Questions and Answers No. 34, Tuesday 16 April 1996

All Hansard & Papers this day
993
PARLIAMENT OF NEW SOUTH WALES
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY

1995

FIRST SESSION OF THE FIFTY-FIRST PARLIAMENT


___________________



QUESTIONS
AND
ANSWERS

No. 34

TUESDAY 16 APRIL 1996

(House prorogued 27 January 1996)

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[The Questions and Answers Paper published for the first sitting day in each week will contain, by number and title, all unanswered questions, together with questions to which answers have been received on the previous sitting and any new questions. On subsequent days, new questions are printed, as are questions to which answers were received the previous day. Consequently the full text of any question will be printed only twice: when notice is given; and, when answered.]


Page 994

    PUBLICATION OF QUESTIONANSWER TO BE LODGED BY
    Q. & A. No. 34
      (No questions submitted)
    Prorogation issue


      NOTE

      While the portfolio of the Minister for Olympics and Minister for Roads and the portfolio of the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for Ports, Assistant Minister for Energy and Assistant Minister for State and Regional Development were partially reallocated on 7 January 1996, questions falling due after that date remain directed to the Minister to whom they were originally allocated. The information published under these portfolios includes answers submitted prior to and after the portfolio reallocation
Page 995
      . (Answers required to have been lodged by 10 January 1996)
          Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—603.
      (Answers required to have been lodged by 16 January 1996)
          Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—683, 684.

      (Answers required to have been lodged by 17 January 1996)
          Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—700.


      Notice of Question given on the date shown

      14 NOVEMBER 1995

      (Paper No. 23)

      *472 STATE EMERGENCY SERVICES CENTRAL PHONE NUMBER—Ms Ficarra asked the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—
          Has consideration been given to a central co-ordinating phone number for State Emergency Services rather than the need for members of the public to obtain district SES phone numbers?
          Answer—
          The State Emergency Service has been investigating with Telstra the introduction of a single contact number.
          The current "13 number" centralised system offered by Telstra is prohibitively expensive and does not have the technical capability to meet the requirements of the Service.
          The State Emergency Service and Telstra are continuing to investigate alternative non-standard options.

      *473 SANS SOUCI WATER POLICE—Ms Ficarra asked the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—
          With regard to the Sans Souci Water Police—
          (1) (a) What are the hours of operation and capacity in an emergency?
            (b) Is there enough staff to man the four vessels currently moored?
          (2) What hours do the Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol operate their 12-metre vessel in Botany Bay, excluding standby times?
          (3) What hours do the Australian Volunteer Coast Guard operate their vessel in Botany Bay, excluding standby times?
          (4) (a) What times are the Sydney Ports Corporation's four vessels operated on Botany Bay?
            (b) Does enough staff exist to man them all at one time?
          (5) What are the hours of operation of the Civil Aviation Authority Rescue and Firefighting Service?
          (6) (a) Can it be indicated how the rafts and flotation platforms for 400 personnel in a rescue on Botany Bay are comprised?
            (b) Are there certificates issued on a yearly basis for these items?
Page 996
          (7) At the time of the DC3 plane crash on 24 April 1994, how many rafts/flotation platforms were utilised and what rescue services were available to respond?
          (8) On 24 April 1994, were most of the rafts and flotation devices stored in various locations in and around the airport and as far away as Bankstown and not able to be utilised in the response?
          Answer—
          (1) This question should be addressed to the Minister for Police as it concerns police operations and resources.
          (2) I am informed that the actual operating hours for the Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol are 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. only on weekends and public holidays.
          (3) I am informed that the actual operating hours for the Australian Volunteer Coast Guard are 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. only on weekends and public holidays.
          (4) This question should be addressed to the Minister for Ports as it concerns the Sydney Ports Authority operations and resources.
          (5) I understand that Air Services Australia, formally the Civil Aviation Authority, Rescue and Fire Fighting Service operates 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
          (6) (a) The rafts and flotation platforms available for deployment are located as follows:
              For initial response:
              Air Service Australia—Fire Station 4 x 30 persons life rafts 120 people
              Rescue and Fire Fighting Service— 10 x 10 persons flotation 100 people
              Rescue Boats platforms
              Sans Souci Water Police 4 x 12 persons flotation 48 people
              platforms
              Sydney Ports Authority Brotherson 4 x 12 persons flotation 48 people
                            Dock platforms
                            __________
                                Total capacity for initial response: 316 people
              For secondary response:
              Westpac Surf Life Saving Helicopter 2 x 15 persons flotation 30 people
              at Prince Henry Hospital at Little Bay platforms
              Careflight Helicopter at Westmead 2 x 15 persons flotation 30 people
              platforms
              Crane Air, Bankstown 4 x 6 persons and 40 people
              4 x 4 persons flotation
              platforms
              __________
                                Total capacity for full response: 416 people
              In addition the responding vessels carry those flotation devices required by Maritime Regulations.
            (b) All flotation devices and liferafts are serviced every 12 months either by Air Services Australia or nominated manufacturers and service agents.
          (7) There were no flotation platforms nor life rafts deployed in response to the crash of the DC3 on Sunday 24 April 1994, as the emergency services were told that there were only 24 people on board the aircraft. The Water Police, Sydney Ports Authority, Australian Volunteer Coast Guard and the Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol vessels all responded to the site. This meant that there was adequate assistance for the number of people involved without having to deploy the platforms and life rafts.
          (8) On 24 April 1994 the life rafts were stored in three locations around Botany Bay—the Water Police base at Sans Souci, the Sydney Ports Authority's base at Brotherson Dock and at the Airport Control Tower. They were available if required.

Page 997
          Additional response supplied by the Minister for Police—
          The Regional Commander, South has provided the following response:
          (1) (a) Sans Souci Water Police presently operates two shifts, 7 days a week. These shifts are 7 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. There is a minimum of three crew per shift.
              On approximately 6 days per fortnight there is an extra crew of two from Sans Souci stationed at the Port Hacking Water Police Station. The hours of duty for this crew vary according to need. There are also three police "on call" after 11 p.m.
              As from 1 January 1996, the existing shifts will change to 6 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. and 3.30 p.m. to 1 a.m., 7 days per week.
            (b) Each of the four vessels has a particular function (shallow water, fast response, seagoing, etc.). In the event of a situation arising, two of these vessels would be able to be manned during normal operating hours, with a third from Port Hacking Water Police available if manned.

      *474 WILSON & STARKEY COSTS—Mr Humpherson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—

      Regarding the Department of Community Services—
          (1) How much does the Department expect to spend in legal and other costs in the custody and committal proceedings in the case of the Department vs Wilson & Starkey?
          (2) How much has been expended in this financial year and in 1994/95?
          (3) What has been the cost of staff resources dedicated to the case?
          (4) How many staff days (EFT) have been committed to the case?
          Answer—
          (1) and (2) I am advised that legal expenses in the matter are being met by the Crown Solicitor's Office, not by the Department of Community Services.
          (3) As at 11 December 1995 the staff costs to the Department of Community Services associated with this matter were approximately $34,500.
          (4) There has been the equivalent of approximately 60 days (EFT) committed to the case to date by district officers and the equivalent of approximately 150 days (EFT) committed by the assistant manager supervising the case.

      *481 SYDNEY OLYMPIC GAMES ORGANISING COMMITTEES FEES—Mr Schipp asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
          (1) Who are the persons who have served on the Sydney Olympic Games Organising Committee since its inception?
          (2) (a) Have all members received fees?
            (b) If so, how much?
          (3) If not, in what circumstances have fees not been paid?
          (4) Have any member(s) had their fees held “in trust”?
          (5) If so, which member(s)?
          Answer—
          (1)
J. Brown, A.O.
    R. McGeoch, A.M.
    P. Coles, A.M.
    C. McLatchley
    G. Lovett, A.M.
    A. Booth
        Page 998

    G. Pemberton
    S. Balderstone
    M. Hemmerling
    J. Coates, A.O.
    S. Mostyn
        K. Gosper, A.O.
        F. Sartor
        K. Packer, A.C.
        K. Baxter
        Hon. N. Greiner, A.C.
        I. Roche
        R. Maher, A.M.
        S. Atkinson, A.O.
        P. Crosswhite
        (2) (a) No.
            (b) The fee established by the last Government is $50,000 per annum for SOCOG directors and $100,000 for the president.
          (3) Ms Mostyn and Mr Packer do not receive fees.
          (4) Yes.
          (5) I. Roche.

      *482 JOBS NORTH PROGRAM—TUNCURRY/FORSTER TAFE—Mr Turner asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—
          (1) Are successful applicants under the Jobs North Program in the Great Lakes area required to attend a hospitality course at the Tuncurry/Forster TAFE?
          (2) If so, does part of the course involve a period of time where members of the union movement who cover the hospitality industry are involved with the tuition of such applicants?
          (3) If so, what is the length of time of union tuition?
          (4) What is taught during that period of time?
          (5) Why is it felt that such union tuition is necessary for unemployed people seeking TAFE tuition to enter the hospitality industry?
          (6) Does the union involved with the tuition actively seek union membership of the applicants under the Jobs North Program during the period of union tuition or any other period during the TAFE course?
          Answer—
          (1) No, trainees under the Jobs North Program are required to do a 6-week component "OFF THE JOB" at TAFE.
    Page 999
          Subjects included are:
      SubjectsSubject No.Hours
      Cultural Awareness
      Customer Relations
      First Aid
      Focus on Industry Skills
      Occupational Hygiene
      Retail Selling Practices
      Sales and Marketing Awareness
      Workplace Calculations
      Workplace Communications
      Work Team Communication
      2601S
      2601K
      6357A
      9408A
      2601H
      8788G
      6641C
      9408B
      6998G
      8979V
      6
      6
      22
      27
      6
      21
      10
      9
      36
      18
          (2) Yes—training provided by accredited TUTA (Trade Union Training Authority) trainers.
          (3) 14 hours of the 180-hour program.
          (4) TUTA Component—
            Course Title:
              Introduction to Industrial Relations.
            Module Purpose:
              This module has been designed for long-term unemployed people. The purpose of this module is to provide participants with basic knowledge on Industrial Relations.
            Subjects to be covered:
              Introductions.
              How these courses came about.
              The history of unions.
              How and why unions came about.
              Three types of laws covering workers.
              What is an award.
              How awards are interpreted.
              ACTU.
              Test cases.
              Employer organisations.
              The Accord.
              The Social Wage.
              The image of unions.
              The media and industrial relations.
              Occupational health and safety and discrimination issues.
              Review of course content.
              Evaluation.
          (5) The Mid North Coast Area Consultative Committee for Hunter DEET recommended to DEET that an Industrial Relations training package be delivered by accredited Trade Union Authority trainers to all New Work Opportunities participants in the region. The requirement for this training is to be incorporated into the New Work Opportunities guidelines.
          (6) Trade Union Training Authority training is provided in conjunction with the TAFE course, but the actual subject content and the delivery is the responsibility of the Trade Union Training Authority. TAFE has no supervision of the Trade Union Training Authority component.

      15 NOVEMBER 1995

Page 1000

      (Paper No. 24)

      *483 FINGAL PENINSULA—Mr Beck asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—
          Given the bipartisan support and pre-election promise for Crown lands at Fingal Peninsula to become a State recreation area/coastal park, will he—
          (1) Guarantee that the Minister for Land and Water Conservation will not proceed any further with any out of court negotiations or actions until he has discussed the matter extensively with Tweed Shire Council?
          (2) Provide a copy of the draft terms of settlement to Tweed Shire Council?
          (3) Ensure that the Government carries out its legal responsibilities under the Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1983 and ensure that every effort is made to prove that the land subject to the claims is not claimable, so that the Government will be able to honour its very undertaking to the people of the Tweed to reserve this land in perpetuity?
          (4) Co-operate with and support Tweed Shire Council in the legal proceedings and in attempts to initiate negotiations involving the Minister, the Tweed/Byron Aboriginal Lands Council, Tweed Shire Council and other stakeholders to enable reflection of legitimate Aboriginal rights and desires within a management/leasing approach based upon public ownership of Fingal Peninsula?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) Justice Bignold in the Land and Environment Court on 24 October 1995 rejected Tweed Shire Council's application for access to the draft terms of settlement.
          (3) The Government will meet its obligations under the Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1983 by acting in accordance with its provisions at all times.
          (4) The Government will hold discussions with Tweed Shire Council and the Tweed Byron Aboriginal Land Council prior to resumption of the appeal hearing.

      *484 DUNGOG RAILWAY STATION—Mr Blackmore asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Tourism—
          (1) Does he intend to staff Dungog Railway Station from December this year?
          (2) What staffing arrangements and hours of operation will be implemented?
          (3) What are the estimated costs, including capital, on costs and recurrent costs to provide staffing at Dungog?
          (4) Will ticket purchases for both CityRail and CountryLink be available at the station?
          (5) Will ticket purchases still be available from the Dillon's agency in Dungog?
          (6) What is the estimated revenue from ticket sales in Dungog?
          (7) Does he intend to install rail crossing gates in Dungog?
          (9) Will he retain the same number of CityRail and CountryLink services to Dungog?
          (9) What is the number of annual passengers and the revenue of ticket sales from the following stations:
          (a) Gloucester?
          (b) High Street?
          (c) Tarro?
          (d) Sandgate?
          (e) Adamstown?
          (f) Teralba?
          (g) Awaba?
            (h) Kotara?
Page 1001
            (i) Paterson?
            (j) Metford?
            (k) Warabrook?
            (l) Hexham?
            (m) Cockle Creek?
            (n) Booragul?
            (o) Dora Creek?
          (10) Does he intend to appoint staff at the above stations?
          (11) If not, why not?
          (12) Did he receive correspondence from the Dungog branch of the Australian Labor Party requesting that he honour a pre-election promise regarding staffing of Dungog Station?
          Answer—
          (1) It is proposed to staff the station from early 1996.
          (2) One staff member will attend the station from 6.30 a.m. to 11 a.m. and another from 2.25 p.m. to 7.55 p.m. Mondays to Fridays.
          (3) $45,000 per annum.
          (4) and (5) Yes.
          (6) $60,000 per annum.
          (7) The matter of boom gates at the level crossing north of Dungog station is the responsibility of the Minister for Roads.
          (8) Yes.
          (9) Estimated annual number Station ticket sale revenue
              of passengers(1994/95)
            (a) 8,614 Nil
            (b) 75,446 Nil
            (c) 12,680 Nil
            (d) 30,115 Nil
            (e) 61,498 $9,933
            (f) 47,550 $17,099
            (g) 15,850 $5,867
            (h) 45,965 $5,332
            (i) 11,729 Nil
            (j) 70,374 $41,800
            (k) Not applicable, as station only opened October 1995.
            (l) 25,994 Nil
            (m) 38,674 $3,631
            (n) 147,222 $8,736
            (o) 47,550 $11,464
          (10) There are no plans to alter current arrangements.
          (11) Budgetary restraints do not permit any changes.
          (12) Yes.

      *486 "WYEWURK"—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) Has he received representations to have "Wyewurk", the Thirroul home of the renowned English author D. H. Lawrence, protected by a permanent conservation order?
          (2) Does he acknowledge "Wyewurk" is a significant item in Australia's cultural heritage?
          (3) What action has he taken to protect "Wyewurk"?
          (4) Are funds available to acquire "Wyewurk" on behalf of the people of New South Wales?

Page 1002
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) It is for the Australian Heritage Commission to determine what constitutes a significant item in Australia's cultural heritage.
          (3) "Wyewurk" is already protected by an interim conservation order. The owner has objected to this order. An inquiry to determine whether the building warrants protection by a permanent conservation order was deferred to enable negotiations with the owner. My administration is currently making arrangements to reconvene the inquiry.
          (4) No.

      *487 SINGLE HOMELESS WOMEN—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) How many single women are known to be homeless in Sydney?
          (2) What State facilities are available for short-term accommodation for single women?
          (3) What charitable facilities are known to be available for short-term accommodation for single women?
          (4) (a) How many single women are on the Department of Housing waiting list for accommodation?
          (b) What percentage of these are presently housed in crisis or other short-term accommodation?
          (5) What funding is made available to charitable organisations to provide accommodation to single homeless women?
          Answer—
          (1) It is difficult to accurately ascertain the number of homeless single women in Sydney. In the 1994/95 financial year, the Homeless Persons Information Centre (located within the Sydney City Council) received 5,768 calls from women with or without children who were homeless. Actual numbers are not available as to how many enquiries were received from individual women from within the Sydney area as these calls came from throughout New South Wales.
          (2) The State Government does not directly provide accommodation services specifically for single women. However, homeless single women are eligible to apply for immediate housing through Department of Housing Offices.
Page 1003
          (3) Government funds have been provided for 322 projects in which non-Government organisations provide accommodation for homeless single women with or without children. These projects include a total of 976 bedrooms.
          (4) (a) As at 30 June 1995, there were 15,867 single women waiting for public housing.
            (b) The Department does not record the current housing situation of people on the waiting list.
          (5) Through the joint Commonwealth/State Crisis Accommodation Program, the Government provides funds for the purchase, construction and modification of housing which non-Government organisations use to accommodate homeless people. Currently, $13.5 million per year is allocated for this purpose. Over the last 2 years, 42 per cent of these funds have been allocated to services for single women with or without children. Recurrent funding for support services to homeless people living in these properties is provided through the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program which is administered by the Department of Community Services. The 1995/96 expenditure on this program will be $78.2 million.

      *488 DEPARTMENTAL INCOME—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) (a) Does the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning receive income from sources other than Consolidated Revenue?
          (b) What are those sources?
          (2) (a) How much income was received in the 1994/95 financial year from such sources?
          (b) How much income is expected to be received in the 1995/96 financial year from such sources?
          (3) What is the reason for these payments?
          (4) Under what statutory power are the monies paid?
          (5) (a) Are staff employed from these monies?
          (b) If so:
      (i) How many?
      (ii) For what purpose?
          (6) For what other purposes is the income used?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) Yes, the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning receives income from sources other than the Consolidated Fund.
            (b) These sources are:
              Recoupment of administration costs from budget sector agencies.
              Recoupment of administration costs from non-budget sector agencies.
              Publication sales.
              Fees for services.
              Minor user charges.
              Interest.
              Grants from budget sector agencies.
              Grants from other organisations.
              Donations and industry contributions.
              Other receipts.
              Net gain on sale of non-current assets.
Page 1004
          (2) (a) During 1994/95 a total of $23,102,000 was received.
              Recoupment of administration costs from budget sector agencies $355,000
              Recoupment of administration costs from non-budget sector agencies $631,000
              Publication sales $156,000
              Fees for services $702,000
              Minor user charges $202,000
              Interest $1,278,000
              Grants from budget sector agencies $5,010,000
              Grants from budget sector agencies—Capital $7,738,000
              Grants from other organisations $5,542,000
              Donations and industry contributions $1,179,000
              Other receipts $266,000
              Net gain on sale of non-current assets $43,000
            (b) During 1995/96 a total of $12,681,000 is expected to be received.
              Recoupment of administration costs from budget sector agencies $30,000
              Recoupment of administration costs from non-budget sector agencies $1,430,000
              Publication sales $130,000
              Fees for services $945,000
              Minor user charges $187,000
              Interest $700,000
              Grants from budget sector agencies $1,704,000
              Grants from other organisations $6,910,000
              Donations and industry contributions $645,000
          (3) The reasons for these payments are:
              Recoupment of administration costs.
              Publication sales.
              Fees for services for processing of development applications in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.
              Minor user charges.
              Interest paid by Treasury on Department's bank accounts.
              Grants from budget sector agencies for contribution to joint funded planning projects and transfer of funds for the Resources and Conservation Assessment Council (1994/95 $4,808,000; 1995/96 $1,704,000).
              Grants from budget sector agencies—capital for fitout costs associated with Governor Macquarie Tower (1994/95 $7,738,000; 1995/96 Nil).
              Grants from other organisations contributing to joint funded planning projects and cost recovery of the operation of the Office of Housing Policy (1994/95 $4,758,000; 1995/96 $6,135,000).
              Donations and industry contributions for joint funded planning projects including funds received from the Commonwealth Government and Local Government.
          (4) The Department of Urban Affairs and Planning has the following statutory powers to receive these monies:
            Under the Public Finance and Audit Act where departmental sources of revenue are retained and not paid into consolidated funds.
          (5) (a) Yes.
              (b) (i) 1995/96 estimate is for 97 staff to be employed from revenue outside of the consolidated fund. 58 staff are estimated in 1995/96 to be employed for the Office of Housing Policy. Other staff are to be employed based on funding and the nature of projects involved.
              (ii) Staff are employed to assist with the management of programs and for technical and professional advice and assistance.
Page 1005
          (6) The income received is also used to fund studies and other operating expenses including advertising, printing and publication costs associated with jointly funded projects.
      *489 HOUSE PURCHASE—LANE COVE—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) Has the Department of Housing acquired a house at 53 Landers Road, Lane Cove?
          (2) Was the consideration $442,500?
          (3) Was settlement effected on or about 1 June 1995?
          (4) What is the intended use of the home?
          (5) (a) Is it still standing vacant over 5 months after settlement?
          (b) If so, why?
          (6) What is the justification for the purchase of this property?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) Yes.
          (3) Yes.
          (4) The dwelling was purchased under the Community Housing Program for use by the Sydney City Mission to house people with a mental illness who:
            (a) need affordable accommodation in the area; and
            (b) are supported by local mental health services.
          (5) No.
          (6) The property was purchased in response to the need for affordable accommodation in the Lower North Shore for people with a mental illness who have strong links with the community and are long-term clients of the local mental health services.

      *490 LIQUOR LAW ENFORCEMENT AND EDUCATION—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Gaming and Racing, and Minister Assisting the Premier on Hunter Development—
          (1) With reference to Budget Paper No. 3, Volume 2, page 440, what is the justification for his Department's 5:1 ratio of revenue inspections for amusement devices against educational visits to licensees to ensure compliance with State laws?
          (2) Is it his policy to give State revenue raising a higher priority than breaches of the liquor laws?
          (3) How many additional inspections has he requested take place since the death of Anna Wood?
          Answer—
          (1) Educational visits to licensees fulfil a strategy of my Department to provide to new licensees, who have had no prior industry experience, an explanation of the requirements of the Liquor Act 1982 in respect of the licensee and the operation of the business authorised by the licence.
          Approved Amusement Device inspections focus on ensuring revenue identified for collection is accurate. Inspectors conducting these inspections have a check list of other issues to attend to. Offences and other compliance issues are given attention. These include: checking that all the approved amusement devices on the licensed premises have been authorised by the Liquor Administration Board; checking the operation of the devices to ensure they have not been interfered with; and checking that the devices are not malfunctioning.
          These inspections also provide an opportunity to resolve complaints from hotel patrons about approved amusement device operation.
          The allocation of inspectorial resources to undertake the targets proposed for educational visits for 1995/96 is based on past results and trends in relation to the number of new inexperienced
Page 1006
      licensees entering the industry. The number of inspections proposed for Approved Amusement Devices is considered to be appropriate in the light of current and anticipated levels of irregular revenue reports received (i.e., where there are significant indications that correct duty has not been paid) by the Liquor Administration Board from licensees and other areas of non-compliance with legislative requirements.
          (2) No. Whilst revenue protection is a very important component in the role played by inspectors, their activities are to both optimise the Government's revenue in relation to liquor and gaming device activity, as well as to ensure compliance with the relevant legislation. Failures by licensees to comply with their legislative obligations, which include offences and breaches of their conditions of licence will frequently have an adverse effect on the revenue anticipated from those licensed premises. However, there has been a growing need in recent years to broaden the focus of inspectors' activity in line with legislative change to include the detection and prosecution of offences and other irregular action or misconduct on licensed premises which is in conflict with the public interest.
          Extensive education of licensees and club management and directors now takes place through the issue by the Department of regular liquor and gaming bulletins, the conduct of seminars for the industry and through the many contacts inspectors make with the industry apart from the educational visits to new licensees.
          (3) The tragic death of Anna Wood followed the conduct of a "rave party" held at the Phoenician Club, Sydney. An urgent departmental investigation into the conduct of this "rave party" and other functions at this club was undertaken by my Department. In the light of the finding of this investigation, the Director of Liquor and Gaming issued a number of summonses out of the Licensing Court against the club and the current Chief Executive Officer and previous Chief Executive Officers of the club.
          Drug sale and misuse at registered clubs and on licensed premises is a matter of great concern to the Government. Departmental inspectors have inspected another club which recently held a large dance party for young people after obtaining Licensing Court approval for the function. There was no drug or alcohol misuse at this function. Whilst the detection of this illicit activity and enforcement of the drug laws is a matter for the Police Service, departmental inspectors are currently monitoring promotions of "rave parties" on club and licensed premises and have reported to the Police Service their concern in relation to the possible use of drugs at these and other licensed premises.
          It is understood that the Police Service has established a task force to detect and investigate illegal drug dealing and use, especially in relation to the drug Ecstasy.

      *491 RAILWAY STATION OPENINGS—Mr O'Farrell asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Tourism—
          (1) Has he said that Warabrook Railway Station was the first new railway station that CityRail has opened for many years?
          (2) On what date was Warabrook Railway Station opened?
          (3) On what date was Metford Railway Station opened?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) Warabrook Railway Station was officially opened on 23 October 1995.
          (3) Metford Railway Station was officially opened on 17 March 1995.

      *493 NATIVE VEGETATION FORUM—Mr Slack-Smith asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—

Page 1007
          Which organisations are represented and the names of the people who represent the Native Vegetation Forum?
          Answer—
            Department of Land and Water Conservation:
              Col Gellatly (Chairperson), Ian Garrard, John Halkett and Lawrie Kirk (Executive Officer).
            NSW Agriculture:
              Andrew Kennedy.
            National Parks and Wildlife Service:
              Janine Williams.
            State Forests:
              Brian Furrer.
            Environment Protection Authority:
              Ross Higginson.
            Department of Urban Affairs and Planning:
              Anne Conway.
            Local Government and Shires Association:
              Councillor Bill Bott.
            NSW Farmers’ Association:
              Peter Comensoli and David Hodgkinson.
            Greening Australia:
              Paul Cruickshank.
            Total Environment Centre:
              Jeff Angel.
            Nature Conservation Council:
              Shelley Burgin.
          Membership of the NSW Vegetation Forum is being expanded to include representation from Catchment Management Committees (1 Coastal and 2 Inland Catchment Management Committees).

      *494 GUNNEDAH RIVERCARE GROUP—Mr Slack-Smith asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
          (1) Is he aware of the Gunnedah Rivercare Group entering private land without permission for the clearing of trees on private land without permission?
          (2) Has the Rivercare Group admitted fault?
          (3) Has there been similar cases in the past?
          (4) If so:
          (a) Did those land owners take legal action against the Department?
          (b) What was the outcome of these actions?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes, I am aware of the incident involving the actions of the plant operator working for the Burburgate Rivercare Group, not the Gunnedah Rivercare Group, entering upon private land. Unbeknown to the Rivercare Group at the time, the plant operator who was working on the opposite riverbank on a group member’s property, decided to cross the river and remove willows which were diverting flow into the group member’s bank and causing erosion. This site had been identified by the Department of Land and Water Conservation’s river planner for works and the plant operator was to contact the landholder first before entering.
Page 1008
          (2) The plant operator has admitted fault. However, the Rivercare Group, DLWC staff and the plant operator have spoken with the landowner involved and all have recognised that a breakdown in communication occurred in this situation. With the landholder’s consent, arrangements were made for rehabilitation of the site.
          (3) No, the plant operator, in conjunction with the DLWC and other Rivercare Groups, had successfully cleared and realigned logs for a length of 47 kilometres along the Namoi River, directly downstream from the landholder’s property, without incident. One of these groups was even awarded a silver medal in the Rivercare 2000 awards. This is an unusual situation which has never occurred in the past and measures have been taken to minimise the chances of it recurring in the future.
          (4) No legal action has been taken.

