength figures are for Bass Hill patrol:
                (1) 55 as at 17 May 1993.
                (2) 61 as at 17 May 1993.
                (3) Commissioner Lauer has advised that policing for the Bass Hill area is adequate.
                (4) 15 as at 17 May 1993.

            *1032 ETHNIC POLICE COMMUNITY LIAISON OFFICERS—Mr Newman asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) What is the job specification for Ethnic Police Community Liaison Officers?
                (2) What is the extent of training provided?
                Answer—

                (1) The Principal Duties of the Ethnic Community Liaison Officer (ECLO) as listed in the Statement of Duties and Accountabilities are:
                    •With an emphasis on the corporate policy of customer service, perform all duties efficiently and cost effectively consistent with the values and strategies of the Police Service.
                    •Establish effective communication between police and the local ethnic community.
                    •Act as a mediator in disputes involving police and ethnic groups.
                    •Establish and maintain close personal rapport with the leaders of the ethnic community.
                    •Assist relatives concerning procedures for visiting ethnic prisoners.
                    •Actively market the functions and aims of the Police Service to the ethnic community.
                    •Attend interviews involving juvenile members of the ethnic community, when required.
                    •Contribute to the training and development of patrol personnel.
                    •Liaise with Patrol Commander, Tactician and shift supervisors on a daily basis.
                    •Adhere to the patrol anti-corruption plan.
                The Essential Qualifications for these positions are:
                    •Broad knowledge of ethnic communities and their culture.
                    •Demonstrated proficiency in written and oral communication skills.
                    •Understanding of EEO principles.
                (2) Training programs for appointed ECLO's are currently under development following a detailed needs analysis. The Police Academy will conduct a structured, job related training program which takes account of the high level of qualifications and work experience possessed by ECLO's.
                The training program will commence as soon as all authorised positions have been filled.


            Page 1526
            *1033 CLEANING CONTRACTS—Mr Page asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
                (1) Was Mr Carlos Mazzocchi, through companies such as Aymate and Roman Cleaning, a holder of cleaning contracts with the State Contracts Control Board?
                (2) Was his work performance of a high standard and without any significant complaints made about it?
                (3) Has he in recent times been rejected from a number of tenders for less than substantial reasons?
                (4) Were new guidelines concerning contracts introduced but not followed by the Board, which appeared at times to continue to follow the guidelines laid down in 1979?
                (5) Was a TAFE cleaning contract at Ryde awarded to JECP which was higher in cost and had less labour content than Roman Cleaning?
                (6) Was the contract later cancelled due to the poor performance by JECP?
                (7) Why was it given the contract in the first place?
                (8) Was a TAFE cleaning contract at Strathfield awarded to the All Areas Company whose bid did not comply with the guidelines?
                (9) Was New Star Engineering initially recommended for the project?
                (10) In view of the fact that it was apparent that the offers by All Areas and New Star Engineering did not comply with the tender specifications, why were they recommended ahead of Roman Cleaning whose offer did comply?
                (11) Was Aymate recommended for the cleaning contract at St Ives South Public School?
                (12) Was that recommendation overturned in favour of JECP which had its Ryde contract cancelled?
                (13) Was the offer by JECP not in accordance with the assessment guidelines?
                (14) Why was JECP preferred?
                (15) Was Sebang Enterprises recommended for the cleaning contract at Maroubra Police Station?
                (16) Was this recommendation overturned and the contract awarded to A.C.S. Nelson which did not appear to have a correct tender calculation and did not conform with the guidelines?
                (17) Was Aymate disqualified for allegedly specifying a cleaning time of 30.5 hours per week when in fact its correct calculation was 33 hours per week?
                (18) Was Aymate's tender for cleaning of Davidson Park Public School rejected because of a mistake in the cost calculations?
                (19) Was this type of error overlooked in awarding contracts to other cleaning companies?
                (20) Was Mastercare awarded the contract for the cleaning of City TAFE?
                (21) Were other companies excluded for not complying with the appropriate award rate?
                (22) Had Mastercare made errors in the hourly rate for early morning cleaning?
                (23) Why was it awarded the contract?
                (24) Did Aymate submit a tender strictly in accordance with the specification requirements for the Police Centre at Surry Hills?
                (25) Did Ileplus submit an offer which was not in accordance with the tender specifications?
                (26) Why was Ileplus given the contract?
                (27) In view of Aymate's efficient work undertaken on Government contracts, why has it not been successful in being awarded contracts in recent times when the evidence supports the contention that it should have been successful?


            Page 1527
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Overall the assessment of his company's work performance was satisfactory with some complaints recorded.
                (3) No.
                (4) The State Contracts Control Board approved of guidelines for the administration of cleaning contracts on 20 February 1979. These guidelines were used to assess contracts until the Accreditation of Cleaning Contractors' Scheme was introduced during 1992. The contracts to which Mr Mazzocchi refers were assessed prior to the introduction of the Accreditation Scheme.
                (5) Yes.
                (6) Yes. In addition to approving the cancellation of the contract, the Board decided to exclude JECP from tenders for catering colleges only, for a period of 2 years from 13 September 1988.
                (7) JECP was assessed as the lowest suitable tender within the guidelines. At the time the firm held 26 contracts including the Department of Main Roads, Sydney, and Strathfield and Hornsby Technical Colleges, providing a satisfactory service.
                (8) On 10 January 1989, the State Contracts Control Board approved the tender of All Areas Cleaning for the cleaning of the TAFE College and Annexe at Strathfield.
                The guidelines approved by the Board on 20 February 1979, were as the name implies, guidelines only. The Board, in examining recommendations referred to it had the flexibility to consider tenders which, while not falling strictly within the guidelines, were advantageous to the Public Service. The Board is obliged under the Public Sector Management Act (Stores and Services) Regulation 1988 to accept the tender which in its opinion, "is the most advantageous to the Public Service".
                In this case the Board exercised this flexibility and determined that the tender of All Areas Cleaning, being some $6,765 per annum lower than the recommended tender and only marginally lower than the hours under the guidelines, was the most advantageous to the Public Service.
                The tender submitted by Roman Cleaning was $9,384 per annum higher than the successful tenderer.
                (9) Yes.
                (10) New Star Engineering's tender complied with the specification and was deemed to be the lowest within the Board's guidelines and was recommended accordingly.
                All Areas Cleaning omitted the toilet allowance of $738 per annum, but notwithstanding, the Board approved in favour of All Areas Cleaning for the reasons stated in the response to question (8).
                (11) Yes.
                (12) Yes. As previously stated, at the time of cancelling JECP's contract for the Ryde TAFE College, the Board approved the exclusion of the firm from tenders for catering colleges only.
                (13) JECP's labour content was 0.98 of an hour per week below the guidelines.
                (14) On 18 July 1989, the Board approved of the tender of JECP for the cleaning of St Ives South Public School. Although marginally lower than the hours provided for under the guidelines, the Board determined that the tender was acceptable as JECP was the existing contractor, had held the contract since 14 July 1986 without any complaint recorded and was $1,857 per annum lower than that submitted by Aymate Pty Ltd.
                (15) Yes.

            Page 1528
                (16) Yes, the recommendation was overturned. On 20 December 1989, the Board approved of the tender of ACS Nelson Cleaning Service for the cleaning of Maroubra Police Station. This decision was based on the fact that the firm was the existing contractor providing satisfactory service since 15 February 1984, and submitted a lower price.
                The tender of ACS Nelson Cleaning Services was accepted at the tendered rate which was lower than those submitted by Aymate Pty Ltd and Sebang Enterprise Co. A recent examination of the firm's tender confirms an incorrect tender calculation.
                (17) Aymate Pty Ltd tendered a rate higher by $2,919 per annum than the recommended firm. The hours tendered of 30.5 per week were below the guidelines.
                (18) No, after reviewing the file no mistake was made by the Department in relation to the on-cost provision.
                (19) To the knowledge of officers involved in the evaluation of tenders under the Board's former guidelines, all successful tenderers complied with the specified minimum on-costs.
                (20) Yes.
                (21) Yes.
                (22) No. It is understood that Mastercare was able to quote lower rates for early morning part time cleaners because of an agreement with its employees. This arrangement is in accordance with the award.
                (23) Mastercare Property Services Pty Ltd was the existing contractor with satisfactory service and was awarded the contract because it was deemed to be the lowest priced tender that complied with the Board's guidelines.
                (24) Yes.
                (25) No.
                (26) Ilepus was awarded the contract as the tender was marginally below (1.74 hours per week) the Board's guidelines and, as the existing contractor, had provided satisfactory service.
                It should be noted that the tender submitted by Aymate Pty Ltd, was $13,139 per annum higher than the successful tenderer.
                (27) The evidence does not support the contention that Aymate Pty Ltd should have been successful in being awarded contracts in recent times.
                NSW Supply Service in recent times has introduced a new process for the letting of cleaning contracts. The process is known as the Accreditation of Cleaning Contractors' Scheme and cleaning contracts have been issued under that Scheme since October 1992.
                It should be noted that of the contracts arranged under the Scheme to date Aymate Pty Ltd has been uncompetitive in tenders submitted.
                I am advised that Mr Mazzocchi has written to the Independent Commission Against Corruption, which has informed the Commercial Services Group that the Commissioner's preliminary enquiry into the complaint about the letting of cleaning contracts found no evidence of corrupt conduct. He has also written to the Office of the Ombudsman which has advised him that it can only take further action if he can provide specific examples of discriminatory action taken against his company.

            *1043 HOME CARE SERVICE—ELECTORATE OF GRANVILLE—Mr Yeadon asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) In the electorate of Granville:
                  (a) How many people have been refused Home Care service?
                  (b) How many people are receiving Home Care?
                  (c) For the following years, how many people received Home Care:
                    (i) 1989?
            (ii) 1990?
            (iii) 1991?
            (iv) 1992?

            Page 1529
                (2) Has Home Care funding been reduced for the current year and in 1992?
                (3) If so, what is the reason for this cutback?
                Answer—
                (1) Residents in the electorate of Granville receive services from the Parramatta and Holroyd branches of Home Care. The electorate forms part of the area covered by each branch.
                It is therefore, not possible to report on customer numbers in the electorate.
                (2) In 1991/92 funding was increased by 10.7 per cent and in 1992/93 a further 3.3 per cent increase was provided to the Parramatta and Holroyd branches.
                (3) Not applicable.

            *1044 GRANVILLE TAFE COLLEGE COURSES—Mr Yeadon asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What courses available at Granville TAFE College in 1992 are not available at this college in 1993?
                (2) What reasons are advanced for cancellation of these courses?
                (3) How many students were enrolled in each of these courses in 1992?
                (4) How many students were enrolled in granville TAFE in the years 1991, 1992 and the present year?
                (5) How many courses were conducted at the Granville TAFE in the years 1991 and 1992?
                (6) How many courses are currently being conducted at Granville TAFE?
                (7) How many teachers were employed at Granville TAFE in the years 1991 and 1992?
                (8) How many teachers are currently employed at Granville TAFE?
                Answer—
                The information requested by the honourable member for Granville is lengthy, statistical and mainly tabular in nature. The material could be more efficiently obtained by direct reference to the South Western Sydney Institute of TAFE.
                The Director, Ms Jozefa Sobski, may be contacted on telephone No. 826 0511. The address of the Institute office is Miller College of TAFE, Cnr Hoxton Park and Banks Roads, Miller.

            27 APRIL 1993

            (Paper No. 15)

            *1048 MOUNT PANORAMA RACING CIRCUIT FUND—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
                (1) Does Bathurst City Council operate a special fund with regard to Mount Panorama racing circuit?
                (2) Does the fund:
                  (a) Pay for all maintenance and upgrading of the track?
                  (b) Purchase land in the Mount Panorama area?
                  (c) Have any other purchasing function?
                (3) Is the fund supplemented for maintenance purposes?
                (4) (a) Has the fund required additional input during the last 10 years?
                  (b) If so, from what source?

            Page 1530
                (5) To which sources are monies paid out of the fund?
                (6) What has been the operating profit from a Council point of view, from 1984 to date, from motor racing on Mount Panorama?
                (7) For what purpose is Council purchasing land in the Mount Panorama area?
                Answer—
                The Bathurst City Council advised on 12 August 1993 as follows:
                (1) Mount Panorama's operations are contained within Council's general fund, but have specific income and expenditure accounts.
                (2) to (6) These questions relate to sensitive commercial financial information on Council's business activities at Mount Panorama, and as such, Council believes all this information should remain confidential.
                (7) The land is being acquired in connection with Council's Mount Panorama motor racing activities.

            *1049 BATHURST CIVIC CENTRE PARKING TICKETS—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) How many parking tickets were issued on vehicles parked outside Bathurst Civic Centre, William Street (both sides), and Russell Street (both sides) on 1 and 2 April 1993?
                (2) How many were issued in the same localities in 1992?
                (3) Are parking police issuing infringement notices to people attending such functions as the Bathurst Eisteddfod and Charles Sturt University graduation ceremonies?
                (4) Have any alternatives ever been considered by police in Bathurst to recognise the significance of these functions?
                (5) Is it possible for Bathurst City Council to mask parking signs on these days?
                Answer—
                (1) 1 April 1993—10.
                  2 April 1993—15.
                (2) Nil.
                (3) Parking infringements are issued when there is a breach of the Traffic Act.
                (4) A number of streets within reasonable walking distance of the Bathurst Civic Centre are unrestricted for parking and Council carparks are also available.
                (5) This is a decision for the Bathurst City Council.

            *1050 CLEOPATRA'S NITE CLUB PENRITH—POSSIBLE LICENCE BREACHES—Mr Face asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) Are there premises known as Cleopatra's Nite Club, High Street, Penrith, on Licence (Restaurant) S/No. 409954, formerly named Connections?
                (2) Are breaches of the law being committed by non-compliance with the licence for those premises by:
                  (a) Allowing alcohol to be served without a meal before 11 p.m.?
                  (b) Drinks being purchased at any time without the purchase of food?
                (3) (a) Who is the owner of such premises?
                  (b) If the owners are individuals, what are their names and addresses?
                  (c) If it is a company, what is the name of the company and who are the directors and principles of that company?

            Page 1531
                (4) Who is the licensee for such premises and what is that person's address?
                (5) If the licensee is not the manager, who is the manager and that person's address?
                (6) How many times have police at Penrith or other police squads visited these premises in the last 12 months?
                (7) If they visited these premises, for what purpose did they visit?
                (8) Were any breaches of the law detected?
                (9) Will he undertake to have the Police Patrol Commander in Penrith consult with the Liquor Administration Board and the Penrith City Council as a matter of urgency about these premises and its operations in regard to the liquor laws?
                (10) (a) Are minors permitted on the premises unaccompanied by a responsible adult?
                  (b) If so, on what conditions are they allowed entry?
                (11) (a) Is an amount of money charged for entry to such premises?
                  (b) If so, what conditions apply to that entry?
                (12) (a) Is there any relationship between any persons connected with this licensed premises in ownership or operation thereof who is a serving member of the NSW Police Service?
                  (b) If so, what is the officer's name, rank and where is he stationed?
                (13) If so, has the police officer complied with police regulations concerning professional responsibility?
                (14) (a) Are persons employed in any capacity on these premises under 18 years of age?
                  (b) If so, do such persons serve liquor and what conditions apply to such persons being employed?
                (15) What are the premises' hours of operation?
                Answer—
                (1) An On-Licence (Restaurant) Serial No. 409954 is held in respect to premises trading as "Cleopatra on High". The restaurant licence was granted on 13 December 1985 and traded under the name "Connections" until 10 September 1992, when the name was changed to "Cleopatra on High".
                (2) (a) Yes.
                  (b) Yes.
                (3) (a) and (b)
                    Building Fynoss Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 186, Penrith 2750.
                    Business Silklynx Pty Ltd, 12 Stockade Street, Emu Plains 2750.
                        Helena Enterprises Pty Ltd, 12 Stockade Street, Emu Plains 2750.
                    These companies have been described as small family companies and are owned by Nader Kyrollos Hanna and Christine Helena Hanna (nee Rzepecki).
                  (c) Silklynx Pty Ltd
                    Terry Lamour, Company Secretary and Director.
                    Allan Max Mitra, Company Director.
                    Nader Kyrollos Hanna, resigned as Company Secretary and Director upon appointment of Terry Lamour on 19 February 1993.
                    Helena Enterprises Pty Ltd
                    Christine Helena Hanna, Director from 19 August 1992 and Secretary from 22 February 1993.
                    Andrew Rzepecki, Director.
                    Nader Kyrollos Hanna, resigned as Company Secretary and Director upon appointment of Christine Hanna and Andrew Rzepecki on 22 February 1993.
                (4) Terry Lamour, 5/10-12 Mary Street, Wiley Park 2195.

            Page 1532
                (5) It has been suggested that the licensee Terry Lamour is also the Manager. However, the Manager's role has been assumed by Nader and Christine Hanna when police have been in attendance.
                The address particulars are:
                  Terry Lamour, 5/10-12 Mary Street, Wiley Park 2195.
                  Nader and Christine Hanna, 12 Stockade Street, Emu Plains 2750.
                (6) State Licensing Investigative Group 2 visits.
                  Patrol Commander, Penrith 3 visits.
                  Supervising Sergeants, Penrith 8 visits.
                  (The visits of the State Licensing Investigative Group and Patrol Commander, Penrith, relate to "Connections" and "Cleopatra on High".)
                (7) Enforcement of the provisions of the Liquor Act as it relates to licensed restaurants.
                (8) Yes.
                (9) I have been advised that following amendments to the Liquor Act in 1989, Councils are the controlling authority in respect to entertainment venues, which include licensed restaurants.
                The Liquor Administration Board is guided by the Council's decision and deals with complaints from the community.
                The Patrol Commander, Penrith, will advise the Liquor Administration Board of the matters pending before the Licensing Court in respect to "Cleopatra on High" before alteration of the current licence is approved.
                (10) (a) A Restaurant Licence granted under the provisions of the Liquor Act does not restrict the age of patrons.
                    A Hoteliers Licence under the same Act restricts the age of patrons and where minors are permitted in certain parts of the premises, they must be in the company of a responsible adult.
                  (b) The Management of "Cleopatra on High" mark the hands of patrons with a rubber stamp to distinguish juveniles from adults when serving alcohol.
                (11) (a) $10 entry fee per person.
                  (b) A voucher is issued for the purchase of a meal.
                (12) (a) Yes.
                  (b) Constable 1st Class Nader Kyrollos (Ralph) Hanna, Wentworthville Police Station.
                (13) The issue of secondary employment by Constable 1st Class Hanna is currently under investigation by the Internal Affairs Branch.
                (14) (a) No complaint has been received in this regard and no offences have been detected.
                  (b) The Liquor Act precludes the employment of persons under the age of 18 years in any capacity, except as apprentices of tradesmen carrying out alterations or repairs to the premises.
                (15) Licensed Restaurants are licensed to trade between the hours of 12 noon to 12 midnight. Liquor may be served ancillary to a meal to patrons seated at a table.
                Where a permit for entertainment is granted, as in the case of "Cleopatra on High", hours of trade are from 12 noon to 3 a.m. Liquor may be served ancillary to a meal to 11 p.m. After 11 p.m. liquor may be purchased without a meal but meals must be available on request.

            *1051 ADVERTISEMENT—DIRECTOR OF CASINO SURVEILLANCE—Mr Face asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
                (1) Did the advertisement for the Director of Casino Surveillance go across a range of skills but fail to require any law enforcement background or prior experience in casinos as a prerequisite?
                (2) Given the specialised nature of this position, why was this not included?

            Page 1533
                (3) Can a job specification be provided which will show duties of the person chosen in this position?
                (4) (a) Why were consultants used?
                  (b) How much will be paid to the consultants?
                (5) What is the anticipated annual cost of the Casino Surveillance Unit?
                (6) How many staff or employees connected in the area of surveillance are anticipated to work in the Casino Surveillance Unit?
                (7) Will such surveillance unit be involved in the compliance area of the casino?
                Answer—
                (1) The advertisement did not require applicants to possess any law enforcement background or prior experience in casinos.
                (2) Those qualifications, while desirable, are not essential to the position.
                (3) Yes.
                (4) (a) A recruitment consultant was used because the position of Director of Casino Surveillance is important to the achievement of the Government's objective to permit casino gaming in the State.
                  (b) $28,000 plus expenses.
                (5) The annual cost of the Division of Casino Surveillance, when fully operational, is estimated to be $4.798 million.
                (6) There are anticipated to be 75 positions in the Division of Casino Surveillance.
                (7) Yes.

            *1064 KENO IN SYDNEY CASINO—Mr Thompson asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
                (1) Is the gambling game of Keno to be available in the Sydney Casino?
                (2) If a decision for Keno in the casino has not been made, will it be considered for the casino or not?
                (3) If so, will the Government seek the approval of Club Keno Holdings for the proposed casino to participate in the game of Keno, as Club Keno is operated by the Registered Clubs Association?
                (4) If approval is sought, will Club Keno Holdings be considered to operate Keno in the casino?
                (5) If not, will Keno be operated in the casino by the successful operator of the Sydney casino?
                (6) If not, will any other operators be considered, or linked with other casinos in Australia be considered?
                Answer—
                (1) I have directed the Casino Control Authority under section 7 (1) of the Casino Control Act 1992 that the casino is required to be of a size sufficient to permit Keno being available, subject to agreement between the appropriate licensees under the Lotto Act 1979 and the casino operator.
                (2) to (6) See answer (1).


            Page 1534
            28 APRIL 1993

            (Paper No. 16)

            *1066 TARPEIAN WAY LIGHTS—Ms Allan asked the Treasurer and Minister for the Arts—
                (1) Is he aware that lights along the Tarpeian Way near the Opera House are out of order?
                (2) Will he take steps to ensure that Opera House patrons and visitors to the forecourt have a well-lit thoroughfare from the Opera House to Macquarie Street?
                Answer—
                (1) The Tarpeian Way, which runs along the top of the cliff overlooking the Opera House site, is the responsibility of the Sydney City Council.
                (2) The major part of the cliff face below the Tarpeian Way is already illuminated by the Opera House lights. The Sydney Opera House has advised me that, although there are no current plans to increase the overall level of illumination in the forecourt area, the lighting level around the fountain roundabout is to be increased by August and new lights are to be installed near the gatehouse at the entrance to the site from Macquarie Street within the next 3 months.

            *1069 ELECTRONIC PRICE SCANNERS—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads—
                (1) Is she aware of recent concerns about the accuracy of electronic price scanners in retail stores?
                (2) What penalties exist for retailers not charging the correct amount by use of electronic scanners?
                (3) How many complaints concerning electronic scanners have been received by the Department of Consumer Affairs?
                (4) What action has been taken on these complaints?
                Answer—
                (1) I am aware of recent media reports raising concerns about the accuracy of electronic price scanners in retail stores.
                (2) Under the Australian Code of Practice for computerised checkout systems in grocery stores, a retailer is obliged to give an item to a customer free of charge where the item scans at a price higher than the shelf price. Where multiple items are involved, the first item is given free while the remainder are charged at the lower price.
                Sanctions such as fines, corrective advertising or item pricing can also be imposed on an offending retailer by a Complaints Committee established pursuant to the Code.
                Under the Fair Trading Act 1987, penalties of up to $5,000 may be imposed on suppliers who are prosecuted for selling goods at the higher of two or more prices attaching or applying to those goods.
                Alternatively, a penalty notice involving a fine of $200 for the above offence may now be issued.

            Page 1535
                (3) Between 1 July 1991 and 31 May 1993 the Department has received six formal complaints.
                (4) When complaints are received about scanning errors, departmental inspectors visit the retail outlet in question as quickly as possible. Particulars of the complaint are raised with store management to ensure that the Code of Practice is being followed. Scanning integrity is checked against a basket of goods selected from the outlet's shelves.
                In addition to these checks, the Department undertakes an ongoing inspection program.

            *1071 CAR THEFTS—MOUNT DRUITT AND ST MARYS—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) How many car thefts were reported to St Marys Police Station last year?
                (2) How many car thefts were reported to Mount Druitt Police Station last year?
                (3) What was the success rate in convictions in each of these two police areas?
                Answer—
                (1) 714.
                (2) 1,137.
                (3) Location Success Rate
                  St Marys 46.5 per cent
                  Mount Druitt 59.0 per cent

            *1074 CHARLESTOWN TAFE COLLEGE COURSES—Mr Face asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What courses available at Charlestown TAFE college in 1992 are not available at this college in 1993?
                (2) What reasons are advanced for cancellation of these courses?
                (3) How many students were enrolled in each of these courses in 1992?
                (4) How many students were enrolled in Charlestown TAFE in the years 1991, 1992 and the present year?
                (5) How many courses were conducted at Charlestown TAFE in the years 1991 and 1992?
                (6) How many courses are currently being conducted at Charlestown TAFE?
                (7) How many teachers were employed at Charlestown TAFE in the years 1991 and 1992?
                (8) How many teachers are currently employed at Charlestown TAFE?
                Answer—
                The information requested by the honourable member for Charlestown is lengthy, statistical and mainly tabular in nature. The material could be more efficiently obtained by direct reference to the Western Sydney Institute of TAFE.
                The Director, Mr Dick Jordan, may be contacted on telephone No. (049) 61 7222. The address of the Institute office is Newcastle College of TAFE, Maitland Road, Tighes Hill.


            Page 1536
            *1089 BOARDING HOMES—LICENSED FOR THE DISABLED—Dr Refshauge asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) How many licensed boarding house premises are there for people with disabilities in New South Wales?
                (2) How many licensed beds are there in boarding house premises for people with disabilities in New South Wales?
                (3) How many people with disabilities are currently living in licensed services?
                (4) How many unlicensed services are there operating in New South Wales?
                (5) How many services have been de-licensed in the last 12 months and the last 5 years?
                (6) Are officers of the Health Department conferring with Community Services Department officers before referring clients to services?
                (7) How many services have temporary or 6-month permits as opposed to licenses?
                Answer—
                (1) 178.
                (2) 3,700.
                (3) The total capacity of all types of licensed residential centres is 25,055 residents. The Department of Community Services does not have information on the actual number of persons resident in these centres at any one time.
                (4) All boarding houses are required to be licensed.
                (5) Licences are revoked in a number of circumstances including when premises change ownership, or when a centre ceases to be a residential centre for people with disability for the purposes of licensing.
                I can advise that in the last 12 months two services have had their licences revoked and in the last 5 years, there have been a total of three revocations as a direct result of departmental action.
                Other revocations have occurred where licensed centres which have been unable to maintain minimum licensing standards have volunteered to close.
                (6) Yes. The Task Force will consider the systems and consultative processes between officers of the Health Department and the Department of Community Services that take place before clients are placed in private, for profit boarding houses.
                (7) Five permits have been given to services which are newly established to allow them to operate, pending completion of the licensing process.

            *1092 STAFF EQUIPMENT—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                With reference to the Minister's Private Secretary—
                (1) Does her immediate staff have the use of a photocopy machine?
                (2) If yes, what is the brand and model?
                (3) Who is responsible for:
                  (a) The selection of the photocopier?
                  (b) Determining the time of replacement?
                  (c) The payment of servicing and maintenance and other associated costs?

            Page 1537
                (4) Does the present photocopier have:
                  (a) Automatic document feeder?
                  (b) Duplex document feeder?
                  (c) Large capacity cassette—if yes, what capacity?
                  (d) Duplex unit—if yes, what capacity?
                  (e) Paper size selection—if yes, what range of paper sizes?
                  (f) Magnification selector—if yes, is it automatic?
                  (g) Reduction and enlargement?
                  (h) Interruption capability?
                  (i) Page by page copying?
                  (j) Frame erasure?
                  (k) Punch hole erasure?
                  (l) Cover mode?
                  (m) Image shifter?
                  (n) Program memory?
                  (o) Built-in editing?
                  (p) Multiple sheet bypass?
                  (q) Bin sorter—if yes, what capacity?
                  (r) Other than black colour copying—if yes, what colours?
                (5) Does the Minister's Private Secretary have the use of:
                  (a) A modular phone?
                  (b) A car phone?
                (6) If yes, in each or either case, what is the brand name and model of the phone(s)?
                (7) If yes, in each or either case, who pays for:
                  (a) The purchase and installation costs?
                  (b) Each call made?
                  (c) Repairs and maintenance costs?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Not relevant.
                (3) Not relevant.
                (4) Not relevant.
                (5) (a) and (b) No.
                (6) Not applicable.
                (7) Not applicable.

            *1093 STAFF EQUIPMENT—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                With reference to the Minister's Executive Director of the Ministry of Education and Youth Affairs—
                (1) Does her immediate staff have the use of a photocopy machine?
                (2) If yes, what is the brand and model?
                (3) Who is responsible for:
                  (a) The selection of the photocopier?
                  (b) Determining the time of replacement?
                  (c) The payment of servicing and maintenance and other associated costs?

            Page 1538
                (4) Does the present photocopier have:
                  (a) Automatic document feeder?
                  (b) Duplex document feeder?
                  (c) Large capacity cassette—if yes, what capacity?
                  (d) Duplex unit—if yes, what capacity?
                  (e) Paper size selection—if yes, what range of paper sizes?
                  (f) Magnification selector—if yes, is it automatic?
                  (g) Reduction and enlargement?
                  (h) Interruption capability?
                  (i) Page by page copying?
                  (j) Frame erasure?
                  (k) Punch hole erasure?
                  (l) Cover mode?
                  (m) Image shifter?
                  (n) Program memory?
                  (o) Built-in editing?
                  (p) Multiple sheet bypass?
                  (q) Bin sorter—if yes, what capacity?
                  (r) Other than black colour copying—if yes, what colours?
                (5) Does the Minister's Executive Director of the Ministry of Education and Youth Affairs have the use of:
                  (a) A modular phone?
                  (b) A car phone?
                (6) If yes, in each or either case, what is the brand name and model of the phone(s)?
                (7) If yes, in each or either case, who pays for:
                  (a) The purchase and installation costs?
                  (b) Each call made?
                  (c) Repairs and maintenance costs?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Not relevant.
                (3) Not relevant.
                (4) Not relevant.
                (5) (a) and (b) Yes.
                (6) (a) NEC P3.
                  (b) NEC 11E.
                (7) (a) to (c) The Ministry of Education and Youth Affairs.

            *1094 STAFF EQUIPMENT—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women—
                With reference to the Director-General, Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education—
                (1) Does her immediate staff have the use of a photocopy machine?
                (2) If yes, what is the brand and model?
                (3) Who is responsible for:
                  (a) The selection of the photocopier?
                  (b) Determining the time of replacement?
                  (c) The payment of servicing and maintenance and other associated costs?

            Page 1539
                (4) Does the present photocopier have:
                  (a) Automatic document feeder?
                  (b) Duplex document feeder?
                  (c) Large capacity cassette—if yes, what capacity?
                  (d) Duplex unit—if yes, what capacity?
                  (e) Paper size selection—if yes, what range of paper sizes?
                  (f) Magnification selector—if yes, is it automatic?
                  (g) Reduction and enlargement?
                  (h) Interruption capability?
                  (i) Page by page copying?
                  (j) Frame erasure?
                  (k) Punch hole erasure?
                  (l) Cover mode?
                  (m) Image shifter?
                  (n) Program memory?
                  (o) Built-in editing?
                  (p) Multiple sheet bypass?
                  (q) Bin sorter—if yes, what capacity?
                  (r) Other than black colour copying—if yes, what colours?
                (5) Does the Director-General, Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education have the use of:
                  (a) A modular phone?
                  (b) A car phone?
                (6) If yes, in each or either case, what is the brand name and model of the phone(s)?
                (7) If yes, in each or either case, who pays for:
                  (a) The purchase and installation costs?
                  (b) Each call made?
                  (c) Repairs and maintenance costs?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Not relevant.
                (3) Not relevant.
                (4) Not relevant.
                (5) (a) and (b) Yes.
                (6) Motorola Micro Tac II.
                  Motorola Mini Tac 6800XL.
                (7) (a) to (c) Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education.

            *1095 STATEWIDE LINKED PROGRESSIVE JACKPOT SYSTEM—Mr Thompson asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
                (1) Will the permanent Sydney casino have the statewide linked progressive jackpot system as a feature of that complex?
                (2) If so, will tenders be called for such implementation?
                (3) In light of your recent statement "any innovative gaming device feature granted to the casino will be granted to clubs and vice versa", is it to be taken that registered clubs in New South Wales will be part of the same linked system?

            Page 1540
                (4) Have any discussions been held, or intend to be held, with the providers of the existing linked Club Keno?
                (5) If so, is it intended that the same holding company system will be devised for statewide linked progressive poker machines?
                (6) Would the existing business configuration of AWA and Club Keno Holdings be considered as opposed to calling public tenders?
                Answer—
                (1) That is a matter for the casino operator to determine, subject to the approval by the Casino Control Authority, and the agreement of the operator of the statewide linked progressive jackpot system.
                (2) See answer (1).
                (3) See answer (1).
                (4) No. Discussions have been held on many occasions with the Registered Clubs Association, the peak body representing the registered club movement in New South Wales. Club Keno Holdings, a subsidiary of the Registered Clubs Association, is one of the two Keno licensees. Neither of the two Keno licensees has been directly involved in discussions relating to statewide linked poker machines.
                (5) Not applicable.
                (6) No. The Chief Secretary's Department will soon be advertising for consultants to advise on the process which should now be followed to select an operator for statewide links. It is extremely unlikely that any process would be accepted other than one which included calling publicly for tenders to operate statewide links. At this stage, the possibility of a joint management arrangement between the selected operator and a company representing the registered club movement has not been ruled out.

            *1097 PROPERTY PURCHASES—Mr Davoren asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
                (1) What was the explanation given to him by the previous Minister for Housing in regard to his property purchase from leading property developer Mr Triguboff?
                (2) (a) Is he aware of any other purchases of property by the previous Minister whilst Housing Minister from 1988 until 1992?
                  (b) What properties were involved?
                Answer—
                (1) A public explanation has previously been given by the former Minister.
                (2) (a) No.
                  (b) Not applicable.

            *1098 HARRY TRIGUBOFF FUNCTION—Mr Moss asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
                (1) Did the previous Minister for Housing attend fundraising functions at Mr Harry Triguboff's mansion at Vaucluse?
                (2) Was he advised of any conflict of interest between the then Minister for Housing and Mr Triguboff?
                (3) If so, what type of conflict?

            Page 1541
                Answer—
                (1) No.
                (2) Not applicable.
                (3) Not applicable.

            *1099 HARRY TRIGUBOFF, O.A.M.—Mr Davoren asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
                (1) Who recommended Mr Harry Triguboff to receive an Order of Australia Medal?
                (2) Did the previous Minister for Housing provide a reference?
                (3) Was it in writing?
                (4) Did the honourable member for Vaucluse also provide a reference?
                (5) What was the content of the references?
                Answer—
                (1) to (5) All nominations for Order of Australia awards are received and considered by the Council of the Order of Australia in confidence.

            *1109 TRIGUBOFF POLICE PROTECTION—Mr Iemma asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) Was Mr Harry Triguboff, of Meriton Apartments Pty Ltd, granted round-the-clock police protection this year after being threatened by a subcontractor armed with a sawn-off shotgun?
                (2) What has this cost?
                (3) Who ordered the police action?
                (4) Did the honourable member for Vaucluse make representations on Mr Triguboff's behalf?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) The patrols were included in the routine patrols of the Vaucluse area.
                (3) The Commander, South Region.
                (4) Yes.

            29 APRIL 1993

            (Paper No. 17)

            *1111 JAVA DEER—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) Will the Java Deer under the "Adopt a Deer" program from the Royal National Park be fertile or infertile?
                (2) What will be the impact of releasing large numbers of fertile deer from the Royal National Park across the State?
                (3) What resources will be available to the National Parks and Wildlife Service to monitor the impact of such deer on the State's natural environment?


            Page 1542
                Answer—
                (1) Fertile.
                (2) Applications from prospective deer owners are currently being assessed by the Service to determine whether the facilities offered meet requirements. The Department of Agriculture has no concerns at present with deer from the park being transferred to suitable private properties.
                (3) Once the animals are removed from the park, the responsibility for their management will rest with the new owners.

            *1112 AUSTRALIAN NATIVE LANDSCAPES—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) What activities occur at Australian Native Landscapes at Martins Road, Badgerys Creek?
                (2) Has the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) received complaints from local residents concerning odour and noise levels from this site?
                (3) Is the EPA monitoring odour and noise emissions from the site?
                (4) If so, what are the results of this monitoring?
                (5) Will he publicly release the monitoring results?
                (6) If not, why not?
                (7) What efforts has the EPA made to work with Liverpool City Council to resolve residents' concerns?
                Answer—
                (1) Composting of a number of organic materials including wood, sewage sludge, tobacco residues, some animal manures, coffee grounds, potato dirt washing and spent mushroom compost.
                (2) Yes.
                (3) Odour is monitored once per week by the EPA's field inspector for this area.
                Noise is not routinely monitored, as such, but any complaints are followed up immediately with the company.
                (4) Odour surveys have indicated that on occasions the sludge composting processes carried out at ANL may lead to odour emissions which can be detected at nearby residences. Noise from these premises generally does not exceed acceptable guidelines.
                (5) The monitoring results obtained are made available to the public on request.
                (6) Not applicable.
                (7) ANL's premises are "scheduled" under the Clean Air Act and the Noise Control Act and hence fall under the regulatory responsibility of the EPA. Council is aware of this and has been requested to advise the EPA whenever they receive a complaint so that appropriate action can be initiated.

            *1116 POLICE CITIZENS YOUTH CLUB—WELLINGTON—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) Is he aware of community calls for a Police Citizens Youth Club at Wellington?
                (2) Has this matter been related to the issue of juvenile crime in that area?
                (3) What is the present position with the funding of this project?


            Page 1543
                Answer—
                (1) There have been no approaches made to the Federation of NSW Police Citizens Youth Clubs for a club to be established in the Werrington area.
                (2) The Patrol Commander, Katoomba, has advised that the incidence of juvenile crime in the Werrington area is less than in other areas of the patrol.
                (3) No funding arrangements are in place for a Police Citizens Youth Club at Werrington.

            *1120 POLICE HELICOPTERS—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) (a) When will each of the single-engined helicopters attached to the Police Airwing be replaced?
                  (b) Will all or any be replaced by twin-engined helicopters?
                (2) What action has been taken to replace the Airwing's only twin-engined helicopter recently damaged during a rescue?
                (3) When will the Airwing become a 24-hour per day operation?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) Following the loss of the twin-engine helicopter, a proposal has been prepared by the Police Service for replacement of the fleet. That proposal is currently under consideration.
                (3) An intelligence-based work analysis indicates that it is not cost-effective or efficient to operate the Air Wing on a 24-hour basis. However, the Police Air Wing maintains a 24-hour call out response capability.

            *1122 SUPPLY OF TYRES—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) What are the current contractual arrangements for the supply of tyres to police vehicles?
                (2) (a) Are those arrangements different from those that existed in March 1988?
                  (b) If so:
                    (i) In what way?
                    (ii) When?
                    (iii) How did those changes take place?
                (3) Where are the tyres, the subject of the current arrangements, manufactured?
                (4) Where were the previously utilised tyres manufactured?
                Answer—
                (1) Motor vehicle tyre contracts for NSW Government organisations, including the Police Service, are arranged by the NSW Supply Service and are approved by the State Contracts Control Board.
                If suitable Australian made tyres are available, the local products are contracted to the exclusion of imported items. This applies to tyres supplied as original equipment on new vehicles, as well as to replacement tyres.
                When tyre sizes and types are not manufactured in Australia, the most suitable and economic imported product is placed in contract (e.g., tyres for Police Service motor cycles).
                Imported vehicles purchased by the Police Service are fitted with tyres made in the country of vehicle origin.

            Page 1544
                (2) (a) No.
                  (b) (i) to (iii) Not applicable.
                (3) and (4) The Australian made brand of tyres in contract in 1988 and at present are Goodyear, Dunlop, Olympic and Bridgestone.

            *1125 POLLUTION FINES—LIVERPOOL—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) How many industries in the Liverpool Local Government area have received pollution fines under the Environmental Offences and Penalties Act since 1 January 1992?
                (2) What are the names of these industries?
                (3) What was the amount of these fines?
                Answer—
                (1) The Environment Protection Authority (EPA) has advised me that in its jurisdiction, one company has received a pollution fine under the Environmental Offences and Penalties Act since 1 January 1992.
                (2) Australian Corrugated Box Co. Pty Limited.
                (3) Australian Corrugated Box Co. Pty Limited received a $15,000 fine and was ordered to pay the prosecutor's costs in the sum of $4,500.

            *1127 COMPOSITE CLASS INFORMATION—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Is the information concerning composite classes currently recorded for each cluster in the electorate of Liverpool?
                (2) As the information contained in the Department's Annual Report is only general statistical information, how can specific information be obtained?
                (3) (a) Will the Minister instruct the Department to make available to the honourable member for Liverpool copies of whatever information is currently on hand concerning composite classes in the electorate of Liverpool?
                  (b) If not, why not?
                Answer—
                The Department of School Education has a clear commitment to excellence in New South Wales schools, providing for more than 750,000 young people currently enrolled in the Government School System.
                The Department's efforts are directed to improving educational standards in schools, improving parental choice and participation and increasing learning opportunities for all.
                To provide the detailed information requested in the member's question would impinge on the resources and time of senior departmental officers. As a consequence, I am not willing to move resources from the Department's core responsibility to meet this request.
                General statistical information on the Department of School Education is available in the Department's Annual Report.


            Page 1545
            *1128 SCHOOL ENROLMENTS—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                What is the average enrolment for each region of the Department of School Education for the number of children in:
                  (a) Primary schools?
                  (b) High schools?
                Answer—
                The average enrolment, as at February 1993, for the Department of School Education for the number of children in primary schools is 265 and high schools is 812. Average enrolments in central schools and schools for specific purposes are 278 and 45, respectively.

            *1129 SCHOOL BANK ACCOUNT FUNDS—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What is the total amount of funds held in school bank accounts as at 29 April 1993?
                (2) What is the average amount of funds held in all primary school bank accounts in each region of the Department of School Education?
                (3) What is the average amount of funds held in all high school bank accounts in each region of the Department of School Education?
                (4) Has the Department of School Education discovered or has it been informed that technology is available in banks which would permit all school bank accounts to earn interest at a rate as if they were one central account while at the same time permitting schools to retain their individual drawing rights?
                (5) Will the Department now adopt the suggestion that such a system be adopted?
                (6) If not, why not?
                Answer—
                (1) The Commonwealth Bank supplies the Department of School Education with school bank account balance details as at 30 June and 30 November each year. In these circumstances, it is not possible to indicate the precise level of balances as at 29 April 1993.
                (2) and (3) As in (1) above.
                (4) to (6) The honourable member raised this matter with me at the 1992 Parliamentary Estimates Committee hearings. Since that time, I have exchanged correspondence with the Minister for Finance on the issue. In addition, the Department of School Education has been reviewing the banking services supplied to schools by the Commonwealth Bank.
                The contract for school and student banking services was negotiated in 1989 on the basis of individual accounts managed and controlled by schools. This is consistent with the Government's Schools Renewal Strategy under which responsibility for financial management has been devolved to schools. This has allowed schools to make investment decisions appropriate to their budget strategies.
                This issue will be researched further before tenders are advertised for renewal of the banking contract which expires in September 1994.


            Page 1546
            *1130 ALEX BARTHEL—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Was voluntary redundancy, including an 8-week incentive payment, offered to Mr Alex Barthel of 38 Ashton Street, Bondi Junction, in August 1991?
                (2) Did Mr Barthel accept the redundancy offer, including the incentive payment, on 20 December 1991?
                (3) Was Mr Barthel informed on 23 December 1991 that the incentive payment was not included in the voluntary redundancy package?
                (4) Why was the TAFE agreement with Mr Barthel, dated 20 December 1991, not honoured?
                (5) Will the Minister now direct that this agreement be honoured?
                Answer—
                (1) No. An initial call for expressions of interest in a voluntary redundancy package was made to Mr Barthel and all other Heads of Divisions on 19 August 1991. Mr Barthel replied that he was interested in considering a redundancy and a formal offer was made to Mr Barthel on 21 October 1991. In order to be eligible for an incentive payment, Mr Barthel was advised in the letter of offer that he must respond within 2 weeks of the date of the letter.
                (2) On 20 December 1991, Mr Barthel sent the NSW TAFE Commission a letter advising of his acceptance of the voluntary redundancy, however this letter of response was clearly outside the 2-week period of the date of the offer as stipulated in the letter of offer dated 21 October 1991.
                (3) On 23 December 1991, Mr Barthel was contacted by telephone and informed that he was no longer eligible for the 8-week incentive payment as he had not complied with the conditions of the original offer which required acceptance of the voluntary redundancy offer within 2 weeks of the offer being made.
                (4) There was no agreement between the NSW TAFE Commission and Mr Barthel on 20 December 1991. Mr Barthel subsequently accepted a redundancy offer which did not include an 8-week incentive payment by submitting a pro forma acceptance dated 23 December 1991.
                (5) The NSW TAFE Commission has honoured the agreement entered into by Mr Barthel on 23 December 1991.

            *1131 NORMANHURST BOYS' AND HORNSBY GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOLS—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                Following the announcement that Normanhurst Boys' and Hornsby Girls' High Schools are to become selective high schools—
                (1) Will students for whom these schools were the nearest local high schools still be able to attend the schools?
                (2) If not, will students from Thornleigh and Westleigh who are not selected to attend Normanhurst Boys' have to attend either Turramurra, St Ives, Killara or Ku-ring-gai High Schools?
                (3) How far away are each of these schools from Thornleigh?
                (4) Is there only a single Thornleigh/Turramurra bus which is already overcrowded?
                (5) What action will the minister take to assist such students?

            Page 1547
                (6) Is private coaching available to improve students' selection test scores in a manner which will assist those students to gain entry to selective high schools?
                (7) If so, what is the Government's attitude to such coaching?
                Answer—
                (1) The only students who will gain entry to Year 7 are those who are selected on the basis of the Selective High Schools Entrance Tests. Students wishing to enrol in Years 8-12 may do so as for a comprehensive school as these years are not yet selective. Students currently enrolled in Year 6 in the local area will still be able to attend single sex schools at Asquith which is only two train stops further north.
                (2) Students from Thornleigh and Westleigh who wish to attend a single sex high school will have enrolment guaranteed at Asquith Boys' High School and Asquith Girls' High School. If they wish to attend a co-educational school, the same choices will be available to them as existed prior to 1994. They will not have to attend any particular school.
                (3) Turramurra High School is 6 km from Thornleigh, St Ives High School is 11 km from Thornleigh, Killara High School is 12 km from Thornleigh and Ku-ring-gai High School is 13 km from Thornleigh.
                (4) There is at present a bus service from Thornleigh to Turramurra High School.
                Two other buses travel from Thornleigh to Turramurra High School, one commencing at Hornsby and passing through Thornleigh and the other commencing at Westleigh and passing through Thornleigh.
                Some overcrowding may occur, especially on afternoon buses.
                The school has endeavoured to overcome the overcrowding by issuing "passes" to ensure that the passenger load is evenly spread over buses arriving at different times.
                A regional working party is reviewing all school transport services in the Upper North Shore consultation area which includes Normanhurst Boys' High School and Hornsby Girls' High School and, where necessary, negotiations will be undertaken with transport providers to address any problems identified by the schools.
                (5) The regional working party is already seeking information on current and projected transport issues.
                (6) Private coaching is an option available to parents of students of all ages and ability. I am unaware whether private coaching purporting specifically to assist students gain entry to selective high schools is currently on offer.
                (7) The Government is committed to maintenance of a selection process which is fair, reliable and equitable.
                The process includes measures of school performance in English and Mathematics provided by the school as well as performance in the Selective High Schools tests in English, Mathematics and general ability.
                If parents choose to arrange private coaching for their children, it is their right to do so.

            *1132 LAVINGTON PUBLIC SCHOOL PRINCIPAL—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Was a vacancy, caused by the sudden illness earlier this year of a principal at Lavington Public School, filled by a Deputy Principal from Albury Public School?
                (2) Was the second vacancy thus caused, filled by an Assistant Principal from a third school and thereby creating a further vacancy?

            Page 1548
                (3) If so, why was the Deputy or Assistant Principal from Lavington Public School not initially chosen to fill the 10-week vacancy?
                (4) Why was it necessary to create administrative disruption at three schools?
                (5) Was the action to fill the initial vacancy taken by the Cluster Director rather than the local school?
                (6) If so, does this accord with the Government's preferred view on how short-term executive vacancies should be filled?
                (7) If not, what action will the Minister take to prevent future recurrence of incidents such as this?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Yes.
                (3) Lavington Public School has no Deputy Principal and two Assistant Principals. Neither was chosen because the nature of the Principal's illness meant an absence of at least 10 weeks and possibly a substantially longer period. The Cluster Director and Assistant Director-General felt that a senior executive with administrative experience of a broader nature than that of the Assistant Principals of Lavington Public School would best meet the needs of the school.
                (4) There was minimal disruption.
                (5) The action was recommended to the Assistant Director-General by the Cluster Director. The Principal of Lavington Public School was not consulted because of his medical condition at the time the decision was required.
                (6) In all such cases, the main consideration is to ensure that the most suitable person available is appointed as relieving Principal.

            *1133 CHILD ABUSE—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Did the North Coast region of the Department of School Education receive complaints in 1991 about physical abuse of children by a teacher at Bellingen Primary School?
                (2) Did the Assistant Director-General of the region, Dr Robin Chapman, meet in August 1991 with parents and grandparents of one of the children allegedly victimised by the teacher?
                (3) Did Dr Chapman refuse to answer questions at the meeting unless they had been delivered to him in writing beforehand and then only give one sentence answers?
                (4) Did he receive complaints about Dr Chapman's behaviour, in letters dated 8 and 9 August 1991, from the parents and grandparents respectively?
                (5) Did the teacher vexatiously report the parents (an similarly threaten other parents at the school) to the then Department of FACS for child abuse in order to have their children removed from them?
                (6) Did the Department of FACS investigate the matter and find no evidence of mental, physical or sexual abuse of the children at home, but evidence of physical and psychological abuse of the children at school?
                (7) Did the parents in question successfully obtain an apprehended violence order on 26 April 1991 against the teacher in question from the Bellingen Local Court?
                (8) Why did the North Coast region fail to assist in obtaining that order?
                (9) Was the teacher later placed on sick leave until her retirement?