      *497 PIPI CONSUMPTION—Mr Turner asked the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries—
          (1) What is the annual number of pipis taken from the beaches of New South Wales for each of the years 1990 to 15 November 1995?
          (2) Is he aware of what percentage of pipis are used for human consumption or used for bait or pet food in each year?
          (3) If so, what are those percentages per each year for each aspect?
          Answer—
          (1) NSW Fisheries has no record of recreational catch of pipis, however the bag limit for recreational fishers is 50 in total per day per person in possession. The commercial catch based on financial year data is as follows:
              1989/90 351,548 kg
              1990/91 289,347 kg
              1991/92 265,171 kg
              1992/93 314,633 kg
              1993/94 246,481 kg
          (2) NSW Fisheries does not collect data to answer this question. The departmental data is limited to the total commercial catch.
          I am advised that the average price of pipi has increased over this 5-year period. Sydney Fish Markets reports the average price in March 1990 was $1.19 kg while in October 1994 the price has risen to $2.30 kg (an almost 100 per cent increase in price). NSW Fisheries advises these changes in price relate to the changing patterns of consumption for pipi identified in the question.
          (3) Not applicable, refer to answer (2) above.

Page 1009

      16 NOVEMBER 1995

      (Paper No. 25)

      *498 BMW REGISTRATIONS—Mr Blackmore asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
          How many BMW motor vehicles are registered to owners whose residential addresses are in the following postcode areas:
          (a) 2166?
          (b) 2170?
          (c) 2176?
          (d) 2177?
          (e) 2088?
          (f) 2089?
          Answer—
          As at 30 June 1995:
            (a) 95
            (b) 216
            (c) 129
            (d) 13
            (e) 614
            (f) 242

      *499 MACLEAN HOSPITAL—Mr Causley asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
          (1) Have funds been made available to upgrade the operating theatres at Maclean Hospital?
          (2) If the funds have been made available, when will the work commence?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) I am advised by the Health Department that a letter of acceptance was issued to the successful tenderer on 12 December 1995. The site is available to the tenderer for the commencement of work 7 days after the issue of the letter of acceptance.

      *500 GATES HEAD PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT—Mr Causley asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) Did she indicate that she was opposed to a development now called Gates Head at Evans Head?
          (2) (a) Did she indicate she had environmental concerns about the proposed residential development?
          (b) If so, what were those concerns?
          (3) Is she aware environmentally sensitive wetland is to be considered for a central school at Evans Head?
          (4) Does she support the development of the school on land that is more environmentally sensitive than the Gates Head development?

Page 1010
          Answer—
          (1) The Minister has consistently objected to improper development on our sensitive coastline. The Iron Gates development is one seen as requiring modification were it to proceed.
          (2) (a) Yes, the Government has consistently stated that it has concerns about the Gates Head development.
            (b) These concerns centred around the fact that the development was to occur in a sensitive coastal environment with the potential for deleterious impacts especially upon endangered fauna habitat.
          (3) National Parks and Wildlife Service have advised that the proposed site for a school at Evans Head will not occur on SEPP 14 wetland, but that other wetland areas occur on site. I am informed by the NPWS that the sensitivity of the site has not as yet been determined.
          (4) The issue is not one of relative environmental sensitivity but rather one of a proper assessment of the impacts of the respective developments in relation to the environments in which they occur.

      *501 CHIEF OF STAFF—Mr Causley asked the Minister for Agriculture—
          (1) What is the background of his Chief of Staff?
          (2) What are his qualifications for the job?
          (3) Does he have any academic or industry qualifications?
          (4) What is his salary?
          Answer—
          (1) My Chief of Staff has had wide experience and involvement in rural industries, combined with extensive involvement in political activity across country New South Wales.
          (2) Breadth of experience in rural matters and extensive and successful political experience in country New South Wales.
          (3) He has entirely appropriate qualifications for the position.
          (4) Salary is in line with PEO guidelines.

      *502 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Ellis asked the Minister for Sport and Recreation—
          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—

Page 1011
          (1) to (6) To answer the honourable member's question would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *503 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Ellis asked the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *505 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Glachan asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
Page 1012
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To answer the honourable member's question would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *507 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Glachan asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—
          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *508 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Glachan asked the Minister for Police—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
Page 1013
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justified.

      *509 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Glachan asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Tourism—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *510 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Glachan asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is tding 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—

Page 1014
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *511 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Glachan asked the Minister for the Environment—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *513 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Glachan asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads representing the Treasurer, Minister for Energy, Minister for State Development and Minister Assisting the Premier—
          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

Page 1015

      *514 CENTRAL COAST SCHOOLS PUBLIC WORKS—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—
          (1) (a) Was Gosford Public School constructed in the 1950s?
          (b) Is it now in need of major redevelopment?
          (2) Is Gosford Public School scheduled for major redevelopment on the Department of Education Capital Works Program?
          (3) If so:
          (a) What works are planned?
          (b) What is the anticipated date of commencement of the works?
          (c) What is the estimated cost of the works?
          (4) If not, why not?
          (5) What other schools on the Central Coast are scheduled for major capital works?
          (6) What is the criteria for inclusion on the Capital Works Program relating to major capital works?
          (7) Will the Capital Works directorate re-rank the priority of schools as previously determined by the regions?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) Some building would be of 1950s vintage.
            (b) No.
          (2) No.
          (3) Not applicable.
          (4) To date the school has not been nominated as a high priority for a capital works program.
          (5) Funding for the construction of stage 2 of a new high school at Tumbi Umbi was approved in the 1995/96 budget. Funds have also been approved for planning for a new school at Blue Haven, a staged follow-on of works at Ourimbah Public School, a hall at Chertsey Public School and Gosford East Public School, and redevelopment of Tuggerah Public School.
          (6) The criteria for inclusion on the capital works program includes the provision of new school places in developing areas of the State, upgradings and additions to existing schools to cater for increasing enrolments and provision of permanent buildings to release demountables.
          (7) Properties Directorate in the Department of School Education considers the proposals for capital works projects and accords each a position on a statewide priority list.

      *515 DUNBOGAN CANAL—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) Did the Commission of Inquiry into the proposed Dunbogan Canal development hold its final sitting on 15 October 1995?
          (2) If not, when was the final sitting?
          (3) When is the inquiry's report due?
          (4) What is the cost of the inquiry?
          (5) Does he affirm a commitment that the Dunbogan Canal development proposal will not be permitted to proceed?
          (6) If so:
          (a) What is the purpose of allowing the inquiry to continue?
          (b) Was the development proponent informed of your decision prior to undertaking further expense to make submissions to the inquiry?

          Answer—

Page 1016
          (1) No.
          (2) The final sitting was on 17 October 1995.
          (3) The Commissioner released the Inquiry Report on 10 November 1995.
          (4) The Office of the Commissioners of Inquiry has advised that the direct cost was $57,000.
          (5) Once I have received the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning's report on the Commissioner's recommendations I will determine whether or not the development will proceed.
          (6) (a) and (b) Not applicable (refer response to question (5)).

      *516 RESIDENTIAL TENANCIES TRIBUNAL PROCEEDINGS—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) How many Department of Housing tenants instituted proceedings in the Residential Tenancies Tribunal against the Department in the year ended 30 June 1995?
          (2) How many cases resulted in orders against the Department of Housing by the Tribunal?
          (3) What are the principal grounds under which proceedings are instituted by tenants against the Department?
          (4) Is failure to carry out maintenance one of the principal reasons?
          (5) How many cases were instituted on the grounds of failure to carry out maintenance?
          (6) How many cases were instituted by the Department of Housing against tenants in the Residential Tenancies Tribunal to the year ended 30 June 1995?
          (7) What were the principal grounds under which proceedings were instituted by the Department against tenants?
          (8) How many actions by the Department against tenants were successful?
          (9) What was the cost to the Department in the last financial year of conducting proceedings with tenants in the Residential Tenancies Tribunal?
          Answer—
          (1) 44 applications were lodged.
          (2) This information is not held by the Department of Housing. The registry of the Residential Tenancies Tribunal has indicated that they do not keep statistical information concerning orders made against individual landlords.
          (3) Failure to provide maintenance to property.
          (4) Yes.
          (5) 15.
          (6) 4,382.
          (7) Rental arrears.
          (8) 4,153.
          (9) $98,102.

      *517 PRISONERS—NUMBERS AND COSTS—Mr Hazzard asked the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) How many prisoners were detained in New South Wales prisons as at:
          (a) 25 March 1995?
          (b) 26 October 1995?
          (2) What was the cost of detention of all such prisoners on an annual basis from 1 July 1994 to 30 June 1995?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) 6,275.
Page 1017
            (b) 6,352.
          (2) The average full cost of detention was $48,540 per annum per prisoner.

      *518 PRISONERS—AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT JURISDICTION—Mr Hazzard asked the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) How many prisoners in total were detained in New South Wales prisons at the request of the Australian Government in the year 1 July 1994 to 30 June 1995?
          (2) What was the average number in this period?
          (3) What was the cost of detention of all such prisoners on an annual basis from 1 July 1994 to 30 June 1995?
          (4) What amount of payment was received from such government for the year towards the cost of detention?
          Answer—
          (1) A total of 1,085 inmates who had a federal offence were detained in New South Wales correctional centres in 1994/95.
          (2) The average number of federal inmates in any month during 1994/95 was 966.
          (3) A breakdown of the costs of detaining these inmates is not available as many have overlapping state/federal sentences. Costs are available for those inmates awaiting deportation. The average annual cost of detaining a prohibited immigrant was $54,995.
          (4) Under section 120 of the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act, every State is required to "make provision for the detention in its prisons of persons accused or convicted of offences against the laws of the Commonwealth". The NSW Department of Corrective Services was, however, able to recoup a total of $198,150 from the Commonwealth Department of Immigration, Local Government and Ethnic Affairs for the detention of prohibited immigrants during 1994/95.

      *519 PRISONERS—PAROLE COSTS—Mr Hazzard asked the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—
          (1) How many offenders were on parole between 25 March 1995 and 26 October 1995?
          (2) What was the average cost of each offender on parole per month?
          (3) What was the number of officers supervising parolees in:
          (a) March 1995?
          (b) June 1995?
          (c) July 1995?
          (d) August 1995?
          (e) September 1995?
          (f) October 1995?
          (g) November 1995?
          (4) How many of the total offenders on parole between 25 March 1995 and 16 November 1995 were not personally seen or visited by a parole officer?
          Answer—
          Under the Sentencing Act 1989, where a sentence consists of a minimum term of imprisonment followed by an additional term which in total does not exceed 3 years, an inmate is automatically released to parole on expiration of the minimum term. However, the inmate will only be supervised if supervision has been stipulated by the sentencing court. An inmate who is released to parole
Page 1018
      which is in excess of 3 years is only supervised for 3 years. The Department of Corrective Services does not record unsupervised inmates.
          (1) A total of 2,916 parolees were supervised by the Probation and Parole Service between April and October 1995.
          (2) The average cost of supervising an offender on parole per month is $120.
          (3) (a) 272.
            (b) 268.
            (c) 278.
            (d) 277.
            (e) 278.
            (f) 274.
            (g) 278.
          (4) Case management practices followed by probation and parole officers are designed to ensure that all supervised offenders are seen at a regular and appropriate frequency. Contact with offenders is recorded on their case history file, however, statistical data is not collected on individual contact frequency.

      *520 WOMEN PRISONERS—Mr Hazzard asked the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—
          As at 16 November 1995—
          (1) How many women prisoners are there detained in New South Wales prisons on behalf of the Australian Government?
          (2) How many women prisoners are there detained in New South Wales prisons at the request of the NSW Government?
          (3) How many women prisoners detained in New South Wales prisons on behalf of the NSW Government are mothers of minor children?
Page 1019
          (4) How many children of such prisoners are aged under 14 years?
          (5) (a) How often do children of women inmates have access to their inmate mothers?
          (b) What are the arrangements at each correctional facility?
          (6) How many of such children have had to be put under the control of the Department of Youth and Community Services because of their mother's incarceration?
          (7) How many of such children are being cared for by persons who are not their natural or adoptive parents and such care arrangements are the direct or indirect result of his/her or their parent's incarceration?
          Answer—
          (1) As at 24 November 1995 there were 24 women inmates serving a federal sentence.
          (2) As at 24 November 1995 there were 291 women inmates serving a New South Wales sentence.
          (3) This information is not presently recorded by the Department of Corrective Services. One of the Department's 1995/96 research projects has as one of its aims the redesign of the standard data collection procedures for women.
          (4) See (3) above.
          (5) (a) Children of women inmates have access on normal visiting days. Children aged under 16 years must be accompanied by an adult, while children aged 16 to 18 years can visit, unaccompanied by an adult, at the discretion of the governor of the relevant correctional centre. Visits for children who are in care, and visits on other than normal visiting days, are by appointment and at the discretion of the governor of the relevant correctional centre. Visits are also allowed on special days, such as Christmas Day and on "gala days", when special activities are arranged for children.
            (b) Mulawa Correctional Centre:
              Normal visiting days are Wednesday to Sunday.
              All-day visiting day for children once a month.
              Norma Parker Correctional Centre:
              Normal visiting days are Saturday, Sunday and public holidays.
              All-day visiting day for children once a month.
              Emu Plains Correctional Centre:
              Normal visiting days are Saturday, Sunday and public holidays.
              Grafton Correctional Centre:
              Normal visiting days are Friday to Sunday. Inmates are allowed a maximum of three ½-day visits per week which may be increased on application.
          (6) See (3) above.
          (7) See (3) above.

      *521 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Police representing the Attorney General and Minister for Industrial Relations—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
Page 1020
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          The Attorney General has advised me that the answers are:
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *522 MANLY DAM RESERVE—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) Has she allocated funds for the acquisition of land formerly held in trust by the Spastic Centre and now owned by Ardel Pty Ltd?
          (2) If so, how much has been allocated?
          (3) If none, will she meet with the Save Manly Dam Catchment Committee to discuss their concerns?
          (4) If so, when will she meet them?
          Answer—
          (1) No. The Director-General of the National Parks and Wildlife Service has advised that whilst the land has value as urban bushland, its acquisition would be hard to justify considering the likely cost and its impact on higher priority statewide conservation programs. The coalition Government allowed the sale of the Spastic Centre at Allambie Heights which precipitated the current public concerns. The Government has made a commitment to add Manly Dam Reserve to Garigal National Park.
          (2) Not applicable.
          (3) Representatives of the Manly Dam Catchment Committee met with the Minister's office on 12 November 1995.
          (4) Not applicable.

      *523 BUSINESS ENTERPRISE CENTRES—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Small Business and Regional Development, Minister for Ports, Assistant Minister for Energy and Assistant Minister for State Development—
          (1) What allocation has he made to fund Business Enterprise Centres in the Budget?
          (2) How much will he allocate to the Manly Warringah Business Enterprise Centre?
          (3) If State funding is reduced, will this lead to the closure of Business Enterprise Centres throughout New South Wales?

Page 1021
          Answer—
          (1) The 1995/96 budgetary allocation for BECs is $3.5 million for a 9-month period. The BECs previous funding period ceased on 30 September 1995. In August I approved a 4-month extension of funding to allow the future role of the BECs to be included in a review of Government-funded services to small business.
          This review is now to be incorporated into a larger examination of regional development culminating in a green paper on regional development due in February 1996. As local and regional development is a major focus for many of the rural BECs it is felt that their role should also be considered in the review of regional development activities.
          I have therefore recently approved the allocation of the balance of the 1995/96 funding. This will enable the outcomes of the reviews to both small business services and regional development to be available in developing new funding and service delivery strategies in relation to BECs for the 1996/97 financial year.
          (2) In October the Manly-Warringah BEC received $28,000 for a 4-month period. It is estimated that a funding assistance of $33,100 for a 5-month period will be provided in January 1996.
          (3) In line with budgetary constraints, there is a projected reduction of direct grant funding to BECs. However, this only refers to the allocation of funding that was previously provided under the Self Employment Development Program. It does not reflect the full extent of funding potentially available to BECs from this Government. Part of the review process involves looking at the options for BECs to deliver additional services on behalf of the Department of Business and Regional Development under a fee for service arrangement.

      *524 ACCESS TO NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICE OFFICERS—Dr Kernohan asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) Who issued the directions to local officers of the National Parks and Wildlife Services (NPWS) that all enquiries from Members of Parliament be directed through her office?
          (2) Why are local Members being advised to go through her office?
          (3) Is she agreeable to local officers of the NPWS speaking directly to local Members on matters pertaining specifically to local electorates?
          Answer—
          (1) to (3) It is the practice of this Government, as has been in previous Governments, that enquiries from members would be dealt with following guidelines provided in the Ministerial Manual. The 1995 Ministerial Manual states:
            If an MP contacts the Service direct on a day-to-day matter of concern to a specific constituent of his/hers, the Service is authorised to deal with the MP's request directly.
          However, if an MP requests information of a broad nature relating to the Service's activities or administration, the person making the request should be asked to refer the request to the Minister's Parliamentary Liaison Officer.

      *525 WILSON PARK CONTAMINATION—Mr Photios asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
          (1) Is he aware of the contamination by previous use of Wilson Park on the Parramatta River at Silverwater?
          (2) What plans has the Government to remediate this site?
          (3) What plans has the Auburn Council to remediate this site with State assistance?
          (4) Will the State Government assist in opening the park for passive recreational use along the foreshores of the Parramatta River?

Page 1022
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) Money has been allocated by the Government to remediate this site and the remediation project is being managed by the Olympic Co-ordination Authority.
          (3) While Auburn Council is consulted on the remediation process the responsibility to remediate this site has been assumed by Government.
          (4) When Wilson Park has been remediated it will be open for passive recreational use along the foreshores of the Parramatta River.

      *526 RE-CENTRALISATION ACTUARIALS—Mr Schipp asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—
          (1) Has he indicated that on request he will release the actuarials which support the projected $17 million savings resulting from the re-centralisation of the Department of School Education?
          (2) Will he now release these actuarials?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes. The details have already been released to those who have requested them.
          (2) Yes.

      *527 SYDNEY WATER BOARD CHARGES—Mr Slack-Smith asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          What is the full list of charges made to consumers of the Sydney Water Board together with the quantity of water allowed to be taken in each category?
          Answer—
          Sydney Water, operating under the Water Board (Corporatisation) Act 1994, generates revenues from:
            charges for water, sewerage and stormwater services supplied to properties;
            property tax charges for business properties only—being phased out;
            charges related to water usage and wastewater removal;
            developer contributions;
            trade waste charges for non-domestic discharges into the sewer or stormwater system;
            charges for the provision of miscellaneous goods and services to customers.
          Sydney Water's new two-part tariff system is based on a service charge and a usage charge for households. Consumers pay for all water used and there is no free water allowance for customers under this system, except in special cases which include kidney dialysis machines, public hospitals, public amenities blocks and drinking fountains. The Corporation continues to provide a variety of special schemes available to assist customers whose special circumstances warrant some form of support.
          The Sydney Water Pricing Handbook 1995/96 contains the full list of charges with accompanying notes and is available to all customers. I encourage all interested members to contact Sydney Water to obtain a copy of the handbook.

      *528 RIVER PUMPERS CHARGES—ELECTORATE OF BARWON—Mr Slack-Smith asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—

Page 1023
          What is the full list of fees and water charges applicable to river pumpers on the Macintyre, Gwydir and Namoi Rivers in the electorate of Barwon?
          Answer—
          The Department of Land and Water Conservation informs me that fees and water charges applicable in the electorate of Barwon for the Macintyre, Gwydir and Namoi Rivers are as follows:
          Normal Security Irrigation
            Entitlement charge $2.00 per Ml of licensed entitlement
            Usage charge $1.50 per Ml of water diverted and metered
          High Security Irrigation
            Entitlement charge $3.00 per Ml of licensed high security entitlement
            Usage charge $1.50 per Ml of water diverted and metered
          Town Water Supply
          Entitlement charge $4.50 per Ml of licensed entitlement (includes a $3.00 per Ml entitlement charge and a $1.50 per Ml usage charge whether diverted or not)
          State water management charge $1.35 per Ml of licensed entitlement (which will be billed separately in early 1996)
          Industrial Supply
            Entitlement charge $10.00 per Ml of licensed entitlement
          The 1995/96 billing arrangements for regulated surface water users in the Barwon Region are as follows:
          Normal Security Quarterly Account
            November 1995 Bill—Billing period 1 July 1995 to 30 September 1995
              Entitlement Charge$0.50 per Ml of licensed annual entitlement
              plus
              Usage Charge $1.50 per Ml of usage from 1 July 1995 to 30 September 1995
            February 1996 Bill—Billing period 1 October 1995 to 31 December 1995
              Entitlement Charge$0.50 per Ml of licensed annual entitlement
            May 1996 Bill—Billing period 1 January 1996 to 31 March 1996
              Entitlement Charge$0.50 per Ml of licensed annual entitlement
              plus
              Usage Charge $1.50 per Ml of usage from 1 October 1995 to 31 March 1996
            August 1996 Bill—Billing period 1 April 1996 to 30 June 1996
              Entitlement Charge$0.50 per Ml of licensed annual entitlement
              plus
              Usage Charge $1.50 per Ml of usage from 1 April 1996 to 30 June 1996

      *529 GUNIDGERA CREEK LICENCES—L.39177 AND L.23223—Mr Slack-Smith asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
          On what date were Gunidgera Creek Licences L.39177 and L.23223 transferred to Mr P. Redfern from M. & D. Oudenryn?
          Answer—

Page 1024
          The Department of Land and Water Conservation informs me that Licences L.39177 and L.23223 have not been transferred from M.A. and T.M. Oudenryn to Mr P. Redfern. Renewal certificates were mistakenly issued in Mr Redfern's name when he paid the renewal fees for the holders of the licences, but the departmental records have since been corrected.
          Until such time as Mr Redfern has paid the balance of the fee to enable a licence to issue in his name, the two licences will remain in the name of the Oudenryns and will not be transferred.

      *530 BORE LICENCES BOOLCARROL STATION—Mr Slack-Smith asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
          (1) On what dates were the two bore licence applications of Twynam Pastoral Co. lodged in Zone 1 in relation to Boolcarrol Station, Wee Waa?
          (2) Which lands were specified on those applications to be irrigated?
          (3) On what dates were those applications advertised for objections in accordance with the Water Act?
          (4) On what date were the licences issued and what are the licence numbers?
          (5) On what date were the issued licences first refused by commission?
          (6) Why were the licences then issued?
          (7) What circumstances and parts of the Water Act enabled those licence applications to be reviewed past that refusal and embargo date of 18 January 1983?
          Answer—
          (1) 22 January 1975 and 20 September 1983.
          (2) The areas denoted to be irrigated are portions 65, 66 and 67, Parish of Burrendong, County of Jamison.
          (3) The applications were not advertised. Section 113 of the Water Act gives the Water Administration Ministerial Corporation a discretionary power as to whether it advertises applications for works defined under Part V of the Act.
          (4) Bore Licence 90BL102394 was issued on 28 April 1975 and 90BL128768 on 4 November 1983.
          (5) These two licences were not refused.
          (6) Not applicable.
          (7) As already stated, these two licences were not refused. Licence No. 90BL102394 originally authorised a bore to access a property allocation of 980 megalitres. Licence No. 90BL128768 authorised a second bore to access the existing property allocation and fell within policy.

Page 1025

      *531 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Smith asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *532 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Smith asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?

Page 1026
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) The diversion of public resources necessary to answer this question is not justifiable.

      *533 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Smith asked the Minister for Agriculture—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *534 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Smith asked the Minister for Small Business and Regional Development, Minister for Ports, Assistant Minister for Energy and Assistant Minister for State Development—
          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
Page 1027
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?

          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of resources which is not justifiable.

      *535 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Smith asked the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June
              1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's question would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *536 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Smith asked the Minister for Gaming and Racing and Minister Assisting the Premier on Hunter Development—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in his portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
Page 1028
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

      *537 MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET—Mr Smith asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs and Minister for Women—

          (1) (a) How many motor vehicles were owned by the agencies in her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (2) (a) How many motor vehicles were leased by the agencies within her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (3) (a) How many vehicles were involved in motor accidents for the year ending 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the number of vehicles for each agency?
          (4) (a) What is the cost of insurance of the motor vehicles for the agencies in her portfolio as at 30 June 1995?
          (b) What is the total cost of motor vehicle insurance for each agency?
          (5) Which agencies allow their motor vehicles to be:
          (a) Garaged overnight by the drivers at their own premises?
          (b) Garaged over weekends by the drivers at their own premises?
          (6) Which agencies permit the private usage of NSW Government-owned or leased motor vehicles for private purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) 150.
            (b) Department of Fair Trading (Consumer Affairs) 83
              Department of Fair Trading (Building Services) 43
              Department of Fair Trading (Real Estate Services) 24
          (2) (a) 82.
            (b) Department of Fair Trading (Consumer Affairs) 80
              Department for Women 2
          (3) (a) 25.
            (b) Department of Fair Trading (Consumer Affairs) 11
              Department of Fair Trading (Building Services) 12
              Department of Fair Trading (Real Estate Services) 2
          (4) (a) $114,000.
            (b) Department of Fair Trading (Consumer Affairs) $64,977
              Department of Fair Trading (Building Services) $36,900
              Department of Fair Trading (Real Estate Services) $11,428
              Department for Women $695
      (5) (a) and (b) In circumstances where vehicles are used for official purposes or where an agency does not have sufficient parking facilities on site to garage vehicles overnight, approval is given to garage vehicles at the drivers own premises.
Page 1029
              This policy applies to all agencies within the Department of Fair Trading and to the Department for Women.
      (6) (a) and (b) The only vehicles allowed to be used for private purposes are Senior Executive Service vehicles where the cost of the vehicle is part of the negotiated salary package.
              The policy applies to SES officers' vehicles within the Department of Fair Trading and the Department for Women.

      *538 WOODCUTTERS—LICENCES AND RESTRUCTURE PACKAGE—Mr D. L. Page asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
          (1) Has miscellaneous woodcutter Bernard Welsh been advised by State Forests at Narooma that Mr Welsh's licence to cut timber left behind on the forest floor will not be renewed?
          (2) Will Mr Welsh's licence be renewed and a compartment allocated for his operation?
          (3) If not, will miscellaneous woodcutters like Mr Welsh be eligible for assistance under the Government Forest Industry Restructure Adjustment Package?
          (4) If so, what form will that assistance take?
          Answer—
          (1) to (4) Mr Welsh is one of four people originally licensed to cut miscellaneous timbers in Murrah State Forest. Mr Welsh cuts miscellaneous timbers, including fencing timber, from trees which he fells, not from timber left behind on the forest floor. Mr Welsh ceased operations in Murrah State Forest in May 1994 following passage of the Timber Industry (Interim Protection) Act under the previous Government.
          The area being logged was neither within "least sensitive areas" defined in the Eden EIS, nor within areas defined for logging under the Timber Industry (Interim Protection) Amendment Act 1994. Furthermore, an environmental consultant recommended that these areas be placed under moratorium to protect koalas. Consequently, the activities were halted by State Forests.
          Mr Welsh has been working elsewhere since cutting was halted in Murrah State Forest. I am informed that State Forests has not advised Mr Welsh that his timber licence would not be renewed.
          The Narooma District Forester will be discussing with Mr Welsh and other affected licensees what options are available, including the possibility of supplying miscellaneous timbers following integrated logging operations in areas available for logging under the Timber Industry (Interim Protection) Act.
          If Mr Welsh's business is adversely affected by the current Government's forestry reforms, and not by the previous Government's actions, he will be eligible for assistance measures contained in the Government's forest industry restructuring package. Details of criteria and assistance measures for employees, contractors and businesses within the forestry industry may be obtained from the Forestry Structural Adjustment Unit within the Department of Land and Water Conservation.

Page 1030

      21 NOVEMBER 1995

      (Paper No. 26)

      *539 NATIONAL PARKS—ELECTORATE OF CLARENCE—Mr Causley asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) Will she guarantee that no new national parks, wilderness areas, State recreation areas or reserves will be created in the electorate of Clarence?
          (2) Can she ensure that the Dalmorton State Forest and the North Washpool State Forest will be preserved for sustainable native forestry?
          Answer—
          (1) No.
          (2) These State forests, like all State forests in eastern New South Wales, are subject to the Government's interim assessment process which is co-ordinated by the Resource and Conservation Assessment Council (RACAC). The outcome of that process is the identification of areas of forest likely to be required for a Comprehensive, Adequate and Representative (CAR) Reserve System. Following interim assessment, the State forests concerned will be subject to joint Commonwealth/State comprehensive regional assessments, also co-ordinated by RACAC, leading ultimately to the establishment of a CAR Reserve System. The RACAC is an independent body and so the Government is not in a position to pre-empt the results of its assessments.