            Page 1549
                (10) Did Dr Chapman later comment to one of the parents that she should not have taken action to obtain the court order?
                (11) What action did the Minister take to investigate the behaviour of both the teacher and the Assistant Director-General in relation to the matter at the time?
                (12) Will the Minister now reconsider the decision not to conduct a public inquiry into the North Coast region of the Department?
                (13) Did the Department of School Education ever apologise for the actions of the teacher in reporting the parents to FACS?
                (14) Will the Minister now apologise to the family for the teacher and the Department's actions?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Yes.
                (3) Dr Chapman is no longer employed by the Department of School Education. On this basis I am unable to provide an answer.
                (4) Two letters of complaint were received in May 1991. A response was issued to both letters on 22 July 1991. There is no record of my office receiving letters of complaint dated 8 and 9 August 1991.
                (5) A notification was made to the then Department of Family and Community Services concerning possible child sexual assault. I am not in a position to comment whether the teacher "vexatiously' reported or did so in order to have the children removed from their parents.
                (6) The matter was investigated by the then Department of Family and Community Services. Their report stated that they had no further concerns or involvement with the family regarding the alleged sexual abuse and also advised of disclosures, which arose in the course of the investigation, alleging physical abuse by the teacher.
                (7) The North Coast Region was made aware of the issue of a Complaint and Summons—Apprehended Violence to be heard before the Local Court Bellingen on 26 April 1991. There is no record within the North Coast Region to indicate whether an apprehended violence order was obtained. On 29 April 1991 however, the school principal was provided with a copy of an undertaking to the Bellingen Court made by the teacher in question which was accepted and signed by the mother of one of the children allegedly victimised.
                (8) There is no record of the complainant having sought the assistance of the North Coast Region in obtaining the order.
                (9) The teacher was on sick leave from 11 April 1991.
                (10) Dr Chapman is no longer employed by the Department of School Education. On this basis, I am unable to provide an answer.
                (11) Two letters of complaint were received in May 1991. A response was issued to both letters on 22 July 1991.
                (12) No.
                (13) No.
                (14) No.

            *1136 ST MARYS COMMUNITY SERVICES OFFICE—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) What has been the staffing level at the St Marys office of Community Services since 1988?

            Page 1550
                (2) How many social workers have been employed each year at the St Marys office of the Department of Community Services since 1988?
                Answer—
                (1) In 1988, there were 27 staff at the St Mary's Community Service Centre. At the present time there are 56 staff at the Centre.
                (2) There are no social worker positions at St Mary's CSC. Some staff employed have social work qualifications.

            *1145 LITTLE BEACH RESCUE COST—Mr Crittenden asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) What was the cost to the Police Service, in terms of Polair 4, for the rescue at Little Beach on the Central Coast on 5 March 1993?
                (2) (a) Has a debriefing on this issue occurred?
                  (b) If so, when?
                  (c) If not, why not?
                Answer—
                (1) The helicopter was a total loss. It was, however, insured under a "new for old" policy and no cost will be incurred in its replacement.
                (2) (a) No.
                  (b) Not applicable.
                  (c) It was considered a briefing would serve no purpose. The incident has been investigated by the Civil Aviation Authority.

            *1146 DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED GROUP HOMES—LAKE MACQUARIE—Mr Face asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) How many developmentally disabled are living in group homes within the Lake Macquarie Local Government area?
                (2) How many group homes for the developmentally disabled are there in the Lake Macquarie Local Government area?
                Answer—
                (1) 70.
                (2) 13.

            *1147 DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED GROUP HOMES—NEWCASTLE—Mr Face asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) How many developmentally disabled are living in group homes within the Newcastle Local Government area?
                (2) How many group homes for the developmentally disabled are there in the Newcastle Local Government area?


            Page 1551
                Answer—
                (1) 92.
                (2) 19.

            *1148 SCHOOL VIOLENCE—ELECTORATE OF CHARLESTOWN—Mr Face asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) On how many occasions since February 1989 have police been involved in dealing with allegations of violence at schools in the electorate of Charlestown to pupils, staff or property by:
                  (a) Other pupils?
                  (b) Staff?
                  (c) Other persons?
                (2) Of each such incident, what was the nature of such?
                (3) (a) Were there any such incidents not reported to police in the same period?
                  (b) If so, for each case, what was the:
                    (i) Nature?
                    (ii) Reason for non-reporting to police?
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) Violence in our schools is totally unacceptable and is the end product of an increasingly violent society. However, the media and Opposition's focus on school violence does not address the real issue and broader problem of youth violence.
                It is the issue of youth violence which is the greatest cause for concern and which warrants a thorough investigation. The NSW Government and the people of this State need to know why youth violence appears to be on the increase and effective measures to counteract this trend.
                Consequently, on Wednesday 19 May 1993, I announced that the Social Issues Committee of the NSW Parliament would investigate the issue of youth violence in New South Wales.
                The Social Issues Committee, with its bipartisan approach, is an effective forum to conduct this enquiry and all relevant Government Departments will assist with provision of necessary information.
                The Social Issues Committee will undertake an enquiry into the issue of youth violence as per the following Terms of Reference:
                  1. Collect and analyse data on the occurrences of youth violence, including violent incidents in schools, and its underlying causes.
                  2. Examine the policies, actions, research, and proposals of relevant Government Agencies and the impact of racial tension, unemployment, family breakdown, media portrayal of violence and any other relevant factors in relation to youth violence.
                  3. Make recommendations to the NSW Parliament to assist all relevant Government Agencies to develop the most effective strategies to deal with youth violence.
                In light of this enquiry, I do not believe it appropriate to overburden the resources of our schools to provide the information requested.
                Youth violence is an issue that concerns everyone in the community. I am sure the Social Issues Committee will address this important task in an expeditious and objective manner.


            Page 1552
            *1150 SCHOOL MAINTENANCE BUDGET—ELECTORATE OF NEWCASTLE—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What was the size of the budget allocation to school maintenance for each of the schools in the electorate of Newcastle for the years:
                  (a) 1988/89?
                  (b) 1989/90?
                  (c) 1990/91?
                  (d) 1991/92?
                  (e) 1992/93?
                (2) What was the last year in which each school had a complete repainting program undertaken?
                (3) In which schools will major maintenance programs be undertaken in the next budget year 1993/94?
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) When this Government came to office in 1988 the maintenance of schools had deteriorated to a disastrous level and estimates of arrears of maintenance were placed somewhere between $400 million and $800 million.
                The level of expenditure was significantly increased in 1988/89 and it has been held at that higher level for the last 4 years. The condition of our schools is improving and they are now leading the nation. In the study carried out by the Australian Teachers Union in 1992 the schools sampled in New South Wales ranked with the best in the nation.
                It is not satisfactory to report on individual schools for 2 years out of a 5-year (external) and 10-year (internal/external) cyclic maintenance program. It would give a distorted impression of expenditure because only some of the schools in the electorate would be scheduled in the 2 years in question.
                The funds for maintenance grants are now incorporated as part of a schools operating budget and are not counted in reporting allocations for cyclic maintenance.

            *1168 QUESTIONS ON NOTICE RESEARCH—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Would senior departmental officers normally assist in researching and compiling answers to Questions on Notice?
                (2) If so, how does providing an answer impinge on the resources and time of senior departmental officers?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) From time immemorial under the Westminster system and under administrations of all political complexions in New South Wales, assistance of the kind referred to has been an integral aspect of the advisory role of senior public servants.


            Page 1553
            *1172 CORRIMAL POLICE STATION—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) How many forced transfers of experienced police to the metropolitan area will occur from the Corrimal Police Patrol?
                (2) What effect will these transfers have on manning and morale of police in the Corrimal Patrol?
                (3) Will police officers forced to transfer be reimbursed for relocation expenses?
                (4) If so:
                  (a) What is this cost to the Police Department to date?
                  (b) What is the potential cost to the Police Department for reimbursement of relocation expenses?
                (5) Will relocation costs of metropolitan police officers transferring to the Corrimal Police Patrol be reimbursed?
                (6) If so:
                  (a) What is this cost to the Police Department to date?
                  (b) What is the potential cost to the Police Department for reimbursement of relocation expenses?
                Answer—
                (1) During 1993/94 it is proposed to transfer approximately 50 police officers to the metropolitan area from the Illawarra/Shoalhaven Police District. It is anticipated that ten officers will be from the Corrimal Police Patrol dependent on the number of officers in the District who volunteer to work in the metropolitan area.
                (2) All police transferred from the Corrimal Police Patrol will be replaced by police from the metropolitan area. It is anticipated that there will be some initial dissatisfaction from police eligible for transfer to the metropolitan area.
                However, this should be offset by the high morale of metropolitan-based police given the opportunity to work closer to their residences within the Illawarra/Shoalhaven District. No doubt these police will bring new ideas to the District and be highly motivated.
                (3) Where appropriate, all police officers will be reimbursed in accordance with the benefits of the Crown Employees Compensation (Transferred Officers) Award as amended in Police Circulars 89/38 and 92/33.
                (4) (a) Nil as at 2 June 1993.
                  (b) The cost of this initiative cannot be accurately estimated until all officers involved have been identified and decisions made regarding the option of commuting to work or relocation of residence.
                    Any transfer costs will be included within the Police Service budget of 1993/94.
                (5) See response to (3).
                (6) (a) Nil as at 2 June 1993.
                  (b) See response to (4) (b).

            *1173 SCHOOL COUNCILS—ELECTORATE OF KEIRA—Mr Markham asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many school councils are operating in the electorate of Keira?
                (2) How many schools in the electorate of Keira have chosen not to form school councils?
                (3) How will schools which choose not to form school councils be funded?

            Page 1554
                (4) What policies are in place to ensure that schools which do not operate under school councils are not financially disadvantaged and are able to offer students the same range of educational services as those which have school councils?
                Answer—
                (1) There are six school councils operating in the electorate of Keira. They are at:
                    •Fairy Meadow Demonstration School.
                    •Figtree Heights Public School.
                    •Keiraville Public School.
                    •Lindsay Park Public School.
                    •Mount Keira Demonstration School.
                    •Nareena Hills Public School.
                (2) Schools choose to form councils when they see the time as appropriate. No school has chosen not to form a council, but some have not yet chosen to proceed at this point.
                (3) and (4) Schools are funded on the basis of formulae relating to student population, teaching and support staff numbers, location and historical data. There is no difference in the formulae for schools with or without school councils.

            *1175 EGG CARRIERS COMPENSATION—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
                (1) Is he aware of a recent court judgement in relation to the successful claim for compensation for three egg carriers who lost their businesses following the deregulation of the NSW Egg Industry in 1989?
                (2) If so, when will he authorise payment of the compensation to these carriers?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) My Department of Agriculture's solicitors have written to the solicitors of the three carriers advising that, following the recent Supreme Court judgement, the Department is now in a position to pay the amount awarded by the Egg Carriers Arbitration Panel in its Notice of Review of Determination dated 20 December 1990, and arrangements for payment are now being made. Until the appeal has been resolved, legal advice was that the Department was justified in witholding the moneys.
                The question of whether any additional compensation should be paid, is now being pursued by the three carriers, and if a negotiated settlement cannot be reached, there is likely to be a rehearing of the carriers' claims by the Egg Carriers Arbitration Panel.

            *1181 SCHOOL COUNCILS—ELECTORATE OF WALLSEND—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many school councils are operating in the electorate of Wallsend?
                (2) How many schools in the electorate of Wallsend have chosen not to form school councils?
                (3) How will schools in the electorate of Wallsend which choose not to form school councils be funded?

            Page 1555
                Answer—
                (1) There are six school councils operating in the electorate of Wallsend.
                (2) Twelve schools in the electorate of Wallsend have not yet formed school councils.
                (3) Schools with school councils and schools without school councils are funded in the same way.

            *1182 GLENDALE TAFE COLLEGE COURSES—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What courses available at Glendale TAFE College in 1992 are not available in 1993 at Glendale College?
                (2) What are the reasons for cancellation of these courses?
                (3) How many students were enrolled in each of these courses in 1992?
                (4) How many students were enrolled at Glendale TAFE College in 1992?
                (5) How many teachers were employed at Glendale TAFE College in 1992?
                (6) How many teachers are employed at Glendale TAFE College now?
                Answer—
                The information requested by the honourable member for Wallsend is lengthy, statistical and mainly tabular in nature. The material could be more efficiently obtained by direct reference to the Hunter Institute of Technology.
                The Director, Mr Dick Jordan, may be contacted on telephone No. (049) 61 7638. The address of the Institute office is Newcastle Campus, Maitland Road, Tighes Hill.

            *1184 "EXECUTIVE BULLETIN" FLYER—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
                (1) Did the "Executive Bulletin" volume 3, number 9, have an insert flyer outlining the services of "Sennitt Management Services"?
                (2) Who authorised this insert?
                (3) Who is Brent Sennitt?
                (4) What Government payments have been made to either Brent Sennitt or Sennitt Management Services during the past 12 months?
                (5) How much did the Premier's Department receive from Sennitt Management Services for using the "Executive Bulletin" distribution network?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) It was authorised by the Premier's Department in accordance with guidelines stipulated in the Department's contract with an advertising agency. This contract was signed in 1990 after tenders were invited from five agencies. The contracted agent obtains appropriate advertisements for placement in the Executive Bulletin (subject to the Department's approval of content) and the Department receives a payment for each advertisement based on an agreed scale of charges. The revenue is an offset to the cost of publishing the Bulletin.
                (3) Mr Brent Sennitt is the principal of Sennitt Management Services Pty Ltd.

            Page 1556
                (4) There is no central record of such matters. The cost of collecting the information to answer this question cannot be justified.
                (5) The payment received by the Department for the insert in the Executive Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 9, was $400, as determined by the rates stipulated in the advertising contract.

            *1185 PREVIOUS MINISTER FOR HOUSING—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
                (1) Did he ask the previous Minister for Housing to resign or be sacked because of the HomeFund affair?
                (2) If so, did the Minister refuse to resign?
                Answer—
                (1) No.
                (2) Not applicable.

            *1198 COMPOSITE CLASSES—ELECTORATE OF GRANVILLE—Mr Yeadon asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Are schools in the electorate of Granville operating classes containing more than 30 pupils?
                (2) If so:
                  (a) At which schools?
                  (b) How many classes at each school?
                (3) Are schools in the electorate of Granville operating composite classes?
                (4) If so:
                  (a) At which schools?
                  (b) How many classes at each school?
                  (c) Which classes are composite in each case?
                  (d) Which schools operate composite classes containing more than 25 students?
                  (e) Which schools operate composite classes containing kindergarten students?
                  (f) How many students are in kindergarten composite classes at these schools?
                  (g) How many of these students are kindergarten students?
                Answer—
                The Department of School Education has a clear commitment to excellence in New South Wales schools, providing for more than 750,000 young people currently enrolled in the Government School System.
                The Department's efforts are directed to improving educational standards in schools, improving parental choice and participation and increasing learning opportunities for all.
                To provide the detailed information requested in the member's question would impinge on the resources and time of senior departmental officers. As a consequence, I am not willing to move resources from the Department's core responsibility to meet this request.
                General statistical information on the Department of School Education is available in the Department's Annual Report.


            Page 1557
            11 MAY 1993

            (Paper No. 18)

            *1200 FOOD SUPPLY PROJECT—FOOD SHARE AUSTRALIA—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) Has he received representation from Mr Michael Deane of Food Share Australia for Government assistance in the establishment of a food supply project?
                (2) What is the present position with these representations?
                (3) What action is the Government taking to assist this organisation?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) I replied to the Member for Vaucluse who made representations on Mr Deane's behalf on 3 March 1993.
                (3) The Department of Community Services has approached the Properties for Community Purposes Program of the Property Services Group to seek assistance in the identification of any warehouse space that may be available for this project.
                Departmental officers will continue to liaise with Mr Deane and will advise him of the outcome of this process.

            *1205 LITHGOW COMMUNITY HOSPITAL—NEW BUILDING—Mr Clough asked the Minister for Health—
                (1) When is it expected that agreement will be reached with the Lithgow Community Hospital committee for the erection of a new hospital at Lithgow?
                (2) What is contained in the present proposal:
                  (a) For public beds?
                  (b) Private beds?
                  (c) What other proposals?
                (3) What is the likely funding source for the hospital?
                (4) Will the Department of Health staff the public sector entirely?
                Answer—
                (1) It is expected that a decision will be made in relation to the Lithgow District Hospital before the end of 1993.
                (2) The latest proposal is looking at the feasibility of refurbishment of the existing site versus construction of a new hospital.
                (3) The funding issue will depend on which proposal is adopted.
                (4) Staffing will depend on which proposal is adopted.

            *1208 CONSOLIDATED FUND TRAFFIC INFRINGEMENT RECEIPTS—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) How much money was paid into the Consolidated Fund in the budget years 1990/91, 1991/92 arising from:
                  (a) Traffic infringements detected by radar?
                  (b) Traffic infringements detected by camera?

            Page 1558
                (2) How many infringements were issued for each of these methods in 1990/91 and 1991/92?
                (3) What was the percentage of recovery of fines for each of these categories?
                (4) For each of the following infringement types what percentage of each fine is allocated to:
                  (a) Consolidated Revenue:
                    (i) On the spot traffic infringements?
                    (ii) On the spot parking infringements?
                    (iii) Radar detected traffic infringements?
                    (iv) Camera detected traffic infringements?
                  (b) Costs of collection and administration:
                    (i) On the spot traffic infringements?
                    (ii) On the spot parking infringements?
                    (iii) Radar detected traffic infringements?
                    (iv) Camera detected traffic infringements?
                Answer—
                (1) (a) Revenue statistics are not available on radar infringement notices. Radar revenue is included in the overall traffic program.
                  (b) 1990/91 Red Light Camera Speed Camera
                    Revenue $8,598,000 *$161,000
                    * Speed camera operations commenced in April 1991.
                    1991/92 Red Light Camera Speed Camera
                    Revenue $6,415,000 $6,876,000
                (2) 1990/91 Red Light Camera Speed Camera
                    Infringements 78,589 *4,192
                    * Speed camera operations commenced in April 1991.
                    1991/92 Red Light Camera Speed Camera
                    Infringements 52,630 77,191
                (3) The overall recovery of penalties paid to the NSW Police Service during these years was:
                    1990/91 70.27 per cent
                    1991/92 77.29 per cent
                (4) (a) 100 per cent of revenue.
                  (b) All fines are paid into Consolidated Revenue. Costs of collection and administration are met through the budget to the Police Service.

            *1209 NON-INDIGENOUS SPECIES—Mr Martin asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) How many deer have been removed from The Royal National Park?
                (2) Are these animals being removed because they are not indigenous?
                (3) Is it policy to remove non-indigenous species from national parks?
                (4) Will he remove feral cats and foxes from national parks?
                (5) Will he consider trout as non-indigenous?
                (6) Will he take action to ensure trout will not be removed from national parks?
                (7) If so, will he consult the community before commencing the ridding of trout from streams?

            Page 1559
                Answer—
                (1) Culling procedures for the deer were initiated in 1972, and since this time 740 deer have been removed.
                (2) Yes.
                (3) Yes.
                (4) Yes. Programs for the removal of feral animals, such as feral cats and foxes, are undertaken in national parks, including Royal National Park.
                (5) All trout are non-indigenous except for members of the Galaxiidae in which some have a common name such as spotted mountain trout.
                (6) Trout come under the Fisheries and Oyster Farms Act 1935, an Act not within my portfolio.
                (7) Not applicable.

            *1211 DRUMMOYNE BOYS' HIGH SCHOOL—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Why was Drummoyne Boys' High School closed?
                (2) Did the Department use 1986 demographic data to assess the factors that brought about the closure of Drummoyne Boys' High School?
                (3) What are the latest demographic figures available to the Department for the assessment of school closures?
                (4) How are these statistics compiled?
                (5) Why has Drummoyne Boys' High School not been used since its closure?
                (6) What is the future for the Drummoyne Boys' High School site?
                Answer—
                (1) Drummoyne Boys' High School was closed because of declining student numbers.
                Enrolments declined from 514 students in 1983 to 120 students when it closed at the end of 1990.
                These remaining students have been accommodated in Concord High School, Balmain High School and Hunters Hill High School.
                (2) Yes.
                (3) and (4) The Department utilises actual enrolment figures for the last Friday in February each year as the comparison figure for demographic projection purposes. Projections are undertaken on an annual basis to determine likely trends over the next 5 years.
            Demographic figures are used as a standard practice for all planning purposes, such as to determine the need for new schools and possible redevelopments, and are not used solely for assessing school closures.
                (5) After the high school ceased to operate the premises were used for the storage of furniture and equipment in relation to the Department's Distance Education Program. Surrounding schools, except Concord High School, have surplus capacity so there is no need to operate it.
                (6) The property is now surplus to the needs of the Department and will be sold. Drummoyne Municipal Council has twice refused to consider a rezoning application for the property.


            Page 1560
            12 MAY 1993

            (Paper No. 19)

            *1229 RECYCLING OF GAMING TICKETS—Ms Allan asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
                (1) Is she aware that TAB tickets are not printed on recycled material?
                (2) Is she aware that used TAB tickets are not recycled?
                (3) Will she investigate the issue of recycling of all types of betting and gaming tickets, such as those for lotteries, lotto, art unions, etc.?
                (4) If not, why not?
                Answer—
                (1) I am advised that this question does not fall within my portfolio and I am unable to provide an answer.
                (2) As for (1).
                (3) and (4) The art union and raffle products produced by community bodies, and trade competition entry forms produced by commercial enterprises, are just some of many products of the community and commerce which might be recycled. I am aware of no basis for tackling just the gaming products of community and commercial bodies. I see it as far preferable to address recycling by community and commercial bodies through measures with broader scope than is available within my administration.
                NSW Lotteries is a statutory corporation subject to my control and direction. It currently sells Instant Lotteries, Lotto, Draw Lotteries and Soccer Pools.
                In Instant Lottery games each ticket is either a winner or loser when printed. To ensure that winner information and therefore game integrity and customer confidence are not jeopardised, tickets must have maximum protection against compromise via mechanical, chemical, X-ray and other forms of interference.
                At the same time, the success of Instant Lotteries depends on the attractive appearance of the tickets and the ease with which customers can scratch the prize panels on tickets. NSW Lotteries advises that at the moment the only way all objectives can be achieved is by producing tickets on a foil laminated paper board which is not recyclable.
                However, I am advised that a number of measures have been taken to improve the overall environmental friendliness of Instant Lottery tickets including:
                    •All base board that is used has a component of recycled material.
                    •Only harvested forests, and not virgin forests, are used in the manufacture of base boards.
                    •Water-based primer is used on the foil for ink adhesion instead of environmentally unfriendly resins and hardeners.
                    •Water-based inks are used for printing instead of environmentally unfriendly solvent or oil-based inks.
                NSW Lotteries currently sells Lotto, Draw Lotteries and Soccer Pools through its on-line system. The source documents for these transactions pass through a computerised selling terminal. I am advised that current recycled products are not suitable for this purpose as impurities in the recycled paper can lead to problems such as darkness of paper, low reflectance value, inadequate tear strength and inconsistent batch quality. These conditions can cause unacceptable rates of misprints, misreads and rejections of customer entries.

            Page 1561
                Environmental issues are considered by lottery industries around the world. Suppliers are constantly striving to address industry needs in more environmentally friendly ways, and NSW Lotteries will continue to monitor the market-place for recycled and recyclable materials which meet their security and other needs.
                Given the above, I do not propose an investigation into the recycling of betting and gaming tickets at this time.

            *1230 AMGROW PTY LTD EPA LICENCE—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) Is he aware of breaches of the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) licence conditions by Amgrow Pty Ltd?
                (2) Were large amounts of sewage sludge left untreated at the company's premises?
                (3) Has this untreated sludge been tested for heavy metals?
                (4) Is the sludge utilised for the production of composted products?
                (5) If so, does the finished product represent a danger to the community or to the environment?
                (6) Is contaminated water escaping from the site due to the permeable nature of the ground surface?
                (7) Will he take action to ensure that these breaches of the company's licencing agreement are investigated and that appropriate action is taken if such breaches are found to be proven?
                (8) If not, why not?
                Answer—
                I am advised by the Environment Protection Authority as follows:
                (1) Amgrow Pty Ltd was convicted and fined $8,000 for a breach of the Clean Waters Act which occurred in February 1990. No further breaches have been detected.
                (2) No. Sewage sludge has not been received at the site for over 18 months.
                (3) There is no untreated sludge stored on site.
                (4) Yes.
                (5) No.
                (6) Testing to date has not detected any migration of contaminants from the site.
                (7) The most recent inspection by the EPA in May 1993 indicated that the company is operating in accordance with the conditions of the licence issued by the EPA.
                (8) Not applicable.

            12 MAY 1993

            (Paper No. 19)

            *1245 RURAL ASSISTANCE—OYSTER CO-OPERATIVE—Mr Martin asked the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Mines—
                (1) Did the NSW Government approve rural assistance to the Australian Oyster Marketing Co-operative Ltd amounting to almost $700,000 in 1992?
                (2) If so, on what basis was this finance made available?
                (3) What were the terms and conditions applying to this finance?
                (4) Why, after the Co-operative was acknowledged as viable, has the Government decided to foreclose on the Co-operative's assets, which will be worthless if the industry closes?
                (5) Will the taxpayers of New South Wales be expected to pick up this $700,000 cost?
                (6) Why did this situation arise in the first instance?