      *540 MINISTERIAL VISITS TO COUNTRY AREAS—Mr Causley asked the Minister for Agriculture—
          (1) What is his budget for ministerial travel for this financial year?
          (2) How often does he intend to visit the head office of the Department in Orange?
          (3) What visits does he plan to country New South Wales carrying out his duty as Minister for Agriculture?
          Answer—
          (1) $34,100.
          (2) As appropriate.
          (3) Regular visits as appropriate.

      *541 FISHERY NUTRIENTS—Mr Causley asked the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries—
          (1) Are the waters which sustain the New South Wales fishery deficient in nutrients necessary for a productive fishery?
          (2) Does mixed quantities of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium damage the food chain so necessary for a productive fishery?

Page 1031
          Answer—
          (1) It is generally recognised that Australia's southeastern oceanic waters are not productive compared with those surrounding other continents because the continental shelf along the southeast coast is relatively narrow and infertile, with little nutrient enrichment from deep ocean upwellings. New South Wales accounts for less than 10 per cent of Australia's fish production. However, fish species in New South Wales waters are quite diverse and support important commercial and recreational fisheries.
          (2) Phosphorus, nitrogen and potassium are natural substances found in our soils and waterways in low concentrations. However, when the levels of these substances become high they can lead to eutrophication, algal blooms and fish kills, and can have other deleterious impacts on aquatic organisms. Any deterioration in water quality has the potential to affect fish resources and fisheries. For specific information I refer you to the Australian Water Quality Guidelines for Fresh and Marine Waters published in 1992 by the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council.

      *542 PUBLIC HOUSING ACCOMMODATION RULES—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) What are the rules or requirements of the Department of Housing in respect of the number of people allowed in its premises for:
            (a) One-bedroom accommodation?
            (b) Two-bedroom accommodation?
            (c) Three-bedroom accommodation?
            (d) Four-bedroom accommodation?
          (2) If none, why not?
          (3) Are tenants of the Department of Housing permitted to have unrelated individuals stay with them?
          (4) If so, what rules or requirements apply?
          Answer—
          (1) (a) One-bedroom accommodation is normally allocated to households containing one person or a couple.
            (b) Two-bedroom accommodation is normally allocated to a couple with one child, a single person with one child, two siblings or two unrelated people.
            (c) Three-bedroom accommodation is normally allocated to a couple with two or three children, a single person with two or three children, three siblings or three unrelated people.
            (d) Four-bedroom accommodation is normally allocated to a couple with four or more children, a single person with four or more children, four siblings or four unrelated people.
          (2) Not applicable.
          (3) Tenants are permitted to have unrelated individuals stay with them.
          (4) The Department may, depending on the individual circumstances of the case, stipulate the period of time that the additional person/s can remain.
          The Department may require the additional occupant/s to contribute to the payment of rent. However, this also is dependent on the individual circumstances of the case.
          In cases where tenants have additional people staying with them, the tenant cannot apply for priority rehousing due to overcrowding of their accommodation.

Page 1032

      *543 PUBLIC HOUSING FIRES—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) How many fires have been reported as occurring in Department of Housing tenanted premises to the year ended 30 June 1995?
          (2) How many of the fires involved fatalities?
          (3) How many of these fires involved the hospitalisation of individuals?
          (4) How many of these fires have been identified as being caused by:
            (a) Arson?
            (b) Domestic disputes?
            (c) Electrical faults?
            (d) Other causes?
          (5) How many fires have left premises in an uninhabitable condition?
          (6) What was the cost to the Department of Housing of restoring fire-damaged premises?
          (7) What is the estimated cost of installing smoke detectors in:
            (a) New housing stock?
            (b) Existing housing stock?
          Answer—
          (1) 581 reported fires have occurred in departmental dwellings during the 1994/95 financial year.
          (2) No fatalities occurred in those 581 fires.
          (3) Data on the numbers of people hospitalised as a result of those fires is not kept by the NSW Fire Brigades or Department of Housing. It is known that 68 people were injured in the fires and some of these required hospitalisation.
          (4) (a) Fires caused by arson—NSW Fire Brigades reports indicate that 117 fires may have resulted from arson, but this could not be proven in most cases.
            (b) Fires caused by domestic disputes—neither the NSW Fire Brigades nor the Department of Housing can separately identify fires caused from this source with certainty. Such fires would be included in those caused by arson.
            (c) Fires caused by electrical faults—44 fires are believed to have resulted from faults in electrical wiring, fuse boxes, switchboards and outlets.
            (d) Fires from other causes—420 fires had other causes; the most predominant single cause is fire resulting from cooking.
          (5) Fires leaving premises uninhabitable—this information is not directly available from the NSW Fire Brigades or Department of Housing data during the 1994/95 year. It is estimated that 158 fires left the affected dwelling in a temporarily uninhabitable condition.
          (6) The cost to the Department of Housing of restoring fire-damaged premises is estimated at $3.9 million, based on dwelling data for which detailed costs of repair work are known.
          (7) Supply and installation costs for hard-wired smoke detectors in Department dwellings are estimated at:
            (a) $80 per new dwelling.
            (b) Typically $250 for existing dwellings, depending on building type.
          The total cost of installation may be up to $42 million. Further costs of $3 million per year are anticipated for ongoing maintenance of these detectors.

Page 1033

      *544 TRIP TO KOREA AND JAPAN—Mr Humpherson asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—
          (1) How much has he budgeted for overseas travel for himself and his entourage this financial year?
          (2) How much did his trip to Korea and Japan cost?
          (3) Who went with him?
          (4) How much did it cost for the entourage to stay at the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo?
          (5) How many nights did he stay there?
          (6) Which rooms did he stay in?
          (7) How much did it cost for the entourage to stay at the Hyatt in Seoul?
          (8) How many nights did he stay there?
          (9) Which rooms did he stay in?
          (10) On what date did he first seek an appointment with the Japanese Prime Minister?
          Answer—
          (1) There is no specific amount budgeted for overseas travel by the Premier and support staff. Overseas travel undertaken because it is a priority commitment is funded from the relevant program in the appropriation to the Premier covered by the 1995 Appropriation Act.
          (2) Total costs Korea and Japan:
              Airfares— $23,711.20
              *Cost—Korea $18,862.47
              *Cost—Japan $59,333.89
            * These represent costs of accommodation for the Premier and Mrs Carr, Mr Wedderburn, Mr Harkins and performing group "ARIEL". They also include the cost of State functions as return hospitality to meet our obligation under the sister State relationships with Seoul and Tokyo.
          (3) The official delegation included:
            Mrs Carr.
              Mr Ken Cripps, Commissioner, Public Employment Office (Korea only).
              Mr Graeme Wedderburn, Senior Press Secretary to the Premier.
              Mr Michael Harkins MVO, Assistant Director of Protocol and Visit Co-ordinator.
            Performing Group "ARIEL" arranged through the Ministry for the Arts as a cultural exchange comprising:
              Mr Michael Atherton.
              Mr Riley Lee.
              Mr Matthew Doyle.
            Media Party:
              Mr Brad Schmitt, Channel 9.
              Mr Paul Mullins, Channel 10.
              Mr Jim Maher, Channel 7.
              Mr John Larkin, News Limited.
              Ms Laura Woolf, Radio 2GB.
              Mr Chris Maher, Radio 2UE.
              Mr Joseph O'Sullivan, TV camera operator.
              Mr Craig Pickersgill, TV sound operator.
          (4) Costs met by New South Wales to stay at Imperial Hotel Tokyo—$1,818.67.
          (5) 4 nights.
          (6) A suite paid for by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government.
Page 1034
          (7) Cost to stay at Hotel Shilla, Seoul—$7,846.20.
          (8) 3 nights.
          (9) A 2-room suite.
          (10) The appointment with the Japanese Prime Minister was not sought by the Premier. The Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs initiated the appointment. The meeting was confirmed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in writing. The Prime Minister cancelled all appointments on the appointed day.

      *546 EPA—EXECUTIVE RESTRUCTURE—Mr Longley asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) What period of time elapsed between when Dr Colin Grant was first advised of his termination and when he was required to leave office as Executive Director of Technical Services for the EPA?
          (2) Why was longer notice not given?
          (3) When will the executive restructure of the EPA be finished?
          Answer—
          (1) These events occurred on the same day.
          (2) Consistent with the Public Sector Management Act requirements, Dr Grant could not be advised of his termination until the Executive Council had determined the matter. I understand Dr Grant has now accepted a position as Executive Director, Environment Planning Estate Management, with the Olympic Co-ordination Authority.
          (3) The final date is dependent on the recruitment process.

      *547 WINDMILL HILL PROPERTIES—Ms Machin asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) Did the Department at any time previously identify two properties at Windmill Hill, Port Macquarie, as desirable for purchase under the Coastal Lands Protection Scheme?
          (2) If so, why has the position changed?
          (3) Is it the desire of the Department to acquire these sites in future as funding permits?
          Answer—
          (1) Lots 14 and 15 on DP560259, Nos 4 and 6 Pacific Drive, Port Macquarie, were designated "Acquisition Essential" under the Coastal Lands Protection Scheme on 16 May 1978 along with adjoining lots which were subsequently bought in 1979.
          (2) When assessed against the criteria for the Coastal Lands Protection Scheme, these two houses in Port Macquarie, whilst being designated for acquisition under the Coastal Lands Protection Scheme, do not meet the criteria for acquisition. They are not essential for public recreation or to provide access to the coast. In addition, given the cost involved in purchasing these properties, their purchase was not recommended.
          (3) Given the recent determination that the properties do not meet the criteria under the Coastal Lands Protection Scheme, it is not anticipated that the Department would consider acquiring these sites.

Page 1035

      *548 HURLSTONE AGRICULTURAL HIGH SCHOOL—Mr Schultz asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—
          (1) Are there plans to resume 15 per cent of Hurlstone Agricultural High School for rail purposes?
          (2) (a) Will sporting facilities be lost as a result?
            (b) If so, which ones?
          (3) What consideration has been given to the noise impact of trains in close proximity to the school students and boarders?
          (4) Will the school lose 12 hectares of land used for educational purposes in dairying, irrigation and broadacre farming?
          (5) Will a new $1/4 million dam be lost?
          (6) What consideration was given to vacant land on the southern side of Hurlstone Agricultural High School for rail purposes?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) The State Rail Authority had proposed the acquisition of approximately 9 hectares at Hurlstone Agricultural High School as part of several proposed railworks in the vicinity of the school including a rail link to Badgerys Creek Airport.
          Following meetings between State Rail, the Department of School Education and representatives of Hurlstone Agricultural High School, a modified proposal is being developed by State Rail.
          The impact of the proposal is yet to be determined.
          A decision will be made following further consultation.

      *549 AGE CARE THERAPY UNIT—ROYAL NORTH SHORE AND GREENWICH HOSPITALS—Mrs Skinner asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
          (1) Is the Age Care Therapy Unit based at Royal North Shore Hospital still to be closed?
          (2) If it is to be relocated to Greenwich Hospital, when will the funds be made available to upgrade Greenwich Hospital and where will they come from?
          (3) (a) Are domiciliary beds at Greenwich Hospital being reduced to make room for the Rehabilitation and Aged Care Unit?
            (b) If so, how many and what effect will this have on families of patients requiring domiciliary care?
          Answer—
          (1) The Unit closed at Royal North Shore Hospital on 8 August 1995 and opened at Greenwich on 11 August. The Unit is fully utilised and integrated into the comprehensive network of aged care services in the Lower North Shore.
          (2) Any minor changes required will be funded from the operating funds of Greenwich Hospital.
          (3) (a) No beds were closed to make room for the Unit. The number of beds had previously been reduced due to under-utilisation and the resources used for community-based rehabilitation services.
            (b) There has been no reduction in the number of patients admitted to the hospital and no significant delays have occurred in admitting patients to Greenwich Hospital.

      22 NOVEMBER 1995

      (Paper No. 27)

Page 1036

      *553 COMMERCIAL FISHING ADVISORY COUNCIL—Mr Causley asked the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries—
          (1) Does he support the democratically elected Commercial Fishing Advisory Council?
          (2) Are his ministerial appointed advisory committees intended to undermine the Commercial Fishing Advisory Council?
          (3) Are there any plans to change the method of election for the Commercial Fishing Advisory Council representatives?
          (4) If so, what will the changes be?
          Answer—
          (1) The Commercial Fishing Advisory Council was established under the Fisheries Management Act 1994 to provide advice to the Minister. I support the need for such an advisory body.
          (2) The recently appointed fishery steering committees have been formed for a specific purpose, to assist my Department to write discussion papers and draft management plans for the currently unmanaged commercial fisheries. The steering committees in no way undermine CFAC—in fact CFAC was requested to provide nominations for these committees.
          (3) So that I can implement the Government's pre-election policy on this matter, I have requested the Director of Fisheries, Dr John Glaister, to undertake a review of the existing CFAC structure in consultation with the commercial fishing industry. Once that review is complete, and if changes to the method of election are proposed, I will notify Parliament accordingly.
          (4) Refer to (3) above.

      *554 CONTAMINATED SITES REGISTER—Mr Longley asked the Minister for the Environment—
          Will she establish a contaminated sites register for New South Wales accessible by the public?
          Answer—
          Mechanisms for the gathering, recording and dissemination of information concerning contaminated land in New South Wales will be defined through the review of the legislative and administrative framework for contaminated land.
          This review is currently being undertaken and will also ensure that information is publicly accessible in a readily understood form which allow informed decision-making.

      *555 NPWS—REGIONAL STAFF REMOVALS—Mr Longley asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) Of the 59 positions removed across the NPWS, how many come from each of the Southern, Central, Northern and Western Regions, and Head Office of the NPWS?
          (2) Are there any other reductions in staff which have occurred or are proposed for the NPWS?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Director-General of the National Parks and Wildlife Service that:
          (1) Over half of the positions removed from the National Parks and Wildlife Service were located at head office. This is in keeping with Government policy to reduce staff in the corporate service, SES and advertising. The remaining positions were removed across all regions (Southern 8, Central 7, Northern 5 and Western 6).
          However it should be remembered that the Government's commitment to the environment, detailed in the lead-up to the March 1995 election, will result in a net increase of over 100 staff for the National Parks and Wildlife Service.
Page 1037
          (2) During 1995/96, no further reductions are anticipated.

      *556 SCHOOLS FUNDING—ELECTORATE OF NORTHCOTT—Mr O'Farrell asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—
          What funds have been allocated each year for:
            (a) capital purposes; and
            (b) recurrent purposes;
          for each Government school in the electorate of Northcott for the period 1987/88 to 1994/95?
          Answer—
          The Department of School Education's finance system captures expenditure on a line item and functional basis for core, equity, strategic, educational support and non-Government education services rather than on an individual school basis. Hence, the detailed information sought by the honourable member cannot readily be extracted from the Department's finance system.
          In respect of capital expenditure, I am advised that individual school details are not available for the 1987/88 financial year. Details of capital expenditure on an individual school basis are shown in the table below.
          Recurrent funding allocated to individual schools is not available for the years prior to 1991/92. The recurrent expenditure shown in the table represents the global funding grants allocated directly to schools since 1991/92. The 1991/92 financial year was the first year in which global school grants were provided to all schools following the initial trial period which occurred in 1988/89 and 1989/90.
          There are other miscellaneous grants paid to schools which are not aggregated and cannot be obtained on a school-by-school basis. The table would therefore represent a minimum funding situation. It should also be recognised that permanent teacher and ancillary staff salaries are paid centrally and funds are not allocated to schools for this purpose.


age 1038
        School1988/891989/901990/911991/921992/931993/941994/95
        Capital
        $
        Recurrent
        $
        Capital
        $
        Recurrent
        $
        Capital
        $
        Recurrent
        $
        Capital
        $Recurrent
        $Capital
        $Recurrent
        $Capital
        $Recurrent
        $Capital
        $Recurrent
        $
        Beecroft P.S.10,587N/A16,265N/A211,568N/A3,225129,3268,138128,87813,700133,44926,267136,108
        Normanhurst P.S.33,983N/A7,620N/A330,618N/A175,67054,97310,82154,3928,96358,63011,22359,978
        Pennant Hills P.S.23,614N/A44,737N/A31,210N/A16,52276,6155,63774,001371,29778,4616,93183,461
        Warrawee P.S.34,350N/A15,225N/A15,731N/A21,83964,47610,13682,242486,19184,69726,36387,926
        Normanhurst West P.S.120,101N/A14,401N/A132,282N/A582,93364,721112,76371,8157,18973,0655,56373,271
        Thornleigh West P.S.26,539N/A10,296N/A138,188N/A6,107105,8938,958106,38324,628110,5178,291111,754
        John Purchase P.S.13,881N/A11,515N/A56,788N/A10,662133,503452,628136,63531,197139,50213,173144,515
        Hornsby South P.S.29,829N/A8,829N/A231,983N/A407,34261,66937,61359,0029,95658,0386,18357,813
        Ormond SSP9,847N/A2,817N/A2,700N/A2,32331,0871,91631,1846,47132,2734,23839,426
        Clarke Road SSP23,662N/A77,843N/A31,807N/A3,18947,87510,30254,0775,36053,86684,76856,614
        Hornsby Girls’ H.S.31,244N/A19,622N/A139,874N/A39,861201,41365,984194,48724,853202,32126,546209,245
        Cheltenham Girls’ H.S.31,049N/A21,576N/A389,515N/A44,465299,76175,425305,08952,114317,04316,247333,169
        Normanhurst Boys’ H.S.221,045N/A16,290N/A51,987N/A24,850189,28955,451183,713840,741184,18234,050188,391
        Pennant Hills H.S.659,350N/A1,076,806N/A1,131,635N/A353,521343,61043,020344,68416,835360,817476,402369,306
        Cherrybrook Technology H.S.9,408N/A333,714N/A7,834,855N/A9,171,000151,860286,283235,02249,983276,16217,529311,524
        TOTAL1,278,489N/A1,677,556N/A10,730,741N/A10,863,5091,956,0711,185,0752,061,6041,949,4782,163,023763,7742,262,501


age 1039

      *557 COWARD FAMILY WATER LICENCE APPLICATION—Mr Slack-Smith asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
          (1) Has a report been finalised on the water licence application by the Coward family?
          (2) When will the Coward family be advised of the recommendations of the report?
          Answer—
          (1) A report has been submitted to me and I am presently reviewing it.
          (2) When I have reviewed the report, I will then decide what is the most appropriate way of dealing with any of the findings of the report.

      23 NOVEMBER 1995

      (Paper No. 28)

      *558 FORBES—PUBLIC SECTOR JOBS—Mr Armstrong asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—
          Why has a total of 36 positions from various departments (State Emergency Service Headquarters; Education Resource Centre; Department of Land and Water Conservation; Department of Education and Training, with cuts to programs such as Workplace, Get Started and Mature Workers; Community Services and Housing) have been taken from the town of Forbes and why Forbes has been forced to bear the biggest cuts in this region?
          Answer—
          I am advised by the Minister for Education and Training that the Education Resource Centre operating in Forbes will close in January 1996 as part of the restructure of the Department designed to provide professional education support services closer to students and teachers. A district office has been established in Orange to provide these direct support services to schools. The office will have an establishment of 22.
          The Minister advises that the Education Resource Centre at Forbes had a staff of two SES positions, the removal of which is in line with the Government's policy to reduce excessive SES levels and two public service positions with four temporary teaching service positions and two temporary clerks engaged on a day-to-day basis. Redeployment assistance for permanent officers is under way while the teaching service persons are being reappointed to new positions and the Home School Liaison Officer will continue to operate from Gooloogong Public School.
          The Department of Training and Education Co-ordination has not operated an office at Forbes.
          Allocations have been provided to run labour market programs and related training programs to the value of over $200,000 in the Forbes/Parkes district in 1995/96.
          I am advised by the Minister for Land and Water Conservation that staffing of the former Department of Conservation and Land Management and former Department of Water Resources in the town of Forbes numbered 36 positions.
          With the establishment of the Department of Land and Water Conservation some regional positions were duplicated.
          The new Department's structure includes 34 positions in the town of Forbes.
          Forbes remains a high priority for the Department's focus in the region.
          I am also advised by the Minister for Emergency Services that the decision to relocate the Lachlan Divisional Headquarters and its two staff from Forbes to Parkes was based on sound operational reasons.
Page 1040
          It is the view of the Director-General of the State Emergency Service that the Lachlan Division can better serve all the people of the region by relocating to Parkes.
          The decision to relocate the Divisional Headquarters was in fact approved by the former Minister for Police and Emergency Services, Gary West, M.P.

      *559 TOURISM COMMISSIONER—Mr Armstrong asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Tourism—
          Following the resignation of Mr Wolfgang Grimm, who will be the new Commissioner responsible for the Central West tourism area?
          Answer—
          Mr Sam Fiszman, A.M., O.A.M. (Chair).

      *561 CRONULLA UNDERWATER OUTFALL—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—

          (1) Who are the members of the review panel to consider Sydney Water's proposal for an underwater outfall at Cronula?
          (2) What are their qualifications?
          (3) When is the review panel to report?
          (4) Will he make the report public?
          (5) Will he undertake to allow the community to be properly consulted before a decision is made?
          (6) Will cost be the principal factor in determining which option is preferred?
          (7) (a) Has he reviewed an instruction from the Premier following his recent trip to Japan to use advanced Australian technology to achieve 100 per cent tertiary treatment in lieu of ocean outfalls?
          (b) If so, why does he not proceed to 100 per cent tertiary treatment in this case?
          Answer—
          (1) Professor Paul Greenfield, Dr Alan Mearns, Dr Graeme Batley, Mr Ian Law.
          (2) Professor Greenfield is Professor of Chemical Engineering and Pro Vice Chancellor (Physical Sciences and Engineering) at the University of Queensland. His areas of research expertise include waste water and environmental management and biochemical engineering.
          Dr Mearns is Senior Ecologist with the Hazardous Materials Response and Assessment Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Seattle, Washington. His research activities include planning and co-ordinating national and U.S. west coast marine pollution and monitoring programs, developing strategies for marine sewage and sludge disposal and co-ordinating research on the biological effects of oil spills clean-up methods.
          Dr Batley is a Chief Research Scientist with CSIRO and heads the Centre for Advanced Analytical Chemistry within the Division of Coal and Energy Technology. His area of research is the fate and impacts of trace metal and organic contaminants in natural water systems, based on the development and application of novel techniques for ultratrace analysis.
          Mr Law is the Industry Manager of the Environmental Division of the CMPS&F group of companies and, as such, is responsible for promoting and developing the company's technical excellence in its environmental services. His particular expertise lies in water and waste water treatment, in particular, nutrient removal, advanced water re-use applications and environmental studies.
          (3) The panel is expected to report in January 1996.
          (4) Yes.
Page 1041
          (5) The community have been part of an extensive process of consultation over the past 12 months. There will be further opportunities for community input when the EIS is displayed in February 1996.
          (6) Cost alone will not determine the final option. The preferred option will be the one which best satisfies all the environmental and community requirements at the most affordable cost to the community.
          (7) (a) and (b) Tertiary treatment alone will not provide the outcome the community requires from the upgrade.

      *562 "CARING FOR HEALTH" PUBLICATION—Mr Humpherson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
          (1) Did he launch a Department of Health document in November 1995 entitled "Caring for Health"?
          (2) (a) Has the Director-General of the Department of Health received advice from the Auditor-General of New South Wales that the newsletter may exhibit "party-political characteristics"?
            (b) On what date was the advice received?
          (3) (a) Which employee(s) wrote the document?
          (b) What are their titles and positions?
          (4) What was the cost of the publication?
          (5) How many copies were published?
          (6) To whom was the publication distributed?
          (7) Who printed the publication?
          (8) What is the printer's name and address?
          (9) (a) Were tenders called for the printing?
          (b) If not, why not?
          (10) (a) Who authorised payment of the publication invoices?
          (b) On what date?
          (11) (a) Has reimbursement been made for the cost of the newsletter invoices by the Australian Labor Party (NSW Branch)?
          (b) For what amount?
          (c) On what date?
          (12) To which account was the reimbursement credited?
          (13) (a) Were ministerial staff used to collate or write the material for the publication?
          (b) Are those staff remunerated from public funds?
          (c) Has any reimbursement been made for the cost of this staff time?
          (d) If not, why not?
          (14) What action has been taken by him to prevent party-political material from being used in Health Department publications?

Page 1042
          Answer—
          (1) I launched "Caring for Health: Equity, Efficiency and Quality: The NSW Government's Economic Statement for Health" on 26 October 1995.
          (2) (a) I am informed that the Director-General of the Health Department has received a letter from the Auditor-General of NSW indicating the Auditor-General's opinion that his "reading of the document indicates that it seeks, on a number of occasions, to convey party political messages about this and former Governments".
            (b) The letter from the Auditor-General was dated 24 November 1995 and was received by the Health Department on 28 November 1995.
      (3) (a) and (b) A steering committee was involved in preparing advice for the "Economic Statement for Health". The document was prepared by officers of the Department and comment was received from the Minister's Office.
          (4) and (5) I am informed by the Department that 6,000 copies were published at a calculated cost of $1.19 per copy.
          (6) The publication was distributed to all Area Health Service Chief Executive Officers and their staff, District Health Service General Managers and their staff, members of each division within the Central Office of the Department of Health. It is available on request.
          (7) Fullpoint Graphics Pty Ltd which subcontracted to ATC Printing Pty Ltd.
          (8) Fullpoint Graphics, 4 Highlands Avenue, Gordon; ACT Printing, 210 George Street, Sydney.
      (9) (a) and (b) As the cost was under $20,000 it was not necessary to tender for this publication. However, as it was over $1,000 it was necessary to call for three quotes and the printer with the cheapest quote was used.
          (10) (a) Ms Deborah Hyland, Director, Health Public Affairs.
            (b) The invoice was signed on 3 November 1995.
          (11) (a) No.
            (b) and (c) Not applicable.
          (12) Not applicable.
          (13) (a) Refer to answer (3) (a).
            (b) Yes.
            (c) No.
            (d) Reimbursement of the costs of Ministerial staff related to the preparation of the document is not required.
          (14) The Acting Director-General has advised me that processes are being established to ensure that departmental officers are not involved in the preparation or provision of party political statements or material. I have carefully considered this matter and will take account of these processes.

      *563 VACANT DEPARTMENTAL POSITIONS—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Police representing the Attorney General and Minister for Industrial Relations—
          (1) What is the number of vacant positions currently held by each Department/Corporation within his portfolio administration?
          (2) What is the grading, job title, position description (briefly) and location of each vacant position?
Page 1043
          (3) Of these positions—
          (a) Which positions will be filled either by:
          (i) acting/higher duties allowance?
          (ii) secondment?
          (iii) internal advertising?
      (iv) media advertising?
          (b) Which positions will be declared excess to Departmental/Corporation staffing requirements?
          (4) What is the number of positions likely to become vacant in the near future or before 31 December 1995 in each Department/Corporation?
          (5) What is the grading, job title, position description (briefly) and location of each position?
          (6) Of these positions—
          (a) Which positions will be filled either by:
          (i) acting/higher duties allowance?
          (ii) secondment?
          (iii) internal advertising?
          (iv) media advertising?
          (b) Which positions will be declared excess to Departmental/Corporation staffing requirements?
          Answer—
          The Attorney General has advised me that the answers are:
          (1) to (6) The diversion of public resources necessary to answer this question is not justifiable.

      *564 VACANT DEPARTMENTAL POSITIONS—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) What is the number of vacant positions currently held by each Department/Corporation within her portfolio administration?
          (2) What is the grading, job title, position description (briefly) and location of each vacant position?
          (3) Of these positions—
          (a) Which positions will be filled either by:
          (i) acting/higher duties allowance?
          (ii) secondment?
          (iii) internal advertising?
          (iv) media advertising?
          (b) Which positions will be declared excess to Departmental/Corporation staffing requirements?
          (4) What is the number of positions likely to become vacant in the near future or before 31 December 1995 in each Department/Corporation?
          (5) What is the grading, job title, position description (briefly) and location of each position?
          (6) Of these positions—
          (a) Which positions will be filled either by:
          (i) acting/higher duties allowance?
          (ii) secondment?
          (iii) internal advertising?
          (iv) media advertising?
          (b) Which positions will be declared excess to Departmental/Corporation staffing requirements?