            Page 1562
                Answer—
                (1) Advances to the Australian Oyster Marketing Co-operative Limited, totalling $705,000 were approved, although the amount actually drawn down was $683,000:
                  1st Advance $350,000 Approved July 1991 by Minister for Natural Resources.
                  2nd Advance $305,000 Approved January 1992 by Minister for Natural Resources.
                3rd Advance $ 28,000 Approved March 1993 by Chief Executive, NSW Rural Assistance Authority on direction from Minister.
                (2) The finance was made available as a secured loan, security being taken over the assets of the Co-operative by way of a registered 1st Charge, and by a registered first mortgage taken over freehold and leasehold land belonging to the "Co-operative".
                (3) The 1st and 2nd Advances were for a maximum period of 15 years with interest at 8 per cent. These loans were to be repayable by 30 six-monthly instalments of principal and interest; first instalments of principal and interest falling due on 30 September 1993 and 30 November 1993, respectively. The 3rd Advance was a short-term loan which should have been repaid by 31 May 1993.
                (4) This question embraces three different issues which will each be addressed separately:
                  (a) It was not the Government's decision to foreclose on the Co-operative assets.
                    The Directors of the Co-operative, on advice from their accountants that the Co-operative was insolvent, requested in writing that the NSW Rural Assistance Authority proceed to have the Co-operative placed in receivership. This was in fact what occurred, following discussions at Ministerial level.
                  (b) The Co-operative was never acknowledged as viable. It was in fact a "New Enterprise" which at the time of its inception appeared to offer a very real chance of promoting and expanding what had for a long time been a fragmented and troubled industry. The Government's decision to support this new venture was made on the recommendation of the former Director of Fisheries, Mr Robin Claxton, on 31 May 1991, after thorough examination of a comprehensive and well prepared "Business Plan", which indicated that the venture should have very reasonable prospects of success.
                    The fact that subsequently the enterprise did not succeed was due to a number of reasons, the most significant being poor management and the collapse of the A.A.C. Credit Union at a critical time, which cut off the Co-operative's credit line.
                  (c) The Co-operative's assets will not be rendered worthless as a result of the Co-operative being placed in receivership, nor does this mean the closing of "the industry" as expressed in your question.
                    The assets of the Co-operative comprise stock, real property, leasehold property, oyster leases, fixtures, plant and equipment and the "Pearler" brand name. All stock has been sold and has realised several thousand dollars. In respect of the other assets, negotiations are proceeding to dispose of same by the appointed receivers by way of public auction in order to finalise realisation of assets.
                (5) As I have previously mentioned it is expected that sale of the Co-operative assets should raise a substantial sum. Whilst there are priority payments to be deducted from the net realisations—i.e., employees' unpaid wages, group taxation deductions, etc.—the net proceeds after these deductions will be applied against the Authority's debt. This should result in a significant reduction of the debt, although it is anticipated there could still be a substantial write-off.

            Page 1563
                (6) The Government saw this as an opportunity to try and promote and assist the ailing Sydney Rock Oyster industry. The Government accepted that the enterprise was entrepreneurial in nature and that there would be risks; however, based on the information available at the time, the Co-operative appeared to have good prospects of succeeding and making a valuable contribution to that industry so as to place it on a sounder footing.
                The loan was therefore given to support what was a new concept, aimed at lifting the Sydney Rock Oyster industry out of the doldrums.

            *1248 OMBUDSMAN COMPLAINT ASSESSMENT—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
                (1) What is the normal period of time for the Ombudsman Office to assess a complaint and determine if the matter is to be dealt with by the Ombudsman?
                (2) If a period of 5 months or more is the norm for the NSW Ombudsman Office to assess a complaint, then what resources is the Government proposing to enable the Ombudsman Office to reduce the assessment period?
                Answer—
                (1) Initial assessment:
                    Letters of complaint received by the Ombudsman's Office are initially sorted into either of the two broad categories:
                    • Complaints relating to police.
                    • General Area complaints, that is, complaints about other public authorities.
                    General Area complaints are assessed within 24 hours of receipt, with subsequent action taking one of the following forms:
                  (a) A suggested alternative avenue of redress, if available, when the complaint is outside the Ombudsman's jurisdiction.
                    (b) Inquiries of the complainant to clarify issues within the complaint.
                    (c) The complaint being declined at the outset.
                    (d) Preliminary inquiries of the public authority being complained about. At this point further assessment is made as to whether the complaint warrants formal investigation under section 16 of the Ombudsman's Act.
                    (e) Commencement of formal investigation.
                    Complaints relating to police are assessed within 48 hours in terms of subsequent action being required.
                    Action where follow-up inquiries are not involved:
                      Mean completion time for completing all action and final correspondence on General Area complaints which were declined without inquiries was 13.1 calendar days in the first quarter of the 1992/93 financial year period.
                    Action where follow-up inquiries are involved:
                      For General Area complaints that involved preliminary inquiries but did not proceed to a formal investigation, the mean completion time for all action and final correspondence was 55.1 calendar days in the first quarter of the 1992/93 financial year period.
                      The Office of the Ombudsman does not have control over the timeframe where the police are required to conduct preliminary inquiries or investigations.
                (2) As the answer to question (1) demonstrates, the norm for the NSW Ombudsman's Office to assess a complaint and determine if the matter is to be dealt with by the Ombudsman is not 5 months or more but rather a mean of 13.1 calendar days in the case of General Area complaints which were declined without inquiries and 55.1 calendar days for those which required further inquiries but did not proceed to a formal investigation.

            Page 1564

            *1249 OPEN TRAINING EDUCATION NETWORK—Mr J. H. Murray asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Which educational institutions will be amalgamated to form Open Training Education Network (OTEN)?
                (2) When will the amalgamation to form OTEN take place?
                (3) Will OTEN be temporarily located at the TNT building at Redfern?
                (4) When will OTEN move to Redfern and when will it move to Strathfield?
                (5) Has the Department of School Education successfully negotiated with staff and unions the working conditions at OTEN?
                (6) Will teachers at OTEN be offered a contract to sign before they take up their positions?
                (7) Will the staff from the various educational institutions which make up OTEN, be offered the same working conditions (i.e., working hours, holidays, pay, etc.)?
                (8) Will there be a reduction in the number of teaching staff as a result of the amalgamation?
                (9) Will there be genuine consultation between the Department and unions during the process of amalgamation, so that working conditions and awards are maintained?
                Answer—
                (1) Educational institutions to be amalgamated to form OTEN are:
                    •The NSW TAFE Commission Open Training and Education Network.
                    •The Department of School Education Open High School.
                    •The Department of School Education Learning Materials Production Centre.
                    •The Department of School Education Media Unit.
                (2) The formal amalgamation was announced on 23 March 1993.
                The Director-General of the Department of School Education and the Managing Director of the NSW TAFE Commission wrote on 24 April to all staff affected by the amalgamation advising that the new enterprise was to take effect immediately and be operational as a single entity by July 1993.
                This was reinforced by the General Manager, OTEN, who advised OTEN staff on 25 March 1993 that she looked forward to consultation with staff and unions and that an interim structure was expected to become operational on 1 July 1993.
                (3) In recognition of the importance of the new open learning institution and the need to facilitate effective planning and integration of operations, co-location of its components is considered to be essential. The Open High School and the Learning Materials Production Centre will move to the TNT Tower at Redfern to strengthen open learning and distance delivery to students. This move will in addition free DSE owned space at Ryde for occupation by DSE entities currently occupying rental accommodation elsewhere, so reducing DSE expenditure.
                (4) OTEN is currently situated at Redfern. The DSE components will be relocated as soon as possible after 1 July which has been established as a target date. The move to Strathfield to a Commonwealth funded purpose built centre is currently projected for 1995. At this stage it is expected that the Strathfield site will be ready for occupation by mid-1995.
                (5) The issue of working conditions of staff at OTEN has been raised between officers of the Department of School Education and TAFE Commission and the NSW Teachers Federation and Public Service Association. It is expected that these and future discussions will provide a basis for successful agreement with staff and employee associations.

            Page 1565
                (6) and (7) Discussion of a range of matters has begun following the announcement of the establishment of OTEN. Although it is too early to predict the outcome of this process it is expected that employment matters will need to be considered as staff affected by the amalgamation are currently employed under four acts of Parliament (i.e., Public Service Management Act 1988; Technical and Further Education Commission Act 1990; Education (Ancillary Staff) Act 1987 and Teaching Services Act 1980).
                In the interim it is intended that all staff move to OTEN on existing conditions giving ample time for effective consultation. The Government is fully prepared to consult with unions on employment matters.
                (8) Staffing levels will be considered as part of the consultations associated with the reorganisation and restructuring of OTEN. The expansion of open learning projected for the rest of the decade points to a strong future for the institution.
                (9) The importance of providing ample time for planning and developing the new institution is recognised by the provision of the 12-month transition period. Planning has commenced, led by the General Manager, OTEN, who has initiated consultation with staff and employee associations.

            *1250 AUBURN PRIMARY SCHOOL AND ELECTORATE OF AUBURN MINISTERIAL REPRESENTATIVE SCHOOL VISITS—Mr Nagle asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Will there be an extension to Auburn Primary School?
                (2) (a) On how many occasions has the Hon. Marlene Goldsmith represented the Minister in attending private and public schools in the electorate of Auburn from 1988 to 1993?
                  (b) Which Schools?
                  (c) What were the occasions?
                  (d) What functions did she perform for the Minister.
                Answer—
                (1) I have approved planning for additional accommodation and consolidation of existing facilities.
                The Department of School Education's Metropolitan West Regional Office has convened a siting committee at the school at which time planning options will be discussed.
                (2) Existing records indicate one visit from 1988 to 1993, to Auburn Public School for the School Multicultural Festival in August 1989, when the Hon. Marlene Goldsmith represented Dr Terry Metherell, former Minister for Education, in presenting a Centre of Excellence Award for the Teaching of English Language.
                Resources are not available to pursue further information.

            *1254 MOORE STREET—LAND DISPOSAL—Ms Nori asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Where are negotiations up to in respect of the disposal of State Transit Authority land near Moore Street, Leichhardt, for the purposes of extending recreational space at Leichhardt High School?

            Page 1566
                (2) Will the Minister agree to the acquisition of the land?
                (3) If not, why not?
                (4) If so, when?
                Answer—
                (1) to (4) Leichhardt High School is located on a very restricted site, 1.267 ha, bounded by Balmain and Derbyshire Roads and Moore Street West.
                Over a number of years an extensive acquisition program has been undertaken to provide sufficient space for the accommodation needs of the school. Most of the properties acquired were small residential blocks with frontage to Balmain Road and Derbyshire Road.
                The anticipated growth for the school, which currently has an enrolment of 489 students, is expected to ensure that the numbers will stabilise at around 550 up to and beyond the turn of the century.
                The Government's decision to declare a large adjoining area of State Rail Authority and Urban Transit Authority land surplus to requirements has enabled the school community groups to present a major extension proposal which they hope will resolve the longstanding need for playing facilities.
                The Property Services Group, which is the authority responsible for disposal of surplus Government property, is aware of the school's need for additional land and is co-ordinating the disposal negotiations.

            13 MAY 1993

            (Paper No. 20)

            *1263 NATIONAL PARK CAMPING FEES—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) Why are the recent increases in national park camping fees necessary?
                (2) Why are large family groups discriminated against as regards such increases?
                (3) Is he aware that many prospective camping groups now have reservations about utilising the basic facilities offered by national parks?
                (4) Will he review the scale of increases in camping fees with a view to offering large family groups an equitable charge for camping?
                (5) If not, why not?
                Answer—
                (1) The current camping fees are the first adjustment of these fees since 1988. The increase is necessary due to the escalating costs of maintaining services and facilities in a restrictive economic climate, and to avoid the possibility of reductions in such services and facilities.
                (2) The new fees do not discriminate against large family groups. The need for services and facilities and the costs of maintaining them is directly related to the impact of individuals utilising these areas. Application of a fee based in part upon such impact is not seen as discrimination.
                (3) Reports from the National Parks and Wildlife Service indicate that there has not been any major decline in camping activity since the introduction of the new fees.
                (4) No.

            Page 1567
                (5) The new fee structure was set having regard to the need to continue to provide low cost camping opportunities within the national park system as well as the impact of campers on the park system. The new fee has been established on an equitable basis.

            *1264 ASBESTOS IN CLASSROOMS—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Has the Minister received information pertaining to deteriorating asbestos in classrooms in New South Wales State schools?
                (2) What schools are affected by this problem?
                (3) What action is being taken to safeguard the health of staff and pupils at these schools?
                (4) What action is being taken to remove the asbestos?
                Answer—
                (1) When the health effects of asbestos were realised the Department of School Education initiated an asbestos removal program targeting the forms of asbestos with the greatest risk. Accordingly asbestos in the fibrous form which had previously been used for insulation and sound absorption was identified and removed from all schools. Asbestos remaining in schools is in the form of asbestos cement (AC) sheet which does not pose a health risk unless disturbed. The treatment of AC sheet is carried out by Public Works in accordance with WorkCover guidelines which indicate that unless the AC sheet is in poor condition or is to be cut, drilled or sanded (or in any way disturbed) it should be left "in situ".
                (2) Deteriorating asbestos has been removed from schools in all known cases.
                (3) During maintenance of schools any asbestos product which poses a risk is removed in accordance with WorkCover guidelines.
                (4) There is a systemic (regionally based) program to remove AC roof sheeting since the removal by trained contractors is preferable to "ad hoc" removal by untrained personnel. AC roof sheeting was installed mainly in the 1950s and is reaching the end of its serviceable life.

            *1266 UNDERGROUND WATER SUPPLIES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
                (1) Is he aware of statements by the Deputy Premier, charging senior staff of the Department of Water Resources with "a scandalous dereliction of duty" as a result of the management of underground water supplies?
                (2) Does he support these statements?
                (3) Are the Deputy Premier's statements supported by expert data?
                (4) If not, what is the present position with underwater reserves in the Namoi, Gwydir and Macintyre Valleys?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) The statements reflect the personal views held by the former Deputy Premier. Debate on his personal opinions is neither relevant nor constructive.
                (3) Not that I am aware of.

            Page 1568
                (4) The important groundwater resources of northwestern New South Wales have been closely monitored and managed by the Department since widespread development of these resources in the 1970s and 1980s.
                Presently, there is adequate groundwater resources in storage in the Namoi, Gwydir and Macintyre Valleys. For example, the storage volume of the Namoi is approximately 33 million megalitres (or the equivalent to more than 78 Keepit Dams at full storage), the Gwydir has over 6 million megalitres (over 4 full Copeton Dams) and the Macintyre, although uncertain due to the valley being shared with Queensland, is approximately 6 million megalitres.
                Even though there have been small to moderate declines in water tables in most areas through increased pumping and lower recharge to the large groundwater storages, due to the present drought conditions, an embargo is presently in place in the Namoi and a temporary embargo has been placed on the Gwydir till the end of July 1993. No action is required in the Macintyre as there is little groundwater development at present.
                The Department will continue to monitor the situation in each valley and will act accordingly to ensure that the groundwater resources are maintained.

            *1274 HOUSIE APPLICATIONS—Mr Anderson asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
                (1) Where an application to conduct the game of Housie in a particular area is received, does her administration:
                  (a) Advertise the proposal?
                  (b) Inform existing Housie operators in the area of the application?
                  (c) Seek the views of existing Housie operators?
                  (d) Ascertain the impact on existing Housie operators should the application be approved?
                  (e) Take into account the views of existing Housie operators?
                (2) Was an application to conduct Housie in Liverpool recently approved?
                (3) (a) In approving the application referred to in question (2) above, did her administration undertake any or all of the steps set out in (a) to (e) of question (1) above?
                  (b) If so, what are the details for each step?
                (4) (a) Who was the applicant in question (2) above?
                  (b) What is the registered address of the applicant?
                  (c) Is the applicant a private company?
                  (d) Have any or all of the funds raised from the operations of this applicant been spent on the provision of facilities in the Liverpool area?
                  (e) Is the applicant leasing the Whitlam Centre from Liverpool Council at an annual rental of $75,000?
                  (f) Is the applicant a business or a charity?
                (5) (a) Have the Catholic parishes of Liverpool, Mount Pritchard and Bonnyrigg been conducting Housie in the area for the past 20 years?
                  (b) Has the approval of a new Housie operator resulted in a substantial drop in takings by the three parishes preventing the completion of a church and jeopardising the loans for a high school and presbytery?
                (6) When contacted by Father Langtry prior to the approval being granted did her administration:
                  (a) Confirm that an application had been received?
                  (b) Refuse to give the name of the applicant?
                  (c) Agree that an objection could be lodged?
                  (d) Advise that an objection would not make any difference?
                (7) What action is proposed regarding the matter?

            Page 1569
                Answer—
                (1) (a) No.
                  (b) Prior to 1986 all applications to conduct the game of Housie in a particular area were rejected where there were existing Housie games being conducted within a 3 km distance. This policy was altered in 1986 on the basis that it was not the policy of the Government to grant exclusive rights to, or special privileges, in respect of any particular form of community-based gaming.
                    However, two subsequent decisions require existing charity Housie operators to be informed of a new application.
                    First, in 1988, it was decided that charity Housie could be played in registered clubs and hotels. In those circumstances, the grant of a new permit is subject to there being no reasonable objections from existing charity Housie operators. The views of existing Housie operators are sought and taken into account, but only where their game is conducted within a 2 km radius of the new game, and the new game is to be conducted at the same time and same day as an existing game.
                    Second, because of particular problems in the Newcastle area, a pilot program was introduced in March 1992. In that area the Chief Secretary's Department informs existing charity Housie operators of new applications within their vicinity. The views of those operators are taken into account in determining the application.
                  (c) The views of existing Housie operators are sought in the circumstances outlined in (b) above.
                  (d) The Chief Secretary's Department does not ascertain the impact of new games on existing games other than in the circumstances outlined in (b).
                  (e) The views of existing Housie operators are taken into account only in the circumstances outlined in (b).
                (2) Yes.
                (3) (a) No.
                  (b) Not applicable.
                (4) (a) The applicant for the game conducted at the Whitlam Centre, Liverpool, was Mr Colin Creig.
                  (b) 12-14 Pindari Road, Peakhurst.
                  (c) No.
                  (d) No information is available of the expenditure of the charity's funds in the Liverpool area.
                  (e) Information lodged with the application states that rental is payable to Liverpool Council at an annual rate of $15,000.
                  (f) The application was lodged on behalf of the Association for Children with Learning Difficulties Inc., a registered charity, by its treasurer.
                (5) (a) As permits are issued for limited periods of time, the records maintained by the Chief Secretary's Department encompass only the last 5 years. During this period the Catholic parishes of Liverpool, Mount Pritchard and Bonnyrigg have been conducting Housie games.
                  (b) Unknown.
                (6) Father Langtry contacted the Chief Secretary's Department after the permit had been issued. However, the response to the questions are:
                  (a) No.
                  (b) Yes.
                  (c) Yes.
                  (d) Yes, as the application had already been granted.
                (7) The Charities Division of the Chief Secretary's Department will evaluate the pilot scheme presently operating in the Hunter region.

            Page 1570

            *1275 SCHOOL MAINTENANCE BUDGETS—ELECTORATE OF LIVERPOOL—Mr Anderson asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What was the size of the budget allocation to school maintenance for each of the schools in the electorate of Liverpool for the years:
                  (a) 1988/89?
                  (b) 1989/90?
                  (c) 1990/91?
                  (d) 1991/92?
                  (e) 1992/93?
                (2) What was the last year in which each school had a complete repainting program undertaken?
                (3) In which schools will major maintenance programs be undertaken in the next budget year 1993/94?
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) When this Government came to office in 1988 the maintenance of schools had deteriorated to a disastrous level and estimates of arrears of maintenance were placed somewhere between $400 million and $800 million.
                The level of expenditure was significantly increased in 1988/89 and it has been held at that higher level for the last 4 years. The condition of our schools is improving and they are now leading the nation. In the study carried out by the Australian Teachers Union in 1992 the schools sampled in New South Wales ranked with the best in the nation.
                It is not satisfactory to report on individual schools for 2 years out of a 5-year (external) and 10-year (internal/external) cyclic maintenance program. It would give a distorted impression of expenditure because only some of the schools in the electorate would be scheduled in the 2 years in question.
                The funds for maintenance grants are now incorporated as part of a school's operating budget and are not counted in reporting allocations for cyclic maintenance.

            *1278 SOUTH CREEK WATER TESTING—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) How many times in the last 2 years has the quality of water in South Creek, Werrington and St Marys been tested for pollution?
                (2) What action does he or the Government propose to take subsequent to these water quality tests?
                (3) How often has testing taken place so far this year?
                Answer—
                (1) Pollution levels in South Creek have been monitored at two sites by the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) on a monthly basis since June 1990. The sites are at the Richmond Road Bridge, Berkshire Park, and at Fitzroy Bridge near Windsor. These sites are located downstream of St Marys and Werrington.
                Since May 1991, South Creek has been sampled 24 times at each site.

            Page 1571
                (2) The following action has been taken:
                    •EPA has negotiated a pollution reduction program with the Water Board for the St Marys sewage treatment plant;
                    •EPA is using the monitoring data to assess the impact of urban development within the catchment; and
                    •EPA is assessing the impact of South Creek on the Hawkesbury/Nepean River by determining the loads of nutrient pollutants entering the Hawkesbury/Nepean River.
                Monitoring, therefore, is playing an important role in the development of environmental management plans for the whole river.
                (3) As of 18 May 1993, water quality testing had been undertaken five times in 1993 at each site.

            *1279 SCHOOLS—ELECTRICITY BILLS—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What is the average bill for electricity paid by primary schools in each classification of primary school in New South Wales?
                (2) What is the average bill for electricity paid by high schools in each category of high school based on enrolment figures in New South Wales?
                (3) What is the allowance made for schools' electricity charges when allocating a global budget for each school in their respective categories?
                (4) On what basis are allowances for electricity charges calculated for each category of school?
                Answer—
                (1) to (4) The question relates to the Department's school funding policies for utilities expenditure (i.e., water rates, electricity, telephone) and seeks school cost data according to the various categories of schools.
                From 1991, the Department of School Education has provided all Government schools with direct cash grants to cover a range of day-to-day operating expenses, including utilities costs, such as electricity, telephones and water rates.
                While these cash grants have gradually moved toward a formula funding approach for all schools, utilities costs are recognised as one area which does not readily lend itself to a formula approach without disadvantaging some schools with unique needs, including climatic, geographic and physical factors. It is for this reason that the utilities component of the school grant has been calculated on the basis of 90 per cent of expenditure history adjusted each year for inflation. The remaining 10 per cent is held in reserve by regional offices to address cases of special need.
                In the context of utilities funding overall, this is the position:
                    •Utilities funding is provided to schools as part of devolved school global funding arrangements.
                    •Whilst most components of school global funding are provided on a formula basis, utilities funding continues to be provided on the basis of historical funding which inherently recognises such factors as climate, different supplier charging practices, type of school construction, whether a school is on the sewer, etc.

            Page 1572
                    •If there are cases of individual schools facing a funding shortfall, schools are able to access reserves held by regional offices. No school has had to use its self-generated funds to meet costs formerly met from departmental allocations.
                    •Because the Department no longer collects data on actual costs for these utilities items, either for individual schools or in aggregate for each school category, it is not possible to supply the information sought by Mr Aquilina.
                    To collect such data would involve circularising each of the 2,200 plus Government schools. I do not believe this information would generate sufficient benefits to outweigh the costs involved in gathering the information. These costs form part of each school's expenditure profile and are incorporated in the annual financial statements of individual schools.
                I might add that some utilities expenditure information has been gathered by the Department's Energy Management Committee as part of an exercise designed to contain energy consumption in schools. However, the release of this information on a school-by-school basis would be meaningless without adequate recognition being given of the characteristics of individual schools which impact on energy consumption patterns.

            *1280 SCHOOLS—TELEPHONE BILLS—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What is the average bill for telephone accounts paid by primary schools in each classification of primary schools in New South Wales?
                (2) What is the average bill for telephone accounts paid by high schools in each category of high school based on enrolment figures in New South Wales?
                (3) What is the allowance made for schools' telephone accounts when allocating a global budget for each school in their respective categories?
                (4) On what basis are allowances for telephone accounts calculated for each category of school?
                Answer—
                (1) to (4) The question relates to the Department's school funding policies for utilities expenditure (i.e., water rates, electricity, telephone) and seeks school cost data according to the various categories of schools.
                From 1991, the Department of School Education has provided all Government schools with direct cash grants to cover a range of day-to-day operating expenses, including utilities costs, such as electricity, telephones and water rates.
                While these cash grants have gradually moved toward a formula funding approach for all schools, utilities costs are recognised as one area which does not readily lend itself to a formula approach without disadvantaging some schools with unique needs, including climatic, geographic and physical factors. It is for this reason that the utilities component of the school grant has been calculated on the basis of 90 per cent of expenditure history adjusted each year for inflation. The remaining 10 per cent is held in reserve by regional offices to address cases of special need.
                In the context of utilities funding overall, this is the position:
                    •Utilities funding is provided to schools as part of devolved school global funding arrangements.

            Page 1573
                    •Whilst most components of school global funding are provided on a formula basis, utilities funding continues to be provided on the basis of historical funding which inherently recognises such factors as climate, different supplier charging practices, type of school construction, whether a school is on the sewer, etc.
                    •If there are cases of individual schools facing a funding shortfall, schools are able to access reserves held by regional offices. No school has had to use its self-generated funds to meet costs formerly met from departmental allocations.
                    •Because the Department no longer collects data on actual costs for these utilities items, either for individual schools or in aggregate for each school category, it is not possible to supply the information sought by Mr Aquilina.
                    To collect such data would involve circularising each of the 2,200 plus Government schools. I do not believe this information would generate sufficient benefits to outweigh the costs involved in gathering the information. These costs form part of each school's expenditure profile and are incorporated in the annual financial statements of individual schools.
                I might add that some utilities expenditure information has been gathered by the Department's Energy Management Committee as part of an exercise designed to contain energy consumption in schools. However, the release of this information on a school-by-school basis would be meaningless without adequate recognition being given of the characteristics of individual schools which impact on energy consumption patterns.