Page 1044
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable

      *565 VACANT DEPARTMENTAL POSITIONS—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Education and Training—

          (1) What is the number of vacant positions currently held by each Department/Corporation within his portfolio administration?
          (2) What is the grading, job title, position description (briefly) and location of each vacant position?
          (3) Of these positions—
          (a) Which positions will be filled either by:
          (i) acting/higher duties allowance?
          (ii) secondment?
          (iii) internal advertising?
          (iv) media advertising?
          (b) Which positions will be declared excess to Departmental/Corporation staffing requirements?
          (4) What is the number of positions likely to become vacant in the near future or before 31 December 1995 in each Department/Corporation?
          (5) What is the grading, job title, position description (briefly) and location of each position?
          (6) Of these positions—
          (a) Which positions will be filled either by:
          (i) acting/higher duties allowance?
          (ii) secondment?
          (iii) internal advertising?
          (iv) media advertising?
          (b) Which positions will be declared excess to Departmental/Corporation staffing requirements?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) Diversion of public resources in order to answer this question is not considered appropriate.

      *566 VACANT DEPARTMENTAL POSITIONS—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—

          (1) What is the number of vacant positions currently held by each Department/Corporation within his portfolio administration?
          (2) What is the grading, job title, position description (briefly) and location of each vacant position?
Page 1045
          (3) Of these positions—
          (a) Which positions will be filled either by:
          (i) acting/higher duties allowance?
          (ii) secondment?
          (iii) internal advertising?
      (iv) media advertising?
          (b) Which positions will be declared excess to Departmental/Corporation staffing requirements?
          (4) What is the number of positions likely to become vacant in the near future or before 31 December 1995 in each Department/Corporation?
          (5) What is the grading, job title, position description (briefly) and location of each position?
          (6) Of these positions—
          (a) Which positions will be filled either by:
          (i) acting/higher duties allowance?
          (ii) secondment?
          (iii) internal advertising?
          (iv) media advertising?
          (b) Which positions will be declared excess to Departmental/Corporation staffing requirements?
          Answer—
          (1) to (6) The diversion of public resources necessary to answer this question is not justifiable.

      *567 CONTRACT INFORMATION—Mr Longley asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) What was the approximate cost to the public of providing information requested in Question on Notice No. 282 in relation to certain contracts?
          (2) Who undertook the cost estimate?
          (3) When was the cost estimate done?
          (4) Who decided that this cost was not justifiable?
          (5) On what basis was this decision made?
          Answer—
          (1) to (5) The cost of assessing the cost to the public of providing the information requested would divert staff away from undertaking essential tasks and achieving better environmental protection in the State.

      *568 ADMINISTRATIVE APPEALS TRIBUNAL—Ms Machin asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—
          (1) When will he establish an administrative appeals tribunal?
          (2) What matters will such a tribunal hear?
          (3) Will appeals be back-dated to the time of the swearing-in of the Government in April 1995?

Page 1046
          Answer—
          (1) The Government is currently reviewing proposals for the establishment of an administrative appeals tribunal and intends to introduce legislation in 1996.
          (2) The extent of the tribunal's jurisdiction has yet to be finally determined, however it is anticipated that the tribunal will have the power to review the merits and undertake judicial review of specified administrative decisions. A number of existing tribunals will be amalgamated into the tribunal.
          (3) No.

      *569 APPOINTMENT OF Mr BARRY O'MARA—Ms Machin asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs and Minister for Women—
          (1) Did she recently appoint Mr Barry Joseph O'Mara as a part-time referee on the Building Disputes Tribunal?
          (2) Was Mr O'Mara named in the Building Royal Commission?
          (3) Why did she make this appointment?
          Answer—
          (1) The appointments of all part-time Building Disputes Tribunals referees, including that of Mr O'Mara, expired on 31 October 1995. Recruitment action had been commenced as all the positions were declared vacant after that date but had not been finalised. To allow the recruitment action to be finalised, the appointments, including Mr O'Mara's, were extended until 15 December 1995. These appointments have now been finalised and Mr O'Mara was not reappointed.
          (2) Yes, in relation to activities of the Master Builders Association (MBA) during Mr O'Mara's presidency of the MBA. The Royal Commission did not make any recommendation concerning action against Mr O'Mara.
          (3) See the answer to question (1).

      *570 BUILDING COMPANY COLLAPSES—Ms Machin asked the Minister for Consumer Affairs and Minister for Women—
          (1) Did three building companies collapse in Port Macquarie in the last year?
          (2) Was one director or individual involved in more than one of these companies?
          (3) What assistance will be provided to consumers and subcontractors affected by these collapses?
          (4) What action will she take to protect consumers and suppliers against such company collapses in future?
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) Yes. One individual was a director of one company and apparently an employee of a second company.
Page 1047
          (3) Consumers who contract with a licensed builder are covered under the Comprehensive Insurance Scheme administered by the Department of Fair Trading.
          The Department also provides a free legal consultation to assist consumers to make informed decisions regarding their contractual position in these matters. Subcontractors have limited cover under the insurance scheme subject to certain conditions.
          (4) The formation of the Department of Fair Trading will result in effective use of resources to implement consumer education programs to ensure that consumers are able to make informed decisions in their selection of contractors. The Department's Home Building Advisory Centres liaise with consumers and industry on a local basis and can provide an early warning of possible builder failures. The centres also provide personal local assistance to consumers.

      *571 PACIFIC HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENTS—Mr Souris asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
          What improvements and when will they be made to the following sections of the Pacific Highway:
          (1) The section from Murwillumbah to the Byron Bay turn off especially the sections at Yelgun, Burringbar, the approach to Murwillumbah and from Brunswick Heads to Tyagarah?
          (2) Tintenbar to Ballina?
          (3) Wardell to Broadwater?
          (4) Tyndale to Cowper and Cowper to South Grafton?
          (5) Coffs Harbour to Repton especially at Bonville?
          (6) Urunga and 5 km south of Urunga?
          (7) Bellimbopinni, especially the road through Frederickton?
          Answer—
          (1) to (7) The timing for all future projects on the Pacific Highway is being reviewed following the Commonwealth Government’s offer to contribute $75 million per year for 10 years to works on the road. A revised program of works for the Highway is being prepared by the Roads and Traffic Authority.

      *572 SOCIAL PROGRAM POLICY—Dr Macdonald asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—
          (1) Can he advise whether his commitment to public reporting of the results of implementing Stage 1 of a social program policy for government trading enterprises has been implemented?
          (2) Can he advise whether, as per his commitment, consultation with non-government organisations on the evaluation of social programs and identification of appropriate “purchasing Ministers” has begun?
          (3) Can he advise what role and resources the Department of Community Services will have to evaluate the individual social programs and hardship relief schemes available to low-income customers of utilities, and to manage them as an integrated program over time?

Page 1048
          Answer—
          (1) Yes, in Budget Paper No. 2 (page 4-152 and Table 4.8).
          (2) The full implementation of Stage II of the social program policy, including evaluation of social programs and identification of appropriate "purchasing ministers", is currently under consideration by the Government. Therefore, consultations with non-Government organisations on these matters has not begun. When the Government has determined its position of Stage II, as I have already promised, there will be full consultation with relevant non-Government organisations, and I look forward to their contribution to this process.
          (3) Until the Government has come to a decision on the implementation of Stage II of the policy, it is not possible to advise what role and resources the Department of Community Services will have to evaluate or manage social programs and hardship relief schemes.

      5 DECEMBER 1995

      (Paper No. 29)

      *573 WAVERLEY-WOOLLAHRA PROCESS PLANT—Mr Longley asked the Minister for the Environment—
          (1) Did she make an election promise to the Greens to close the Waverley-Woollahra Process Plant (WWPP)?
          (2) Was the Eastern Suburbs Waste Management Inquiry Committee (ESWMIC) therefore set up to ensure the closure of the WWPP?
          (3) (a) Has this committee now met 12 times over 5 months, with more than 20 participants at each fortnightly meeting?
          (b) What has been the cost to the EPA and individual councils?
          (4) (a) Why did she introduce the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill 1995 and the Waste Reforms paper through the EPA 2 weeks prior to the date set for the ESWMIC to report, that being 1 December 1995?
          (b) Have the objectives of the ESWMIC now been superseded by this legislation?
          (5) (a) Are there any additional benefits that could arise from the committee findings?
          (b) Have there been any predetermined outcomes?
          (6) (a) On what date does she anticipate making a statement regarding the closure of the WWPP?
          (b) On what date does she plan to close the plant?
          (7) (a) Does she intend to renew the waste depot licence of the WWPP which is due for renewal on 1 January 1996?
          (b) Has application been made by the plant to the EPA?
          (8) What amount of compensation is planned for the public owners of this legal and authorised business?
          (9) What alternative arrangements will then be made for the disposal of the 135,000 tonnes of putrescible waste from the City of Sydney, South Sydney City, Waverley, Woollahra, Randwick and Botany, and the quarantine waste from the Federal Airports Corporation that is currently disposed of through the WWPP each year?
          (10) (a) Does she consider landfill to be a preferable alternative to modern technology such as waste-to-energy plants?
          (b) If so, on what basis is her decision made?
Page 1049
          (11) Do any overseas studies and findings identify waste-to-energy emission standards as being far higher than any current New South Wales emission limits?
          (12) With the expansion of landfill sites around Sydney, will there be serious emission and leaching problems in the future?
          (13) (a) Where would she anticipate locating the proposed cluster parks?
          (b) Are Randwick (Bunnerong Power Station) and Botany Bay sites being considered?
          (14) Does the current proposal mean that cluster parks will also be transfer stations?
          (15) If more waste has to go to landfill from the cluster parks, has the issue of additional transportation damage to the environment and associated costs been considered?
          (16) (a) Will all of the waste minimisation and recycling strategies be in place by the year 2000?
          (b) Would it be feasible to have cluster park concepts in place within 5 years?
          (c) If not, how does she see this impacting on the "green" theme of the Olympics?
          Answer—
          (1) The Government has indicated in its policy statements that incineration is not a favoured form of waste disposal.
          (2) The Eastern Suburbs Waste Management Inquiry was established to systematically examine alternative means to dispose of the waste currently being disposed of at the incinerator.
          (3) The Committee Membership and Meeting Schedule was such as to ensure that all councils currently using the incinerator and other key stakeholders had the opportunity to fully consider the alternative waste management options.
          (4) The EPA and the Minister for the Environment received regular information on the progress of the inquiry and advice on the issues that the committee felt should be addressed in the new waste legislation.
          (5) to (16) The final report of the inquiry is expected to assess the broad range of issues associated with alternative management of waste going to the incinerator and to propose time-frames for new initiatives. The report will inform future policy and licensing decisions.

      *574 HILTON JONES COMPLAINT—Dr Macdonald asked the Minister for Local Government—
          With regard to the December 1994 formal complaint to Shoalhaven City Council by Mr Hilton Jones of Culburra Beach regarding the conduct of officers of its Development Services staff—
          (1) Has the complaint been satisfactorily investigated and determined?
          (2) Were the matters relevant and adequately and appropriately dealt with?
          (3) Was the subsequent conduct of council's General Manager, General Manager Development Services and Mayor acceptable?
          (4) Were actions taken legal in all respects?
          (5) What action will he be taking?
          Answer—
          I have requested the Department of Local Government to make enquiries into the issues raised and to report to me on the matter. The Department has advised that it has commenced these enquiries and will be inspecting all relevant files at the council and conducting interviews where necessary. A full response to the above questions will be made as soon as possible.

      *575 DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF INQUIRIES—Mr O'Farrell asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          (1) How many reports of inquiries by Commissioners of Inquiry for Environment and Planning have:
Page 1050
          (a) Endorsed a proposed development without conditions?
          (b) Endorsed a proposed development with conditions?
          (c) Completely rejected a proposed development?
          (2) (a) How many proposed developments have proceeded following (a) or (b) in (1) above?
          (b) How many have not proceeded?
          (3) (a) How many proposed developments have proceeded following (c) in (1) above?
          (b) How many have not proceeded?
          Answer—
          (1) I am informed by the Office of the Commissioners of Inquiry for Environment and Planning that:
            (a) No reports have endorsed a proposed development without conditions.
            (b) 114 reports (from January 1981 to October 1995) have endorsed a proposed development with conditions.
            (c) 30 reports (from January 1981 to October 1995) have completely rejected a proposed development.
          (2) (a) This information is unavailable from either the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning or the Office of Commissioners of Inquiry.
            (b) This information is unavailable from either the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning or the Office of Commissioners of Inquiry.
          (3) (a) This information is unavailable from either the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning or the Office of Commissioners of Inquiry.
            (b) This information is unavailable from either the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning or the Office of Commissioners of Inquiry.

      *576 HACC FUNDING—Mr O'Farrell asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—
          (1) Has the Government met its electoral platform commitments on HACC funding?
          (2) If so:
          (a) How?
          (b) Where has the funding been spent or proposed to be spent?
          (3) Did Labor's policy “Labor's Plans for Older People” (March 1995) state that State funding in real terms for the Home and Community Care Program will increase?
          (4) Has the estimate of New South Wales funding to HACC increased from $92.5 million in 1994/95 to $93.4 million in 1995/96?
          (5) Does Budget Paper No. 2 indicate an annual inflation forecast of 4.3 per cent for 1995/96, thereby resulting in a -3 per cent growth in the HACC estimates?
          (6) Does he stand by his reply to the honourable member for Northcott dated 13 November 1995?

Page 1051
          Answer—
          (1) Yes.
          (2) (a) Through provision of $6.5 million for growth in service provision and cost indexation for all services.
            (b) Decisions concerning allocation of growth funds to services across New South Wales is being considered as part of the annual HACC planning process.
          (3) Yes.
          (4) Yes.
          (5) Budget Paper No. 2 indicates an overall inflation estimate of 4.3 per cent. The Commonwealth, as a joint partner in the HACC Program, has estimated indexation requirements for HACC services at 1.5 per cent only.
          (6) Yes.

      *577 WOLLONGONG COURT—SENTENCING—Mr Rumble asked the Minister for Police representing the Attorney General and Minister for Industrial Relations—
          (1) In the previous 12 months in respect of the Wollongong Court, what sentences have been handed down to those convicted of car stealing and the various categories of assault?
          (2) Is he or the Director of Public Prosecutions satisfied with these sentences, bearing in mind many people in the community are of the opinion that the courts are giving inadequate sentences in the above categories?
          Answer—
          The Attorney General has advised me that the answers are:
          (1) The Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research has provided me with the information contained below. Statistical information is available for 1994 only, at present.
          Wollongong District Court: penalties imposed
      Principal OffencePrison SentencePeriodic Detention OrderCommunity Service OrderGood Behaviour BondTotal
      Assault occasioning actual bodily harm1--34
      Assault officer in the execution of duty---11
      Common assault3--36
      Malicious wounding--2-2
      Maliciously inflict grievous bodily harm1-113
      Larceny motor vehicle-1113
      Total514919
    Page 1052
            Wollongong Local Court: penalties imposed
        Principal OffencePrison SentencePeriodic Detention OrderCommunity Service OrderGood Behaviour BondFineTotal
        Assault occasioning actual bodily harm4110171749
        Assault officer in the execution of duty1---1011
        Assault Special Constable in Execution of Duty---1-1
        Assault person aiding an officer----11
        Common assault73106569154
        Malicious wounding---1-1
        Grievous bodily harm by unlawful/negligent act---1-1
        Abuse child or cause/procure child to be abused---2-2
        Intimidate or annoy by violence or otherwise1----1
        Stealing/larceny of a motor vehicle3426520
        Use motor vehicle without owner's consent----11
        Take conveyance (other than boat or vessel) without consent12--14
        Drive/ride in conveyance taken without consent----22
        Attempt steal motor vehicle1-1--2
        Take conveyance (excluding ship or vessel) without consent--1--1
        Total18102493106251
            (2) The penalties handed down in individual instances are determined by judges and magistrates having regard to a range of factors before them—including the nature of the offence; the defendant's previous record (if any); the maximum penalty available for the offence; penalties generally imposed for that offence; the culpability of the defendant; and any mitigating factors raised on the defendant's behalf.
            It is not possible to assess the applicability of individual sentences without having access to all that information. However, it is always open to the Director of Public Prosecutions or the police, as the case may be, to appeal a penaly which is considered inadequate.

        *578 PUBLIC HOUSING—SMOKE DETECTORS—Mr Schipp asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
            (1) Of the total public rental housing stock, how many:
            (a) houses;
            (b) units;
            are fitted with smoke detectors?
            (2) How many:
    Page 1053
            (a) houses;
            (b) units;
            have hard-wired and battery powered detectors installed?
            (3) Are hard-wired detectors fitted only to new accommodation?
            (4) When did the program of equipping Department of Housing accommodation with smoke detectors commence?
            (5) (a) Is there a program of retro-fitting?
            (b) If so, how many:
                (i) houses;
                (ii) units;
                have been retro-fitted with hard-wired or battery powered detectors?
                (6) In which localities has this program of retro-fitting been given effect?

                Answer—

                (1) and (2) It is unknown as to the total number of public rental housing stock which have had hard-wired and/or battery powered smoke detectors fitted as tenants are able to have these units installed themselves.
                (3) Hard-wired detectors will be fitted to both new and existing public rental accommodation.
                (4) The program planning for fitting hard-wired smoke detectors to new accommodation commenced in May 1994 for all contracts signed after 30 June 1994.
                The planning for the retro-fitting pilot program commenced in June 1994.
                (5) (a) A comprehensive retro-fitting program for the Department of Housing accommodation was established in November 1995.
                (b) (i) 34 houses.
                (ii) 195 units.
            (6) The localities for the retro-fitting program are:
                Sydney, Camden, Narellan, Parramatta, Coffs Harbour, Nambucca Heads, Grafton, Lismore, Port Macquarie and Tamworth.

        *579 PUBLIC HOUSING STOCK—Mr Schipp asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
            (1) How many:
            (a) houses;
            (b) units;
            of public rental housing stock are owned and managed by the Department of Housing?
            (2) What is the total value of this stock?
            (3) What is the apportionment of this valuation as to:
            (a) houses?
            (b) units?
            (4) How many:
            (a) houses;
            (b) units;
            are provided by private or commercial investors?
            (5) What is the total value of this stock?
            (6) What is the apportionment of this valuation as to:
            (a) Houses?
            (b) Units?
            (7) When did the Department of Housing first commence to involve private or commercial investors in the provision of public rental housing stock?
    Page 1054
            Answer—
            (1) As at 30 November 1995, the number of public rental housing stock owned and managed by the Department of Housing was:
              (a) 84,638 "House" type stock—detached, semidetached, townhouse, row house, etc., design types.
              (b) 48,679 "Unit" type stock—multiunit high and low-rise, walkup, pensioner unit, etc., design types.
            (2) $14.5 billion—total market value.
            (3) The Department's valuation assessment is unable to be apportioned between houses and units.
            (4) As at 30 November 1995, a total number of 2,117 dwellings had been provided. Of this number, 1,490 represents unit type accommodation provided under the Public Equity Partner-ship Scheme.
            The Department's records do not have a detail of the mix of the remaining balance of these properties.
            (5) As at 30 November 1995, the Public Equity Partnership property stock had a value of $200 million.
            Valuations of the balance of the private or commercial investor properties are not available to the Department.
            (6) Not available.
            (7) The first major involvement was the Public Equity Partnership Scheme which commenced in 1990/91.

        6 DECEMBER 1995

        (Paper No. 30)

        *580 LACHLAN AND CENTRAL WESTERN DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICES—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Armstrong asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
            (1) How many community nurses were employed by Lachlan and Central Western District Health Services in:
            (a) 1992/93?
            (b) 1993/94?
            (c) 1994/95?
            (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
            (2) How many nurses were employed by these district health services for the same periods by the following classifications:
            (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
            (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
            (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?

    Page 1055
            Answer—
            (1) A number of honourable members have asked for the same information for Areas and Districts in which they have an interest. The following table provided by the NSW Health Department sets out the information for the requested Area and District Health Services.
            The statistics, including those for 1995/96, have been provided by Area and District Health Services as at 30 September each year. In some instances where these statistics were not available, the source of the data was local reports written during the relevant periods. However, in some cases, data on community nurse positions are not available for periods prior to the establishment of District Health Services.
            These numbers do not include community nurses employed by Sydney Home Nursing Service which provides services in a number of areas.
            The Government has committed $3.5 million to increasing the number (by 100) of community nurses over the next 3 years. These additional resources are currently being allocated to Areas and Districts of population growth and where community service gaps have been identified.
            The movement towards the substitution of community-based services for acute services in some areas has resulted in the development of shared hospital/community positions. As these initiatives develop, hospitals are using staff in newly defined roles. These positions will not necessarily be separately identified as community nurse positions and are additional to the 100 new positions referred to above.
            (2) Data on Nurse Unit Manager, Clinical Nurse Specialist and Clinical Nurse Specialist positions have been collected from the NSW Health Department quarterly Hospay and Micropay reports as at September for each year. It is set out in the table.
            Reports in 1992/93 and 1993/94 were provided by Hospay for each Health Region, however, the data are not able to be re-aggregated into districts as Hospay does not hold the original data.
            A joint taskforce comprising service providers, the NSW Nurses' Association, and the Department has been established to develop strategies to increase the clinical nursing workforce, and focus on retention strategies.
        Question No.580582584586589591
        Area/District
        Health Service
        Lachlan DHSCentral West DHSTweed Valley DHSHunter AHSMonaro DHSHume DHSCentral Coast AHS
        Community Nurses
        1992/9318.3087.8028.80190.8010.0027.00*
        1993/9418.3088.8029.00203.809.6828.00115.50
        1994/9519.3089.9029.20202.809.2028.00131.90
        1995/9619.3096.6033.60210.8010.6029.00133.00
        Nursing Unit Manager
        1992/93* * * 174.80* * 39.00
        1993/94* * * 183.30* * 46.00
        1994/9511.1031.1013.90172.4016.5032.0048.60
        1995/969.0027.6015.10154.0017.6027.5045.60
        Clinical Nurse Specialist
        1992/93* * * 344.40* Page 1056
        * 83.00
        1993/94* * * 372.60* * 94.30
        1994/957.6064.1023.00386.8018.2040.1098.90
        1995/963.0061.8028.30372.0013.4046.4095.90
        Clinical Nurse Consultant
        1992/93* * * 46.50* * 11.20
        1993/94* * * 45.10* * 11.70
        1994/953.5010.802.8041.804.904.0014.90
        1995/960.5010.703.1039.404.304.0020.50
        * Records not available. Data as at 30 September each financial year.
        Question No.597599609611613615617
        Area/District Health ServiceMacleay Hastings
        DHS
        South Western Sydney
        AHS
        Richmond DHSCastlereagh
        DHS
        Western Sydney AHSRiverina DHSMacquarie DHSSouthern Tablelands DHS
        Community Nurses
        1992/9333.20248.9143.1012.30194.6073.1031.9025.41
        1993/9433.20254.5545.4012.30214.8075.1030.9024.42
        1994/9535.30265.5345.4013.70199.3079.1030.3036.69
        1995/9636.90281.0245.4014.70205.2081.8042.2039.29
        Nursing Unit Manager
        1992/93* 129.70* * 192.90* * *
        1993/94* 119.00* * 162.90* * *
        1994/9522.00113.6043.209.00143.6018.9023.0030.30
        1995/9610.00109.0043.909.00145.1019.4031.1024.00
        Clinical Nurse Specialist
        1992/93* 279.30* * 592.10* * *
        1993/94* 245.20* * 521.60* * *
        1994/9537.20231.1079.0012.60521.7060.8022.5054.20
        1995/9619.40239.1074.6014.00491.3055.8028.3043.00
        Clinical Nurse Consultant
        1992/93* 36.50* * 69.80* * *
        1993/94* 34.90* * 72.80* * *
        1994/959.0039.2012.803.0078.4012.30Page 1057
        8.004.50
        1995/965.5045.6014.902.0087.9012.9022.306.30
        * Records not available. Data as at 30 September each financial year.
        Question No.619621623625633636
        Area/District
        Health Service
        Barwon DHSNorth West DHSSouth Coast DHSLower North Coast DHSEvans DHSNew England DHSMurrum-bidgee
        DHS
        Community Nurses
        1992/93* 47.9034.5035.0030.10* 30.70
        1993/9442.0049.8037.0036.3330.1022.1030.50
        1994/9548.8849.8040.5039.9532.5022.1030.00
        1995/9651.1656.4042.0046.6032.5022.1029.40
        Nursing Unit Manager
        1992/93* * * * * * *
        1993/94* * * * * * *
        1994/9512.9024.8015.8021.5017.0017.5017.90
        1995/9612.9027.2015.0016.8015.0017.9014.40
        Clinical Nurse Specialist
        1992/93* * * * * * *
        1993/94* * * * * * *
        1994/9513.7041.5025.8047.6018.5029.2023.10
        1995/9613.2048.4036.0040.0023.1024.0023.20
        Clinical Nurse Consultant
        1992/93* * * * * * *
        1993/94* * * * * * *
        1994/951.0020.503.009.5010.702.004.10
        1995/962.5019.304.0011.3011.703.004.80
        * Records not available. Data as at 30 September each financial year.
        Question No.638643650672674685
        Area/District
        Health Service
        Illawarra AHSSouth Eastern Sydney AHSNorthern Sydney AHSCentral Sydney AHSClarence DHSPage 1058
        Wentworth AHS
        Community Nurses
        1992/93151.68156.48206.35145.0014.50164.70
        1993/94149.82177.67211.15146.0014.50181.00
        1994/95153.01183.23194.30145.7014.50175.30
        1995/96152.14198.08193.40188.6114.50180.10
        Nursing Unit Manager
        1992/9375.20234.10192.40151.80* 52.10
        1993/9465.20247.60196.80197.50* 54.30
        1994/9554.90251.90186.10199.2016.2042.40
        1995/9653.20218.00187.10210.0011.0043.70
        Clinical Nurse Specialist
        1992/93223.40852.80459.30572.80* 133.50
        1993/94165.70877.00446.10725.20* 154.40
        1994/95172.60841.80411.70711.409.40129.40
        1995/96167.10817.10375.50740.8017.40121.10
        Clinical Nurse Consultant
        1992/9320.30114.4043.8060.20* 10.60
        1993/9421.90124.6046.5087.80* 13.50
        1994/9524.20126.1048.7087.803.0015.30
        1995/9622.90124.6058.9088.603.0014.60
        * Records not available. Data as at 30 September each financial year.
        *581 LACHLAN AND CENTRAL WESTERN DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICES—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Armstrong asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
            (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Lachlan and Central Western District Health Services in:
            (a) 1993?
            (b) 1994?
            (c) 1995 (estimated)?
    Page 1059
            (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in these district health services in:
            (a) 1993?
            (b) 1994?
            (c) 1995 (estimated)?
            Answer—
            (1) and (2) A number of honourable members have asked for the same information for Areas and Districts in which they have an interest. The following table provided by the NSW Health Department gives the information for the requested Area and District Health Services.
            The table sets out elective and emergency surgical procedures performed in public hospitals in Areas and Districts, 1993 to 1995.
            The Department advises that the waiting list information system only provides information after 1 July 1994. Thus, in order to make the data comparable, the Inpatient Statistics Collection (ISCOS) has been used as the source of the data.
            Full year information is available for the calendar years 1993 and 1994. For 1995 only the first 6 months' data are available (note that Port Macquarie Base Hospital, previously Hastings District Public Hospital and a private hospital after November 1994, has not been included in Macleay-Hastings District for the period November 1994 to June 1995).
            There are no available estimates for the full calendar year 1995. To estimate 1995 volumes would require a major statistical modelling exercise.
            In relation to the definition of "elective", the Department advised that ISCOS currently has two variables that may be used to distinguish elective patients from emergency patients. The first of these is "Admission through Casualty" as source of referral and the second is a flag indicating an emergency admission. The former is a description of the path of admission to hospital while the second is based on clinical criteria (i.e., needs hospital care within 24 hours).
            Ideally, the emergency flag would be the appropriate descriptor of an emergency admission. However, this flag was not in place until after July 1993 and for some months following its introduction this field was very unreliably reported. Further, no estimates are available for the second half of 1995. Therefore 1994 is the only full year for which this variable is available. Consequently, the variable "Admission through Casualty" has been used as an indicator of non-elective status. This variable is available for 1993, 1994 and the first half of 1995. Care should be taken when comparisons are made between these data and data derived from the waiting list information system because the two respective definitions of elective patient are different.
            In relation to the definition of "procedure", the Department advises that procedures are as defined by ISCOS. Each patient record forwarded to the Department under ISCOS reports a number of possible procedures. Prior to 1 July 1993 this number was restricted to reporting a maximum of four procedures per patient. After this date the number was extended to a maximum of eleven procedures per patient. The majority of computer sites report a maximum of ten and the non-computerised sites report a maximum of four. The increase in procedures between 1993 and 1994 in the table is considered to be mainly due to this change in reporting.
    Page 1060


        Question No.Area/DistrictSURGICAL PROCEDURES
        1993
        Elective Emergency1994
        Elective Emergency1995 (January to June)
        Elective Emergency
        581
        581
        583
        585
        587
        590
        592
        598
        600
        610
        612
        614
        616
        618
        618
        620
        620
        622
        624
        626
        634
        637
        639
        644
        651
        673
        675
        686
        Lachlan
        Central Western
        Tweed Valley
        Hunter
        Monaro
        Hume
        Central Coast
        Macleay-Hastings
        South Western Sydney
        Richmond
        Castlereagh
        Western Sydney
        Riverina
        Macquarie
        Southern Tablelands
        Barwon
        North West
        South Coast
        Lower North Coast
        Evans
        New England
        Murrumbidgee
        Illawarra
        South Eastern
        Northern Sydney
        Central Sydney
        Clarence
        Wentworth
        2,480 196
        8,867 745
        5,834 1,287
        47,633 12,935
        1,631 273
        7,992 1,200
        17,873 8,051
        7,015 1,188
        45,873 11,407
        14,254 1,344
        1,308 90
        57,943 16,752
        7,820 3,139
        4,868 1,537
        4,694 736
        1,811 284
        9,281 1,054
        4,848 512
        4,328 1,246
        7,239 946
        6,032 668
        4,140 972
        28,049 6,162
        105,977 29,688
        59,402 21,438
        66,159 12,267
        3,351 551
        14,004 5,692 2,517 220
        9,937 2,067
        6,898 2,140
        58,372 15,707
        1,737 343
        8,213 1,729
        23,357 11,084
        6,241 1,352
        56,874 13,909
        15,343 3,432
        1,250 73
        75,396 19,962
        9,805 3,540
        5,962 1,932
        4,767 748
        1,739 297
        11,200 1,537
        5,780 385
        4,586 1,445
        6,604 1,276
        5,694 714
        4,048 1,148
        30,153 8,119
        129,019 37,092
        75,507 30,220
        77,883 17,487
        2,795 605
        15,112 5,893 1,083 89
        3,670 1,179
        3,105 1,135
        30,095 9,630
        833 110
        4,388 1,057
        14,274 6,130
        1,397 277
        32,372 8,665
        6,867 2,585
        603 36
        37,246 10,308
        4,983 2,042
        3,566 1,287
        1,947 310
        791 116
        4,927 955
        3,006 232
        2,456 835
        3,477 694
        2,610 735
        2,191 595
        15,941 4,688
        62,449 19,582
        34,640 14,912
        39,623 8,280
        1,660 347
        8,313 3,830
    Source: Inpatient Statistics Collection Online System.
          *582 TWEED VALLEY DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Beck asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many community nurses were employed by Tweed Valley District Health Service in:
              (a) 1992/93?
              (b) 1993/94?
              (c) 1994/95?
              (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
              (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
              (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
              (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
              (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          *583 TWEED VALLEY DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Beck asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
        Page 1061

              (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Tweed Valley District Health Service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581

          *584 HUNTER AREA HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Blackmore asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many community nurses were employed by Hunter Area Health Service in:
              (a) 1992/93?
              (b) 1993/94?
              (c) 1994/95?
              (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
              (2) How many nurses were employed by this area health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
              (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
              (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
              (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          *585 HUNTER AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES— Mr Blackmore asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Hunter Area Health Service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this area health service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?