            *1281 SCHOOLS—WATER RATES—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What is the average bill for water rates paid by primary schools in each classification of primary school in New South Wales?
                (2) What is the average bill for water rates paid by high schools in each category of high school based on enrolment figures in New South Wales?
                (3) What is the allowance made for schools' water rates when allocating a global budget for each school in their respective categories?
                (4) On what basis are allowances for water rates calculated for each category of school?
                Answer—
                (1) to (4) The question relates to the Department's school funding policies for utilities expenditure (i.e., water rates, electricity, telephone) and seeks school cost data according to the various categories of schools.
                From 1991, the Department of School Education has provided all Government schools with direct cash grants to cover a range of day-to-day operating expenses, including utilities costs, such as electricity, telephones and water rates.
                While these cash grants have gradually moved toward a formula funding approach for all schools, utilities costs are recognised as one area which does not readily lend itself to a formula approach without disadvantaging some schools with unique needs, including climatic, geographic and physical factors. It is for this reason that the utilities component of the school grant has been calculated on the basis of 90 per cent of expenditure history adjusted each year for inflation. The remaining 10 per cent is held in reserve by regional offices to address cases of special need.

            Page 1574
                In the context of utilities funding overall, this is the position:
                    •Utilities funding is provided to schools as part of devolved school global funding arrangements.
                    •Whilst most components of school global funding are provided on a formula basis, utilities funding continues to be provided on the basis of historical funding which inherently recognises such factors as climate, different supplier charging practices, type of school construction, whether a school is on the sewer, etc.
                    •If there are cases of individual schools facing a funding shortfall, schools are able to access reserves held by regional offices. No school has had to use its self-generated funds to meet costs formerly met from departmental allocations.
                    •Because the Department no longer collects data on actual costs for these utilities items, either for individual schools or in aggregate for each school category, it is not possible to supply the information sought by Mr Aquilina.
                    To collect such data would involve circularising each of the 2,200 plus Government schools. I do not believe this information would generate sufficient benefits to outweigh the costs involved in gathering the information. These costs form part of each school's expenditure profile and are incorporated in the annual financial statements of individual schools.
                I might add that some utilities expenditure information has been gathered by the Department's Energy Management Committee as part of an exercise designed to contain energy consumption in schools. However, the release of this information on a school-by-school basis would be meaningless without adequate recognition being given of the characteristics of individual schools which impact on energy consumption patterns.

            *1282 TEACHING STAFF ESTIMATES—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                With regard to the estimates for teaching numbers in the 1991/92 Budget Paper No. 2 at page 478 and the actual outcomes in 1992/93 indicating the average teaching staff numbers in the following categories:

            EstimateActual
            General Primary Education Government schools19,70320,880
            Education of children with disabilities2,6342,786
            General Secondary22,47123,679
            Total of three categories44,80847,345
                (1) Why is there such a discrepancy between the estimate and actual figures?
                (2) What confidence does the Minister have about the corresponding estimates for 1992/93?
                Answer—
                (1) A direct comparison between 1991/92 and 1992/93 budget papers for staffing details cannot be easily made because of changes in the methodology of compiling equivalent full-time teacher numbers.

            Page 1575
                Prior to the 1992/93 estimates, the budget papers did not reflect the EFT staffing equivalent of short-term relief teachers and teachers on paid leave. This methodology was similar to that adopted for Australian Education Council staffing presentations.
                In 1992/93, Treasury directed that the staff numbers include relief and paid leave provisions in order that direct comparisons can be made between salaries allocations and expenditures and staff numbers.
                When this change was made, the actual figures for the preceding year were cast in the revised format to allow comparison between 1991/92 actual and 1992/93 staff estimates.
                (2) The estimates for 1992/93 were based on student and teacher number data available at the time. I have confidence that these estimates are soundly based. There will however be variation between the 1992/93 actual and estimates to reflect changes in enrolment numbers and other factors.

            *1283 PEER SUPPORT FOUNDATION—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                With regard to teacher training in the area of peer-led drug education being carried out by the Peer Support Foundation—
                (1) Upon what basis was the Minister's decision that the foundation be the sole provider of peer-led drug education training appropriate?
                (2) What justification is there for limiting peer-led drug education training to one provider?
                (3) Were tenders called for provision of such training prior to making this decision?
                (4) If so, when?
                (5) If not, how can the Minister be sure that this training is being provided to the Department of School Education at the best available rate?
                (6) Given that the Minister admitted, in a letter to Mr R. Thomson on 4 April 1991, that the Elizabeth Campbell Peer Support program was a suitable source for providing peer support training in Government schools, what has led to a change in the Department's policy to exclude that organisation from providing such training?
                (7) Does the Department of School Education consider the Peer Support Foundation a "partner organisation"?
                (8) If so, what evaluation did the Department undertake of the Peer Support Foundation before granting it "partner organisation" status?
                (9) Did the Department examine the matters raised in Question on Notice No. 733 of 1992/93?
                (10) If not, why not?
                (11) What other organisations have "partner organisation" status with the Department of School Education?
                Answer—
                (1) The Peer Support Foundation is not the sole provider of peer-led drug education programs. Many schools provide their own peer-led drug education programs. Where schools require outside support to carry out a peer-led drug education program, they use the Peer Support Foundation.
                (2) Peer-led drug education is not limited to one provider. Many schools provide their own peer-led drug education programs. Where support for such programs is required from outside the school, the Department acts through the Peer Support Foundation.

            Page 1576
                (3) No tenders were called.
                (4) Not applicable.
                (5) Most schools do not seek training in peer-led drug education. Individual schools make their own decisions about whether to use local funds for training in peer-led drug education. Their decision will be based on the cost effectiveness of the program.
                (6) In the period following this letter there was a reassessment of all peer-led drug education programs in NSW Government schools. A decision was made to use the Peer Support Foundation.
                (7) Yes.
                (8) The Department of School Education has had a long and effective working relationship with the Peer Support Foundation.
                (9) Yes.
                (10) Not applicable.
                (11) None.

            *1286 METFORD PLUMBING TRADES COURSES—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What is the current enrolment at the Metford Campus of Students in the following plumbing trades courses:
                  (a) Stage 1?
                  (b) Stage 2?
                  (c) Stage 3?
                (2) In each of these courses, how many students:
                  (a) Live in the Newcastle/Lake Macquarie area?
                  (b) Are apprenticed to Master Plumbers in the Newcastle/Lake Macquarie area?
                  (c) Are apprenticed to Master Plumbers in the Metford/Maitland area?
                (3) Of the students enrolled in prevocational and JSST courses in plumbing, how many expect to take up apprenticeships in the Maitland/Metford area?
                Answer—
                (1) (a) Stage 1 13
                  (b) Stage 2 46
                  (c) Stage 3 40
                (2) (a) Stage 1 2
                    Stage 2 24
                    Stage 3 21
                  (b) Stage 1 4
                    Stage 2 28
                    Stage 3 22
                  (c) Stage 1 9
                    Stage 2 18
                    Stage 3 18
                (3) Experience has shown that apprentices will take up apprenticeships wherever they are available. Often this entails travel to other suburbs or neighbouring towns.


            Page 1577
            *1287 NEWCASTLE PLUMBING TRADES COURSES—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                Following the closure of the Plumbing Trades Training Section at the Newcastle campus of the Hunter Institute of Technology—
                (1) How many enrolments have taken place at the Metford campus in:
                  (a) The Prevocational Plumbing Course?
                  (b) The joint school (JSST) plumbing program?
                (2) How many of these students reside in the Newcastle/Lake Macquarie area?
                (3) What provisions have been made to ensure access of Newcastle and Lake Macquarie students to prevocational and JSST plumbing courses?
                (4) Will the Minister act to restore these courses to the Newcastle campus?
                Answer—
                (1) (a) 24.
                  (b) 36.
                (2) (a) Prevocational Plumbing Course: 7.
                  (b) JSST: 0.
                (3) Prevocational:
                  Access is open to all young people. There is no residential qualification.
                  Joint Secondary Schools TAFE (JSST) Courses:
                  No significant demand has been expressed for JSST courses in Plumbing by schools/students from the Newcastle and Lake Macquarie areas. No plumbing JSST program has been run at Newcastle.
                (4) No.

            *1288 HOME CARE SERVICES—Mr Irwin asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                What are the rates paid for the range of services provided by the Home Care service:
                  (a) In each region?
                  (b) As a statewide average?
                Answer—
                  (a) The contributions made by Home Care customers vary according to their need and ability to pay. Contribution levels are negotiated with each customer at the time of assessment.
                  (b) The average statewide contribution for 1 hour of Home Care service is $3.74.

            *1289 HOME CARE CHARGES—Mr Irwin asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) Are different charges for the same service charged to Home Care clients in different branches within each region?
                (2) Are standard procedures adopted for assessing the ability of clients to pay?


            Page 1578
                Answer—
                (1) Yes. No person is denied service if he or she is unable to make a contribution.
                (2) Yes.

            *1290 HOME CARE CLIENT CHARGES—Mr Irwin asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) On what basis are client charges established for Home Care clients?
                (2) Is there a standard rate of charges for the whole State?
                (3) What guidelines exist for setting the charge for each client?
                Answer—
                (1) Home Care service contributions are negotiated between the customer and Home Care. Customers' individual circumstances are taken into account. No person is denied service if he or she is unable to make a contribution.
                (2) No.
                (3) Branches have been advised that when negotiating a customer's contribution the following factors should be taken into account when setting the level of contribution a customer will make:
                    •customers new to the service are generally willing to contribute between $4 and $5 per hour;
                    •the "market price" for Home Care services is about $18 per hour;
                    •customers with high usage levels are likely to make a lower per hour contribution; and
                    •in this last circumstance, it is sometimes more convenient to agree for contributions to be set at a maximum amount to be paid every 4 weeks.

            *1291 SCHOOL VIOLENCE—ELECTORATE OF PENRITH—Mrs Lo Po' asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) On how many occasions since February 1991 have police been called to schools in the electorate of Penrith to deal with allegations of violence?
                (2) Is the Minister satisfied with the schools' handling of reports of violence?
                (3) What are the dates and locations of police involvement in school violence?
                (4) Has the Minister given direction to Principals on how to handle school violence?
                (5) What are the comparable incidents of school violence in the years:
                  (a) 1985?
                  (b) 1986?
                  (c) 1987?
                  (d) 1988?
                  (e) 1989?
                  (f) 1990?


            Page 1579
                Answer—
                (1) to (5) Violence in our schools is totally unacceptable and is the end product of an increasingly violent society. However, the media and Opposition's focus on school violence does not address the real issue and broader problem of youth violence.
                It is the issue of youth violence which is the greatest cause for concern and which warrants a thorough investigation. The NSW Government and the people of this State need to know why youth violence appears to be on the increase and effective measures to counteract this trend.
                Consequently, on Wednesday 19 May 1993, I announced that the Social Issues Committee of the NSW Parliament would investigate the issue of youth violence in New South Wales.
                The Social Issues Committee, with its bipartisan approach, is an effective forum to conduct this enquiry and all relevant Government Departments will assist with provision of necessary information.
                The Social Issues Committee will undertake an enquiry into the issue of youth violence as per the following Terms of Reference:
                  1. Collect and analyse data on the occurrences of youth violence, including violent incidents in schools, and its underlying causes.
                  2. Examine the policies, actions, research, and proposals of relevant Government Agencies and the impact of racial tension, unemployment, family breakdown, media portrayal of violence and any other relevant factors in relation to youth violence.
                  3. Make recommendations to the NSW Parliament to assist all relevant Government Agencies to develop the most effective strategies to deal with youth violence.
                In light of this enquiry, I do not believe it appropriate to overburden the resources of our schools to provide the information requested.
                Youth violence is an issue that concerns everyone in the community. I am sure the Social Issues Committee will address this important task in an expeditious and objective manner.

            *1292 TUGGERAH LAKES RESTORATION PROGRAM—Mr McBride asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
                (1) How much money has been spent on the Tuggerah Lakes Restoration Program in the 1992/93 financial year so far?
                (2) How much will be spent on the program in the rest of the 1992/93 financial year?
                (3) On what particular works will the money be spent?
                (4) How will the works improve the condition of the lake?
                (5) (a) Have there been any shortfalls in spending commitments announced in the 1992/93 Budget Capital Works Program?
                  (b) If so:
                    (i) To what amount has there been a shortfall?
                    (ii) Why has there been a shortfall?
                    (iii) How will this effect the program's intention of improving the condition of the lake?
                    (iv) Does he have plans to fast-track work in future years to ensure the program is completed by the promised date of 1995?
                (6) When will the program be completed?


            Page 1580
                Answer—
                (1) At present Public Works expenditure on the Tuggerah Lakes Restoration Project in the 1992/93 financial year is $3 million.
                (2) No additional expenditure beyond the allocation of $3 million.
                (3) In the 1992/93 the major items of work include:
                    •Extractive works and foreshore reinstatement at Berkeley Vale, Long Jetty and Canton Beach.
                    •Foreshore reinstatement at Terilbah Reserve, San Remo, Halekulani and Southeast Tuggerah.
                    •Construction of sediment trap structures.
                    •The purchase of the dredge, jointly funded by the Government and Council.
                    •Dredging works at the lake entrance and Saltwater Creek, Long Jetty.
                    •Algae removal.
                    •Public awareness programs through circulation of the video "Saving the Lakes".
                (4) The works will assist to restore the lakes environment and increase the enjoyment of the lakes system by residents and visitors.
                The works meet three overall objectives:
                    •To remove sediment and nutrients from the lakes system (extractive works).
                    •To reduce the amount of sediment and nutrient inputs entering the lakes system (management works).
                    •To improve tidal exchange, i.e., to increase the amount of nutrients and sediments being exchanged with clean ocean water on each tidal cycle (entrance works).
                The visible improvement to the lakes foreshores, improvements to fishing and the positive reaction of the local community and visitors to the area are clear indications that the project is achieving its objectives.
                (5) (a) There have been no shortfalls in spending commitments announced in the 1992/93 Budget Capital Works program.
                  (b) Not applicable.
                (6) The Tuggerah Lakes Restoration Program is scheduled for completion in June 1994.

            *1298 SCHOOL COUNCILS—ELECTORATE OF CABRAMATTA—Mr Newman asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many school councils are operating in the electorate of Cabramatta?
                (2) How many schools in the electorate of Cabramatta have chosen not to form school councils?
                (3) How will schools in the electorate of Cabramatta which choose not to form school councils be funded?

                Answer—
                (1) Of the 15 schools in the electorate of Cabramatta, 11 schools have school councils.
                (2) No school in the electorate of Cabramatta has chosen not to form a school council. The 4 schools currently without school councils have steering committees which are drawing up school council constitutions.

            Page 1581
                (3) Since no school has chosen not to form a school council, the question is not applicable. However, regardless of whether a school has chosen to have or, at this stage, not to have a school council, the policy of the Department of School Education is to fund all schools according to a statewide formula taking into account specific site circumstances, through the allocation of global grants.

            *1299 SCHOOL VIOLENCE—ELECTORATE OF CABRAMATTA—Mr Newman asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) On how many occasions since February 1989 have police been involved in dealing with allegations of violence at schools in the electorate of Cabramatta to pupils, staff or property by:
                  (a) Other pupils?
                  (b) Staff?
                  (c) Other persons?
                (2) What was the nature of each such incident?
                (3) (a) Were there any such incidents not reported to police in the same period?
                  (b) If so, for each case, what was the:
                    (i) Nature?
                    (ii) Reason for non-reporting to police?
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) Violence in our schools is totally unacceptable and is the end product of an increasingly violent society. However, the media and Opposition's focus on school violence does not address the real issue and broader problem of youth violence.
                It is the issue of youth violence which is the greatest cause for concern and which warrants a thorough investigation. The NSW Government and the people of this State need to know why youth violence appears to be on the increase and effective measures to counteract this trend.
                Consequently, on Wednesday 19 May 1993, I announced that the Social Issues Committee of the NSW Parliament would investigate the issue of youth violence in New South Wales.
                The Social Issues Committee, with its bipartisan approach, is an effective forum to conduct this enquiry and all relevant Government Departments will assist with provision of necessary information.
                The Social Issues Committee will undertake an enquiry into the issue of youth violence as per the following Terms of Reference:
                  1. Collect and analyse data on the occurrences of youth violence, including violent incidents in schools, and its underlying causes.
                  2. Examine the policies, actions, research, and proposals of relevant Government Agencies and the impact of racial tension, unemployment, family breakdown, media portrayal of violence and any other relevant factors in relation to youth violence.
                  3. Make recommendations to the NSW Parliament to assist all relevant Government Agencies to develop the most effective strategies to deal with youth violence.
                In light of this enquiry, I do not believe it appropriate to overburden the resources of our schools to provide the information requested.
                Youth violence is an issue that concerns everyone in the community. I am sure the Social Issues Committee will address this important task in an expeditious and objective manner.


            Page 1582
            *1300 COMPOSITE CLASSES—ELECTORATE OF CABRAMATTA—Mr Newman asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Are schools in the electorate of Cabramatta operating classes containing more than 30 pupils?
                (2) If so:
                  (a) At which schools?
                  (b) How many classes at each school?
                (3) Are schools in the electorate of Cabramatta operating composite classes?
                (4) If so:
                  (a) At which schools?
                  (b) How many classes at each school?
                  (c) Which classes are composite in each case?
                  (d) Which schools operate composite classes containing more than 25 students?
                  (e) Which schools operate composite classes containing kindergarten students?
                  (f) How many students are in kindergarten composite classes at these schools?
                  (g) How many of these students are kindergarten students?
                Answer—

                (1) to (4) The Department of School Education has a clear commitment to excellence in New South Wales schools, providing for more than 750,000 young people currently enrolled in the Government School System.
                The Department's efforts are directed to improving educational standards in schools, improving parental choice and participation and increasing learning opportunities for all.
                To provide the detailed information requested in the member's question would impinge on the resources and time of senior departmental officers. As a consequence, I am not willing to move resources from the Department's core responsibility to meet this request.
                General statistical information on the Department of School Education is available in the Department's Annual Report.

            *1313 STAFF EQUIPMENT—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women—
                With reference to the Director-General, Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education—
                (1) Does his immediate staff have the use of a photocopy machine?
                (2) If so, what is the brand and model?
                (3) Who is responsible for:
                  (a) The selection of the photocopier?
                  (b) Determining the time of replacement?
                  (c) The payment of servicing and maintenance and other associated costs?
                (4) Does the present photocopier have:
                  (a) Automatic document feeder?
                  (b) Duplex document feeder?
                  (c) (i) Large capacity cassette?
                    (ii) If so, what capacity?

            Page 1583
                  (d) (i) Duplex unit?
                    (ii) If so, what capacity?
                  (e) (i) Paper size selection?
                    (ii) If so, what range of paper sizes?
                  (f) (i) Magnification selector?
                    (ii) If so, is it automatic?
                  (g) Reduction and enlargement?
                  (h) Interruption capability?
                  (i) Page by page copying?
                  (j) Frame erasure?
                  (k) Punch hole erasure?
                  (l) Cover mode?
                  (m) Image shifter?
                  (n) Program memory?
                  (o) Built-in editing?
                  (p) Multiple sheet bypass?
                  (q) (i) Bin sorter?
                    (ii) If so, what capacity?
                  (r) (i) Other than black colour copying?
                    (ii) If so, what colours?
                (5) Does the Director-General of the Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education have the use of:
                  (a) A modular phone?
                  (b) A car phone?
                (6) If yes, in each or either case, what is the brand name and model of the phone(s)?
                (7) If yes, in each or either case, who pays for:
                  (a) The purchase and installation costs?
                  (b) Each call made?
                  (c) Repairs and maintenance costs?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Xerox 5052 (purchased under State Government Contract 390 Item 13).
                (3) (a) Manager, Industrial Relations Unit.
                  (b) Manager, Industrial Relations Unit.
                  (c) Manager, Industrial Relations Unit.
                (4) (a) Yes.
                  (b) Yes.
                  (c) (i) Yes.
                    (ii) 2,000 sheets.
                  (d) (i) Yes.
                    (ii) 50 pages.
                  (e) (i) Yes.
                    (ii) A4, A3.
                  (f) (i) Yes.
                    (ii) Yes.
                  (g) Yes.
                  (h) Yes.
                  (i) Yes.

            Page 1584
                  (j) Yes.
                  (k) Yes.
                  (l) Yes.
                  (m) Yes.
                  (n) Yes.
                  (o) Yes.
                  (p) Yes.
                  (q) (i) No.
                    (ii) Not applicable.
                  (r) (i) No.
                    (ii) Not applicable.
                (5) (a) Yes.
                  (b) Yes.
                (6) (a) Motorola Micro Tac II.
                    Motorola Mini Tac 6800XL.
                (7) (a) Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education.
                  (b) Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education.
                  (c) Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education.

            *1320 LINE HAULAGE—Mr Face asked the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
                (1) Has the issue of line haulage been raised by sections of the liquor industry concerning this iniquitous and discriminatory tax?
                (2) Did LIMAC unanimously support the abolition of line haulage as disincentive to the liquor industry and small business and disadvantaging country people?
                (3) Is it Government policy that line haulage be abolished?
                (4) If so, why has it not been abolished?
                (5) Does she intend to ignore the LIMAC's unanimous views on this tax?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) Yes.
                (3) Yes.
                (4) The matter is to be progressed in the Budget Session of Parliament 1993.
                (5) No.

            *1323 GEORGES RIVER WATER QUALITY—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) What is the current state of water quality of the upper reaches of the Georges River in the vicinity of the electorate of East Hills?
                (2) Does your Department carry out regular checks on Georges River water quality?
                (3) What has been the results of these tests?
                (4) If tests are not carried out, what is the reason?
                (5) Is the river in the area referred to in Question (1) considered to be fit for swimming?
                (6) Will further development of the catchment area of the Georges River continue to place pressure on river water quality?
                (7) What is your Department's projected prognosis of river water quality over the next 2, 5 and 10 years?

            Page 1585
                (8) Does Water Board overflowing sewerage mains significantly affect river water quality?
                (9) If so, what measures in conjunction with the Water Board has your Department taken to address this problem?
                (10) Is there regular liaison between your Department and the Water Board to improve river water quality?
                Answer—
                (1) The Georges River forms the boundary of the electorate of East Hills between the confluence of Salt Pan Creek and the Milperra Bridge. Water quality in this area is generally good except for periods after wet weather when runoff from urban areas combined with surcharges from sewerage mains results in turbid water with elevated bacterial levels.
                (2) No. Most monitoring in the area has been undertaken by the Water Board.
                (3) Not applicable.
                (4) Ongoing routine monitoring of such event-dominated systems generally does not contribute to a detailed understanding of the system or help in formulating solutions to problems if they arise. Should specific issues of potential concern be identified, resources are allocated to investigate the extent and causes of the pollution.
                (5) Information from the Water Board on water quality indicates the Georges River between Salt Pan Creek and Milperra has sufficiently high water quality for swimming except after periods of rain when stormwater runoff and surcharges from the sewerage system reduce the clarity and increase the bacterial concentration.
                (6) Yes.
                (7) Maintenance of Georges River water quality will be dependent on better controls of urban runoff and sewerage overflows being put into place. Timeframes for improvement cannot be given until some of the major studies being undertaken as part of the clean waterways program are finished and strategies developed for improving water quality.
                (8) While it is known that sewer surcharges contribute to poor water quality during periods of wet weather, it is not possible with our present knowledge, to quantify the relative contribution of this source compared with the general urban runoff.
                (9) The current discharge licence for the Liverpool sewage treatment works directly addresses the question of wet weather surcharges into the Georges River by requiring wet weather flows at Liverpool Sewage Treatment Works to be retained to the capacity storage at the site until the mains can accept the flow.
                (10) Yes.

            *1325 PLASTIC AND RUBBER SKILLS CENTRE—Mr Rogan asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Is TAFE to close the Plastic and Rubber Skills Centre at Revesby in June this year?
                (2) Why was this decision taken?
                (3) Who will now provide the skilled training for those employed in the plastic and rubber industry?
                (4) Will TAFE be required to pay "dead" rent on the Revesby building until February 1994?
                (5) What is the cost of this "dead" rent?
                (6) Is the Minister aware of the view expressed by leaders in the plastic industry that the decision to close this centre is a penny-pinching exercise?

            Page 1586
                (7) Since its establishment in 1985, has the centre trained 300 students per year to senior operator level?
                (8) Will this valuable training now be lost to the plastics and rubber industry?
                (9) Is the plastics and rubber industry one of the few growth industries in New South Wales with 14 industry groups, 900 enterprises and 27,000 employees covering injection moulding, reinforced plastics, blow moulding, rubber moulding and cable making?
                (10) Is the Minister aware this industry is about to commence a major export drive which will only be successful if the industry has skilled operators?
                (11) Will the Minister now review her decision to close the centre?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) The financial viability for the joint venture has proved negative and operational cost per student far exceeded normal TAFE costings. In addition, the centre is not effectively meeting the range of industry needs.
                (3) The NSW TAFE Commission will continue to provide training in the plastics and rubber industry and is continuing to work with industry to ascertain the training needs, both short term and long-term.
                (4) No.
                (5) Not applicable.
                (6) On the contrary, industry leaders agree it is not an economic proposition to maintain the centre at Revesby.
                (7) No.
                (8) No. Refer to Answer (3).
                (9) The recent ABS figures quoted in NSWPRITC Strategic Plan indicate employment of 23,000 in March 1993, a decline of 2,000 from the previous year. This decline is overwhelmingly in the fibreglass area.
                (10) Present industry demand for training is being met, irrespective of the purpose for training.
                (11) No. A clear decision has been made to terminate the Revesby centre and to determine alternate training pathways.

            18 MAY 1993

            (Paper No. 21)

            *1329 BONNIEVALE BOAT RAMP—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) Has $60,000 been earmarked in the National Parks and Wildlife Service budget for the construction of a boat ramp at Bonnievale, Simpsons Bay near Bundeena?
                (2) Will such a facility impact adversely on the community and the environment of The Royal National Park?
                (3) Is Simpsons Bay extremely shallow and subject to infilling?
                (4) Will the seagrass beds be disturbed or destroyed by the propellers and keels of the power boats?
                (5) Will he rescind the decision to allow this construction to proceed?
                (6) If not, why not?


            Page 1587
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) A full environmental assessment and an assessment of the impact on park users will be undertaken prior to a determination being made.
                (3) Yes.
                (4) The impact on seagrass beds will be addressed in the environmental assessment process.
                (5) Following a recent meeting involving the Port Hacking Protection Society and the Bundeena/Maianbar Water Access Association I have instructed the National Parks and Wildlife Service that no further action is to be taken on this matter pending further information.
                (6) Not applicable.

            *1330 BLACKTOWN VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE OFFICE—Ms Allan asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women—
                (1) What services are currently offered by the Vocational Guidance Office at Blacktown?
                (2) How many clients visit the office each week?
                (3) How successful has the office been in assisting clients find employment or pursue further training?
                (4) Will the office close on 30 June 1993?
                (5) Is so, why?
                (6) Where will local residents and unemployed receive assistance after the office closes?
                Answer—
                (1) Vocational guidance counselling service is available to any person over 14 with a career or employment related problem.
                (2) Average of 70.
                (3) Detailed records are not kept on placements of clients.
                (4) No. Office services relocated in September.
                (5) Single function offices are being amalgamated with other offices in order to ensure all services of the Department are available to clients at any location.
                (6) Penrith, Parramatta and Liverpool offices which will have additional staff and the ability to provide the full range of departmental services.

            *1333 SCHOOL VIOLENCE—ELECTORATE OF ST MARYS—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many reports of school violence has the Minister received with regard to schools within the electorate of St Marys?
                (2) What action is the Minister taking to reduce school violence?


            Page 1588
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) Violence in our schools is totally unacceptable and is the end product of an increasingly violent society. However, the media and Opposition's focus on school violence does not address the real issue and broader problem of youth violence.
                It is the issue of youth violence which is the greatest cause for concern and which warrants a thorough investigation. The NSW Government and the people of this State need to know why youth violence appears to be on the increase and effective measures to counteract this trend.
                Consequently, on Wednesday 19 May 1993, I announced that the Social Issues Committee of the NSW Parliament would investigate the issue of youth violence in New South Wales.
                The Social Issues Committee, with its bipartisan approach, is an effective forum to conduct this enquiry and all relevant Government Departments will assist with provision of necessary information.
                The Social Issues Committee will undertake an enquiry into the issue of youth violence as per the following Terms of Reference:
                  1. Collect and analyse data on the occurrences of youth violence, including violent incidents in schools, and its underlying causes.
                  2. Examine the policies, actions, research, and proposals of relevant Government Agencies and the impact of racial tension, unemployment, family breakdown, media portrayal of violence and any other relevant factors in relation to youth violence.
                  3. Make recommendations to the NSW Parliament to assist all relevant Government Agencies to develop the most effective strategies to deal with youth violence.
                In light of this enquiry, I do not believe it appropriate to overburden the resources of our schools to provide the information requested.
                Youth violence is an issue that concerns everyone in the community. I am sure the Social Issues Committee will address this important task in an expeditious and objective manner.

            *1337 HOME CARE BUDGET—HUNTER REGION—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) What percentage of the Home Care budget for the Hunter region was allocated to the following service areas:
            (a) Personal care for physically disabled clients?
            (b) Personal care for frail aged clients?
                  (c) Household assistance for clients?
            (d) Mobility assistance for clients?
            for the budget years:
            (i) 1988/89;
            (ii) 1989/90;
            (iii) 1990/91;
            (iv) 1991/92;
            (v) 1992/93.
                (2) What percentage of funds were spent in each of these areas?
                (3) What was the total budget allocation for Home Care in the Hunter region for each of these years?
                (4) What is the percentage growth in budget for each of these years?


            Page 1589
                Answer—
                (1) (i) and (3) In 1988/89 branch budgets were set in “hours” rather than dollars. Total expenditure in the Hunter for this year was $8.513 million.
                    From 1989/90 onwards branch budgets were set in dollars and the budgets for the subsequent years were:
                (ii) 1989/90 $ 9.026 million
                (iii) 1990/91 $ 9.867 million
                (iv) 1991/92 $10.716 million
                (v) 1992/93 $11.316 million
                (a) to (d) People who receive services under the HACC Program, and who are under the age of 60, are people with disabilities. In monitoring service, Home Care does not differentiate between services provided to people with different types of disabilities or the frail aged. The only differentiation which is made is between younger people with disabilities and the frail aged.
                    In these terms, Home Care provides service to the following age groups in the Hunter area:
                        Under 60 years 809 or (13 per cent)
                        Between 60-64 years 259 or ( 4 per cent)
                        Between 65-69 years 501 or ( 8 per cent)
                        Over 70 years 4,622 or (75 per cent)
                    This is a total 6,191 of customers in the Hunter area.
                    Similarly, Home Care does not collect information on the types of service provided to different members of the target population. However, Home Care does collect statistical information on the different types of services it provides.
                    In the 9 months to March 1993, out of a total of 381,209 hours of service, the following service types were provided to customers in the Hunter Area:
                        General housekeeping 61.9 per cent
                        Personal care 22.9 per cent
                        Respite care 10.9 per cent
                        Overnight and live-in housekeeping 0.9 per cent
                        Handyperson 1.7 per cent
                    Transport, shopping and laundry are not core services provided by Home Care but may be provided if there is no other service available. The level of service provided in the Hunter in all three of these service types is 1.7 per cent.
                (2) It is not possible for Home Care to state the percentage of funds spent on people with physical disabilities or the frail aged.
                (4) The percentage growth in expenditure in the years when budgets were set in "hours" was:
                  1988/89 14.4 per cent
                  1989/90 6.0 per cent
                The percentage growth in the budget for the following years was:
                  1990/91 9.3 per cent
                  1991/92 8.6 per cent
                  1992/93 5.6 per cent


            Page 1590
            *1345 SCHOOL MAINTENANCE BUDGETS—ELECTORATE OF ROCKDALE—Mr Thompson asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What was the size of the budget allocation to school maintenance for each of the schools in the electorate of Rockdale for the years:
                (a) 1988/89?
                (b) 1989/90?
                (c) 1990/91?
                (d) 1991/92?
                (e) 1992/93?
                (2) What was the last year in which each school had a complete repainting program undertaken?
                (3) In which schools will major maintenance programs be undertaken in the next budget year 1993/94?
                Answer—
                When this Government came to office in 1988 the maintenance of schools had deteriorated to a disastrous level and estimates of arrears of maintenance were placed somewhere between $400 million and $800 million.
                The level of expenditure was significantly increased in 1988/89 and it has been held at that higher level for the last 4 years. The condition of our schools is improving and they are now leading the nation. In the study carried out by the Australian Teachers Union in 1992 the schools sampled in New South Wales ranked with the best in the nation.
                It is not satisfactory to report on individual schools for 2/3 years out of a 5-year (external) and 10-year (internal/external) cyclic maintenance program. It would give a distorted impression of expenditure because only some of the schools in the electorate would be scheduled in the 2 years in question.
                The funds for maintenance grants are now incorporated as part of a schools operating budget and are not counted in reporting allocations for cyclic maintenance.

            19 MAY 1993

            (Paper No. 22)

            *1347 RIDGEWAY RESIDENTS' ACTION GROUP—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) Has he received requests from the Ridgeway Residents' Action Group at Queanbeyan to appeal to the ACT Government concerning excess noise from motor racing near their homes?
                (2) If so, what action has he taken?
                (3) How long have these New South Wales residents experienced noise problems from motor racing within the ACT?
                (4) What proposed changes to noise limits within the ACT will increase the noise nuisance to these residents?
                (5) Will he seek urgent discussions with the ACT Government to defer these changes?
                (6) If not, why not?


            Page 1591
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) (a) The EPA has continued to advise the ACT Authority of New South Wales environmental policies and operational procedures.
                  (b) The EPA has also reviewed existing and developing ACT environmental policies for consistency with corresponding New South Wales policies.
                (3) I am advised that the first expressions of concern from residents were received in July 1990.
                (4) I understand that the ACT recently commenced revising all its environmental legislation with a view to making it consistent with other states, especially New South Wales.
                (5) The ACT Government is yet to confirm any detail of possible changes. They have been made aware of our concerns.
                (6) See answer to question (5).

            *1356 SCHOOL COUNCILS—ELECTORATE OF CHARLESTOWN—Mr Face asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many school councils are operating in the electorate of Charlestown?
                (2) How many schools in the electorate of Charlestown have chosen not to form school councils?
                (3) How will schools in the electorate of Charlestown which choose not to form school councils be funded?
                Answer—
                (1) There are eight school councils operating in the electorate of Charlestown.
                (2) Twelve schools are yet to establish school councils.
                (3) Schools with school councils and schools without school councils are funded in the same way. There is no financial incentive or disincentive in this regard. All schools which establish a school council receive a school council establishment grant of $1,000 following approval of their council constitution.

            *1360 SCHOOL VIOLENCE—ELECTORATE OF NEWCASTLE—Mr Gaudry asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) On how many occasions since February 1989 have police been involved in dealing with allegations of violence at schools in the electorate of Newcastle to pupils, staff or property by:
                  (a) Pupils?
                  (b) Staff?
                  (c) Other persons?
                (2) What was the nature of each such incident?
                (3) (a) How many incidents were not reported to the police in the same period?
                  (b) If so, for each case, what was the:
                    (i) Nature?
                    (ii) Reason for non-reporting to police?

            Page 1592
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) Violence in our schools is totally unacceptable and is the end product of an increasingly violent society. However, the media and Opposition's focus on school violence does not address the real issue and broader problem of youth violence.
                It is the issue of youth violence which is the greatest cause for concern and which warrants a thorough investigation. The NSW Government and the people of this State need to know why youth violence appears to be on the increase and effective measures to counteract this trend.
                Consequently, on Wednesday 19 May 1993, I announced that the Social Issues Committee of the NSW Parliament would investigate the issue of youth violence in New South Wales.
                The Social Issues Committee, with its bipartisan approach, is an effective forum to conduct this enquiry and all relevant Government Departments will assist with provision of necessary information.
                The Social Issues Committee will undertake an enquiry into the issue of youth violence as per the following Terms of Reference:
                  1. Collect and analyse data on the occurrences of youth violence, including violent incidents in schools, and its underlying causes.
                  2. Examine the policies, actions, research, and proposals of relevant Government Agencies and the impact of racial tension, unemployment, family breakdown, media portrayal of violence and any other relevant factors in relation to youth violence.
                  3. Make recommendations to the NSW Parliament to assist all relevant Government Agencies to develop the most effective strategies to deal with youth violence.
                In light of this enquiry, I do not believe it appropriate to overburden the resources of our schools to provide the information requested.
                Youth violence is an issue that concerns everyone in the community. I am sure the Social Issues Committee will address this important task in an expeditious and objective manner.

            *1363 ALBION STREET PROCLAIMED PLACE—Mr Knowles asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) Does the Department of Community Services provide funding to the Haymarket Foundation Ltd to operate Albion Street Proclaimed Place?
                (2) Are persons who stay at that Proclaimed Place detained under the Intoxicated Persons Act?
                (3) Is the Coroner currently investigating the death of a person or persons at Albion Street Proclaimed Place?
                (4) What is the amount of funding provided to Albion Street Proclaimed Place by the Department of Community Services?
                (5) What training specific to Proclaimed Places does the Department of Community Services provide?
                (6) Did the Interim SAAP Training Committee, held on 15 May 1992, express concern over training in Proclaimed Places?
                (7) What action was taken by the Department to address the concern of the committee?
                Answer—
                (1) and (4) Yes. The Department provides an annual recurrent grant of $477,013 which is a contribution towards the operating costs of the Albion Street Proclaimed Place.
                (2) Yes.

            Page 1593
                (3) I understand that there are two inquests relating to Albion Street Proclaimed Place listed for hearing in July at the Coroner's Court. The Department of Community Services will request a copy of the Coroner's findings at the conclusion of the inquests.
                (5) The Department of Community Services provides funding for training to proclaimed place workers as part of the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program's (SAAP) training strategy. The courses are available on a regular basis and include:
                    •The Centre of Education and Information on Drug and Alcohol (CEIDA) courses.
                    •Mental Health and Addiction courses.
                    •Risk Management—to minimise stress and violence in the workplace.
                    •Issues affecting workers in proclaimed places.
                These are held on a regular basis.
                (6) and (7) Yes. The Interim SAAP Training Committee at a meeting on 19 June 1992, resolved that the "Managing Drugs and Alcohol" course be accepted as a core SAAP training subject.

            *1375 ANTIHOMOPHOBIA TRAINING—Ms Moore asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Why is antihomophobia training not a compulsory part of the school curriculum?
                (2) Why are schools required to develop policies on racism and sexism but not homophobia?
                Answer—
                (1) The Personal Development, Health and Physical Education syllabus, developed by the Board of Studies, provides the curriculum context for the development of programs to address homophobia.
                In Government schools, where teachers consider there is a need to address issues of homophobia, they will select materials and programs which are age appropriate and culturally relevant for their particular students.
                Every Government secondary school already has materials which address homophobia. These include sections of work within the "HIV/AIDS Education Years 7-10 Teaching Materials" and the "HIV/AIDS Education Years 11 and 12 Teaching Strategies".
                Every Education Resource Centre has master copies of the "Resources for Teaching Against Violence" and the "Module of 6 Lessons on Homophobia". Schools can make as many copies of these as they need.
                (2) Schools are using and developing programs which address racism, sexism and homophobia. The Department of School Education is at present developing a generic anti-discrimination policy against discrimination and harassment in all its forms including homosexual vilification and homophobia.

            *1378 HOME SECURITY REGULATIONS—Mr Newman asked the Minister for Energy and Minister for Local Government and Co-operatives—
                (1) What fire escape regulations cover the normal family home?
                (2) Are there special conditions for the installation of window security bars to provide for fire escape situations?
                (3) Which authority is responsible to police security type modifications to family homes?


            Page 1594
                Answer—
                (1) The technical content of the State's building laws is contained in the Building Code of Australia (BCA). There are no provisions in the BCA which regulate the need for specific means of escape in homes.
                The private family home is regarded as the personal domain of the occupants and the normal means of egress via external doors is generally considered a sufficient means of escape in an emergency. In the event of a fire there is an obvious desire for occupants to be alerted in sufficient time for escape and this can be achieved through the installation of devices such as smoke detectors. This is an aspect of fire safety which is currently being addressed by the Australian Uniform Building Regulations Co-ordinating Council (AUBRCC), the authors of the BCA, to determine the need for requiring smoke detectors in new homes.
                (2) There are no provisions in the BCA regulating the installation of window security bars, as these devices are usually installed for building security purposes which is not a matter for building regulation purposes.
                Because window security bars have potential to inhibit escape in times of emergency when doors are not accessible, the need for home owners to seek a balance between achieving property security and maintaining means of escape in the event of fire is critical. It is understood that there are specific types of security bar systems available which can be easily opened from within buildings and the selection of these types would obviously be preferable where a risk from fire is evident.
                (3) There is no Government authority with responsibility for policing security type modifications to family homes. This is an aspect left to an individual's choice and not controlled by the BCA. In some instances it may require the prior approval of the local council if building works are undertaken.

            *1382 ANTIHOMOPHOBIA KIT—Ms Nori asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Why is the antihomophobia kit not designated as a compulsory resource to help combat homophobia in schools?
                (2) Is the Minister prepared to ensure it is made compulsory?
                (3) Will the compulsory discussion of such issues in the long-term help reduce the levels of homophobia in society in the future?
                Answer—
                (1) Every Government secondary school already has materials which address homophobia. These include sections of work within the "HIV/AIDS Education Years 7-10 Teaching Materials" and the "HIV/AIDS Education Years 11 and 12 Teaching Strategies".
            Every Education Resource Centre has master copies of the "Resources for Teaching Against Violence" and the "Module of 6 Lessons on Homophobia". Schools can make as many copies of these as they need.
                Where teachers consider there is a need to address issues of homophobia they will select materials and programs which are age appropriate and culturally relevant for their particular students.
                (2) No, for the reasons indicated above.
                (3) The Department of School Education has already developed preventative materials and programs to address this issue and is now developing further materials.
                I consider that, in the long-term, the use of these materials will assist in reducing the levels of homophobia in our society.

            Page 1595
            20 MAY 1993

            (Paper No. 23)

            *1389 PENDLE HILL CREEK EFFLUENT DISCHARGES—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) What industries are currently licensed to discharge effluent into Pendle Hill Creek?
                (2) What is the nature and quantity of the discharges?
                (3) What plans has the Environment Protection Authority developed to reduce these discharges?
                Answer—
                (1) EPA licence records show that there are no industries currently licensed to discharge effluent to Pendle Hill Creek.
                (2) No licensed discharges.
                (3) Not applicable.

            *1390 GREYSTANES CREEK EFFLUENT DISCHARGES—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) What industries are currently licensed to discharge effluent into Greystanes Creek?
                (2) What is the nature and quantity of the discharges?
                (3) What plans has the Environment Protection Authority developed to reduce these discharges?
                Answer—
                (1) EPA licence records show that one industrial premises, a quarry, is currently licensed to discharge to Greystanes Creek.
                (2) The licensed discharge is for filtered stormwater not exceeding 1,728 kilolitres per day under controlled conditions.
                (3) The company is to introduce secondary filtration and is currently undertaking a water quality survey to reduce turbidity.

            *1391 COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT BUSINESS TEAM—Ms Allan asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) Is the National Parks and Wildlife Service advertising for a business team to develop commercial opportunities in national parks?
                (2) How many officers will make up the team and what will they be paid?
                (3) What will be the duties of the team?
                (4) Will these duties include putting a realistic price on National Parks and Wildlife Service fee-for-service activities?
                (5) If so, how will the team determine realistic pricing of National Parks and Wildlife Service activities?
                (6) Will the public be consulted before National Parks and Wildlife Service institutes new fees or fee increases?
                (7) If not, why not?

            Page 1596
                (8) Why has Mr Alastair Howard, Acting Director of the National Parks and Wildlife Service, claimed that user fees are only collected at 13 locations?
                (9) What are these locations?
                (10) Where else are park fees collected?
                (11) How much will Palmer Holt Executive Search consultants be paid to find the officer to head the business team?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) The Service has resisted prescribing the size and shape of the Business Unit and is open to applicants' proposals for staffing and funding of the unit.
                (3) This is yet to be determined.
                (4) This also is still to be determined.
                (5) The specifics of how this will be done will be left to the expertise in the Business Unit, in consultation with the Service.
                (6) This will be worked out following establishment of the Business Unit.
                (7) Not applicable—see answer (6).
                (8) There are 13 locations under the NPWS management where park entrance booths operate and park use fees are collected.
                (9) These locations are:
                    •Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park.
                    •Royal National Park.
                    •Lane Cove National Park.
                    •Blue Mountains National Park (Glenbrook only).
                    •Captain Cook's Landing Place Historic Site.
                    •Cattai National Park.
                    •Garigal (Davidson) National Park.
                    •Georges River National Park.
                    •Warrumbungle National Park.
                    •Kosciusko National Park.
                    •Bungonia State Recreation Area.
                    •Budderoo National Park (Minnamurra only).
                    •Munmorah State Recreation Area.
                (10) Park use fees are also collected at many camping areas within national parks and individual locations such as Montague Island and Sea Acres Rainforest Centre.
                (11) The fee allocated for recruitment of the Business Unit is substantially below that normally charged by executive search companies.

            *1393 BREAD PRICE INCREASES—Mr Amery asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads—
                (1) Is she aware of Australian Bureau of Statistics figures which show that bread prices, between 1989 and 1993, increased by over 28 per cent?
            (2) Has the CPI increased by less than half that amount during this period?
            (3) Will she refer this increase to the Prices Commission for investigation?


            Page 1597
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) I am aware that according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics' document "Average Retail Prices of Selected Items" (Cat. No. 6403), the Sydney All Groups Consumer Price Index increased by 13 per cent over the 3½-year period in question (June Quarter 1989 to December Quarter 1992). I am also aware that average retail prices for bread (based on a white sliced loaf sold in supermarkets) increased by 28 per cent during the same time. However, I do not intend to refer this matter to the Prices Commission for investigation.
                This Government believes that the demands of consumers are best met by encouraging a dynamic and competitive business sector and the bread industry reveals itself to be a competitive one. Although there are a small number of large manufacturers, these manufacturers compete with a large number of small bakeries and hot bread shops. As a result consumers have a high degree of choice in terms of the type of bread they wish to purchase and the price they are prepared to pay.
                The increased cost of a white sliced loaf actually reflects the increase in costs to the producers associated with the production of bread for weekend trading and the increase in the cost of flour.
                I should note that it was the former Labor Government which deregulated the industry, recognising that competition amongst bread producers was the best way to ensure that the demands of consumers are met.

            *1403 SALE OF WATER FILTERS—ELECTORATE OF ST MARYS—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads—
                (1) Is she aware of water filtration companies seeking to sell water filters to unsuspecting Sydney Water Board ratepayers in the electorate of St Marys under the guise of Water Board approved contractors?
                (2) Have any persons been convicted of this offence in the electorate of St Marys?
                Answer—
                (1) My Department received complaints relating to deceptive conduct by door-to-door water filter salesmen from consumers throughout the metropolitan area. Two of these complaints were from people residing in the electorate of St Marys.
                Complainants were concerned that the salespeople had called at their home and gained entry on the pretence that they had been sent to conduct an analysis of their tap water. These salespeople were usually dressed in uniforms and created the impression that they were conducting an official Government survey.
                Having gained entry, the salespeople launched into a high pressure sales spiel for an expensive water filter unit on the basis that the tap water was contaminated and unsafe to drink without filtration.
                These complaints prompted my predecessor, the Hon. K. A. Chikarovski, M.P., to issue a statement in March this year warning consumers about the deceptive conduct of these salespeople.
                Complaints were received about the conduct of door-to-door sales representatives from three businesses. Departmental investigators interviewed the management of these businesses and advised them as to the provisions of the Fair Trading Act relating to false and misleading conduct.

            Page 1598
                Two of these businesses discontinued all door-to-door sales activity and the third business suspended all sales for several weeks to allow a major review of their sales presentations and promotional material.
                This business revised its promotional material to meet the requirements of the Department and the Sydney Water Board. An undertaking was also obtained that salespersons would properly identify themselves as representatives of a business selling water filters.
                (2) No.

            *1404 SCHOOL COUNSELLORS—WESTERN METROPOLITAN REGION AND ELECTORATE OF ST MARYS—Mr A. S. Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many school counsellors are presently servicing schools in the Western Metropolitan region?
                (2) How many school counsellors presently service schools in the electorate of St Marys?
                (3) What was the number of school counsellors servicing the electorate of St Marys and the Western Metropolitan region in each year since 1988?
                Answer—
                (1) There are currently 75.5 effective full-time counsellor positions in Metropolitan West Region.
                (2) Counsellors are allocated on a pro rata population basis to each Education Resource Centre. Counsellors are appointed to districts across electorate boundaries.
                (3) There has been a slight reduction in counsellor establishment due to demographic shifts.

            *1407 VALENTINE PRIMARY SCHOOL—SCHOOL ASSISTANT—Mr Bowman asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                With regard to the school assistant at Valentine Primary School injured while using a photocopier in June 1990___
                (1) What action has been taken since that time by the Department of Education in an attempt to find a suitable position for that school assistant?
                (2) Does the Department of Education consider her unemployable?
                (3) Why did it refuse to further negotiate with the school assistant and continually refer her to the Government Insurance Office?
                Answer—
                (1) Continued attempts have been made to identify positions which would address the special health requirements of the injured worker. To this date only two positions have been trialled and both proved to be unsuccessful.
                (2) No. The Department is unable to provide suitable duties but does not consider her to be unemployable.
                (3) When the Department advised the insurer, GIO Australia, that it was unable to provide suitable duties the insurer took over management of the case and therefore the claimant was referred direct to them for any advice.

            Page 1599

            *1408 WOY WOY SEWER MAINS—Mr Doyle asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
                (1) Have numerous defects been identified in recently constructed sewer mains in the Woy Woy Peninsula area?
                (2) Will other identified defects significantly reduce the expected life of parts of the pipeline system?
                (3) Do many of these defects require urgent repair?
                (4) Has an agreement been reached with Gosford City Council on the financing of investigations and further repairs which the pipeline system requires?
                (5) (a) If so, what are the details of the agreement?
                  (b) If not, why not?
                (6) For what reasons have the defects occurred?
                (7) Will he meet with Gosford City Council to discuss these matters?
                Answer—
                (1) Construction of the sewer system at Woy Woy/Umina area took place progressively over a 10-year period ending in about 1988. This work was carried out under agreement with the Gosford City Council as part of the Government subsidised Country Town Water Supply and Sewerage Program.
                The scheme has been operating satisfactorily even though some problems have developed in that failures have been evidenced in some sewer pipes.
                (2) Other than the above there are no other identified defects known which will significantly reduce the life of the sewer system. Work underway will ensure an acceptable life expectancy.
                (3) The vast majority of the defects have, in consultation with the Gosford City Council, been already addressed. One section of the main was an impediment to the orderly use and operation of the system and it was therefore addressed and repaired expeditiously.
                (4) Agreement was reached for investigations of all works and for repairs to the bulk of the works identified. Recently, the former Minister made an offer of assistance to complete the program of works needed.
                (5) (a) The existing agreement under which the Government has offered 50 per cent financial assistance to a program of works budgeted at $309 million, has been varied to embrace the additional work. Savings already made have not required any change to that budget.
                    The City Council has requested that I review the offer recently made to complete the program. That review is being handled at senior officer level and I am confident of a satisfactory outcome.
                  (b) Not applicable (see above).
                (6) Sewer construction is not an exact science and it is not unusual to experience the odd failure in sewer pipelines. Being an inexact science guarantees cannot be given and it would be inordinately costly, and false economy, to build to such a specification.
                At Woy Woy/Umina there were a number of failures, though I might say, they have not resulted in significant operational problems. The cause of the failures appears to have centred upon fractured pipes caused by a combination of factors, faulty pipes, deep trenches and high overburden pressure, and pipe settlement/movements resulting therefrom.
                (7) I have already offered to meet with the Gosford City Council if it is appropriate to do so.