        Page 1062
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

          *586 MONARO DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Cochran asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many community nurses were employed by Monaro District Health Service in:
              (a) 1992/93?
              (b) 1993/94?
              (c) 1994/95?
              (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
              (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
              (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
              (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
              (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          *587 MONARO DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Cochran asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Monaro District Health Service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

          *588 LONGBOW POINT SUBDIVISION—Mr Ellis asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) Why has he not given Shoalhaven City Council any detailed information in regard to his concerns relating to the proposed Longbow Point subdivision at Culburra?
              (2) Why has he declined to discuss with Shoalhaven City Council the reason for his decision to use ministerial powers in this matter under section 101 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act?
        Page 1063
              (3) Why has he failed to consult with Shoalhaven City Council or the applicant in regard to these actions in light of promises of consultation with the community by the present Government prior to the last election?
              (4) Is he intending that there be full consultation with the council or the applicant prior to him making a determination on the application?
              (5) Can he indicate when the matter will be resolved?
              (6) Will he list the grounds upon which he elected to exercise section 101 of the Act in regard to this matter?
              (7) How did he substantiate those grounds?
              Answer—
              (1) Shoalhaven City Council was given detailed information regarding the Longbow Point subdivision at Culburra on 25 August 1995.
              (2) and (3) The letter to the council clearly explained the reasons for the decision taken. Council was offered the opportunity to discuss this decision with officers of the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning. This offer has not been taken up. However, officers of the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning have met with the landowner, his consultants and Mr Ellis and explained the reasons for this decision. The council and the applicant have also been made aware of their rights to seek a public hearing before the application is determined.
              (4) Before any decision is made a comprehensive report from the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning canvassing in detail all the issues raised by the council, the applicant, public authorities and any others with an interest in the proposal is to be submitted for review.
              (5) A decision on this matter is expected to be made in 1996.
              (6) This was canvassed in the letter to the Shoalhaven City Council dated 25 August 1995 (refer to the response for question (1)).
              (7) The significance of Lake Wollumboola and the adjoining wetlands is documented in the number of reports and studies including those prepared by Shoalhaven City Council, the applicant and independent people/organisations.

          *589 HUME DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Glachan asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many community nurses were employed by Hume District Health Service in:
              (a) 1992/93?
              (b) 1993/94?
              (c) 1994/95?
              (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
              (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
              (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
              (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
              (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          *590 HUME DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES— Mr Glachan asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Hume District Health Service in:
        Page 1064
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

          *591 CENTRAL COAST AREA HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Hartcher asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many community nurses were employed by Central Coast Area Health Service in:
              (a) 1992/93?
              (b) 1993/94?
              (c) 1994/95?
              (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
              (2) How many nurses were employed by this area health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
              (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
              (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
              (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          *592 CENTRAL COAST AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Hartcher asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Central Coast Area Health Service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this area health service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

          *593 DOYALSON AMBULANCE STATION—Mr Hartcher asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
              (1) How many ambulance staff were located at Doyalson Ambulance Station on:
              (a) 30 June 1995?
        Page 1065
              (b) 30 November 1995?
              (2) Does Doyalson Station have a paramedic service?
              (3) How many hours per day does the paramedic service operate?
              (4) What is the average response time to calls from Doyalson Station?
              (5) How many ambulance vehicles were based at Doyalson Station on:
              (a) 30 April 1995?
              (b) 30 September 1995?
              (6) How many calls for an ambulance were received at Doyalson Station, or directed to Doyalson Station, for the year ended:
              (a) 30 November 1994?
              (b) 30 November 1995?
              (7) Is the station so staffed that two officers can be sent to attend emergency calls?
              (8) If not, why not?
              (9) What is the policy on the use of two-person crews?
              Answer—
              (1) I am informed by the NSW Ambulance Service that the following staff were on duty at Doyalson Ambulance Station on:
              (a) 30 June 1995: 2 officers day shift (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
                2 officers night shift (5 p.m. to 7 a.m.)
                (b) 30 November 1995: 2 officers day shift (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
                          2 officers night shift (5 p.m. to 7 a.m.)
              (2) and (3) There are no paramedic officers based at Doyalson Ambulance Station. However, of the staff complement of ten officers at Doyalson (nine permanent and one relief), six officers are trained to Level 4 (Advanced Life Support) standard.
              Paramedic officers are stationed in the Newcastle area (as an area resource) at both Hamilton and Cardiff Ambulance Stations. There are at lease two paramedics on duty at each of these stations 24 hours a day.
              These officers operate from either road ambulances of the Newcastle-based rescue helicopter. The mode of transport used depends upon the location of the incident—each incident is assessed individually, but the prime focus is on getting paramedics to the scene as quickly as possible.
              In addition, paramedics are also stationed south of Doyalson in the Sydney area of Bateau Bay.
              (4) The average response time to calls from Doyalson Ambulance Station for the first 9 months of this calendar year was 10.76 minutes.
              (5) The Ambulance Service has advised that the following vehicles were based at Doyalson Ambulance station on:
                (a) 30 April 1995: 2 ambulances and 1 at workshop
                (b) 30 September 1995: 3 ambulances
        Page 1066
              (6) The total number of cases handled by Doyalson Ambulance Station for the year ended:
                (a) 30 November 1994 was 2,131 cases.
                (b) 30 November 1995 was 2,173 cases.
              (7) and (8) Doyalson Ambulance Station has a roster which provides for two officers on duty 24 hours a day. Programmed absences such as annual leave and training are generally covered by a relief officer. However, unscheduled absences from the roster such as sick leave are only covered if there is a formal requirement to do so under the Maintenance of Roster Industrial Agreement.
              On those occasions when an officer is not replaced because the absence falls outside the provisions of the agreement, the remaining officer will work alone unless he or she can be teamed up with another single officer from another station.
              When single officers are sent on cases, especially urgent calls, the question of backup is considered at the time of their response.
              (9) The policy at Doyalson Ambulance Station is that all ambulances are double crewed except where the roster is depleted due to the absence of an officer on unscheduled leave.

          *594 PEAT ISLAND CENTRE INQUIRY—Mr Hartcher asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services,
              Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—
              (1) Has Dr Moira Carmody been appointed to conduct an inquiry under the Public Sector Management Act into allegations about a sexual assault at the Peat Island Centre?
              (2) What were the terms of reference?
              (3) What was the designated report date?
              (4) Is Dr Carmody an employee under the Public Sector Management Act?
              (5) Under what power was Dr Carmody appointed?
              (6) By whom was Dr Carmody appointed?
              (7) Is evidence to be taken from residents at the Peat Island Centre?
              Answer—
              (1) Dr Carmody has been appointed to conduct inquiries at the Peat Island Centre under the Public Sector Management Act. The inquiries are into the actions of officers of the Department in response to instances of sexual and physical assault.
              (2) Dr Carmody has been appointed to conduct preliminary inquiries pursuant to clause 24 (1) of the Public Sector Management (General) Regulation 1988, into alleged breaches of discipline by a number of departmental officers within the meaning of section 66 (e) of the Public Sector Management Act 1988. These relate to the officers' alleged failure to implement departmental procedures when made aware of instances of assault upon a client by another client of the Peat Island Centre and their alleged failure to take steps to ensure the safety of the client subject of the assaults.
              (3) The designated report date was 10 November 1995. This was extended to 22 December 1995.
              (4) Yes.
              (5) Dr Carmody was employed under section 38 of the Public Sector Management Act 1988.
              (6) Approval for the employment of Dr Carmody was given by the Director, Corporate Services, Department of Community Services.
              (7) Given the nature of the inquiries there has been no need to take evidence from the residents of the Peat Island Centre.

          *595 PEAT ISLAND—Mr Hartcher asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—

        Page 1067
              (1) How many residents are there on Peat Island:
              (a) Permanently?
              (b) On respite care programs?
              (2) How many are aged:
              (a) 1-20 years?
              (b) 20-30 years?
              (c) 30-40 years?
              (d) 40-50 years?
              (e) Over 50 years?
              (3) How many established staff are there on Peat Island?
              (4) How many of these on 1 December 1995 were on:
              (a) Stress leave?
              (b) Recreation leave?
              (c) Suspension?
              (d) Other leave?
              (5) What is the total area of land occupied by the Peat Island Centre?
              (6) What is the total value as recorded by the State according to the principles of accrual accounting?
              (7) (a) What consultative processes exist at the Peat Island Centre for the residents to express their views?
              (b) If none, why not?
              (8) Will he guarantee that all residents wishing to remain for the rest of their lives at the Peat Island Centre will be permitted to do so?
              Answer—
              (1) There are 122 permanent residents and 9 temporary residents.
              (2) (a) 3.
                (b) 4.
                (c) 23.
                (d) 57.
                (e) 44.
              (3) 170, of which 85 are nursing staff.
              (4) (a) 3.
                (b) 12.
                (c) Nil.
                (d) 6.
              (5) 17,400 sq m (including staff cottages).
              (6) $13.641 million (as at September 1995).
              (7) (a) Consultative processes include:
                  Consumer/Unit Meetings (monthly);
                  SPICE (Independent Consultant);
                  Recreation Committee;
                  House Committee through the parents;
                  Consumer/Family meetings (quarterly or as suggested).
                (b) Not applicable.
              (8) Under the NSW Disability Services Act (1993), congregate care in large residentials such as Peat Island Centre, is not considered appropriate. It does not allow for basic human rights such as privacy and dignity.
              All persons residing at Peat island Centre will be individually assessed to determine the most appropriate alternative accommodation for them, be it in a community-based group home, aged care service or other community-based service.
        Page 1068
              On 21 November 1995, I announced in the House that the Carr Government guarantees that all persons who currently reside at the Peat Island Centre will continue to receive the services and levels of support needed to enable them to make a successful transition to community living. The guarantee of lifetime care will extend until the client no longer requires such care.

          *596 OLDER PERSONS HOUSING STRATEGY—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
              (1) (a) How will the money allocated for Older Persons Housing Strategy be expended?
              (b) How does the strategy differ from existing pensioner housing strategies?
              (2) (a) How many existing housing units are subject to the bedsit conversion program?
              (b) How does he propose to implement the program?
              Answer—
              (1) (a) In 1995/96 funds were allocated under the Older Persons Housing Strategy for the specific purpose of developing pilot housing projects which would demonstrate innovative models for the provision of housing for older people. Criteria for funding are that the project must target older people; be innovative in design and/or management; be easily transferable to other projects; demonstrate the effective and efficient use of Government resources; and be achievable in the timeframe of the Older Persons Housing Strategy. The pilot projects announced in November 1995 all meet these requirements and on completion will be evaluated as models for other organisations developing accommodation services for older people. To date six projects have been funded, a total of $3,973 million, to provide 40 units of accommodation.
                (b) The Older Persons Housing Strategy represents a comprehensive approach to housing for older people in New South Wales and is an expression of the Government's commitment to providing increased housing choice for older people. It involves research, policy reform and program initiatives over a 3-year period. The Strategy's two key objectives are to (i) develop new approaches to the provision of housing assistance to older people; and (ii) influence housing market responses to the housing needs of older people. Projects undertaken within the Strategy during 1995 reflect the fact that its charter is far broader than existing pensioner housing strategies provided through the Department of Housing. These have included, for example, an older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's housing conference, a Home Maintenance and Security Handbook for older home owners and renters, funding of the Pilot Projects Program, and a major market research study into the appropriateness of medium-density housing for older people.
              (2) (a) The Department of Housing's bedsitter conversion program involves 251 existing units of accommodation.
                (b) These units will be converted by the Department of Housing into 187 larger units of accommodation.

          *597 MACLEAY-HASTINGS DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Jeffery asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many community nurses were employed by Macleay-Hastings District Health Service in:
              (a) 1992/93?
              (b) 1993/94?
              (c) 1994/95?
              (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
        Page 1069
              (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
              (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
              (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
              (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          *598 MACLEAY-HASTINGS DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Jeffery asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Macleay-Hastings District Health Service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

          *599 SOUTH WESTERN AREA HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Dr Kernohan asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many community nurses were employed by South West Area Health Service in:
              (a) 1992/93?
              (b) 1993/94?
              (c) 1994/95?
              (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
              (2) How many nurses were employed by this area health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
              (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
              (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
              (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          *600 SOUTH WESTERN AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Dr Kernohan asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

              (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the South West Area Health Service in:
              (a) 1993?
        Page 1070
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this area health service in:
              (a) 1993?
              (b) 1994?
              (c) 1995 (estimated)?
              Answer—
              (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

          *601 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT 1995—Mr Longley asked the Minister for the Environment—
              (1) What was the total cost of production of the NSW State of the Environment Report 1995?
              (2) How many copies of the report were produced?
              (3) What is the cost of ancillary items for the report such as delivery, background research, etc.?
              (4) What is the cost of any other matters related to the report?
              Answer—
              (1) $489,967 ($288,571 wages and $201,396 production).
              (2) 3,000 reports, 15,000 summaries.
              (3) CSIRO GIS Based Reporting Consultancy: $99,000.
              (4) Advertising and launches: $5,253.

          *602 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Longley asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads representing the Treasurer, Minister for Energy, Minister for State Development and Minister Assisting the Premier—
              (1) What agencies under the Treasurer's portfolio, including Pacific Power, produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
              (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
              (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
              (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
              (5) If none, why not?
              (6) What is the estimated cost of this reduction?
              Answer—
              (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
              (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

          603 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Longley to ask the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
          Page 1071
                (1) What agencies under his portfolio, including Sydney Water, produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                (5) If none, why not?
                (6) What is the estimated cost of this reduction?

            *604 Mr BOB ELLIS—Ms Machin asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—
                (1) Does Mr Bob Ellis still work for you as a comic script and speech writer?
                (2) How much has be been paid to date?
                (3) How is Mr Ellis' work evaluated?
                (4) Does Mr Ellis undertake any work for the Minister for Agriculture?
                Answer—
                (1) Mr Bob Ellis advises the Premier on Arts matters and writes and rewrites assigned speeches.
                (2) Mr Ellis is employed and paid in accordance with Public Employment Office guidelines.
                (3) Mr Ellis' work is evaluated on a performance basis.
                (4) Mr Ellis has not undertaken any work for the Minister for Agriculture.

            *605 COOPERNOOK BYPASS—Ms Machin asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                (1) Why was there no funding for the Coopernook Bypass in the 1995/96 budget?
                (2) Will he determine a final route for the bypass?
                (3) Will he acquire affected properties?
                (4) What is the total cost of the proposed bypass?
                (5) When will it be completed?
                Answer—
                (1) $200,000 has been allocated in 1995/96 for investigation work for the bypass.
                (2) The Chief Executive of the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) will determine the route, having regard to the Environmental Impact Statement for the project.
                (3) The RTA’s policy for land acquisition will be followed.
                (4) It is estimated that the cost will be between $19 million and $23 million.
                (5) A timetable for the project has not yet been determined.

            *606 DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES—Ms Machin asked the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries—
                (1) What academic qualifications does the new Director of Fisheries hold?
                (2) Has he stated that the Director has three doctorates?
                (3) Why has he made this claim?
                Answer—

          Page 1072
                (1) 1970-73:
                    School of Biological Sciences, James Cook University, Queensland—B.Sc.; Zoology, Botany majors.
                  1973:
                    School of Biological Sciences, James Cook University, Queensland—B.Sc.(Hons); Development in Atyid Shrimp.
                  1974-78:
                    Zoology Department, University of New England, New South Wales—M.Sc.; Ecology of School Prawns in the Clarence River Region.
                  1978-84:
                    School of Biological Sciences, the University of New South Wales—Ph.D.; Dynamics of King Prawns in Northern New South Wales.
                  1988-90:
                    Graduate School of Management, The University of Queensland—M.B.A.; Accounting, Marketing majors; Thesis on the Japanese Prawn Export Market.
                Dr Glaister was also a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Miami during 1986 where he undertook a computer simulation study of the Northern Territory Barramundi fishery. This study focussed on the interaction between recreational and commercial fishers. It is, I believe, the only Fulbright that has been awarded for fisheries work in Australia.
                (2) I have made several references to the new Director's high academic achievements and the number of post-graduate qualifications that he has been awarded.
                (3) I was referring to his post-graduate degrees.

            *607 CHILDREN'S ACCOMMODATION—Ms Moore asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—
                (1) How many accommodation units for children in the care of the State have been opened since the announcement in July 1994 of a policy to close large institutions and replace them with smaller accommodation units and community-based accommodation?
                (2) What alternative accommodation has replaced Renwick?
                (3) What secure emergency accommodation is available now for children in need of emergency care?
                (4) What steps have been taken to remedy the crisis in accommodation for children in care in country areas, for example in Kempsey, where 12 and 13-year-old children have been detained in police cells due to lack of suitable accommodation for them?
                Answer—
                (1) 16 accommodation units providing 96 placements for children and young people in the care of the State have been opened since July 1994. 1 unit, located at Orange, closed in December 1995 due to staffing and operational difficulties.
                (2) The 15 new units provide alternative placements to Renwick.
                (3) The Department provides emergency accommodation at Ormond and Minali for children and young people who need an intensive level of service. The high staff to child ratio and additional specialist staff on site who provide psychological services ensure that young people who may be a risk to themselves are able to receive an intensive level of supervision and support.
                (4) Three steps have been taken to improve supported accommodation for children needing care in country areas:
                  * Area planning for future services is based upon detailed analysis of current needs and predicted entry into care figures derived from a needs-based planning model.
          Page 1073
                  * Currently planning sessions are under way in country areas to examine how transition plans for current services can include immediate expansion in capacity.
                  * Some country areas have begun a process of negotiation between the Department of Community Services and the Department of Juvenile Justice with a view to developing a joint foster care response to the accommodation needs of children and young people who are involved in the juvenile justice system.

            *608 INDUSTRIAL ARTS EQUIPMENT COMMITTEE—Mr O'Doherty asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—
                (1) What is the Industrial Arts Equipment Committee?
                (2) Does it have status within the Department of School Education?
                (3) What funding or other assistance has the committee received towards its activities from the Department of School Education?
                (4) Has the committee received support from other sources including industry?
                (5) If so, from whom?
                Answer—
                (1) The Department of School Education does not have an Industrial Arts Equipment Committee. The Industrial Arts Equipment Committee operates in an unofficial capacity to promote industrial arts. The committee is comprised of teachers in Government and non-Government schools.
                (2) The Industrial Arts Equipment Committee has no status within the Department of School Education. Official Department of School Education Equipment Committees were disbanded in 1989 and the responsibility for decision-making about equipment purchases was devolved to schools. The Department is currently considering proposals to establish advisory groups for equipment and other issues.
                (3) The Department does no presently fund or assist the Industrial Arts Equipment Committee.
                (4) The committee has received support from commercial organisations. Whether that support is financial in nature is unclear.
                (5) The minutes of their meetings indicate that support is provided by equipment suppliers such as ASTEG Pty Ltd and DEMCO Machinery Co. Pty Ltd.

            *609 RICHMOND DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr D. L. Page asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many community nurses were employed by Richmond District Health Service in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          Page 1074

            *610 RICHMOND DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr D. L. Page asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Richmond District Health Service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

            *611 CASTLEREAGH DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Peacocke asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many community nurses were employed by Castlereagh District Health Service in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

            *612 CASTLEREAGH DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Peacocke asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Castlereagh District Health Service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

          Page 1075

            *613 WESTERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Richardson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                (1) How many community nurses were employed by Western Sydney Area Health Service in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                (2) How many nurses were employed by this area health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          Page 1076

            *614 WESTERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Richardson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Western Sydney Area Health Service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this area health service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

            *615 RIVERINA DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Schipp asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many community nurses were employed by Riverina District Health Service in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

            *616 RIVERINA DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Schipp asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Riverina District Health Service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

          Page 1077

            *617 MACQUARIE AND SOUTHERN TABLELANDS DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICES— COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Schultz asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many community nurses were employed by Macquarie and Southern Tablelands District Health Services in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                (2) How many nurses were employed by these district health services for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

            *618 MACQUARIE AND SOUTHERN TABLELANDS DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICES— ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Schultz asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Macquarie and Southern Tablelands District Health Services in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in these district health services in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

            *619 BARWON AND NORTH WEST DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICES—COMMUNITY NURSES— Mr Slack-Smith asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many community nurses were employed by Barwon and North West District Health Services in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
          Page 1078
                (2) How many nurses were employed by these district health services for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

            *620 BARWON AND NORTH WEST DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICES—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Slack-Smith asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Barwon and North West District Health Services in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in these district health services in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

            *621 SOUTH COAST DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Smith asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many community nurses were employed by South Coast District Health Service in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

          Page 1079

            *622 SOUTH COAST DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Smith asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the South Coast District Health Service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

            *623 LOWER NORTH COAST DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Turner asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many community nurses were employed by Lower North Coast District Health Service in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

            *624 LOWER NORTH COAST DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Turner asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Lower North Coast District Health Service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                Answer—

          Page 1080
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

            *625 EVANS DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr West asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many community nurses were employed by Evans District Health Service in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

            *626 EVANS DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES— Mr West asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Evans District Health Service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?

                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

            7 DECEMBER 1995

            (Paper No. 31)

            *627 BOARD AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS—Mr Beck asked the Minister for Police representing the Attorney General and Minister for Industrial Relations—

                (1) Which agencies or corporations within his portfolio have a board or advisory committee?
                (2) (a) What full-time appointments has he made since 4 April 1995 to the boards of agencies and corporations within his portfolio?
                (b) Please list each person and agency?
                (3) (a) What part-time appointments has he made since 4 April 1995 to the boards of agencies and corporations within his portfolio?
                (b) Please list each person and agency?
                (4) (a) Which full-time appointments expire prior to 30 June 1996?
                (b) Please list each person and agency?
          Page 1081
                (5) (a) Which part-time appointments expire prior to 30 June 1996?
                (b) Please list each person and agency?
                Answer—
                The Attorney General has advised me that the answers are:
                (1) to (5) The Government is committed to the principles of independence and merit in selections to Government boards and committees.
                The establishment of the Public Employment Office, with a charter to ensure merit, integrity and independence in selection and appointment matters, provides Ministers with assistance in identifying suitable people for appointments to Government boards and committees.

            *628 BOARD AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS—Mr Beck asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—

                (1) Which agencies or corporations within his portfolio have a board or advisory committee?
                (2) (a) What full-time appointments has he made since 4 April 1995 to the boards of agencies and corporations within his portfolio?
                (b) Please list each person and agency?
                (3) (a) What part-time appointments has he made since 4 April 1995 to the boards of agencies and corporations within his portfolio?
                (b) Please list each person and agency?
                (4) (a) Which full-time appointments expire prior to 30 June 1996?
                (b) Please list each person and agency?
                (5) (a) Which part-time appointments expire prior to 30 June 1996?
                (b) Please list each person and agency?
                Answer—
                (1) to (5) The Government is committed to the principles of independence and merit in selections to Government boards and committees. The establishment of the Public Employment Office, with a charter to ensure merit, integrity and independence in selection and appointment matters, provides Ministers with assistance in identifying suitable people for appointments to Government boards and committees.
                The Public Employment Office recently called for expressions of interest from members of the community to nominate to have their name on a register that will be used in making appointments to all Government boards and committees.
                The Government has also committed itself to achieving 50 per cent representation of women on boards and committees. In order to promote the selection of women to boards and committees, a women’s register has been established. A register has also been established for people from a non-English speaking background, as part of the Government’s strategy in ethnic affairs, to ensure that people of non-English speaking background are well represented on decision making bodies in this State.

          Page 1082

            *629 MINISTERIAL STAFF—Mr Beck asked the Minister for Sport and Recreation—
                (1) How many staff are employed in her ministerial office?
                (2) What is the name and job title of each staff member?
                (3) What is the remuneration package of each staff member?
                (4) Which staff members are career public servants?
                (5) Which staff members are issued with NSW Government credit cards?
                (6) Which staff members are issued with CabCharge cards?
                (7) Which staff members have a NSW Government owned motor vehicle allocated for their use?
                (8) Which staff members have Government purchased motor vehicles included in their salary package?
                (9) How many mobile telephones are Government owned or Government leased in her ministerial office?
                Answer—
                (1) Eight.
                (2) D. Britton Chief of Staff
                  D. Howse Policy Officer
                  R. Posner Policy Officer
                  J. Raines Private Secretary
                  M. Brown Media Officer
                  I. Shiel Assistant Private Secretary
                  C. Power Receptionist
                  T. Johns Driver
                (3) Salary and conditions are set by the Commissioner for Public Employment and are generally comparable to public service salaries and conditions.
                (4) There are two staff seconded from NSW Government departments. Their salaries are met from the Minister's budget.
                (5) to (7) None.
                (8) D. Britton.
                (9) Five.