            Page 1600
            *1409 DEPARTMENTAL DISTRICT OFFICES—CENTRAL COAST, HUNTER VALLEY, MID- NORTH COAST AND NEWCASTLE—Mr Doyle asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                What is the estimated population served by each of the Department of Family and Community Service District Centres in:
                  (a) Cardiff?
                  (b) Cessnock?
                  (c) Charlestown?
                  (d) Gosford?
                  (e) Maitland?
                  (f) Muswellbrook?
                  (g) Newcastle?
                  (h) Raymond Terrace?
                  (i) Taree?
                  (j) Woy Woy?
                  (k) Wyong?
                Answer—
                The estimated populations are as follows:
                (a) Cardiff The Cardiff Community Services Centre relocated to Toronto in 1991. The Toronto CSC serves a population of approximately 83,000.
                  (b) Cessnock 43,854.
                  (c) Charlestown 79,000.
                  (d) Gosford 129,894 (including Woy Woy Sub-office).
                  (e) Maitland 54,024.
                  (f) Muswellbrook 47,827.
                  (g) Newcastle 131,300.
                  (h) Raymond Terrace 47,615.
                  (i) Taree 67,080.
                  (j) Woy Woy 61,709 (Sub-office of Gosford).
                  (k) Wyong 99,504.

            *1422 DEPARTMENTAL PRE-SCHOOLS—CENTRAL COAST ELECTORATES—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                Of the 60 departmental pre-schools in the electorates of The Entrance, Gosford, Peats and Wyong, how many are located in each electorate?
                Answer—
                There are 68 departmental pre-schools statewide. Of these, there is one in the electorate of Peats and there are none in the electorates of The Entrance, Gosford and Wyong.


            Page 1601
            *1423 COMPOSITE CLASS INFORMATION—ELECTORATE OF THE ENTRANCE—Mr McBride asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Is the information concerning composite classes currently recorded for each cluster in the electorate of The Entrance?
                (2) If so:
                  (a) Will the Minister release to the honourable member for The Entrance information requested in Question on Notice No. 772?
                  (b) If not, why not?
                Answer—
                (1) The Department of School Education has a clear commitment to excellence in New South Wales schools, providing for more than 750,000 young people currently enrolled in the Government School System.
                The Department's efforts are directed to improving educational standards in schools, improving parental choice and participation and increasing learning opportunities for all.
                To provide the detailed information requested in the member's question would impinge on the resources and time of senior departmental officers. As a consequence, I am not willing to move resources from the Department's core responsibility to meet this request.
                General statistical information on the Department of School Education is available in the Department's Annual Report.
                (2) (a) and (b) Refer to above.

            *1431 SCHOOL MAINTENANCE BUDGETS—ELECTORATE OF WALLSEND—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What was the size of the budget allocation to school maintenance for each of the schools in the electorate of Wallsend for the years:
                  (a) 1988/89?
                  (b) 1989/90?
                  (c) 1990/91?
                  (d) 1991/92?
                  (e) 1992/93?
                (2) What was the last year in which each school had a complete cyclic maintenance program undertaken?
                (3) What is the year of the next cyclic maintenance program for each school in the electorate of Wallsend?
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) When this Government came to office in 1988 the maintenance of schools had deteriorated to a disastrous level and estimates of arrears of maintenance were placed somewhere between $400 million and $800 million.

            Page 1602
                The level of expenditure was significantly increased in 1988/89 and it has been held at that higher level for the last 4 years. The condition of our schools is improving and they are now leading the nation. In the study carried out by the Australian Teachers Union in 1992 the schools sampled in New South Wales ranked with the best in the nation.
                It is not satisfactory to report on individual schools for 2/3 years out of a 5-year (external) and 10-year (internal/external) cyclic maintenance program. It would give a distorted impression of expenditure because only some of the schools in the electorate would be scheduled in the 2 years in question.
                The funds for maintenance grants are now incorporated as part of a schools operating budget and are not counted in reporting allocations for cyclic maintenance.

            *1432 SCHOOL VIOLENCE—ELECTORATE OF WALLSEND—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) On how many occasions since February 1989 have police been involved in dealing with allegations of violence at schools in the electorate of Wallsend to pupils, staff or property by:
                  (a) Pupils?
                  (b) Staff?
                  (c) Other persons?
                (2) What was the nature of each such incident?
                (3) (a) How many incidents were not reported to the police in the same period?
                  (b) For each such case, what was:
            (i) The nature of the incident?
            (ii) The reason for not reporting to police?
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) Violence in our schools is totally unacceptable and is the end product of an increasingly violent society. However, the media and Opposition's focus on school violence does not address the real issue and broader problem of youth violence.
                It is the issue of youth violence which is the greatest cause for concern and which warrants a thorough investigation. The NSW Government and the people of this State need to know why youth violence appears to be on the increase and effective measures to counteract this trend.
                Consequently, on Wednesday 19 May 1993, I announced that the Social Issues Committee of the NSW Parliament would investigate the issue of youth violence in New South Wales.
                The Social Issues Committee, with its bipartisan approach, is an effective forum to conduct this enquiry and all relevant Government Departments will assist with provision of necessary information.
                The Social Issues Committee will undertake an enquiry into the issue of youth violence as per the following Terms of Reference:
                  1. Collect and analyse data on the occurrences of youth violence, including violent incidents in schools, and its underlying causes.
                  2. Examine the policies, actions, research, and proposals of relevant Government Agencies and the impact of racial tension, unemployment, family breakdown, media portrayal of violence and any other relevant factors in relation to youth violence.
                  3. Make recommendations to the NSW Parliament to assist all relevant Government Agencies to develop the most effective strategies to deal with youth violence.

            Page 1603
                In light of this enquiry, I do not believe it appropriate to overburden the resources of our schools to provide the information requested.
                Youth violence is an issue that concerns everyone in the community. I am sure the Social Issues Committee will address this important task in an expeditious and objective manner.

            *1439 CLINICAL WASTE AUSTRALIA—SCRUBBERS—Mr Nagle asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) (a) Has Clinical Waste Australia installed scrubbers in its stacks?
                  (b) If so, why is there still black smoke coming from the plant at Silverwater?
                (2) What steps have been taken or will be taken by the EPA to ensure that the scrubbers are in working condition and are in fact operational and working when required to be so?
                (3) Does Clinical Waste Australia, Silverwater, do most of its burning from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. when there are no Environmental Protection Authority officers in the area to supervise and observe the pollution levels of the company?
                (4) (a) Will Clinical Waste Australia be forbidden to operate its stacks from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m., 7 days a week?
                  (b) If not, why not?
                (5) (a) Will the Environmental Protection Authority supervise the operation of Clinical Waste Australia in the evenings and early mornings?
                  (b) If not, why not?
                Answer—
                (1) (a) No. Clinical Waste Australia has installed a two-stage gas scrubber on the property adjacent to its incinerators at Silverwater. The scrubber takes gas from either incinerator and uses a separate exhaust stack.
                  (b) At the time the question was put on notice, the scrubber was being commissioned. During this period the need for adjustments caused the diversion of exhaust gasses to the incinerator stack. Such diversions may have produced temporary smoke emission.
                (2) The scrubbers are part of the operating plant, and are therefore subject to the provisions of section 14 of the Clean Air Act, which requires that air pollution control equipment be maintained in an efficient condition, and operated in a proper and efficient manner.
                (3) Clinical Waste Australia operates it's incinerators 24 hours a day. Its major workload occurs at night. Environment Protection Authority officers operate outside of normal business hours when necessary. This occurs if there is substantive evidence that pollution may be occurring at those times.
                (4) (a) No.
                  (b) The incinerators are kept operating as steadily as possible, rather than stop-go operation. This improves the effectiveness of the pollution control system and reduces the risk of equipment failure. Operation on a 24-hour basis forms part of the emission minimisation strategy.
                (5) (a) and (b) Yes, existing surveillance will be maintained.

            *1440 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN THE WORKPLACE—Mr Nagle asked the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) Has the WorkCover Authority taken part in a study of workplaces in the electorate of Auburn using hazardous chemicals and who are destroying hazardous material?

            Page 1604
                (2) How many breaches of the law were detected regarding failure to notify "significant incidents" involving dangerous chemicals?
                (3) Will any of the offenders be prosecuted?
                (4) If so, how many?
                (5) What other steps will the Government take both to enforce the law and to improve safety of workers and the public in the electorate of Auburn?
                (6) What breaches have taken place at Clinical Waste Australia at Silverwater?
                (7) How many prosecutions have been launched?
                (8) What are the results?
                Answer—
                I am advised by the Environment Protection Authority that the use of hazardous chemicals in the workplace in New South Wales is the responsibility of the WorkCover Authority. This Authority is not under my jurisdiction.

            *1441 SCHOOL MAINTENANCE BUDGETS—ELECTORATE OF AUBURN—Mr Nagle asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How much was spent on maintenance at the following public schools in the electorate of Auburn in 1990/91 and 1991/92 over and above the annual maintenance grant:
                  (a) Auburn Public School?
                  (b) Regents Park Public School?
                  (c) Birrong Public School?
                  (d) North Auburn Public School?
                  (e) West Auburn Public School?
                  (f) Berala West Public School?
                  (g) Lidcombe Public School?
                  (h) Bankstown North Public School?
                  (i) Yagoona Public School?
                (2) Is there a waiting list for funding of major maintenance items at these schools?
                (3) If so:
                  (a) Which schools are wait-listed?
                  (b) What are the maintenance items awaiting funding?
                  (c) Which items will be funded in 1992/93?
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) When this Government came to office in 1988 the maintenance of schools had deteriorated to a disastrous level and estimates of arrears of maintenance were placed somewhere between $400 million and $800 million.
                The level of expenditure was significantly increased in 1988/89 and it has been held at that higher level for the last 4 years. The condition of our schools is improving and they are now leading the nation. In the study carried out by the Australian Teachers Union in 1992 the schools sampled in New South Wales ranked with the best in the nation.

            Page 1605
                It is not satisfactory to report on individual schools for 2/3 years out of a 5-year (external) and 10-year (internal/external) cyclic maintenance program. It would give a distorted impression of expenditure because only some of the schools in the electorate would be scheduled in the 2 years in question.
                The funds for maintenance grants are now incorporated as part of a schools operating budget and are not counted in reporting allocations for cyclic maintenance.

            *1442 TAFE COURSES—LIDCOMBE/BANKSTOWN—Mr Nagle asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What courses have TAFE closed and are to close at Lidcombe/Bankstown TAFE College this year and next year?
                (2) Why was this decision made?
                (3) Who will now provide the skilled training for those employed in these areas?
                (4) Will this valuable training now be lost to industry?
                Answer—
                Given that there are over 112 TAFE colleges/campuses in 11 institutes and more than 400,000 students studying over 1,500 courses, the collection of information such as this is a complex, resource intensive and costly exercise.
                The honourable member could easily obtain the particular information by contacting the relevant TAFE Institute Director.
                The address in this instance is:
                  Ms Judith Steanes
                  Director
                  Southern Sydney Institute of TAFE
                  Level 8, Bankstown Civic Tower
                  66-72 Rickard Road
                  BANKSTOWN
                  Telephone No. 790 7357
                The NSW TAFE Commission will continue to develop and provide quality training in areas identified by industry.

            *1451 INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION PROCEEDINGS—Mr Scully asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women—
                (1) Is the Minister aware of proceedings No. 162 of 1992 between HCF and the Federated Clerks Union (FCU) in the Industrial Commission before Commissioner Kelly?
                (2) (a) What happened to those proceedings on 4 March 1993?
                  (b) (i) Did the FCU request by letter dated 9 March 1993 to Commissioner Kelly that the proceeding be relisted?
                  (ii) What happened to that letter?
                  (iii) Why did Commissioner Kelly not relist the matter for hearing prior to 1 April 1992 so as to allow the union to argue preference to unionists under now repealed provisions of the relevant legislation?
                (3) What steps does the Minister propose to take so as to restore the rights of former employees of HCF to argue preference of employment?

            Page 1606
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) (a) The proceedings on 4 March 1992 was a report back on matter No. 162 of 1992 between the HCF and the Federated Clerks Union (FCU) which had been the subject of compulsory conference before Conciliation Commissioner Kelly on 20 February 1992.
                    During that report back submissions were put by HCF relating to the Commissioner's jurisdiction to hear the matter under the current FCU application. The Commissioner concluded the proceedings on the basis that it is up to the union to establish if it wishes to pursue this matter by way of separate application.
                  (b) (i) Yes.
                    (ii) There is indication from file records that verbal communications took place between Commissioner Kelly and officers of the FCU as to attempts to arrange a hearing date.
                    (iii) File records indicate the unavailability of FCU officers due to annual leave may have contributed to the delay in having the matter listed for hearing.
                (3) As the matter has now been stood over generally to be relisted upon the application of either party, the Government is not in a position to take any action in this matter.

            *1452 MR DEREK GRAHAM—Mr Scully asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women—
                (1) Is the Minister aware of the submission made by Mr Derek Graham of counsel before Commissioner Kelly in the Industrial Commission on 4 March 1992 while acting on behalf of HCF in proceedings No. 162 of 1992?
                (2) (a) Did the Federated Clerks Union claim that Mr Graham gave a false and inaccurate submission to Commissioner Kelly resulting in proceedings being concluded and the union being deprived of the ability to pursue a preference to unionists claim before the new industrial legislation came into operation on 1 April 1992?
                  (b) What does the Minister propose to do to reinstate the rights of the members of this union extinguished as a result of the actions of Mr Graham?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) (a) An examination of transcript of hearings before the Commissioner and other file notations indicate that no such claim was made by any officer of the FCU.
                  (b) As the application by the FCU to the Industrial Relations Commission has been stood over generally to be relisted upon application by either party, the Government is not in a position to take any action in this matter.

            *1453 SCHOOL VIOLENCE—ELECTORATE OF SMITHFIELD—Mr Scully asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many acts of school violence have been reported in the electorate of Smithfield in each year since March 1988?

            Page 1607
                (2) To whom were these acts of violence reported and what is the breakdown of the type of each violent act?
                (3) Specify the schools in the electorate of Smithfield where acts of violence have been reported?
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) Violence in our schools is totally unacceptable and is the end product of an increasingly violent society. However, the media and Opposition's focus on school violence does not address the real issue and broader problem of youth violence.
                It is the issue of youth violence which is the greatest cause for concern and which warrants a thorough investigation. The NSW Government and the people of this State need to know why youth violence appears to be on the increase and effective measures to counteract this trend.
                Consequently, on Wednesday 19 May 1993, I announced that the Social Issues Committee of the NSW Parliament would investigate the issue of youth violence in New South Wales.
                The Social Issues Committee, with its bipartisan approach, is an effective forum to conduct this enquiry and all relevant Government Departments will assist with provision of necessary information.
                The Social Issues Committee will undertake an enquiry into the issue of youth violence as per the following Terms of Reference:
                  1. Collect and analyse data on the occurrences of youth violence, including violent incidents in schools, and its underlying causes.
                  2. Examine the policies, actions, research, and proposals of relevant Government Agencies and the impact of racial tension, unemployment, family breakdown, media portrayal of violence and any other relevant factors in relation to youth violence.
                  3. Make recommendations to the NSW Parliament to assist all relevant Government Agencies to develop the most effective strategies to deal with youth violence.
                In the light of this enquiry, I do not believe it appropriate to overburden the resources of our schools to provide the information requested.
                Youth violence is an issue that concerns everyone in the community. I am sure the Social Issues Committee will address this important task in an expeditious and objective manner.

            *1460 DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY SERVICES—ILLAWARRA OFFICES—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Community Services and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) Does the Department of Community Services intend to close its office located in Wollongong?
                (2) Does the Department of Community Services intend to open new offices in Corrimal, Dapto and Keiraville?
                (3) Why were these suburban sites chosen?
                (4) What will be the location of the client base for the offices to be located at Corrimal, Dapto and Keiraville?
                (5) What are the public transport services from each client base area to the respective new Department of Community Services offices at Corrimal, Dapto and Keiraville serving their respective client base?


            Page 1608
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The Department of Community Services intends to open new offices at Corrimal and Dapto and extend the services provided at Keiraville. The Wollongong office will be closed as a result of this service improvement.
                (3) The suburban sites were chosen in response to consumer consultation in August 1992, population changes and client needs in various geographical locations.
                (4) The geographical areas to be serviced from each Community Service Centre are:
                  PLACE POST CODE
                  Corrimal
                    Helensburgh 2508
                    Otford
                    Darkes Forest
                    Stanwell Park
                    Stanwell Tops
                    Coalcliff
                    Clifton 2528
                    Scarborough
                    Wombarra
                    Coledale
                    Austinmer
                    Thirroul
                    Bulli 2516
                    Woonona 2517
                    Russell Vale
                    Bellambi 2518
                    Corrimal
                    Towradgi
                    Tarrawanna
                    Balgownie 2519
                    Mount Ousley
                    Mount Pleasant
                    Fairy Meadow
                  Dapto
                    Berkeley 2506
                    Figtree 2525
                    Unanderra 2526
                    Kembla Heights
                    Mount Kembla


            Page 1609
                    Dapto 2530
                    Kanahooka
                    Koonawarra
                    Mount Brown
                    Yallah
                    Brownsville
                    West Dapto
                  Keiraville
                    Wollongong 2500
                    Keiraville
                    Coniston
                    Gwynneville
                    Mount Keira
                    West Wollongong
                    Warrawong 2502
                    Lake Heights
                    Cringila
                    Port Kembla 2505
                    Windang 2528
                (5) The public transport services available to each Centre are:
                  CORRIMAL
                    John J. Hill and Dion's Bus Companies provide regular services through the northern suburbs to Wollongong via Corrimal.
                  DAPTO
                    The Dapto area is serviced by Rutty's Bus Company. Buses from Shellharbour and Wollongong are available approximately every half hour during business hours.
                  KEIRAVILLE
                    The John J. Hill Bus Service provides bus services to Wollongong (Central), Keiraville, Gwynneville, Coniston, Mount Keira, West Wollongong, Windang, Warrawong, Cringila, Lark Heights and Port Kembla.

            *1461 SCHOOL VIOLENCE—ELECTORATE OF WOLLONGONG—Mr Sullivan asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many reports of school violence has the Minister received with regard to schools within the electorate of Wollongong?
                (2) What action is the Minister taking to reduce school violence?


            Page 1610
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) Violence in our schools is totally unacceptable and is the end product of an increasingly violent society. However, the media and Opposition's focus on school violence does not address the real issue and broader problem of youth violence.
                It is the issue of youth violence which is the greatest cause for concern and which warrants a thorough investigation. The NSW Government and the people of this State need to know why youth violence appears to be on the increase and effective measures to counteract this trend.
                Consequently, on Wednesday 19 May 1993, I announced that the Social Issues Committee of the NSW Parliament would investigate the issue of youth violence in New South Wales.
                The Social Issues Committee, with its bipartisan approach, is an effective forum to conduct this enquiry and all relevant Government Departments will assist with provision of necessary information.
                The Social Issues Committee will undertake an enquiry into the issue of youth violence as per the following Terms of Reference:
                  1. Collect and analyse data on the occurrences of youth violence, including violent incidents in schools, and its underlying causes.
                  2. Examine the policies, actions, research, and proposals of relevant Government Agencies and the impact of racial tension, unemployment, family breakdown, media portrayal of violence and any other relevant factors in relation to youth violence.
                  3. Make recommendations to the NSW Parliament to assist all relevant Government Agencies to develop the most effective strategies to deal with youth violence.
                In light of this enquiry, I do not believe it appropriate to overburden the resources of our schools to provide the information requested.
                Youth violence is an issue that concerns everyone in the community. I am sure the Social Issues Committee will address this important task in an expeditious and objective manner.

            21 MAY 1993

            (Paper No. 24)

            *1466 PROFESSIONAL OFFICERS ASSOCIATION—WATER RESOURCES REPRESENTATION— Mr Amery asked the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
                (1) Has he received representations from the Professional Officers Association of New South Wales dated 7 May 1993, expressing concern about the impact on employees of the Department of Water Resources, of public statements by the Deputy Premier?
                (2) If so:
                  (a) Have the representations advised that employees of the Department have been subject to verbal abuse by members of the public?
                  (b) What action has he taken on these representations?
                Answer—
                (1) Yes.
                (2) (a) Yes.
                  (b) The Government has answered the representations to the satisfaction of the Professional Officers Association.


            Page 1611
            *1471 NEW COURSE IMPLEMENTATION—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                What liaison presently occurs between the Department of School Education and the Board of Studies concerning the resource requirements for implementing new courses?
                Answer—
                All school systems are formally represented on all Board committees which develop particular syllabuses.
                When the Board of Studies proposes a syllabus I consider the writing brief for its resource implications. Advice is sought from the Department of School Education about how this proposed syllabus will affect both the school curriculum in terms of existing courses and the capacity of schools and the system to resource the implementation and support strategies.
                The Department is also represented on the Board's subcommittees and reference panels, all of which have a role in scrutinising materials developed by syllabus committees. Departmental officers play an active role in contributing to the work of syllabus committees in this way.
                A key feature of the curriculum development process is widespread consultation. Materials are distributed in draft forms to schools and systems for comment at various stages of the process. This ensures that the progressive development of curriculum materials takes full account of classroom resources.
                Consultation with systems also occurs via special conferences which the Board holds with systems representatives at an early stage in the development of new syllabuses. The conferences discuss implementation issues connected with the new courses and are aimed specifically at ensuring proper planning of resource development. This collaboration ensures that support materials duplication does not occur and that resources are optimally used to support school implementation of the syllabus.
                The portfolio is currently undertaking a study of the curriculum development processes in all departments and the associated resource requirements.

            *1472 TEACHING SERVICE REQUIREMENTS—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) In what circumstances are secondary school teachers able to teach a subject in which they do not have a degree major at Government secondary schools?
                (2) How many teachers does the Department of School Education estimate teach the subjects of dance, drama and legal studies without a degree major in these subjects?
                (3) What are the present minium requirements for employment in the New South Wales Teaching Service?
                Answer—
                (1) Providing the minimum academic and professional requirements for a first teaching subject are met, secondary school teachers may teach other subjects if they possess the equivalent of 1-year of full-time tertiary study in each of the relevant subjects together with appropriate method studies.

            Page 1612
                A first teaching subject requires a minimum of 2 years of full-time tertiary study in an approved subject and corresponding method studies.
                (2) Dance, drama and legal studies are currently being taught by teachers with varied levels of academic qualifications in those and related subject areas.
                Dance, in many cases, is being taught by physical education teachers with formal studies in human movement.
                Many teachers of drama and legal studies have completed at least 1 year of study in those areas as part of qualifications originally related to the teaching of other subjects.
                (3) A 3-year course of teacher education including both KLA studies and teacher education.
                  A 4-year course of teacher education including both KLA studies and teacher education.
                  A 4-year bachelors degree including relevant KLA studies plus a 1-year diploma of education with relevant teaching methods.

            *1473 DEPARTMENTAL MANDATORY POLICIES—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                In view of the concern of the Statewide Principals Working Party that the Department of School Education should evaluate and rationalise its mandatory policies with a view to lessening the demands which they place upon the time of teaching staff and students—
                (1) What is the estimated total cost to schools of the Department of School Education's mandatory policies for implementation by schools?
                (2) How many such policies are there and what topics does each address?
                (3) What evaluation of resources required to implement each policy is undertaken before such mandatory departmental policies are issued?
                Answer—
                (1) The President of the Secondary Principals' Council has indicated that the recommendation in the Secondary Principals' Working Party Report for an in-depth evaluation of both policy and policy implementation refers to, and is an endorsement of, a policy rationalisation process currently being undertaken by the Department. The first stage of the process is nearing completion and has involved the analysis and removal of a large number of outdated policy-related procedure and guideline documents. The revised list of current documents will enable principals and teachers to manage more efficiently by lessening the demands which are placed upon them through redundant documents.
                The documents provide guidance and assistance to principals and teachers in their task of educating the public school students of New South Wales for the benefit of each individual, the community and the nation. The cost of specific policies cannot be dissected on a differential basis. The cost of their implementation to schools is the cost of providing high quality public school education to the students who are enrolled in the school.
                (2) The review and rationalisation process has resulted in the reduction of the total number of current documents to less than half the previous number.
                (3) The evaluation of resource implications is an integral part of the policy development process. Extensive consultations with school and community groups, which is a key element of the policy development process, incorporate analyses of resourcing implications. No policies are released unless it can be clearly documented that adequate resources exist, or are being made available, for their implementation.