            *630 MINISTERIAL STAFF—Mr Beck asked the Minister for Local Government—

                (1) How many staff are employed in his ministerial office?
                (2) What is the name and job title of each staff member?
                (3) What is the remuneration package of each staff member?
                (4) Which staff members are career public servants?
                (5) Which staff members are issued with NSW Government credit cards?
                (6) Which staff members are issued with CabCharge cards?
                (7) Which staff members have a NSW Government owned motor vehicle allocated for their use?
                (8) Which staff members have Government purchased motor vehicles included in their salary package?
                (9) How many mobile telephones are Government owned or Government leased in his ministerial office?

          Page 1083
                Answer—
                (1) Seven as at 22 December 1995.
                (2) Chief of Staff Paul Tracey
                  Policy Adviser Ted Plummer
                  Media Officer Paul Murphy
                  Policy Officer Freda Backes
                  Policy Officer Ros Riordan
                  Assistant Private Secretary Samantha Mangin
                  Assistant Private Secretary Vanessa Lovett
                (3) Salary and conditions are set by the Commissioner for Public Employment and are generally comparable to public service salaries and conditions.
                (4) to (7) None.
                (8) Paul Tracey.
                (9) Three.

            *631 FORESTRY LOGGING OPERATIONS—Mr Causley asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
                (1) How will the 15 per cent criteria set by the Federal Government to protect forest communities before 1750 be calculated?
                (2) Will New South Wales exclude all the areas under the Federal Government's deferred forestry policy from logging operations?
                (3) How many jobs will be lost from the forest industry in the electorates of Clarence, Coffs Harbour and Lismore?
                Answer—
                (1) to (3) On 13 June 1995, the Government announced its historic forestry and conservation reforms driven by a commitment to implement the National Forest Policy Statement, including the conservation and industry development principles. Logging is restricted predominantly to regrowth forest and plantation areas pending an interim assessment. This interim assessment will identify forest areas to be available for logging and those to be reserved whilst Comprehensive Regional Assessments and a comprehensive, adequate and representative reserve (CAR) system is developed.
                The Government has not yet adopted a position in relation to the criteria for developing a comprehensive, adequate and representative (CAR) reserve system. The interim assessment and advice on reserve criteria will be provided by the Resource and Conservation Assessment Council (RACAC).
                For the purpose of the Deferred Forest Assessment, recently undertaken jointly by NSW and the Commonwealth Governments, the Commonwealth’s criteria were used to identify those areas which should be reserved from logging to avoid compromising options for the creation of a CAR reserve system.
                The Commonwealth’s position paper suggests that, “as a broad benchmark, 15 per cent of the pre-1750 distribution of each forest community should be represented in the dedicated conservation reserve system”. It also states that “this benchmark could be modified for particular purposes . . . For extensive, little-cleared forest communities there may be no need to reserve as large an area as the 15 per cent benchmark would dictate”.
          Page 1084
                The 15 per cent criteria was addressed using the best available information available. For the purposes of the DFA the area being assessed was divided into four regions, Northern, Central, Southern and Eden. The nature of the information available varied between regions. In the Northern Region the assessment was based on forest types, in Central Region vegetation communities, in the Southern Region environmental units and for Eden vegetation units were used. The pre-1750 distribution of each forest type was estimated using computer-based modelling and the area of each forest type reserved from logging was determined.
                Of the 198 land units (forest types, vegetation communities, environmental units, vegetation units) assessed 142 met the 15 per cent benchmark in existing reserves, deferred areas or through protection from harvesting using the harvest planning process. The 15 per cent benchmark could not be met on public land for 44 land units. Where these units occur on public land they have been included in deferred areas or will be protected from harvesting using the harvest planning process.
                Two land units did not meet the 15 per cent criteria and are available for harvesting in the interim resource area. The withdrawal of these types would lead to an unacceptable impact on industry, and the decision to allow some logging has been made on social and economic grounds.
                The Deferred Forest Areas in NSW have been identified with the aim of maintaining timber supplies until mid-1996. Provision has been made in the DFA for a revision following the completion of the Resource and Conservation Assessment Council’s interim assessment process. The information derived from this assessment will be used to update the DFA to identify those forests which will be available for logging and those which will be deferred pending completion of comprehensive regional assessments and the signing of regional forest agreements between the State and the Commonwealth.
                The Prime Minister has invited the Premier to enter into a Deferred Forest Agreement which will commit the State to exclude the deferred areas identified in the DFA report from logging pending the signing of Regional Forest Agreements under the processes previously outlined.
                The Government’s forestry reforms made a commitment to two objectives of equal importance—the conservation of high conservation value old growth and identified wilderness forest, and the establishment and maintenance of a viable and competitive timber industry that emphasises value adding processing.
                No precise estimate can be made on the impact of the above processes on the forest industry in the Clarence, Coffs Harbour or Lismore electorates as a result of the processes outlined and yet to be finalised.
                Nevertheless, the Government and Parliament is aware that people in such communities may be affected by the Government’s forestry reforms. The reforms included strategies to minimise impact and included an industry assistance package to assist employees affected by the restructuring of the timber industry onto an ecologically sustainable, value adding basis. The measures include employment preference arrangements, redeployment to other sectors of the industry, residential accommodation, and training and redundancy payments if required.
                NSW Parliament has taken action to provide $60 million to fund a structural adjustment program and the Commonwealth Government has agreed to provide matching funding to assist with the structural adjustment process.

            *633 NEW ENGLAND DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Chappell asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many community nurses were employed by New England District Health Service in:
                (a) 1992/93?
                (b) 1993/94?
                (c) 1994/95?
                (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
          Page 1085
                (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

            *634 NEW ENGLAND DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Chappell asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the New England District Health Service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
                (a) 1993?
                (b) 1994?
                (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                Answer—
                (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

            *635 WORK PROGRAMS—Mrs Chikarovski asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—
                (1) (a) How many young people were assisted under the Workplace Program in the years 1993/94 and 1994/95?
                (b) How many young people were assisted into employment or training?
                (2) How many young people were assisted by the Work Experience Program in the years 1993/94 and 1994/95?
                (3) How many older people were assisted by the Work Experience Program in 1994/95?
                (4) How many young people were assisted by the Get Started Program in the years 1993/94 and 1994/95?
                (5) How many people were assisted by the Job Target Program in 1993/94 and in 1994/95?
                (6) How many young people were provided with on-the-job training under the Enterprise Training for Youth Program in 1993/94 and in 1994/95?
                Answer—
                (1) to (6) Statistics on employment and training programs are available in the annual reports of the former Department of Industrial Relations, Employment, Training and Further Education and the Department of Training and Education Co-ordination.
                The NSW Government has in 1995/96 increased the youth budget and will now redirect efforts into the training area where young people can gain the vocational skills they need to provide the basis of a skilled and competitive growing economy.

            *636 MURRUMBIDGEE DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Cruickshank asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
            Page 1086
                  (1) How many community nurses were employed by Murrumbidgee District Health Service in:
                  (a) 1992/93?
                  (b) 1993/94?
                  (c) 1994/95?
                  (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                  (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                  (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                  (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                  (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

              *637 MURRUMBIDGEE DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Cruickshank asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                  (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Murrumbidgee District Health Service in:
                  (a) 1993?
                  (b) 1994?
                  (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                  (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
                  (a) 1993?
                  (b) 1994?
                  (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

              *638 ILLAWARRA AREA HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Ellis asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                  (1) How many community nurses were employed by Illawarra Area Health Service in:
                  (a) 1992/93?
                  (b) 1993/94?
                  (c) 1994/95?
                  (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                  (2) How many nurses were employed by this area health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                  (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                  (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                  (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

            Page 1087

              *639 ILLAWARRA AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Ellis asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                  (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Illawarra Area Health Service in:
                  (a) 1993?
                  (b) 1994?
                  (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                  (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this area health service in:
                  (a) 1993?
                  (b) 1994?
                  (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

              *640 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Ellis asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—
                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

              *641 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Ellis asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—

                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?

            Page 1088
                  Answer—
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government’s mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

              *642 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Ellis asked the Minister for Police representing the Attorney General and Minister for Industrial Relations—

                  (1) What agencies under the Attorney's portfolios produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  The Attorney General has advised me that the answers are:
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

            Page 1089

              *643 SOUTH EASTERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Ms Ficarra asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                  (1) How many community nurses were employed by South Eastern Sydney Area Health Service in:
                  (a) 1992/93?
                  (b) 1993/94?
                  (c) 1994/95?
                  (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                  (2) How many nurses were employed by this area health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                  (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                  (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                  (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

              *644 SOUTH EASTERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Ms Ficarra asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                  (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the South Eastern Sydney Area Health Service in:
                  (a) 1993?
                  (b) 1994?
                  (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                  (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this area health service in:
                  (a) 1993?
                  (b) 1994?
                  (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

              *645 MULTICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT—Ms Ficarra asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—
                  (1) Will the Multicultural Development Project funding be continued, in particular funding for the Pole Depot Neighbourhood Centre, Penshurst?
                  (2) If so, for what period of time will the project continue?
                  (3) If not, why not, and when will the relevant community workers be notified in writing?

            Page 1090
                  Answer—
                  (1) The Multicultural Development Project was a one-off funding initiative of 18 months duration to address the issue of access to services by people from a non-English speaking background.
              Four workers were employed, including one to cover the Local Government areas of Botany, Randwick and South Sydney, which was auspiced by the Botany Migrant Resource Centre.
              The project was extended until the completion of an evaluation period in November 1995.
                  The Pole Depot Neighbourhood Centre, Penshurst, did not receive direct funding from the Multicultural Development Project. The Multicultural Development worker for that area was funded through and based at the Botany Migrant Resource Centre.
                  An external consultant recently completed an evaluation of the project which will be submitted in January 1996.
                  (2) The project has now ceased.
                  (3) See answer to question (1). The responsibility of notifying the relevant workers rested with the auspicing organisations.

              *646 OFFICIAL FUNCTIONS—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Tourism—
                  (1) How many official functions have been held in his ministerial office since 4 April 1995?
                  (2) When were the functions held?
                  (3) What was the cost of each function?
                  (4) How much was spent on the following:
                  (a) Beer?
                  (b) Imported champagne?
                  (c) Australian champagne?
                  (d) Wine bottled in New South Wales?
                  (e) Wine bottled interstate?
                  (f) Wine bottled overseas?
                  (g) Spirits?
                  (5) Was caviar offered to the guests?
                  (6) Who were the guests at each function?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Nil.
                  (2) to (6) Not applicable.

              *647 HOUSING TENANTS REQUIREMENTS—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
                  (1) What is the Department of Housing's policy in respect of individuals living in departmental accommodation which is larger than their requirements?
                  (2) (a) Are any records kept by the department to indicate the number of people in accommodation larger than their requirments?
                  (b) If so, of what kind?
                  (3) (a) Is any check made by the Department to ascertain instances where tenants' housing circumstances have so changed that the housing size is no longer appropriate, e.g., children leaving home?
                  (b) If so, what sort of check?
                  Answer—

            Page 1091
                  (1) The Department will relocate those of its tenants who are underoccupying accommodation by two bedrooms or more and the accommodation is in a high demand area and is not required for redevelopment.
                  (2) (a) Yes.
                    (b) The Department has computer records of those tenants underoccupying its accommodation who are in receipt of a rental rebate.
                  (3) (a) Yes.
                    (b) This information can be checked when the tenant lodges an application for Rental Rebate or during the annual client visits.

              *648 OFFICIAL FUNCTIONS—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Gaming and Racing and Minister Assisting the Premier on Hunter Development—

                  (1) How many official functions have been held in his ministerial office since 4 April 1995?
                  (2) When were the functions held?
                  (3) What was the cost of each function?
                  (4) How much was spent on the following:
                  (a) Beer?
                  (b) Imported champagne?
                  (c) Australian champagne?
                  (d) Wine bottled in New South Wales?
                  (e) Wine bottled interstate?
                  (f) Wine bottled overseas?
                  (g) Spirits?
                  (5) Was caviar offered to the guests?
                  (6) Who were the guests at each function?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Nil.
                  (2) to (6) Not applicable.

              *649 PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY'S CAR USE—Mr Hartcher asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—
                  (1) Does his Parliamentary Secretary, the Member for Keira, have access to a Government car?
                  (2) (a) On how many days since 4 April 1995 has the Parliamentary Secretary utilised a Government supplied or hired car?
                  (b) What were the dates?
                  (3) What was the cost on each occasion and for how long was the car away from its base?
                  (4) What were the occasions?
                  (5) (a) If an official occasion, was the Parliamentary Secretary invited personally?
                  (b) If not, who was he representing?
                  (6) Where used, does the Government car transport the Parliamentary Secretary to and from his home?

            Page 1092
                  Answer—
                  (1) The member for Keira, as Parliamentary Secretary, is entitled to access to a Government car and driver when on official business in his capacity as Parliamentary Secretary.
                  (2) to (6) The diversion of public resources to answer the remaining questions is not justifiable.

              *650 NORTHERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Humpherson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                  (1) How many community nurses were employed by Northern Sydney Area Health Service in:
                  (a) 1992/93?
                  (b) 1993/94?
                  (c) 1994/95?
                  (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                  (2) How many nurses were employed by this area health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                  (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                  (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                  (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

              *651 NORTHERN SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Humpherson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                  (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Northern Sydney Area Health Service in:
                  (a) 1993?
                  (b) 1994?
                  (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                  (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this area health service in:
                  (a) 1993?
                  (b) 1994?
                  (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

              *652 PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY'S CAR USE—Mr Humpherson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                  (1) Does his Parliamentary Secretary, the Member for Port Jackson, have access to a Government car?
                  (2) (a) On how many days since 4 April 1995 has the Parliamentary Secretary utilised a Government supplied or hired car?
                  (b) What were the dates?
                  (3) What was the cost on each occasion and for how long was the car away from its base?
                  (4) What were the occasions?
            Page 1093
                  (5) (a) If an official occasion, was the Parliamentary Secretary invited personally?
                  (b) If not, who was she representing?
                  (6) Where used, does the Government car transport the Parliamentary Secretary to and from her home?
                  Answer—
                  (1) The member for Port Jackson is entitled to access to a Government car and driver when on official business in her capacity as Parliamentary Secretary.
                  (2) to (6) The diversion of public resources necessary to answer the remaining questions is not justifiable.

              *653 PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY'S CAR USE—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Tourism—

                  (1) Does his Parliamentary Secretary, the Member for Canterbury, have access to a Government car?
                  (2) (a) On how many days since 4 April 1995 has the Parliamentary Secretary utilised a Government supplied or hired car?
                  (b) What were the dates?
                  (3) What was the cost on each occasion and for how long was the car away from its base?
                  (4) What were the occasions?
                  (5) (a) If an official occasion, was the Parliamentary Secretary invited personally?
                  (b) If not, who was he representing?
                  (6) Where used, does the Government car transport the Parliamentary Secretary to and from his home?
                  Answer—
                  (1) The Member for Canterbury is entitled to access to a Government car and driver when on official business in his capacity as Parliamentary Secretary.
                  (2) None.
                  (3) to (6) Not applicable.

              *654 PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY'S CAR USE—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Police—

                  (1) Does his Parliamentary Secretary, the Member for Bulli, have access to a Government car?
                  (2) (a) On how many days since 4 April 1995 has the Parliamentary Secretary utilised a Government supplied or hired car?
                  (b) What were the dates?
                  (3) What was the cost on each occasion and for how long was the car away from its base?
                  (4) What were the occasions?
            Page 1094
                  (5) (a) If an official occasion, was the Parliamentary Secretary invited personally?
                  (b) If not, who was he representing?
                  (6) Where used, does the Government car transport the Parliamentary Secretary to and from his home?
                  Answer—
                  (1) to (6) A car is provided to enable the Member for Bulli to represent myself and the Minister for Emergency Services at official functions.
                  Use of the vehicle is in accordance with guidelines for official Government vehicles. Provision of further information would be time consuming and would divert officers of my administration from more essential tasks.

              *655 PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY'S CAR USE—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Police representing the Attorney General and Minister for Industrial Relations—

                  (1) Does his Parliamentary Secretary, the Member for Hurstville, have access to a Government car?
                  (2) (a) On how many days since 4 April 1995 has the Parliamentary Secretary utilised a Government supplied or hired car?
                  (b) What were the dates?
                  (3) What was the cost on each occasion and for how long was the car away from its base?
                  (4) What were the occasions?
                  (5) (a) If an official occasion, was the Parliamentary Secretary invited personally?
                  (b) If not, who was he representing?
                  (6) Where used, does the Government car transport the Parliamentary Secretary to and from his home?
                  Answer—
                  The Attorney General has advised me that the answers are:
                  (1) The member for Hurstville is entitled to access to a Government car and driver when on official business in his capacity as Parliamentary Secretary.
                  (2) to (6) The diversion of public resources necessary to answer the remaining questions is not justifiable.

              *656 PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY'S CAR USE—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—

                  (1) Does his Parliamentary Secretary, the Member for The Entrance, have access to a Government car?
                  (2) (a) On how many days since 4 April 1995 has the Parliamentary Secretary utilised a Government supplied or hired car?
                  (b) What were the dates?
                  (3) What was the cost on each occasion and for how long was the car away from its base?
                  (4) What were the occasions?
                  (5) (a) If an official occasion, was the Parliamentary Secretary invited personally?
                  (b) If not, who was he representing?
                  (6) Where used, does the Government car transport the Parliamentary Secretary to and from his home?
                  Answer—

            Page 1095
                  (1) The Member for The Entrance is entitled to access to a Government car and driver when on official business in his capacity as Parliamentary Secretary.
                  (2) to (6) The diversion of public resources necessary to answer the remaining questions is not justifiable.

              *657 OUTSTANDING CORRESPONDENCE—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
                  (1) What is the longest time members have had to wait for a reply to representations made on behalf of constituents?
                  (2) What is an appropriate timeframe for a constituent to wait for a response to representations?
                  (3) When will the member for Davidson receive a reply to representations on behalf of Mr Barry Condon of Oxford Falls?
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2) As a general rule, my portfolio aims for a maximum 4-week turnaround on Ministerial correspondence.
                  Bearing in mind the decentralised nature of the Department of Land and Water Conservation, you will appreciate that advice on a number of matters needs to be sought from rural-based staff prior to a reply being drafted.
                  My portfolio is turning over some 8,000 pieces of ministerial correspondence per year and an endeavour is made to provide replies to all correspondence as quickly as possible.
                  (3) The matters raised in the representations by the member for Davidson, on behalf of Mr Barry Condon of Oxford Falls, raised a number of complex issues relating to the status of land in this area and the implications of that land's status in terms of any legal actions that might be brought. Following completion of this legal investigation, a response to the Member's representations has now been forwarded.

              *658 WASTE MIMINISATION—Mr Longley asked the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—

                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
            Page 1096
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

              *659 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Longley asked the Minister for Gaming and Racing and Minister Assisting the Premier on Hunter Development—

                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

              *660 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Longley asked the Minister for Fair Trading and Minister for Women—

                  (1) What agencies under her portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

              *661 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Richardson asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—

                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
            Page 1097
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

              *662 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Richardson asked the Minister for Police—

                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

              *663 WASTE MIMINISATION—Mr Richardson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
            Page 1098
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

              *664 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Rixon asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—

                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Nil.
                  (2) to (6) Not applicable.

              *665 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Rixon asked the Minister for Agriculture—

                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) NSW Agriculture produces waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill 1995.
                  (2) NSW Agriculture produces industrial, vegetative, putrescible and liquid waste. No attempt has been made to date to quantify this.
                  (3) NSW Agriculture has taken steps to responsibly handle and reduce all categories of waste. It participates in the recycling of its industrial waste wherever local government or private industry provide a suitable service. NSW Agriculture has constructed and carefully manages plants on its facilities to deal with organic wastes from plants and animals. It has also constructed storage, washdown and collection facilities to enable it to manage chemical wastes such as herbicides and insecticides. All of its major establishments have energy management systems to assist in energy conservation. NSW Agriculture will significantly reduce the level of waste it produces by the year 2000.
                  (4) No annual targets have been set by NSW Agriculture, although the Department has undertaken to review the setting of recycling targets by 1997.
                  (5) Having 91 sites scattered across rural New South Wales means that there are few reliable recycling services available to NSW Agriculture. The Department has therefore had to gear its
            Page 1099
              waste minimisation and management policies to the level of service that can be provided at each location.
                  (6) No attempt has been made at this time to cost waste reduction in NSW Agriculture.

              *666 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Rixon asked the Minister for Small Business and Regional Development, Minister for Ports, Assistant Minister for Energy and Assistant Minister for State Development—
                  (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                  (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                  (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                  (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                  (5) If not, why not?
                  (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                  Answer—
                  (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                  (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

              *667 HOMEFUND COMPENSATION—Mr Schipp asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
                  (1) Of the 28,246 HomeFund borrowers who received compensation for delayed crediting of loan repayments, how many received amounts between:
                  (a) 39 cents and $1?
                  (b) $1.01 and $5?
                  (c) $5.01 and $10?
                  (d) $10.01 and $20?
                  (e) $20.01 and $50?
                  (f) $50.01 and $100?
                  (g) $100.01 and $200?
                  (h) $200.01 and $302?
                  (2) Why was the delayed clearance system introduced into the HomeFund Scheme?
                  (3) When was this system introduced?
                  (4) When was it terminated?
                  (5) Did other home loan financiers at any time use a similar system?
                  (6) Did they cease this practice on introduction of electronic clearance systems?
                  (7) Is electronic clearance now available for processing of HomeFund repayments?
                  (8) When was this system installed?
                  (9) Are all Co-operative Housing Societies currently equipped with electronic clearance facilities?
                  (10) What is the current delay between lodgment of payments and crediting of the borrower's account?
                  Answer—

            Page 1100
                  (1) To 31 December 1995, 28,256 HomeFund borrowers had been assessed for/received compensation for delayed crediting of loan repayments. 1,700 borrowers were not entitled to receive any compensation. 23 borrowers received compensation of less than 39 cents. The number of remaining borrowers receiving compensation of between 39 cents and $302.47 was as follows:
                    (a) 179
                    (b) 2,185
                    (c) 2,952
                    (d) 5,131
                    (e) 8,925
                    (f) 3,027
                    (g) 3,808
                    (h) 323
                  (2) To allow a 10-day period within which rejected direct debit payments could be identified.
                  (3) The arrangements were in place at the commencement of the HomeFund Scheme.
                  (4) The arrangements were terminated in January 1992.
                  (5) and (6) The past practices of other home loan financiers are not known.
                  (7) No. The Bulk Electronic Clearing System is programmed for introduction in October 1996.
                  (8) Not applicable.
                  (9) No.
                  (10) Payments are credited to borrowers' accounts on the date of lodgement.

              *668 HOMEFUND COMPENSATION PAYMENTS—Mr Schipp asked the Minister for Fair Trading and Minister for Women—
                  (1) Which Co-operative Housing Societies have been made to pay compensation payments to HomeFund borrowers?
                  (2) In respect of each society:
                  (a) What has been the total compensation paid?
                  (b) What has been the highest/lowest payment?
                  (c) How many borrowers have received compensation?
                  (d) What are the reasons for compensation being paid?

            Page 1101
                  Answer—
                  (1) and (2)
              Q. 1


              Name of co-operative housing societies
              Q. 2 (a)


              Compen-sation paid $
              Q. 2 (b)

              Range of compensation payments
              Q. 2 (c)

              No. borrowers received compen-sationQ. 2 (d)



              Reason
              Lowest
              $
              Highest
              $
              1. AWUN CHS37,924.2211,494.6526,429.572Shortfall waiver of interest
              2. City Central CHS42,056.36567.5812,223.305Interest rate adjustment
              3. Coffs Harbour CHS50.0050.0050.001Interest rate adjustment
              4. Liberty Plains CHS15,646.3615,646.3615,646.361Refund of overpayment by borrowers and interest rate adjustment
              5. Marsden CHS526.81137.25389.562Refund of repayment by borrowers
              6. MIA CHS221.00221.00221.001Refund of cost of discharging borrowers
              7. Milton and Ulladulla CHS924.79924.79924.791Shortfall payment of principal and interest
              8. Montgomery CHS16,535.2235.2216,500.002Refund of overpayment by borrowers and shortfall waiver of interest
              9. Mutual Homes CHS346.67346.67346.671Refund of overpayment by borrowers
              10. Northern Mutual CHS12,883.4412,883.4412,883.441Refund of overpayment by borrowers
              11. Parkes CHS9,390.009,390.009,390.001Refund of overpayment by borrowers
              12. Parramatta CHS3,039.473,039.473,039.471Administrative error by Co-operative
              13. Penrith CHS1,281.82160.001,121.822Refund of overpayment by borrowers
              14. Port Kembla CHS1,355.891,355.891,355.891Interest rate adjustment
              15. Riverina CHS688.77688.77688.771Interest rate adjustment
              16. SBS CHS123.97123.97123.971Refund of overpayment by borrowers
              17. Sutherland Shire CHS2,162.612,162.612,162.611Interest rate adjustment
              18. Wellington CHS5,300.005,300.005,300.001Breach of FANMAC guidelines by Co-operative
              TOTAL150,457.4035.2226,429.5726
            Page 1102

                *669 DEPARTMENTAL AMALGAMATIONS—Mr Slack-Smith asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
                    With the amalgamation of the Department of CaLM and the Department of Water Resources—
                    (1) How many positions were duplicated?
                    (2) How many redundancy offers were made to management and staff?
                    (3) How many offers were accepted?
                    Answer—
                    (1) The structure of the Department of Land and Water Conservation is yet to be completely finalised. To date, an estimated 62 positions in the head office Corporate Services Division may be regarded as duplications following the rationalisation of functions and activities. It is estimated that there will be approximately a further 50 positions performing technical service functions that will also be identified as duplications.
                    (2) The Government’s policy is that there will be no forced redundancies in the public sector. Accordingly, no staff have been offered redundancy without also having the option of redeployment.
                    The Department has, however, received requests for redundancy from 32 officers.
                    (3) Of the 32 requests for redundancy received from departmental officers, 25 have so far been approved on the basis that the duties being performed in the positions are duplicated, and on the basis that it is unlikely that similar positions will be available in the public sector, therefore indicating that those officers affected will be declared "displaced employees".
                    The remaining seven requests for redundancy which the Department has received are currently being considered.

                *670 ROY ARTHUR ALLAN—Mr Turner asked the Minister for Police—
                    (1) Why did Dr Garrard of the Police Medical Branch attend upon Ray Arthur Allan at the Police Medical Branch on 28 July 1987?
                    (2) What was the sergeant's medical condition for which he was referred to the Medalla Clinic for treatment?
                    Answer—
                    The Executive Director, Human Resources, advised the following in response to a previous parliamentary question on this issue (LA Question No. 185):
                    (1) I am advised that Sergeant Allan, at his request, sought an interview with officers of the Internal Police Security Unit and attended that unit on the morning of 28 July 1987. The interviewing officer formed the opinion that Sergeant Allan was in need of medical assistance and arranged for him to be conveyed to the Police Welfare and Medical Branch.
                    Dr Garrard examined Sergeant Allan at about midday on 28 July 1987, for approximately 1½ hours.
                    (2) I believe it is inappropriate for me to reveal the details of any individual's medical condition.

            Page 1103

                *671 HACC FUNDING—Mr Turner asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—
                    With regard to the $239 million allocated to the State of New South Wales under the HACC Program, how much will be spent on the cost of—
                    (1) Administrative and Bureaucratic activities of people at State and Local Government and community levels in administering the HACC program?
                    (2) Providing home and community care to those in need in the community?
                    (3) Other items?
                    Answer—
                    (1) Approximately $2.8 million is allocated from HACC Program funds for administration of the HACC Program. Administrative costs relating to services funded through the HACC Program are currently being identified through the Unit Costs Survey.
                    (2) All HACC funds, with the exception of the administrative funds discussed in question (1), are allocated for the provision of Home and Community Care Services. This totals over $236 million.
                    (3) Not applicable.

                *672 CENTRAL SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Zammit asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                    (1) How many community nurses were employed by Central Sydney Area Health Service in:
                    (a) 1992/93?
                    (b) 1993/94?
                    (c) 1994/95?
                    (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                    (2) How many nurses were employed by this area health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                    (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                    (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                    (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                    Answer—
                    (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

                *673 CENTRAL SYDNEY AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Zammit asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                    (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Central Sydney Area Health Service in:
                    (a) 1993?
                    (b) 1994?
                    (c) 1995 (estimated)?
            Page 1104
                    (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this area health service in:
                    (a) 1993?
                    (b) 1994?
                    (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                    Answer—
                    (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

                12 DECEMBER 1995

                (Paper No. 32)

                *674 CLARENCE DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Causley asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                    (1) How many community nurses were employed by Clarence District Health Service in:
                      (a) 1992/93?
                      (b) 1993/94?
                      (c) 1994/95?
                      (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                    (2) How many nurses were employed by this district health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                      (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                      (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                      (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                    Answer—
                    (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

                *675 CLARENCE DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Causley asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                    (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Clarence District Health Service in:
                      (a) 1993?
                      (b) 1994?
                      (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                    (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this district health service in:
                      (a) 1993?
                      (b) 1994?
                      (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                    Answer—
                    (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

                *676 NARRANDERA—GOVERNMENT OFFICE BLOCK—Mr Cruickshank asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—

            Page 1105
                    With regard to the building known as the Government Office Block in Twynam Street, Narrandera, Lot 9, Sect. 24, DP758757, previous title vol. 5166, folio 163, Parish of Narrandera, County of Cooper—
                    (1) Why did the NSW Government resume this building in 1975?
                    (2) How much money did the Government pay for this building?
                    Answer—
                    (1) It cannot be confirmed why the resumption took place in 1975. One of the two pertinent departmental files on this matter was lost in 1984 and the other file was destroyed in accordance with approved culling procedures in 1994.
                    However, from information on the Certificate of Title, the Government Gazette of 5 November 1976 and from information from local residents, it appears that after the school (which used the building) was closed in 1973, the property was deemed surplus to the requirements of the Department of Education and the title to the property was transferred to the Minister for Public Works.
                    (2) There are no records which indicate if any compensation was paid to the Department of Education. As the building was apparently declared surplus after the school's closure, it is likely that the resumption was a formality.

                *677 WASTE MINIMISATION—Ms Ficarra asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Tourism—
                    (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                    (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                    (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                    (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                    (5) If not, why not?
                    (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                    Answer—
                    (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                    (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

                *678 WASTE MINIMISATION—Ms Ficarra asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—
                    (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                    (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                    (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                    (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                    (5) If not, why not?
            Page 1106
                    (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (6) To provide answers to the honourable member's questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.

                *679 WASTE MINIMISATION—Ms Ficarra asked the Minister for the Environment—
                    (1) What agencies under her portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                    (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                    (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                    (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                    (5) If not, why not?
                    (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                    Answer—
                    (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                    (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

                *680 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Longley asked the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries—
                    (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                    (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                    (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                    (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                    (5) If not, why not?
                    (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?

            Page 1107
                    Answer—
                    (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                    (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

                *681 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Longley asked the Minister for Sport and Recreation—
                    (1) What agencies under her portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                    (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                    (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                    (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                    (5) If not, why not?
                    (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                    Answer—
                    (1) Obviously each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                    (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

                *682 WASTE MINIMISATION—Mr Longley asked the Minister for Local Government—
                    (1) What agencies under his portfolio produce waste as defined in the Waste Minimisation and Management Bill?
                    (2) What quantities of each type of waste is produced by each agency annually, both currently and in 1990?
                    (3) Will each agency reduce each type of waste, and waste in total, by 60 per cent of the 1990 level by the year 2000?
                    (4) If so, what are the annual targets up to the year 2000?
                    (5) If not, why not?
                    (6) What is the estimated cost of undertaking this waste reduction?
                    Answer—
                    (1) Each of the portfolio agencies has the potential to produce waste.
                    (2) to (6) In accordance with the Government's mandatory waste reduction and purchasing policy, all agencies within the portfolio will be required to develop waste reduction and purchasing plans which identify the opportunities for avoiding, reusing and recycling waste in key areas and set down cost-effective strategies for contributing to the 60 per cent waste reduction target.

                683 ORANGE SUITS—Mr O'Farrell to ask the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—

            Page 1108
                    (1) Is he aware of concerns at the use, by some Greenpeace members, of orange "jaffa" suits used by State Emergency Service personnel?
                    (2) Are the activities of some Greenpeace activists, wearing jaffa suits, bringing service personnel into disrepute?
                    (3) If so, what action will he take to restrict access to jaffa suits by non-State Emergency Service personnel?

                684 ORANGE BEACONS—Mr O'Farrell to ask the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—
                    (1) Are State Emergency Services restricted to using orange beacons?
                    (2) Are orange beacons also used by the NRMA and tow truck operators?
                    (3) Do the Bush Fire Service, Ambulance Services and Fire Brigade use red beacons?
                    (4) Why are State Emergency Services restricted to orange beacons?

                *685 WENTWORTH AREA HEALTH SERVICE—COMMUNITY NURSES—Mr Rozzoli asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                    (1) How many community nurses were employed by Wentworth Area Health Service in:
                      (a) 1992/93?
                      (b) 1993/94?
                      (c) 1994/95?
                      (d) 1995/96 (estimated)?
                    (2) How many nurses were employed by this area health service for the same periods by the following classifications:
                      (a) Nurse Unit Manager?
                      (b) Clinical Nurse Specialist?
                      (c) Clinical Nurse Consultant?
                    Answer—
                    (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 580.

                *686 WENTWORTH AREA HEALTH SERVICE—ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES—Mr Rozzoli asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                    (1) How many elective procedures were performed in the Wentworth Area Health Service in:
                      (a) 1993?
                      (b) 1994?
                      (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                    (2) How many emergency procedures were performed in this area health service in:
                      (a) 1993?
                      (b) 1994?
                      (c) 1995 (estimated)?
                    Answer—
                    (1) and (2) The information requested is set out in my answer to question No. 581.

                *687 DOMAIN MUSIC SHELL—Mr Schipp asked the Minister for the Environment—

            Page 1109
                    (1) What was the original cost of the Music Shell which is erected annually in the Domain?
                    (2) What is its estimated replacement value?
                    (3) Over what period is it being depreciated?
                    (4) What is the per annum cost of erection and dismantling?
                    (5) Has consideration been given to finding a permanent site?
                    Answer—
                    (1) $500,000 (canopy and stage).
                    (2) $500,000 (canopy and stage).
                    (3) The anticipated life of the canopy is 10 years.
                    (4) About $95,000.
                    (5) Yes. Public Works and Services has considered a permanent structure in the Domain. However the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust will not support a permanent erosion of the Domain's precious green space. The present arrangements allow both a summer season of concerts as well as autumn and winter use for team sports.

                *688 HOUSING—DEPARTMENTAL PROPERTIES SALES—Mr Schipp asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
                    (1) How many Department of Housing properties, apportioned as to units and houses, were sold in the years:
                      (a) 1993/94?
                      (b) 1994/95?
                      (c) 1995 to date?
                    (2) What was the total value of housing stock sold?
                    (3) How were these revenues redeployed?
                    (4) In what areas were the properties located?
                    Answer—
                    (1) Sales of detached houses to Department of Housing tenants were as follows:
                      (a) 116.
                      (b) 74.
                      (c) 42 (as at 31 December 1995).
                    The Department of Housing does not sell townhouses, villas, apartments/units or pensioner accommodation, nor does it sell housing stock to the general public.
                    (2) $21,130,613.
                    (3) The revenues received were utilised in the purchase of additional houses for Department of Housing clients.
                    (4) The properties sold were located in all areas of New South Wales, with approximately one half located in the Sydney Metropolitan Area.

                *689 HOMEFUND BORROWERS—MISLEADING CONDUCT—Mr Schipp asked the Minister for Fair Trading and Minister for Women—
                    (1) How many HomeFund borrowers were assessed as contributing to their downfall by engaging in their own misleading and deceptive conduct at the time of loan application?
                    (2) How many of these borrowers:
                      (a) Failed to disclose other debts?
                      (b) Understated income?
                      (c) Overstated income?
            Page 1110
                      (d) Distorted their employment history?
                      (e) Included loans as gifts?
                    (3) What was the total value of these loans?
                    (4) What was the total value of government subsidy paid to these borrowers?
                    (5) Has recovery action been taken against these borrowers?
                    (6) Did all borrowers sign statutory declarations?
                    (7) What other checks were in place?
                    Answer—
                    (1) In excess of 55,000 loans were written under the HomeFund Scheme. The HomeFund Commissioner contacted all borrowers advising them of their right to lodge a complaint. A total of 8,319 complaints were lodged. Of these, approximately 4,200 are from borrowers who have refinanced their loans with a commercial lender, 1,400 are from borrowers who have left the scheme other than by refinancing, i.e., by sale, surrender or by eviction from their home; and 2,700 are from current borrowers.
                    The HomeFund Commissioner has issued two separate conciliation offers to selected complainants. The first in the amount of $400 and the second in the amount of $1,000. The first offer was made to borrowers who had refinanced their loans, current borrowers who had been classified in the restructuring program as Category A and those borrowers who had accepted Category B. These borrowers only retained the rights set out in Schedule 2 of the HomeFund Restructuring Act or those against parties other than those directly involved in the HomeFund scheme. The matters set out in Schedule 2 relate mainly to complaints of maladministration occurring during the course of the loan. Extensive analysis of these types of complaints indicated an average financial loss not exceeding a few hundred dollars.
                    The amount of the conciliation offer was equivalent to the minimum administrative cost of conducting an investigation. Eligible borrowers received the offer if, on the basis of a preliminary assessment, their complaints fell within jurisdiction and if proven would entitle them to compensation. The offer was made in lieu of a full investigation of the borrowers complaint. Consequently, it is not possible to ascertain whether these borrowers who accepted the offer had contributed in a material way to their problems with their HomeFund loan. Full details with respect to this conciliation process is set out in the Homefund Commissioner Special Report to the Minister for Consumer Affairs, 1 June 1994, subsequently tabled in Parliament.
                    The second conciliation offer in the amount of $1,000 was made to Category C borrowers. These borrowers were eligible for a number of benefits under the restructure and the Commissioner is required by the HomeFund Restructuring Act 1993 to have regard to any assistance granted, or for which the borrower is eligible, in assessing whether a borrower is entitled to any further compensation. In addition, a general analysis of these borrowers revealed that the financial loss suffered as a result of Schedule 2 complaints would not, in most cases, exceed $600. This conciliation offer was on the same basis as the first offer. Full details with respect to this conciliation process is set out in the HomeFund Commissioner Special Report to the Minister for Consumer Affairs, 12 May 1995, subsequently tabled in Parliament.
                    As at 15 January 1996 some 3,059 borrowers had accepted the $400 offer and 369 had accepted the $1,000 offer. Thus for these 3,428 borrowers it is not possible to answer the question because no thorough investigation has been undertaken.
                    Offers were not accepted by 1,955 borrowers and these complainants are currently in the process of being fully investigated.
                    As at 15 January 1996 some 264 (18 per cent) of 1,441 HomeFund borrower complaints investigated by the HomeFund Commissioner have been assessed as involving misleading and deceptive conduct by the borrower at the time of the loan application. Consequently, pursuant to section 12 (3) (f) of the HomeFund Commissioner Act 1993, the borrower has been advised that their conduct disqualifies them from receiving any compensation.
            Page 1111
                    (2) (a) to (e) The HomeFund Commissioner advises that many of these borrowers failed to disclose other debts, or characterised personal loans as gifts when applying for their HomeFund loan. Others under or overstated their income, or supplied a false employment record.
                        It is not possible to specify numbers for each type of conduct outlined above as this information is not captured on the data system of the HomeFund Commissioner. To gather this information would require an individual examination of each file and in many cases further investigation to ascertain whether the borrower had engaged in more than one type of disqualifying conduct. The HomeFund Commissioner has a statutory requirement to act expeditiously in the investigation of complaints. Given the fact that an investigation is still to commence in relation to some complaints, the Commissioner is of the view that he cannot justify the diversion of resources to the task of collecting this information at this time.
                    (3) The information sought is not available.
                    (4) The information sought is not available.
                    (5) Recovery action is outside the jurisdiction of the HomeFund Commissioner.
                    (6) The information sought is not available.
                    (7) The HomeFund Commissioner is not able to answer this question as it is not within his area of responsibility.

                *690 ROBBIE HAYES REVIEW—Mrs Skinner asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                    (1) Has the Department of Health conducted a review of the Health Care Complaints Commission investigation of the death of Robbie Hayes at St George Hospital?
                    (2) (a) Is the review complete?
                      (b) If not, when will it be finished?
                    (3) Will the report be made available to the public and/or to Robbie's father?
                    Answer—
                    (1) The tragic death of 10-year-old Robby Hayes occurred when resources at St George Hospital Emergency units were stretched as a result of the across-the-board productivity cuts of the previous Government. It was only after pressure from the then opposition that the case was investigated.
                    I am advised that Mr Richard Hayes has written to the Director-General of the Department of Health about the Complaints Unit investigation.
                    The Complaints Unit released two investigation reports on the case. As a result of these investigations significant new emergency department policies were developed. As Minister, I have ensured these policies are implemented. The Complaints Unit investigation did not find evidence that suggested that disciplinary action should be taken against the individual health practitioners involved.
                    However, the lapse of time since Robby's death makes reinvestigations inappropriate and inadvisable. What is crucial is ensuring adequate policies are in place to ensure there is no repeat of this tragedy.
                    (2) and (3) Not applicable.

                *691 LINEAR ACCELERATOR—LIVERPOOL HOSPITAL—Mrs Skinner asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                    (1) Why has the second linear accelerator ready to treat patients at Liverpool Hospital since July this year, not yet been put to use?
                    (2) When will it start to be used and why the delay?
            Page 1112
                    (3) How many patients are now waiting for treatment which could be provided by the machine if it were in use?
                    (4) How long have they been waiting for treatment?
                    Answer—
                    (1) and (2) I am advised by the South Western Sydney Area Health Service that the first linear accelerator in the Cancer Therapy Centre at Liverpool Hospital was commissioned for radiotherapy treatment in May 1995. The second linear accelerator was not ready to treat patients until September 1995 and will be commissioned in February 1996.
                    Recruitment of the additional professional staff required to operate the linear accelerator is most easy at the end of the year when new graduates become available. Six graduate radiation therapists were recruited in November 1995 and will commence duties in mid-January 1996. One position for a senior radiation therapist has not been filled to date. The Department of Health is aware of the difficulties associated with training and recruitment of radiation therapists and is currently reviewing this matter.
                    In addition, a third radiation oncologist is expected to commence work at the Liverpool Hospital in January 1996.
                    (3) and (4) The Area has advised that the current waiting time for radiation therapy at Liverpool Hospital is approximately 4 weeks following the 2 weeks that is required for radiotherapy planning prior to treatment.
                    Currently 45 patients are listed for treatment. Patients that require urgent radiotherapy can be treated within 2 days, or can be transferred to Westmead Hospital where current waiting times are short because of a reduction in workload as a result of the commissioning of the Liverpool Centre.
                    Radiotherapy services are also available at St George, Prince of Wales, St Vincent’s, Royal Prince Alfred, Royal North Shore and the Illawarra Cancer Care Centre. As a statewide referral service, access is based on clinical need and not on place of residence.

                *692 BRACHYTHERAPY UNIT—LIVERPOOL HOSPITAL—Mrs Skinner asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—
                    (1) Is a brachytherapy unit proposed for Liverpool Hospital soon to be commissioned and operational?
                    (2) If not, what has become of the $350,000 committed for the purpose?
                    Answer—
                    (1) Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy treatment where radio-isotopes are inserted into the body of the patient for local radiotherapy. This is used particularly for gynaecological cancer. It is suitable for a relatively small proportion of patients who require radiotherapy.
                    I am advised by the South Western Sydney Area Health Service that in planning the establishment of the Cancer Therapy Centre at Liverpool, there was a broad based agreement that establishment of the linear accelerators and associated equipment should be given first priority and that brachytherapy should be deferred until a later stage. One reason for this was that there are several ways to administer brachytherapy and it was felt appropriate to leave the decision on the sort of equipment to be installed until advice could be given by Liverpool Hospital's Radiation Oncologists.
                    The hospital's second Staff Radiation Oncologist commenced in July 1995 and has just submitted a proposal for brachytherapy at Liverpool Hospital. However, it is important that this proposal is reviewed in the context of the possible networking of services between Liverpool, Westmead and Nepean Hospitals, to ensure that there is not inappropriate duplication of brachytherapy services for a relatively small number of patients.
            Page 1113
                    Discussions between South Western Sydney, Western Sydney and Wentworth Area Health Services concerning more effective networking of radiation therapy services across the greater west of Sydney have already commenced. The provision of effective brachytherapy services is to be a priority item for discussion.
                    (2) The Area has advised that the funds designated for brachytherapy remain within the funds allocated for equipment associated with the major redevelopment of Liverpool Hospital. These will be used to purchase new equipment for specialist services in accordance with clinical need. It is still to be determined whether brachytherapy equipment is a high priority item.

                *693 MINOR CAPITAL WORKS—Mr Souris asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                    What are the various projects to the value of $245.489 million listed in 1995/96 Budget Paper No. 4, page 65 under the heading minor capital works?
                    Answer—
                    The information is currently being compiled. However, due to the complexity of the information sought, it is unavailable at this point of time and will be forwarded to the honourable member as soon as it is available.

                *694 PUBLIC TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM—Mr Souris asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                    (1) What are the projects to be carried out this financial year under the Public Transport Infrastructure Improvement Program?
                    (2) What is the cost of each of these projects?
                    (3) When are the projects scheduled to begin?
                    (4) When are the projects scheduled to finish?
                    (5) In which electorates are these works to be undertaken?
                    (6) What was the criteria used to allocate these projects?
                    (7) How many of these projects were previously on the forward capital program of the NSW Department of Transport?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (7) To provide answers to the honourable member’s questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.
                    I prefer to spend that money building a better road network. The expenditure on the program will be audited independently by the 3x3 Committee comprising of Mr Don Mackay, Mr Allan Fifield, Ms Audrey Hardman, and Mr Neville Head.

                *695 WESTERN SYDNEY ROADS AND TRANSPORT PROGRAM—Mr Souris asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                    (1) What is the full schedule of works to be carried out under the Western Sydney Roads and Transport Program?
                    (2) What is the value of these projects?
                    (3) What is the cost of each of these projects?
                    (4) When are the projects scheduled to begin?
                    (5) When are the projects scheduled to finish?
                    (6) In which electorates are these works to be undertaken?
            Page 1114
                    (7) What was the criteria used to allocate these projects?
                    (8) Can he give a commitment that the Western Sydney Roads and Transport Program will continue past this financial year?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (8) To provide answers to the honourable member’s questions would require a diversion of public resources which is not justifiable.
                    I prefer to spend that money building a better road network. The expenditure on the program will be audited by an Independent Review Committee comprising of Mr Lindsay Barnett as the Chairperson, a representative from Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils and a representative from the National Roads and Motorists Association.

                13 DECEMBER 1995

                (Paper No. 33)

                *696 SCHOOL CROSSING SUPERVISORS—Mr Armstrong asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                    (1) How many school crossing supervisors did the RTA fund or partly fund during 1994/95?
                    (2) How many school crossing supervisors will the RTA fund or partly fund during 1995/96?
                    Answer—
                    (1) 305.
                    (2) Estimated 352.

            Page 1115

                *697 PACIFIC HIGHWAY UPGRADING—COFFS HARBOUR—Mr Armstrong asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                    (1) In light of a recent death between Englands and Lyons Road on the Pacific Highway at Coffs Harbour, why has he delayed a $29 million upgrading of this black spot?
                    (2) Why has he abandoned a $5 million project due to start in 1995/96 from Bruxnor Park Road to Pine Brush Creek in the electorate of Coffs Harbour?
                    Answer—
                    (1) This project has not been delayed. The work has a high priority and funding has been made available for preconstruction activities in this financial year.
                    The recently-signed 10-year Commonwealth/State Heads of Government agreement on the Pacific Highway has meant that a revised program of works for the highway is being developed. The highway upgrading project at Coffs Harbour will be commenced as soon as practicable following the development of the new program and the finalisation of planning and property acquisition for the work.
                    (2) This important work has not been abandoned. As indicated in (1) above, a revised program of works for the Pacific Highway is being developed. The project will be commenced as soon as practicable following the completion of the new program of works for the highway.

                *698 DEPARTMENTAL CONTRACTS—Mr Armstrong asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                    (1) Has any department or agency under his administration let any contracts to any companies that have previously entered administration or a scheme of arrangement with creditors?
                    (2) If so, what are the names of the companies?
                    (3) How did this situation occur?
                    (4) What procedures are in place to ensure that the situation will not occur again?
                    (5) Why does the Government take no action to ensure security of payment in the building industry?
                    Answer—
                    (1) The Olympic Coordination Authority (OCA) and the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) records do not show any contracts let to any company that had previously entered administration or a scheme of arrangements with creditors.
                    (2) Not applicable.
                    (3) Not applicable.
                    (4) The RTA has a prequalification scheme which checks the technical, management and financial capacity of organisations which undertake its major contract works. When applying for prequalification, applicants are required to disclose whether the company had in the past failed to complete a contract and if so, when, where and why. Companies are prequalified following this assessment.
                    The RTA has not prequalified any company which has previously entered into administration or a scheme of arrangements with creditors. Only prequalified companies are contracted by the RTA for major construction works.
                    Contracts let by the OCA have used standard contract documents prepared by the Department of Public Works and Services and incorporating the requirements of Premier’s Memorandum No. 95-1 of January 1995 relating to Security of Payment.
                    Detailed financial checks of contractors are carried out prior to the letting of contracts except for minor works where major subcontracting is not involved.
            Page 1116
                    (5) The NSW Government has in place a strategy for ensuring security of payment in the building industry. This whole of Government approach was developed by the Construction Policy Steering Committee and adopted in Premier’s Memorandum No. 95-1.
                    Reflective payment clauses now ensure that equitable terms of payment are observed for all parties down the payment chain.

                *699 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Cochran asked the Minister for Land and Water Conservation—
                    (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                    (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                    The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                    The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                700 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Cochran to ask the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—

                    (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
            Page 1117
                    (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?

                *701 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Cochran asked the Minister for Agriculture—

                    (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                    (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                    The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                    The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulation 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                *702 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Cochran asked the Minister for Small Business and Regional Development, Minister for Ports, Assistant Minister for Energy and Assistant Minister for State Development—

                    (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
            Page 1118
                    (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                    The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                    The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulation 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                *703 GAME BIRD HUNTING BANS—Mr Cruickshank asked the Minister for the Environment—
                    (1) What conservation grounds were invoked for the ban on game bird hunting?
                    (2) What conservation authorities did she contact overseas to ascertain the conservation advantages of such a ban?
                    (3) What published scientific material did she and her advisers refer to in deciding the ban was necessary?
                    Answer—
                    (1) There have been occasions where endangered species such as the Freckled Duck have unlawfully been shot during previous open seasons.
                    The decision was however based on animal welfare and community acceptability grounds rather than conservation of species.
                    (2) No overseas authorities were consulted. The National Parks and Wildlife Service did consult with the Western Australian Department of Conservation and Land Management on the results of the termination of open seasons on ducks in that State.
                    (3) Nil.

                *704 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Debnam asked the Minister for Corrective Services and Minister for Emergency Services—

                    (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
            Page 1119
                    (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                    The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                    The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                *705 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Debnam asked the Minister for Gaming and Racing and Minister Assisting the Premier on Hunter Development—

                    (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                    (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                    The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                    The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                *706 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Debnam asked the Minister for Fair Trading and Minister for Women—
            Page 1120

                    (1) (a) Does she personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under her administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has she approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                    (4) For each agency under her administration what was:
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does she have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?
                    Answer—
                    (1) (a) Yes.
                      (b) Not applicable.
                    (2) Three:
                        Department of Fair Trading (Consumer Affairs) 1
                        Department of Fair Trading (Real Estate Services) 1
                        Department for Women 1
                      Note that the overseas travel referred to with respect to the officer from the Department of Fair Trading (Real Estate Services) was not taxpayer funded. Funding was provided from the Real Estate Services Council (RESC) a Statutory Authority within the portfolio. Funds to support the operation of the RESC are derived from licence fees, part interest from funds retained on trust by agents and interest on accumulated investments.
                    (3) $15,798.
                    (4) Department of Fair Trading (Consumer Affairs):
                      (a) Manager, Co-operatives Development.
                      (b) Fair Trading—To attend the International Co-operative Alliance Centenary Congress and to present a paper at associated meetings and visit relevant regulatory and development authorities.
                      (c) England.
                      (d) $5,078.
                      (e) 14 days, including travel.
                      Department of Fair Trading (Real Estate Services):
                      (a) General Manager, Real Estate Services Council.
                      (b) To attend the national conference of Association Real Estate Licence Law Officials. Discussions with representatives of the National Association of Real Estate Agents.
                      (c) USA, England and Holland.
                      (d) $10,378.
                      (e) 13 days, including travel.
            Page 1121
                      Department for Women:
                      (a) Director General, Department for Women.
                      (b) To address an international discussion meeting on "Globalisation of Seoul: Discussion on Women's Policy in the Metropolitan area" in the Republic of Korea. The journey was extended to include Hong Kong to conduct meetings with representatives of women's interest groups in Hong Kong.
                      (c) Republic of Korea, Hong Kong.
                      (d) The Director-General was the guest of the Republic of Korea and as a result no costs were incurred by the Department. The Department paid only for the Hong Kong leg of the journey which cost $342 being the air fare.
                      (e) Hong Kong, 8 to 9 December 1995. Republic of Korea, 9 to 14 December 1995.
                    (5) Yes.
                    (6) Premier's Memorandum No. 89-2.

                *707 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Debnam asked the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries—

                    (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                    (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                    The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                    The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                *708 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Debnam asked the Minister for Sport and Recreation—

                    (1) (a) Does she personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under her administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has she approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                    (4) For each agency under her administration what was:
            Page 1122
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does she have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                    The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                    The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                *709 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Debnam asked the Minister for Local Government—

                    (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                    (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                    (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                    (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                    (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                    (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                    (b) The purpose of each trip?
                    (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                    (d) The cost of each trip?
                    (e) The duration of each trip?
                    (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                    (6) If so, what are they?
                    Answer—
                    (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                    The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                    The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                *710 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Humpherson asked the Premier, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Ethnic Affairs—
              Page 1123
                      (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                      (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                  *711 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Humpherson asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs—

                      (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                      (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?

              Page 1124
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      In accordance with the Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995, details of overseas visits undertaken by Health Department employees are published in the Department's Annual Report.

                  *712 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads representing the Treasurer, Minister for Energy, Minister for State Development and Minister Assisting the Premier—

                      (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                      (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulation 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                  *713 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Police—

                      (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                      (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
              Page 1125
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                  *714 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Humpherson asked the Minister for Transport and Minister for Tourism—

                      (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                      (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                  *715 COMIC SCRIPT WRITER—Ms Machin asked the Minister for Agriculture—
                      (1) Does he employ any person to write comic scripts for him?
                      (2) If so:
                      (a) Who is this person?
                      (b) What is the basis of their employment?
              Page 1126
                      (c) Has the Premier sought his assistance in the preparation of humorous speeches?
                      Answer—
                      (1) No.
                      (2) Not applicable.

                  *716 YABBY TRAPPING—DARLING RIVER—Ms Machin asked the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries—
                      (1) Is he considering granting a commercial licence for yabby trapping in the Darling River?
                      (2) What consultation has he undertaken on this matter?
                      (3) What research is available in regard to the likely impact of a commercial operation on this river?
                      (4) When will he make a decision on this matter?
                      Answer—
                      (1) There will be no commercial licences issued specifically for yabby trapping in the Darling River. However, I have been asked to consider allowing existing inland commercial fishers to use yabby traps in the Darling River upstream of Pooncarie.
                      (2) The issue has been debated in meetings between NSW Fisheries, inland commercial fishermen and recreational groups including the South and South West Amateur Fishermen's Association and the Far West Anglers Association. A decision, as yet, has not been made.
                      (3) The yabby fishery is not believed to be under any threat of over harvesting by commercial fishing and research is not a high priority. However, a research project is being funded to analyse the extensive data from the inland commercial fishery and will provide information on catch-per-unit-effort, fish population status and historical catch trends.
                      (4) A decision will only be made after further consultation with the commercial industry and recreational bodies in the area.

                  *717 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE—Mr O'Doherty asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—
                      (1) Why has English as a Second Language Teachers been cut in the Metropolitan East Region?
                      (2) What is the level of cuts to the number of teachers in this region?
                      (3) What impact will this have on the teaching of ESL in primary schools?
                      (4) What follow-on effect will this have to the teaching of other curricula?