            Page 1613
            *1474 PRINCIPALS' WORKING PARTY REPORT—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) Following your meeting with principals on 10 May 1993, what action will the Minister take to ease the workload and pressure being placed upon principals referred to in the Principals' Statewide Working Party report?
                (2) Will the Minister speed up the appointment of senior clerical appointees to relieve principals of administrative responsibility?
                (3) Will the Minister place a moratorium on the implementation of the Heagney Report in relation to the additional burdens placed on principals?
                (4) What steps will the Minister take to reduce the intrusion into school affairs that some Clusters and ERCs are imposing?
                Answer—
                (1) The Principals' Statewide Working Party report referred to by Mr Aquilina was prepared by a small group of principals for preliminary discussions only. As far as the Principals' Councils are concerned, the report had no official status.
                The Department has undertaken a number of initiatives to assist principals. These include training and development opportunities, enhanced computerisation of school administrative and financial functions and provision of up to 16 days release per year for principals of small schools.
                (2) His Honour, Mr Justice Peterson, recently handed down a judgment on the Public Service Association's application for increased wage rates for school ancillary staff. The judgment increased wage rates for senior clerical assistants in recognition of changes to the work of those staff in schools.
                (3) The process of dispute resolution at the school level proposed by the Heagney Review seeks to introduce a structured means of preventing and resolving grievances and disputes at the school level. This is a proper and legitimate function for principals to undertake and one which is directed at reducing conflict in schools.
                An industrial relations training program for principals and Teachers Federation representatives has been developed by the Department of School Education and the NSW Teachers Federation as a result of the Heagney Review to assist in resolving industrial issues at the school level.
                (4) Regional Principals' Council have been asked to raise specific concerns in relation to Education Resource Centres with the Assistant Director-General in their region.

            *1475 RECORDS OF ACHIEVEMENT—Mr Aquilina asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What is the annual cost to the Board of Studies of the policy of providing Year 11 Records of Achievement?
                (2) What is the estimated annual cost to high schools of providing Year 11 Records of Achievement?
                (3) What is the estimated total teacher-hours per student?
                (4) How many Year 11 Records of Achievement are provided annually?
                (5) Will the Minister discard the Year 11 Record of Achievement in its present form?

            Page 1614
                Answer—
                (1) The Board's annual expenditure on providing Year 11 Records of Achievement represents a cost of 80 cents per student.
                (2) and (3) All schools are required to assess students in Year 11 both for HSC assessment purposes and for reporting to parents (as in other years). Assessment tasks are thus carried out as normal school procedures and not specifically for the purposes of the Year 11 Record of Achievement.
                (4) Year 11 Records of Achievement are provided to the cohort which completes Year 11. In 1992, 62,773 Records of Achievement were provided.
                (5) The provision of a Year 11 Record of Achievement to students is required under section 98 of the Education Reform Act 1990. Section 98 requires that the record specify the student's achievements in any courses of study undertaken in Year 11 and may include such other information relating to the student's activities at school as the Board thinks appropriate.
            *1521 LANGUAGE EXCHANGE PROGRAMS—Mr Mills asked the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many teachers from New South Wales schools have taught in other countries on "language exchange programs" or on secondment or other transfer systems related to language teaching, for periods in excess of 2 weeks, in each of the following years:
                  (a) 1990?
                  (b) 1991?
                  (c) 1992?
                  (d) 1993?
                (2) How many of these teachers in each year taught overseas for periods in excess of 3 months?
                (3) How many taught in:
                  (a) Japan?
                  (b) China?
                  (c) Singapore?
                  (d) Indonesia?
                  (e) Italy?
                  (f) Germany?
                  (g) France?
                (4) Who arranges these exchanges/transfers?
                (5) How are teachers selected to participate?
                (6) Is Ministerial approval required for the teachers to teach abroad?
                (7) If not, for which cases is approval required and not required?
                (8) Are such teachers paid by the Department of Education or by the school abroad at which they teach?
                (9) Are normal leave and other entitlements accrued during such periods teaching abroad?
                (10) Are replacement teachers paid from individual school budgets or from central/regional budgets?


            Page 1615
                Answer—
                (1) to (10) The Department of School Education has a clear commitment to excellence in New South Wales schools, providing for more than 750,000 young people currently enrolled in the Government School System.
                The Department's efforts are directed to improving educational standards in schools, improving parental choice and participation and increasing learning opportunities for all.
                To provide the detailed information requested in the member's question would impinge on the resources and time of senior departmental officers. As a consequence, I am not willing to move resources from the Department's core responsibility to meet this request.
                General statistical information on the Department of School Education is available in the Department's Annual Report.

            7 September 1993

            (Paper No. 25)

            1525 BUILDING CONTRACTS—Mr Amery to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
                (1) Is he aware of repeated calls by the "Building Action Review Group Inc." for the introduction of legislation to:
                  (a) Prohibit commercial arbitration clauses in home building contracts?
                  (b) Put into effect a compulsory home building contract with standard conditions to apply to all home building contracts?
                  (c) Introduce a privately operated insurance scheme for home owners to cover them for 100 per cent of losses related to financial failure of builders and the undertaking of defective work?
                (2) What is his response to these issues?
                (3) What action is he proposing in regard to these issues?

            1526 LANGUAGE TEACHERS—Mr Aquilina to ask the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What is the present number of language (LOTE) teachers in NSW Government secondary schools?
                (2) What is the Department of School Education's present estimate of the number of teachers necessary to implement the Government's policy that 100 hours of LOTE be mandatory from 1996?
                (3) What is the Department of School Education's present estimate of the number of teachers required to implement the Government's policy that 200 hours of LOTE will be mandatory from 2000?


            Page 1616
            1527 ABORIGINAL STUDENTS RETENTION RATE—Mr Aquilina to ask the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What was the Year 7-12 apparent retention rate for Aboriginal students across New South Wales in the mid-year census in 1992?
                (2) What was it at the start of the 1993 school year?
                (3) What were the rates in the mid-year censuses in 1991 and 1990?

            1528 NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING BACKGROUND STUDENT RETENTION RATE—Mr Aquilina to ask the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What was the Year 7-12 apparent retention rate for students of Non-English Speaking Background across New South Wales in the mid-year census in 1992?
                (2) What was it at the start of the 1993 school year?
                (3) What were the rates in the mid-year censuses in 1991 and 1990?

            1529 SECOND SYDNEY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT—Mr A. S. Aquilina to ask the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
                (1) Is he aware of the need for a second international airport for Sydney?
                (2) Will he commit funds from the State Budget for the infrastructure required to assist the development of the Badgerys Creek Airport?
                (3) If so, how much and when?
                (4) If not, why not?

            1530 GOVERNMENT CLEANING SERVICE—Mr A. S. Aquilina to ask the Chief Secretary and Minister for Administrative Services—
                (1) How many cleaners are presently employed in the NSW Government Cleaning Service?
                (2) How many cleaners are presently employed with the NSW Government Cleaning Service in the electorate of St Marys?
                (3) What is the ratio of male to female workers in the Government Cleaning Service in New South Wales and in the electorate of St Marys?

            1531 SCHOOL STAFF AND STUDENT SAFETY—Mr Beckroge to ask the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                In the event a student is readmitted by a Court Order:
                (1) What assurance can be given that student and staff property will be safe?
                (2) What value is placed on the right of law abiding student's rights to a free and unhindered education?

            Page 1617
                (3) What precautions will the Department of School Education take to ensure the safety and the rights of students and staff?
                (4) What is to prevent a subsequent exclusion being overridden by a Court to overcome its own lack of options?
                (5) When will the Department of School Education amend the law to insist that the education of the majority of the student population is its prime consideration and that the criminal individual has forfeited his/her right to consideration at the expense of other law abiding students?

            1532 SRA REAL ESTATE REGISTER—Mr Clough to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Does the SRA keep a register of all the real estate it owns?
                (2) If so, will he table this list?

            1533 MSB UNOCCUPIED PROPERTIES—Mr Crittenden to ask the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
                (1) In relation to MSB real estate holdings, what properties owned by the MSB are currently unoccupied?
                (2) What is the value of this real estate?

            1534 MSB PROPERTY LEASES—Mr Crittenden to ask the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
                (1) Does the MSB own any properties/office space which it lets to private households or businesses, or to other Government departments?
                (2) Where are these properties?
                (3) What is the value of these properties?

            1535 MSB LEASING OF PROPERTY—Mr Crittenden to ask the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
                (1) Does the MSB rent any properties/office space from other organisations/individuals?
                (2) (a) Where are these properties/office spaces?
                  (b) What are they used for?
                (3) Will he provide details concerning the lengths of the leases?
                (4) Are any of the properties/office spaces which the MSB rents from other organisations/ individuals currently unoccupied?

            1536 STA REAL ESTATE REGISTER—Mr Gibson to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Does the STA keep a register of all the real estate it owns?
                (2) If so, will he table this list?


            Page 1618
            1537 STA PROPERTY LEASES—Mr Gibson to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Does the STA own any properties/office space which it lets to private households or businesses, or to other Government departments?
                (2) Where are these properties?
                (3) What is the value of these properties?

            1538 STA REAL ESTATE—Mr Gibson to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) In relation to properties owned by the STA, what real estate does the STA own for STA purposes?
                (2) What is the value of this real estate?

            1539 DISCHARGE OF SEWAGE REGULATIONS—Mr Langton to ask the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
                (1) Has the Waterways Authority introduced regulations concerning discharge of sewage from boats on Sydney Harbour?
                (2) Do the same regulations apply in Pittwater?
                (3) If not, why not?
                (4) Will regulations the same as those applying in Sydney Harbour be introduced into other waterways?

            1540 ALBURY TRAFFIC STUDIES—Mr Langton to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Has the Roads and Traffic Authority conducted, or are they currently conducting, studies on traffic movements through Albury?
                (2) What do these studies involve?
                (3) If the studies are complete, what do they reveal in terms of traffic movements through Albury, especially with regard to heavy vehicles?
                (4) If available, what is the per hour traffic count, hour-by-hour throughout a day?
                (5) How many heavy vehicles were counted, hour-by-hour?

            1541 ELECTRIC PUMP SAFETY—Mr Langton to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) With regard to the work undertaken at the pedestrian subway at Mount Ku-ring-gai Railway Station following flooding in late March, was the safety of the electric pump installation certified by a qualified inspector before connection of the equipment to the Sydney Electricity power grid?
                (2) If so, does that certificate confirm that the equipment is approved for submersion in polluted water in which members of the public are likely to be wading when the equipment is intended to switch on?
                (3) Does the relevant certificate also confirm, before connection to the Sydney Electricity power grid, that all the equipment and cables incorporated approved protection such as watertight connections and armoured shielding against the probability of damage from the sharp edged expanded galvanised steel grate through which the cable passes?

            Page 1619
                (4) (a) Are the original copies of all such relevant certificates available for inspection?
                  (b) If so, where may they be examined?
                (5) Is there a hazzard of electrocution in future storms?
                (6) How does the SRA advise passengers on unattended stations of emergencies, and what procedures are in place for passengers on unattended stations to advise the SRA of emergencies?

            1542 SRA ADMINISTRATIVE PROPERTY—Mr McBride to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) How much real estate does the SRA own for office/administration purposes?
                (2) What is the value of this real estate?

            1543 SRA REAL ESTATE—Mr McBride to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) In relation to properties owned by the SRA, what real estate does the SRA own for SRA purposes?
                (2) What is the value of this real estate?

            1544 SRA REAL ESTATE UNOCCUPIED—Mr McBride to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) In relation to SRA real estate holdings, what properties owned by the SRA are currently unoccupied?
                (2) What is the value of this real estate?

            1545 RTA REAL ESTATE REGISTER—Mr McManus to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Does the RTA keep a register of all the real estate it owns?
                (2) If so, will he table this list?

            1546 RTA REAL ESTATE—Mr McManus to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) In relation to properties owned by the RTA, what real estate does the RTA own for RTA purposes?
                (2) What is the value of this real estate?

            1547 RTA ADMINISTRATIVE PROPERTY—Mr McManus to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) How much real estate does the RTA own for office/administration purposes?
                (2) What is the value of this real estate?


            Page 1620
            1548 PORT KEMBLA COAL TERMINAL UPGRADING—Mr Markham to ask the Premier and Minister for Economic Development—
                (1) Why was a decision made to utilise the services of a consultant, Barlow Jonker Pty Ltd, in preparing the submission for the proposed upgrading of the Port Kembla Coal Terminal?
                (2) What was the cost of the consultancy?
                (3) Was the Office of Economic Development approached by a representative of the coal industry seeking support by way of a submission critical of the recommendation of Wollongong City Council that road haulage to Port Kembla be reduced?
                (4) If so, what companies made the approach?
                (5) Did the Office of Economic Development consider that rail haulage of South Western coal to Port Kembla could be subject to benefits under a Rail Freight Equalisation Scheme, similar to that of Western coal producers shipping coal via Port Kembla?
                (6) Does the Office of Economic Development consider that Tahmoor coal is adversely affected by restricting its coal dispatches to Port Kembla to rail?
                (7) If so, what form of coal dispatches does the Office of Economic Development favour?

            1549 TRAFFIC NOISE ABATEMENT—Mr Markham to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Is he aware of the report released by Healthy Cities Illawarra and the Environment Protection Agency entitled Traffic Noise Study 1992?
                (2) Does he support the findings of the report?
                (3) (a) Does he support the recommendations regarding the installation of noise abatement infrastructure?
                  (b) If not, why not?
                (4) What steps will he take to reduce the noise levels, intimated in the report, to at least acceptable Roads and Traffic Authority standards?

            1550 TRAFFIC NOISE ABATEMENT—Mr Markham to ask the Minister for the Environment—
                (1) Is he aware of the report released by Healthy Cities Illawarra and the Environment Protection Agency entitled Traffic Noise Study 1992?
                (2) Does he support the findings of the report?
                (3) Does he support the recommendations regarding the installation of noise abatement infrastructure?
                (4) (a) Will he lobby the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads to have this infrastructure erected?
                  (b) If not, why not?

            1551 CROWN LAND RETENTION—Mr Martin to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
                (1) How many parcels of Crown land have been excluded from lease conversions and retained in Crown ownership since 1988 for environmental, access and recreational purposes?
                (2) How many of these parcels fronted watercourses?
                (3) How many parcels which had been excluded and retained in Crown ownership have since been sold?
                (4) What was the amount received from the sales and what was the total area involved?
                (5) How many parcels proposed to be excluded on conversion, but which had not come to finality, were cancelled by the Government since 1988?

            Page 1621

            1552 SENIOR OFFICER DISMISSALS—Mr Martin to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
                (1) Why was the former Director-General dismissed from his position on 30 April 1993?
                (2) What was the financial payout to the former Director-General?
                (3) Was the then Director of Conservation, CALM, dismissed on 30 April 1993?
                (4) Why was the Director of Conservation, CALM, dismissed?
                (5) What was the financial payout to the former Director of Conservation, CALM, as a result of his dismissal?

            1553 CROWN LANDS—Mr Martin to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
                In respect of the Eastern, Central and Western Divisions of New South Wales for each of the financial years 1987/88, 1988/89, 1989/90, 1990/91, 1991/92 and 1992/93, what was the—
                (1) Number and total area of all leases distinguished by tenure under the former Crown Lands and Closer Settlement Acts?
                (2) Number and area of incomplete purchases?
                (3) Area of alienated land at the end of the each year?
                (4) Area of land given to other State Government authorities and the names of the authorities?
                (5) Areas reserved for public purposes each year?
                (6) Number of licences current at the end of each financial year, the total area involved and revenue received?
                (7) Number of conversions from which land was withdrawn or excluded for public proposes each financial year?
                (8) Number of resumptions or reversions of land to the Crown each financial year?

            1554 HUNTER AREA HEALTH SERVICE ELECTIVE SURGERY—Mr Mills to ask the Minister for Health—
                (1) How many operations classified as elective surgery were carried out at each of the hospitals of the Hunter Area Health Service in each month from January 1991 to August 1993, inclusive?
                (2) How many of these in each month were day surgery?

            1555 MALE UROLOGY SERVICES—Mr Mills to ask the Minister for Health—
                (1) Which of the 10 Area Health Services has outpatients services available for male urology patients?
                (2) Which of the 22 District Health Services has outpatients services available for male urology patients?
                (3) At which hospitals are these services available?
                (4) How many occasions of outpatients male urology service were there at each of the above hospitals in:
                  (a) 1991?
                  (b) 1992?


            Page 1622
            1556 NURSING HOME BEDS—Mr Mills to ask the Minister for Health—
                (1) How many nursing home beds were owned by the State at 30 June in:
                  (a) 1993?
                  (b) 1990?
                  (c) 1987?
                  (d) 1983?
                (2) What are the names of the state-owned nursing homes?
                (3) In what suburbs or towns are they located?
                (4) What was the licensed bed capacity of each of these nursing homes in 1993, 1990, 1987 and 1983?
                (5) How many nursing home licensed beds have been disposed of by the state-owned nursing homes in the periods between each of the above dates?
                (6) How many of these bed licences were transferred to privately owned nursing homes?
                (7) How many nursing home beds were there in each of the 10 Area Health Services and the former 6 Health Regions at 30 June in:
                  (a) 1993;
                  (b) 1987;
                in each of the categories:
                  (i) Privately owned?
                  (ii) State-owned?
                  (iii) Other?
                (8) What funding arrangements and/or constraints are undertaken for the state-owned nursing homes by the Commonwealth Government?
                (9) What rates does the Commonwealth Government fund recurrent expenditure in the state-owned nursing homes in New South Wales?

            1557 BICYCLE ACCESS TO THE CBD—Mr J. H. Murray to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Does the redevelopment of the Pyrmont Peninsula promote cycling as a transport option to the city?
                (2) Is the only viable bicycle access between Pyrmont and the Sydney Central Business District via Pyrmont Bridge?
                (3) Has this bridge been recommended as a cycleway in several studies?
                (4) Is he aware that the Darling Harbour Authority refuses to allow cyclists access to Pyrmont Bridge and will shortly remove the only ramp between the bridge and the city of Sydney?
                (5) Will he prevent removal of this ramp until a permanent cycle access can be established?

            1558 FURNITURE BUDGET FOR OTEN—Mr J. H. Murray to ask the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) What is the furniture budge for OTEN?
                (2) How much of the budget was spent?
                (3) Where was this money spent?
                (4) How much was spent on the 11th level of the TNT building?


            Page 1623
            1559 TAFE STAFF OTEN—Mr J. H. Murray to ask the Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment and Minister for the Status of Women representing the Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                (1) How many existing TAFE staff are employed by OTEN?
                (2) How many are employed on a permanent basis?
                (3) How many are employed on a casual basis?
                (4) How many are employed on contracts?
                (5) Are the lengths of contracts all the same?
                (6) If not, what is the breakdown?

            1560 RTA LEASING OF PROPERTY—Mr Nagle to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Does the RTA rent any properties/office space from other organisations/individuals?
                (2) Where are these properties/office spaces and what are they used for?
                (3) Will he provide details concerning the lengths of the leases?
                (4) Are any of these properties/office spaces which the RTA rents from other organisations/ individuals currently unoccupied?

            1561 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING CONTRIBUTIONS—Mr Page to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
                (1) For each council, what financial contributions have (i) Randwick City Council, and (ii) Waverley Council made to the Department of Planning in the following years:
                  (a) 1987?
                  (b) 1988?
                  (c) 1989?
                  (d) 1990?
                  (e) 1991?
                  (f) 1992?
                  (g) 1993?
                (2) (a) What is the purpose of these contributions?
                  (b) How are they calculated?
                (3) Under what legislation are the contributions authorised?

            1562 PUBLIC HOUSING APPLICATIONS—ELECTORATE OF COOGEE—Mr Page to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
                (1) How many applications for public housing are current by persons residing in the electorate of Coogee?
                (2) What is the classification of these applicants?
                (3) What is the average waiting time for Department of Housing applicants for:
                  (a) The Bondi/Coogee/Maroubra area?
                  (b) Other Sydney regions?
                (4) How many Department of Housing pensioner units are located in the electorate of Coogee?
                (5) How many 1, 2, 3, and 4-bedroom units does the Department of Housing own in the electorate of Coogee?

            Page 1624
                (6) How many units are currently under, or proposed to be constructed, in the electorate of Coogee?
                (7) What is the location of these sites?

            1563 STRICKLAND HOUSE PROPERTY—Mr Page to ask the Minister for Land and Water Conservation representing the Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing—
                (1) Does the Carrara/Strickland House property adjoin Nielson Park and the Hermitage Foreshore Reserve, both part of Sydney Harbour National Park, at Vaucluse?
                (2) Was the Carrara/Strickland House 4.9 ha property purchased by the NSW Government in 1914 under the Foreshore Resumption Scheme under which, what is now known as Nielson Park and the Hermitage Foreshore Reserve, had previously been purchased?
                (3) Was the historic house Carrara utilised as a public hospital and opened in 1915 and named Strickland House after the Governor; as Greycliffe, the historic house in Nielson Park, had been utilised and opened in 1913 and named after the Governor's wife?
                (4) Was the public hospital facility at Strickland House closed by the Greiner Government in December 1989, after 74 years as a public hospital facility?
                (5) Will all of the property become part of Sydney Harbour National Park?
                (6) If so, when will it become part of Sydney Harbour National Park?
                (7) (a) If not all of the property will become part of Sydney Harbour National Park, which area will be excluded?
                  (b) Why is it proposed to exclude such area?
                  (c) Will this exclusion be done by subdivision of the property?
                  (d) Will this excluded area be alienated on a long-term lease which can be on-sold?
                  (e) What is contained in this excluded area?
                  (f) Why is the whole property not to become part of Sydney Harbour National Park?

            1564 MSB REAL ESTATE REGISTER—Mr Price to ask the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
                (1) Does the MSB keep a register of all the real estate it owns?
                (2) If so, will he table this list?

            1565 MSB REAL ESTATE—Mr Price to ask the Deputy Premier, Minister for Public Works and Minister for Ports—
                (1) In relation to properties owned by the MSB, what real estate does the MSB own for MSB purposes?
                (2) What is the value of this real estate?

            1566 NEWMED II PATIENTS—Mr Price to ask the Minister for Health—
                (1) On a daily basis, how many patients are being treated at the Newmed II Oncology Unit at the Mater Hospital, Waratah:
                  (a) In the radiotherapy facility?
                  (b) By chemotherapy?
                (2) What is the actual waiting time between referral and treatment commencing in percentage terms for these patients?

            Page 1625
                (3) Of the total cancer patients being treated in Newmed II, how many are located within the boundaries of:
                  (a) The Hunter Area Health Service?
                  (b) Country areas of New South Wales (specify areas)?
                  (c) The Central Coast?
                  (d) The inner metropolitan areas of Sydney?
                  (e) The outer metropolitan areas of Sydney?
                (4) How many patients from the Hunter Area Health Service are refered to Sydney for radiotherapy?

            1567 PROPOSED INVERELL HOSPITAL—Dr Refshauge to ask the Minister for Health—
                (1) Does the Government have any plans to build a new hospital for the Inverell community?
                (2) If not, are there any plans for a private hospital to be built in the area?

            1568 MANNING BASE HOSPITAL INCINERATOR—Dr Refshauge to ask the Minister for Health—
                (1) When did the Manning Base Hospital, at Taree, replace its old incinerator with a new high temperature waste burning incinerator?
                (2) When was it decided to stop using the new incinerator?
                (3) Was the new incinerator turned off because it eroded the original chimney?
                (4) Where are waste products from Manning Base Hospital now going?
                (5) Has the incinerator now been sold?

            1569 INTERNATIONAL SECURITY PRODUCTIONS—Dr Refshauge to ask the Minister for Police and Minister for Emergency Services—
                (1) Did Mr Martin Nichols work in the Freedom of Information office of the Police Service until late 1992?
                (2) Did Mr Chris Doyle work in the Freedom of Information office of the Police Service until late 1992?
                (3) Did Mr Nichols and Mr Doyle establish a private company, "International Security Productions" whilst employees of the Police Service?
                (4) Did "International Security Productions" quote the phone number of the Freedom of Information office of the Police Service as the company's office telephone number?
                (5) Did Mr Nichols and Mr Doyle have access to confidential police information whilst employees of the Police Service?
                (6) Have employees of "International Security Productions" been paid in cash enclosed in Police Service official envelopes?

            1570 BANKSTOWN HOSPITAL CAPITAL FUNDING—Mr Shedden to ask the Minister for Health—
                What are the detailed capital funding arrangements for the redevelopment of Bankstown Hospital?


            Page 1626
            1571 BANKSTOWN HOSPITAL UPGRADING—Mr Shedden to ask the Minister for Health—
                Is the Health Department. at this stage, in possession of a full master development control plan for the proposed upgrading of Bankstown Hospital?

            1572 BANKSTOWN HOSPITAL BED NUMBERS—Mr Shedden to ask the Minister for Health—
                (1) What is the current bed number at Bankstown Hospital?
                (2) What are the allocated beds?

            1573 F2 CORRIDOR—Mr Thompson to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) When it was gazetted in 1951, did the corridor for the proposed F2 run along the reservation inside the southern boundary of the Pennant Hills Golf Course?
                (2) (a) Has this corridor changed?
                  (b) If so, when and why?

            1574 RURAL TOW TRUCK OPERATORS—Mr Thompson to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Has he been approached by tow truck operators from rural areas concerned at the costs involved in taking the new Tow Truck Industry Council test, such as, a full workday involved in travelling to an approved TAFE college to take the test, plus $50?
                (2) Has he any plans to expand the number of TAFE colleges where the test may be taken?
                (3) Are there any other measures being considered to reduce the financial burden the test places on rural tow truck operators?

            1575 M4 EMERGENCY SERVICES—Mr Thompson to ask the Minister for Transport and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Is he aware of complaints concerning the emergency telephones on the M4 being connected to the NRMA?
                (2) Is he aware of instances in which motorists have been refused assistance because they were not members of the NRMA?
                (3) How is the NRMA's performance, with regard to its role on the M4, monitored and/or audited?
                (4) How was the decision to award this job to the NRMA made?










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            Authorised by the Parliament of New South Wales