              Page 1127
                      Answer—
                      (1) The allocation of ESL staff is based on a statewide assessment of need. The Department of School Education bases this assessment on data collected from schools at the beginning of term three each year. Because of demographic movements the pattern of need for support has changed considerably over the last few years. Metropolitan East's student population has been in decline for almost a decade. The number of ESL teachers allocated to the region reflects this change.
                      (2) The region has 301.8 ESL teachers for 1996. This is a reduction of 20.5 teaching positions from 1995. These positions have gone largely to schools in Metropolitan South West Region and Metropolitan West Region.
                      (3) The overall number of ESL teachers across the State has remained the same. As ESL staffing is a statewide process based upon reported need by each school during the annual assessment, the impact of these changes on the teaching of ESL in primary schools should not be a variable.
                      (4) There should be no follow-on effect to the teaching of other curricula.

                  *718 ROADS BUDGET SUBMISSIONS—Mr Photios asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                      (1) Did he or his personal staff take submissions in either verbal or written form from Members of Parliament in the preparation of the 1995/96 roads budget?
                      (2) If so, how many of these submissions were from Labor Members of Parliament, and how many were from Coalition Members?
                      Answer—
                      (1) Yes.
                      (2) According to Roads and Traffic Authority records, I received about 500 written representations concerning road funding matters from Members of Parliament during the period 1 May last to the release of the budget. Approximately 300 of these representations were made by Government Members and about 200 representations were made by Members of the Coalition Parties.

                  *719 ROADS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY—Mr Photios asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                      (1) Did a National Ministerial Council for Roads Transport meeting this year agree to a national approach to the development of all information technology for our roads system?
                      (2) How is the Government implementing this policy?
                      (3) Did the RTA sign an agreement with Philips and AWA to develop the next generation of software for the Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS) in September 1995?
                      (4) Given the fact that the SCATS system is widely used around Australia, is the decision to proceed with further development, but without input form other states, contrary to the national agreement?

              Page 1128
                      Answer—
                      (1) The Australian Transport Council agreed to a national approach to some aspects of Intelligent Transport Systems development. As regards the development of an Advanced Traffic Management System, of which SCATS is an example, the council has simply noted the RTA proposal to upgrade SCATS with the assistance of the private sector and with the possible involvement of some other State traffic authorities.
                      (2) The Australian Transport Council Intelligent Transport Systems Working Group was established to identify and adopt standards for intelligent transport systems, to investigate potential applications and to review financial, legal and organisational implications. The Government, through RTA representation on this Group, has made a substantial contribution to the implementation of a national approach in the agreed priority areas.
                      (3) The RTA has signed an agreement with AWA and Philips to jointly fund and direct a project to define the functional requirements and systems architecture for an upgraded SCATS system. There has been no agreement to actually develop the software.
                      (4) No. There has been input from other States and Territories at workshops attended by representatives of Australian and New Zealand authorities using SCATS. At the workshops, a briefing paper on the proposed approach to upgrading SCATS was provided and user needs and priorities were canvassed. Also, there has been some direct participation in the project by Queensland and Victoria authority staff and it is expected that this will continue.

                  *720 DEDICATED OLYMPIC TRAFFIC LANES—Mr Photios asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                      (1) Is the Government obliged to provide dedicated traffic lanes running between the two main Olympic sites at Homebush and Darling Harbour for those members of the "Olympic family" who will need to travel by road during the running of the Olympic Games in 2000?
                      (2) If so, what are the Government's plans to honour this commitment?
                      (3) If not, and given that transport by either train or rivercat will not always be feasible, what plans does the Government have to allow for quick road transport between the two sites for members of the Olympic family?
                      (4) Is he aware that despite a commitment to a car-free games, are many of the owners of the industrial and commercial sites around Olympic Park already planning to turn their properties into giant car parks for the duration of the games?
                      Answer—
                      (1) The concept of assigning dedicated lanes for official Olympic traffic was proposed in Sydney's bid to host the Year 2000 Games. The dedicated lane is to be used by Olympic Games organisers, security, officials and guests, athletes, fire brigade, ambulance and police.
                      (2) The Government intends to meet this commitment. Detailed traffic management plans which will recognise the needs of Sydney and the Olympic Games have not yet been finalised. Accordingly, at this stage, it is not possible to indicate where the dedicated lanes will be provided.
                      (3) Not applicable.
                      (4) The Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) is not aware of plans by owners of industrial and commercial sites in the vicinity of the Homebush Bay Olympic Games complex to use these sites as car parks during the course of the Games. It is the Government's strategy to provide public transport for spectators attending the Games.
                      Under the Local Government (Approvals) Regulation Act 1993, the concurrence of the RTA is required for the use of a site as a public car park.

                  *721 CASTLE HILL POLICE STATION—Mr Richardson asked the Minister for Police—

              Page 1129
                      (1) What is the authorised strength of Castle Hill Police Station?
                      (2) (a) How many officers are currently stationed at Castle Hill?
                      (b) What rank and status are those officers?
                      (3) (a) Has he agreed to transfer officers from Castle Hill Police Station to Parramatta?
                      (b) If so, how many officers have or are to be transferred?
                      (4) (a) Does he have any plans to bring manning levels at Castle Hill up to authorised strength?
                      (b) If so, what timeframe does he have in mind?
                      Answer—
                      The Regional Commander, North West, has provided the following response:
                      (1) 85 as at 5 January 1996.
                      (2) (a) 85 as at 5 January 1996.
                        (b) Superintendent 1
                          Senior Sergeant 3
                          Sergeant 14
                          Constable 67
                      (3) (a) Yes.
                        (b) Three officers were transferred from Castle Hill to Parramatta on 15 December 1995.
                      (4) (a) Castle Hill Police Station is at authorised strength as at 5 January 1996.
                        (b) Not applicable.

                  *722 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Schultz asked the Deputy Premier, Minister for Health and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs representing the Minister for Community Services, Minister for Aged Services and Minister for Disability Services—

                      (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                      (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulation 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

              Page 1130

                  *723 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Schultz asked the Minister for Police representing the Attorney General and Minister for Industrial Relations—

                      (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                      (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?
                      Answer—
                      The Attorney General has advised me that the answers are:
                      (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulations 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                  *724 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Schultz asked the Minister for Education and Training and Minister Assisting the Premier on Youth Affairs—

                      (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                      (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that all Ministers are satisfied that procedures are in place which
              Page 1131
                  establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulation 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                  *725 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Schultz asked the Minister for the Environment—

                      (1) (a) Does she personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under her administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has she approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
                      (4) For each agency under her administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does she have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (6) Premier's Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satified that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the "strictest economy" be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulation 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                  *726 OVERSEAS TRAVEL—PUBLIC SERVANTS—Mr Schultz asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—

                      (1) (a) Does he personally approve each application for taxpayer-funded overseas travel for public servants from agencies under his administration?
                      (b) If not, what procedure is followed?
                      (2) Since 4 April 1995, how many overseas trips has he approved?
                      (3) What is the total cost of these trips?
              Page 1132
                      (4) For each agency under his administration what was:
                      (a) The position of each officer approved for an overseas trip since 4 April 1995?
                      (b) The purpose of each trip?
                      (c) The countries visited on each trip?
                      (d) The cost of each trip?
                      (e) The duration of each trip?
                      (5) Does he have guidelines for the granting of approval of overseas trips?
                      (6) If so, what are they?
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (6) Premier’s Memorandum 89-2 regarding overseas travel by public sector employees and statutory officers requires that the Minister be satisfied that procedures are in place which establish that a proposed visit is essential and that significant benefit (to their particular administration and/or to the State in general) will accrue in the foreseeable future.
                      The Memorandum also requires that the “strictest economy” be exercised in respect of official overseas travel.
                      The Annual Reports (Departments) Regulation 1995 and the Annual Reports (Statutory Bodies) Regulation 1995 require details of overseas visits undertaken by officers and employees to be published.

                  *727 ROADS BUDGETS PROGRAM FORMATS—Mr Souris asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                      What are the figures in the following new program formats for the last ten roads budgets:
                      (1) Road Network Infrastructure:
                      (a) Network Development?
                      (b) Infrastructure Maintenance?
                      (2) Road Safety and Traffic Maintenance?
                      (3) Driver and Vehicle Policy and Regulation?
                      (4) Debt Servicing and Repayment?
                      (5) Non-current assets?
                      (6) Voluntary redundancies?
                      (7) Total expenditure?
                      Answer—
                      The following points relating to this answer should be noted:
                      • The amount shown for each year is actual expenditure.
                      • Expenditures for debt servicing and repayment, non-current assets, voluntary redundancies and total expenditure are as per final expenditure reports at 30 June each year.
                      • Expenditures in the core function programs, that is, Network Development, Infrastructure Maintenance, Road Safety and Traffic Management and Driver and Vehicle Policy and Regulation have been derived from a conversion of historical expenditure under the former program formats.
                      • Expenditure prior to 1989/90 relates only to the former Department of Main Roads.
                      • Expenditure prior to 1991/92 includes payments to Councils of Commonwealth grants for local roads.
                      (1) $ million
                        (a) 1985/86 539.9
                          1986/87 479.3
              Page 1133
                          1987/88 408.5
                          1988/89 392.8
                          1989/90 528.9
                          1990/91 652.5
                          1991/92 597.5
                          1992/93 676.7
                          1993/94 659.0
                          1994/95 630.4
                                        $ million
                        (b) 1985/86 281.9
                          1986/87 340.3
                          1987/88 382.3
                          1988/89 473.4
                          1989/90 575.9
                          1990/91 664.3
                          1991/92 477.2
                          1992/93 608.8
                          1993/94 628.5
                          1994/95 568.4
                          $ million
                      (2) 1985/86 53.3
                          1986/87 52.6
                          1987/88 72.7
                          1988/89 91.1
                          1989/90 76.7
                          1990/91 84.1
                          1991/92 96.7
                          1992/93 146.2
                          1993/94 179.8
                          1994/95 206.2
                                        $ million
                      (3) 1985/86 5.0
                          1986/87 6.3
                          1987/88 4.3
                          1988/89 6.9
                          1989/90 109.2
                          1990/91 132.0
                          1991/92 126.8
                          1992/93 135.3
                          1993/94 145.9
                          1994/95 176.1

              Page 1134
                                        $ million
                      (4) 1985/86 83.9
                          1986/87 122.0
                          1987/88 139.4
                          1988/89 145.2
                          1989/90 157.3
                          1990/91 175.3
                          1991/92 193.5
                          1992/93 152.2
                          1993/94 158.0
                          1994/95 163.2
                                        $ million
                      (5) 1985/86 8.2
                          1986/87 18.3
                          1987/88 14.2
                          1988/89 38.9
                          1989/90 73.9
                          1990/91 90.8
                          1991/92 50.5
                          1992/93 119.5
                          1993/94 81.7
                          1994/95 114.0
                                        $ million
                      (6) 1985/86 Nil
                          1986/87 Nil
                          1987/88 Nil
                          1988/89 3.3
                          1989/90 14.7
                          1990/91 5.9
                          1991/92 73.0
                          1992/93 58.3
                          1993/94 42.7
                          1994/95 40.1
                                        $ million
                      (7) 1985/86 972.2
                          1986/87 1,018.8
                          1987/88 1,021.4
                          1988/89 1,151.6
                          1989/90 1,536.6
                          1990/91 1,804.9
                          1991/92 1,615.2
                          1992/93 1,897.0
                          1993/94 1,895.6
                          1994/95 1,898.4

                  *728 NETWORK DEVELOPMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE MAINTENANCE—Mr Souris asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—

              Page 1135
                      (1) How much was spent in the Network Development and Infrastructure Maintenance categories on the Pacific Highway over the past 10 financial years?
                      (2) What was the breakdown of Federal and State funds in the above allocations?
                      (3) Under what programs were the Federal funds delivered?
                      (4) Is the State Government currently negotiating with the Federal Government for the application of additional Commonwealth funds under any existing or proposed programs?
                      Answer—
                      It should be noted that for the purpose of answering this question, the Pacific Highway has been regarded as that part of the highway from Hexham to the Queensland border.
                      Parts (1) and (2) of the question relate to expenditure details for Road Development and Infrastructure Maintenance Programs only. The totals shown for these programs do not include any additional expenditure incurred for works carried out under Road Safety and Traffic Management Programs, funded from both Federal and State sources.
                      (1) Network Development $448.5 million
                        Infrastructure Maintenance $248.4 million
                      (2) Federal Funds $169.0 million
                      State Funds $527.9 million
                      (3) Federal funds were provided under the Australian Land Transport Development Act 1988 under the following categories:
                        National Arterials
                        Provincial Cities and Rural Highways
                        Accident Blackspots
                      (4) On 25 January 1996 the Federal and State Governments signed an historic Heads of Government Agreement on the Pacific Highway. This agreement guarantees extra funding for the Pacific Highway program from both the Federal and State Governments.

                  *729 ROADS SYSTEMS RECLASSIFICATION—Mr Souris asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads—
                      (1) Is the Government currently considering a major reclassification of the State's roads systems?
                      (2) If so, who are the parties to the negotiations?
                      (3) What is the intention of such a reclassification?
                      (4) Will the reclassification lead to a reduction in the amount of money spent on roads in New South Wales by the Government?
                      Answer—
                      (1) Yes. A significant reclassification of New South Wales roads has been agreed to by the State Government and Local Government, and this reclassification is currently being progressed. The changes are part of a micro-economic reform process covering road management and funding arrangements between the State and Local Government. Significant reform of the road management system has been achieved.
                      (2) The principles for the process of the review of the classification of roads were established jointly by the State Government and the Local Government and Shires Associations in 1989. Guidelines for the review of the rural road network were established by the Regional Roads Working Party, which consulted widely with councils. The identification of roads with a potential for reclassification was undertaken by consultative committees of councils and the RTA.
                      Negotiations over classification changes for specific roads were undertaken at local level between the RTA and local councils. In this regard, an independent assessment process was available where agreement could not be reached.
              Page 1136
                      (3) The reclassification of roads is an integral part of the process of reforming the management and funding arrangements between the RTA and Local Government. The intention of this reform is to enable more efficient and effective use of the road funds available to the State by reducing administrative overlap between the RTA and councils, to improve accountability for the network and to allow councils greater decision autonomy and the professional recognition councils have sought in relation to Regional Roads. Significant reform has been already achieved.
                      (4) The underlying reason for the review of road classifications is to ensure that available road funds are spent more efficiently and effectively on roads that meet the criteria for State or Regional Roads. The amount of funding assistance to Local Government for Regional Roads has been increased.
                      The RTA still provides funds to Local Government for Regional Roads and local roads under a number of special programs. While these programs remain under the RTA’s control, the identified funds for Regional Roads are controlled by councils. It should be noted that the RTA retains its strategic interest in road safety and traffic management across the entire road network.

                  *730 MINISTER FOR AGRICULTURE—BUDGET—Mr Causley asked the Minister for Agriculture—
                      (1) What is the 1995/96 budget for the Office of the Minister for Agriculture?
                      (2) How many staff does he employ?
                      (3) What is the office rent?
                      (4) Did the former Minister for Agriculture also administer Minerals and Fisheries?
                      Answer—
                      (1) $870,000.
                      (2) Eleven.
                      (3) $185,573 per year.
                      (4) Yes.

                  *731 MINISTER FOR MINERAL RESOURCES AND MINISTER FOR FISHERIES—BUDGET— Mr Causley asked the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries—
                      (1) What is the 1995/96 budget for the Office of the Minister for Mineral Resources and Minister for Fisheries?
                      (2) How many staff does he employ?
                      (3) What is the office rent?
                      (4) How much cheaper was the Office of the former Minister for Agriculture, Minerals and Fisheries?
                      Answer—
                      (1) The total budget for the 1995/96 financial year is $801,000.
                      (2) There are currently eight staff employed by the Ministry.
                      (3) The office rent is currently $129,000 per annum.
                      (4) This information is not available to the Department of Mineral Resources as the accounts of the former Minister were kept by the Department of Agriculture.

                  *732 RAVE PARTIES—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Police—
                      (1) What legal controls are there at present on "rave dance" parties?
                      (2) In which areas do they principally take place?
                      (3) How are they advertised?
              Page 1137
                      (4) What is the usual admission fee?
                      (5) Are they regularly checked by police?
                      (6) Have any prosecutions been instituted for:
                        (a) Sale of alcohol to underage persons?
                        (b) Supply of prohibited drugs?
                        (c) Possession of prohibited drugs at such parties?
                      (7) Who are the principal organisers of such parties?
                      Answer—
                      (1) to (7) The State Commander has advised me:
                      The legality of these parties is subject to a number of considerations and may depend on the particular circumstances of each venue. This includes ownership of the land, building or site; whether it is private or community (council) land; and, whether or not council has approved the venue for that specific purpose.
                      The initial legality of the venue falls largely within the domain of local government which is vested with the authority to approve the use of premises/land for public entertainment purposes. There is a range of legislation that may impact (directly or indirectly) upon activity in responding to and the general policing of these parties, for example, the Local Government Act; Environmental Planning and Assessment Act; Noise Control Act; Summary Offences Act; Drugs Misuse and Trafficking Act.
                      Rave parties are usually advertised in free magazines and selected music stores throughout the metropolitan area. Tickets range from $30 to $35 per head. The venue details are generally only available between 1 and 2 hours on the day prior to the event being held by dialling a 0055 telephone number for information or by recorded message.
                      Rave parties are currently identified through intelligence and when police become aware of their existence, they attend to ensure that breaches of the law do not occur. The State Intelligence Group has the charter to identify proposed rave parties.
                      Much of the information sought by the honourable member is not readily available and would involve the diversion of scarce resources within the Police Service to compile a more detailed response. Such action is not justified within the competing priorities of the NSW Police Service.

              Page 1138

                  *733 TOMERONG SUBDIVISION—Mr Hartcher asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
                      (1) Did Shoalhaven Council apply in August 1995 for a subdivision of Lot 4, DP 830647 Turpentine Road, Tomerong?
                      (2) Was the application refused?
                      (3) If so, why?
                      (4) Is Turpentine Road partially constructed on land owned by Basil Sweeney?
                      (5) Was the council proposal designed to rectify an anomalous situation which had arisen due to wrongful construction of the road on private property?
                      (6) How would the creation of a single 2-hectare lot with dwelling rights constitute a significant variation from development standards given that it is in an area that contains a number of rural subdivisions?
                      (7) Is he prepared to review the Director-General's refusal of the subdivision plan?
                      Answer—
                      (1) No. The Shoalhaven City Council requested the concurrence of the Director-General of Urban Affairs and Planning under State Environmental Planning Policy No. 1—Development Standards to an application to create a lot of 1.9 ha.
                      (2) The Director-General declined to grant concurrence to the proposed subdivision. The council subsequently refused the application.
                      (3) The reasons for declining to grant concurrence to the proposed subdivision were that:
                        • the proposed lot was not created as a result of a road separation;
                        • the proposed 1.9 ha lot was a significant variation to the 40-hectare development standard; and
                        • the situation was not unique and would most likely lead to similar applications in the future. This would have the cumulative effect of undermining the integrity of the 40-hectare standard, the planning objectives for the area and the resolve of Shoalhaven City Council's draft Rural Lands Local Environmental Plan.
                      (4) Shoalhaven City Council has advised that Turpentine Road is partially constructed on privately-owned land.
                      (5) No.
                      (6) The existing planning controls require a minimum of 40 hectares for new allotments created by a subdivision. The adjoining small lots were created by way of a concessional lot subdivision of large holdings, allowed for by council's existing planning controls.
                      (7) No. The council is the determining authority. The applicant has the right of appeal to the Land and Environment Court against the council's refusal of the application.

                  *734 HELENSBURG SEWAGE SERVICE—Mr McManus asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—
                      (1) Was $500,000 allocated for the construction of sewage services to the Public Housing Estate at Merrigong Road, Helensburgh?
                      (2) Have a number of residents objected to a Sydney Water levy to construct the services?
                      (3) Has this position now changed?
                      (4) when will the construction commence?
                      (5) When will the services be available to the residents?

              Page 1139
                      Answer—
                      (1) An allocation of $570,000 was listed in "State Capital Projects—The Water Board" in 1993/94, Budget Paper No. 4.
                      (2) to (5) Of the 37 properties to be sewered in Merringong Place, Helensburgh, 33 are owned by the Department of Housing and the remaining 4 are in private ownership. In January 1994, the 4 private owners rejected a proposal that they contribute $2,195 per property to the construction of the sewage service. Since 1994, continued negotiations with the owners, involving the honourable member for Bulli, have indicated that these owners may now be prepared to make this contribution to the construction of the sewage service. A formal offer will be made to the owners in mid-January 1996 for their consideration.
                      Provided the offer is accepted, it is anticipated that construction will be complete by the end of 1996 allowing owners to connect to the service in early 1997.

                  *735 LOTTERIES PRIZE LEVEL LIMITS REVIEW—Mr O'Farrell asked the Minister for Gaming and Racing and Minister Assisting the Premier on Hunter Development—
                      (1) When will his review of lotteries prize level limits:
                        (a) Commence?
                        (b) Conclude?
                      (2) Will the review include examination of the discrimination faced by New South Wales-based prize winners of national lotteries?
                      (3) Will he provide a copy of the review to the honourable member for Northcott when it is completed?
                      Answer—
                      (1) A review of lotteries prize level limits is not planned.
                      (2) There is no discrimination faced by New South Wales prize winners in national lottery games.
                      The percentage allocated as prizes for these games (Oz Lotto and Soccer Pools) is the identical in all states. New South Wales prize winners receive an equivalent dividend to their interstate counterparts for a corresponding win.
                      (3) Not applicable.

                  *736 CORPORATE ADVISORS—Mr Phillips asked the Minister for Public Works and Services, Minister for the Olympics and Minister for Roads representing the Treasurer, Minister for Energy, Minister for State Development and Minister Assisting the Premier—
                      (1) Has the Government or NSW Treasury appointed corporate advisors to advise on the corporatisation involved in reforming the New South Wales electricity industry?
                      (2) If so, was a tender process undertaken?
                      (3) Can he outline the tender process and relevant timeframe for the tender?
                      (4) What was the criteria used for the selection of and the experience of the successful tender?
                      (5) What are the details of the fee arrangement negotiated with the corporate advisor?
              Page 1140

                      Answer—
                      (1) Yes. NSW Treasury has appointed the consultants named below to conduct reviews in and/or advise on the four areas indicated for the State's electricity distributors:

                  Name of reviewPrinciple consultant in consortiumOther consultants in consortium
                  Verification and Valuation of Assets and LiabilitiesPrice WaterhouseFreehill, Hollingdale & Page.
                  Colliers Jardine.
                  Operational and Capital Expenditure ReviewArthur AndersenUMS Group.
                  GHD-Black & Vech.
                  Capital Structure and Business Valuation StudyPacific Road SecuritiesNot applicable.
                  Legal ConsultancyClayton UtzNot applicable.
                      The legal consultant is also providing advice in other areas related to electricity reform.
                      (2) Yes. In each case a tender process was undertaken.
                      (3) Yes. The tender process in each of the consultancies was undertaken as follows:

                  Name of reviewNumber of invitations to tenderDate invitation madeDate tenders closedNumber of responses receivedDate consultant approved
                  Verification and valuation of assets and liabilities.2425/10/956/11/95428/11/95
                  Operational and capital expenditure review.2425/10/956/11/95928/11/95
                  Capital structure and business valuation study.269/11/9517/11/951211/12/95
                  Legal consultancy1028/11/954/12/95621/12/95
                      (4) The selection of each successful tenderer in respect to each of the consultancies was based on the following criteria:
                      Operational and Capital Expenditure Review (Arthur Andersen) and Verification and Valuation of Assets and Liabilities (Price Waterhouse)
                          •Conformance with requirements set out in the brief.
                          •Capacity of tenderer to provide the service.
                          •Relevant experience of the tenderer including suitability in terms of expertise and experience of named personnel proposed to carry out the project or designated specialised aspects of it.
                          •The planning methodology used in controlling and co-ordinating the assignment.
                          •The methodology proposed to undertake the assignment.
                          •The performance of the tenderer as assessed by means of reference checks.
                          •The mix and balance of skills of the proposed consultancy team.
                          •The absence of any conflicts of interest.
                          •Tender fees and charge-out rates.
                      Capital Structure and Business Valuation Study (Pacific Road Securities)
              Page 1141
                          •Conformance with requirements set out in the brief.
                          •Capacity of tenderer to provide the services required.
                          •Relevant experience of the tenderer including suitability in terms of expertise and experience of named personnel proposed to carry out the project or designated specialised aspects of it.
                          •Commitment of the named personnel to the study.
                          •The planning methodology used in controlling and co-ordinating the assignment.
                          •The methodology proposed to undertake the study.
                          •The performance of the tenderer as assessed by means of reference checks.
                          •The mix and balance of skills of the proposed consultancy team.
                          •The absence of any conflicts of interest.
                          •Tender fees and charge-out rates.
                      Legal Consultancy (Clayton Utz)
                          •Conformance with the requirements set out in the tender document.
                          •Capacity of the tenderer to provide the services required or which may be required in the future.
                          •Relevant experience of the tenderer.
                          •A demonstrated understanding of the electricity reform process presently under way in New South Wales.
                          •An understanding of the structure of the Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Scheme.
                          •The performance of the tenderer as assessed by means of reference checks.
                          •Tender fees for both the initial drafting task and for subsequent tasks.
                      (5)
                  Name of reviewFee basisOut of pocket expensesAdditional expensesFee instalments
                  Verification and valuation of assets and liabilities.Fixed lump sum in Australian currency.Included in fixed lump sum fee. Not eligible for any further expenses unless agreed.Not eligible unless agreed.30 per cent payable on presentation of interim report.
                  50 per cent payable on Treasury's acceptance of final report.
                  20 per cent payable on finalisation of opening balance sheet.
                  Operational and capital expenditure review.Fixed lump sum in Australian currency.At cost but capped at 10 per cent of total consultancy cost.Not eligible unless agreed.40 per cent payable on presentation of interim report.
                  60 per cent payable on Treasury's acceptance of final report.
                  Capital structure and business valuation study.Fixed lump sum in Australian currency.Included in fixed lump sum fee. Not eligible for any further expenses unless agreed.Not eligible unless agreed.30 per cent payable on presentation of interim report.
                  70 per cent payable on Treasury's acceptance of final report, including resolution of opening balance sheet values with the other consultant.
                  Legal consultancy.Fixed lump sum in Australian currency for initial three tasks. Thereafter, each task to be negotiated based on hourly charge-out rates supplied.Firm estimates to be provided for each task.Not eligible unless agreed.Detailed monthly invoices to be raised.
                  *737 AUSTRALIAN WATER TECHNOLOGIES—Mr Phillips asked the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning and Minister for Housing—

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                      (1) Has he permitted Sydney Water, through its trading arm, Australian Water Technologies, to bid for the equivalent entity in Victoria which is currently being sold by the Victorian Government?
                      (2) Has an exemption been given to Sydney Water from NSW Treasury guidelines prohibiting public sector entities in such transactions?
                      (3) Will Sydney Water's purchase add to the Government's liabilities?
                      (4) Has the extent to the liabilities been quantified?
                      (5) If so, how can this increase in liabilities be reconciled with the Government's Debt Elimination Bill?
                      (6) Further, will Australian Water Technologies be allowed to seek private equity?
                      (7) If so, will the term and conditions of such an equity raising be made public?
                      Answer—
                      (1) Australian Water Technologies Pty Ltd has acquired a Victorian environmental services company, Water ECOscience Pty Ltd. Water ECOscience Pty Ltd was previously owned by Melbourne Water Corporation (50 per cent) and Rural Water Corporation, Victoria (50 per cent). Under the State Owned Corporations Act 1989, Sydney Water Corporation or its subsidiary, Australian Water Technologies Pty Ltd, are required to gain "voting shareholder" approval of such an acquisition. Voting shareholder approval was obtained.
                      (2) Not applicable.
                      (3) to (5) Sydney Water Corporation has not undertaken any borrowing for Australian Water Technologies Pty Ltd's acquisition of Water ECOscience Pty Ltd. These is no impact on the State's liabilities as a result of this acquisition.
                      (6) and (7) The development of the Australian Water Industry and future role of Australian Water Technologies Pty Ltd are matters being considered by the Board of Directors of Australian Water Technologies Pty Ltd and the Board of Directors of Sydney Water Corporation. A proposal has not been placed before the voting shareholders of Sydney Water Corporation.











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